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WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2013 Classical

Fretwork Schubert Ensemble Britten Centenary

Contemporary

A Cappella Festival Lore Lixenberg Gravenhurst, Teitur

Spoken Word

Jewish Book Week: Amos Oz & Fania Oz-Salzberger Pat Barker

Jazz

Bobby Watson Hans Koller

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03

WELCOME TO THE SPRING 2013 SEASON AT KINGS PLACE! As we enter our fifth year we are proud to announce our biggest composer series to date: Bach Unwrapped. Beginning just after Christmas 2012 with Florilegium (30 Dec 2012) and closing with the magnificent B minor Mass in late December (21 Dec 2013), we celebrate Bach’s extraordinary legacy with an impressive line-up that includes our cover star, soprano Carolyn Sampson, and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields (22 Feb, 15 Jun & 27 Sep). Celebrated viol consort Fretwork present a brand-new series taking in music by Dowland, White and Tallis (17–19 Jan), while The Schubert Ensemble bring their 30thanniversary celebrations to Kings Place with a retrospective programme. There’s a fascinating and original tribute to Britten (7–9 Feb) by two enterprising young pianists, John Reid and

Andrew Matthews-Owen, along with soprano Claire Booth and rising star tenor Nicky Spence. Visual and musical art meet with an exhibition of Adam Birtwistle’s portraits at Kings Place Gallery and a special concert of his father Sir Harrison’s music (9 Jan). Expect the unexpected as The Local presents three days of new existential songwriting with a host of off-kilter lo-fi bands and troubadours, The Stranger, The Better (10–12 Jan), while Alan Bearman Music curates Hidden Treasure (13–16 Mar), featuring much-loved stars Martin Simpson, Eliza Carthy and Roy Bailey alongside newcomers Mawkin. The Swingle Singers and London A Cappella Festival (24–26 Jan) return with a Best of British theme, featuring The King’s Singers, Clare College Choir and the radical vocals of Danish

pioneers Postyr; whilst US jazz legend Bobby Watson and celebrated songstress Claire Martin join our jazz workshops and concerts for the Global Music Foundation (28 Mar – 1 Apr). Jewish Book Week (23 Feb – 3 Mar) returns with an astonishing line-up that includes Fania Oz-Salzberger and Dorian Lynskey, who leads a tribute to Leonard Cohen. On a celebratory note, we welcome the Brodsky Quartet as our new resident quartet and look forward to hearing more from them throughout 2013–14.

Peter Millican, CEO

COVER: CAROLYN SAMPSON & ABOVE: PETER MILLICAN © NICK WHITE

CONTRIBUTORS

Anthony Clavane, who writes on British Jews in football (p42), comes to speak at JBW in February. His first book, Promised Land, won both Football and Sports Book of the Year 2011. His latest book is Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here? and is published by Quercus.

Dr Simon Heighes, who writes on Bach (p28), is a musicologist with a passion for the Baroque; he’s also a critic for International Record Review and a familiar voice on BBC Radio 3. He will be running a Bach study day later in the season.

Dorian Lynskey, who assesses the influence of Leonard Cohen’s music (p34) and will chair the Cohen event for Jewish Book Week, is author of the blog and book 33 Revolutions Per Minute, A History of Protest Songs, and a music writer for The Guardian.

Fiona Maddocks, who writes on painter Adam and composer Sir Harrison Birtwistle (p44), is classical music critic of The Observer. She was chief arts feature writer of the Evening Standard and has written and broadcast widely.


CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS 8 A New Beat for the Brodskys 9 Musickʼs Monument: Fretworkʼs new series 10 Schubert Ensemble at 30 28 DIVINE INVENTOR Dr Simon Heighes on what recent scholarship has taught us about JS Bach 30 JOURNEYS OF THE HEART Bach is at the centre of the musical lives of Carolyn Sampson (above), Elizabeth Wallfisch and Rachel Podger 40 SUFFOLK LODESTAR A Britten centenary tribute from two enterprising pianists

REGULARS

JÉRÔME NOETINGER © MAT RANSON

GRAVENHURST © LUCY JOHNSTON

BOBBY WATSON © SUPPLIED PHOTO

CAROLYN SAMPSON © NICK WHITE

CLASSICAL

JAZZ

FOLK/ CONTEMPORARY

JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS

FOLK HIGHLIGHTS

16 Kollerʼs Dream Team Sebastian Scotney on Hans Kollerʼs new project

13 The Blessings of Busking Colin Irwin meets ahab

16 Lockheart meets Ellington

15 Three Cane Whale

17 Get The Blessing 18 Kansas Hero down with the kids The legendary Bobby Watson (above) joins workshops and performances at the Global Music Foundation this Easter

03 06 07 08 28

WELCOME TICKET INFORMATION PLANNING YOUR WEEK HIGHLIGHTS FEATURES

CONTEMPORARY 20

14 Party time with The Woes 38 THE STRANGER, THE BETTER Kate Mossman discusses a new generation of enigmatic, lo-fi bands, from Gravenhurst (above) to Meursault, with promoter Howard Monk 82 Q&A Folk programmer and promoter Alan Bearman

48 49 57 67

LISTINGS JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH

21 21 22

34

76 77 78 82

CONTEMPORARY HIGHLIGHTS Immersive Interference Jérôme Noetingerʼs (above) reel-to-reel adventures Lixenbergʼs Manifesto From Futurism to Fluxus Will Duttaʼs Glitch A Cappella Festival The Swingle Singers welcome the Kingʼs Singers, Clare College Choir and the radical Danish group Postyr IF TRUTH BE TOLD… Dorian Lynskey pays tribute to the great songwriter Leonard Cohen

ART LISTINGS ARTISTIC HIRES CALENDAR Q&A with Alan Bearman

WHAT’S ON JANUARY – MARCH 2013


SPOKEN WORD SPOKEN WORD HIGHLIGHTS

ART

12 Bringing the Dead to Life Pat Barkerʼs new book 36 IN THE BEGINNING... Fania Oz-Salzberger and Amos Oz on a very Jewish intergenerational dialogue 42 DOES YOUR RABBI KNOW YOUʼRE HERE? Anthony Clavane on the Jewish contribution to British football

19 Incense and Insensibility The Milk Monitors (above) promise a brand-new Jane Austen novel, with a little help from the audience... INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS 26 Young Poets on a Quest Four local schools join the PoetryQuest at Kings Place this spring

LISTINGS

ART HIGHLIGHTS

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS

11 Poetry and Medicine

ABI WADE © KENNY MCCRAKEN

QUEEN VICTORIA © PAINTING BY ADAM BIRTWISTLE

ILLUSTRATION © HARDIE / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM

AUSTENTATIOUS © IDIL SUKAN

COMEDY/ INTERACT

24 The Enduring Jurassic Ian Collins on the paintings of Jeremy Gardiner 25 Coventryʼs Creatures A new exhibition of work by the Cornish-based sculptor 44 FATHER AND SON Composer Sir Harrison Birtwistle always wanted to be a painter; his son Adam is one. Fiona Maddocks spoke to them both as a new exhibition of Adamʼs portraits (see above) comes to Kings Place Gallery

LISTINGS 48 Listings 76 Art Listings 77 Artistic Hires 78 Calendar FOOD & DRINK HIGHLIGHTS 23 Winter Warmers Classic cocktails and warming mulled wine at Rotunda this season

EDITORIAL TEAM Publisher Kings Place Music Foundation Contact +44 (0) 20 7520 1440 mag@kingsplace.co.uk www.kingsplace.co.uk

Editor-in-Chief Helen Wallace Editorial Team Janie Nicholas Emrah Tokalaç Michael Green Lindsay Garfoot (web) Alice Clark (web)

Art Direction Ana Acosta / Moira Gil Design Assistant Samuel Kang Picture Research Sunita Sharma-Gibson Proofreading Susannah Howe Print Wyndeham Roche

Thanks to Peter Millican, Jen Mitchell, Tanya Cracknell, Amy Sibley-Allen, Chris Nye, Holly Thomas, Hervé Bournas, Joanie Magill, Zoë Jeyes, Aurelie Gillson, Richard Hartwell, Nell Halford, Annette Telesford

© Kings Place 2013 All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of Kings Place is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at the time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Kings Place.


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

TICKET INFORMATION www.kingsplace.co.uk Box Office 020 7520 1490

YOUR JOURNEY We are located a short walk from King’s Cross and St Pancras Stations. Our main entrance is on York Way.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Visit www.tfl.gov.uk to help plan your journey, or call London Travel Information 020 7222 1234.

BOOKING

Tickets for all performances from £9.50 online The online ticket prices are shown in the listings. Please add £2 to the online ticket price if booking by other methods.

ONLINE

www.kingsplace.co.uk Secure online booking 24 hours a day.

HALL ONE

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or opt for the Online Savers option online savers: BOOK NOW

You are guaranteed a seat. Its location will be allocated by the Box Office. £9.50 Online Savers can only be purchased online and are subject to availability. Tickets may be collected at any time during the hour before the performance.

HALL TWO

All seating is unreserved, some events may be standing only. £9.50 Online Savers can only be purchased online and are subject to availability.

ST PANCRAS ROOM

All seating is unreserved, some events may be standing only.

BY PHONE & IN PERSON

020 7520 1490 Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri & Sat: 12–8pm, Tue 12–6pm, Sun: 12–7pm (Closed Bank Holidays) Opening hours may vary – please check the website for the most up-to-date information.

BY POST

Kings Place Box Office 90 York Way, London N1 9AG

GROUPS

Buy 8 or more tickets and save 20%. Group discounts are only available directly through the Box Office and exclude Online Savers.

PARKING

NCP Car Park – Pancras Road. Visit www.ncp.co.uk or call 0845 050 7080 for further details.

ACCESS

Kings Place aims to be accessible to all, and the venue offers suitable seating for  wheelchair users. Please inform us of any access requirements when booking. There is an induction loop at the Box Office to assist those with hearing aids. An infrared system is installed in Halls One and Two, with hearing advancement headsets for audience members who do not use a hearing aid. Neck loops are available to use with hearing aids switched to  the ‘T’ position. All areas of Kings Place are  accessible to those with Guide & Hearing Dogs.

SPRING 2013 SPECIAL OFFERS

Available for the following events: Bach Unwrapped; Jewish Book Week; Schubert Ensemble 30th Anniversary; London A Cappella Festival; London Chamber Music Series; Not So Silent Movies

Please check kingsplace.co.uk for additional offers.

KINGS PLACE HALL ONE © KEITH PAISLEY

TICKETS

06 TICKETS


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2013

PLANNING YOUR

WEEK

WEEKLY FOCUS

PLANNING YOUR WEEK 07

WEDNESDAY/THURSDAY–SATURDAY EACH WEEK

A collaborative mix of artists, curators, organisations and producers presenting an exciting series of events.

See Listings p48 for details or go to

www.kingsplace.co.uk

A NEATLY EFFECTIVE IDEA OF INVITING DIFFERENT MUSICIANS TO PLAN WEEKLY THEMED CONCERTS... THE GUARDIAN

CONTEMPORARY

COMEDY

SATURDAYS SUNDAYS

CLASSICAL

THURSDAYS FRIDAYS

JAZZ

MONDAYS

FOLK

MONDAYS

SPOKEN WORD

REGULAR NIGHTS


08 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS

A NEW BEAT FOR THE BRODSKYS Kings Place is proud to announce a new residency for the Brodsky Quartet, beginning in December 2012. Helen Wallace spoke to violist Paul Cassidy about their plans. ‘Kings Place feels like the perfect fit for us – it’s a really happening space, there’s so much going on, and it feels vibrant, there’s a sense of possibility in the air.’ So says Paul Cassidy, violist of the Brodsky Quartet, whose trio of 40th-birthday concerts in December 2012 will launch a new residency at Kings Place. The idea for a relationship was born before the building of Hall One, as Cassidy recalls: ‘I can remember standing with Peter Millican in a hard hat when Hall One was just a hole in the ground. I loved the idea of the place: when we played Maxwell Davies early on in 2008, we recognised what a fabulous hall it was acoustically. But just at that time we were embarking on an exclusive relationship with Cadogan Place, so we had to wait for a while.’

IT FEELS LIKE THE PERFECT FIT FOR US, THERE’S A SENSE OF POSSIBILITY IN THE AIR The Brodsky’s acclaimed series of Shostakovich Quartets in April this year set the seal on a new association: ‘We knew Shostakovich was going to sound tremendous in that hall, and it did. In my opinion it’s the best chamber music hall in London.’

Their three concerts in December are a taste of things to come, combining 20thcentury classics like George Crumb’s Black Angels with an evening of song with Jacqui Dankworth and a finale featuring their ‘Wheel of 4Tunes’, in which the audience gets to select the music for the concert. ‘What we’d like to be doing at Kings Place is showcasing the really exciting projects we do all over the world, some of which have been, to date, one-offs. For instance, this year we worked with the most amazing Australian countertenor, David Hansen, at the Risør Festival, doing everything from Handel to Björk, and another time we worked on an brilliant new song-cycle with Eddie Perfect in Melbourne (think Eddie Izzard meets Tim Minchin) called ‘Songs from the Middle’, which we really should do in London one day. We’d love Kings Place to become the platform for all the ground-breaking work we do elsewhere.’ Future plans are still being cooked up, but the Brodskys will definitely have a key part to play in the next two Unwrapped series in 2014 and 2015.

Brodsky Quartet 6–8 December 2012


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HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

January—March 2013

MUSICK’S MONUMENT 30 DEC – 4 JAN

Florilegium: Cantatas (30 Dec) Wallfisch Band: Cantatas (31 Dec & 1 Jan) OSJ + G Simcock Qt (2 Jan) La Nuova Musica: Cantata & Psalm (3 Jan) Christoph Richter cello (4 Jan)

29 JAN – 2 FEB

Kingʼs College Choir & Academy of Ancient Music: St Matthew Passion (29 Jan) Rachel Podger violin Sonatas & Partitas (30 Jan) Miki Skuta piano: Goldberg Variations (31 Jan) London Sinfonietta (1 Feb) Academy of Ancient Music: The Suites in Focus (2 Feb)

13 – 22 FEBRUARY

Keyboard Convers. (13 Feb) RAM Baroque Orch. (15 Feb) Pekka Kuusisto violin (18 Feb) Fretwork: The Art of Fugue (20 Feb) Katya Apekisheva piano: Inventions & Sinfonias (21 Feb) ASMF with C. Sampson (22 Feb)

16 – 24 MARCH

Clare College Choir & Aurora Orch.: St John Passion (16 Mar) Dmitry Sitkovetsky & Friends: The Goldberg Arr. (20 Mar) Charles Owen: Partitas (21 Mar) OAE: The Brandenburg Concertos (22 Mar) Penelope Spencer & Friends: Violin Sonatas (24 Mar)

Richard Boothby of Fretwork introduces the group’s new Kings Place series, which is inspired by the memory of one of their founding members and takes in music by White, Tallis and Dowland. Richard Campbell was a founder member of Fretwork, and it was he who memorably suggested the name. He played with us until he took his own life in March 2011, overcome by a melancholy that was always present, but which eventually overwhelmed him. Fretwork’s mini-series in January has a melancholy theme: Lamentations, Tears & Remembrances. While it wasn’t designed to be ‘in memoriam’ Richard Campbell, it has turned out to be just the kind of thing of which he would have approved: first of all, he was the contact between the group and Peter Millican of Kings Place, who secured a place for us in the first public event in Hall One; secondly, he played the first performance of Wild Winter I by Thea Musgrave, which we’ll perform with Alamire; thirdly, he was a fine exponent of Dowland’s Lachrimae Pavans, playing treble on our recording of the work; and, lastly, it was his idea to construct a programme from Thomas Mace’s fascinating

THE INSPIRATION IS MACE’S FASCINATING BUT FRUSTRATING BOOK OF 1676 and frustrating vanity-project of a book, published in 1676, Musick’s Monument. In it, amongst other things, Mace reminisces about music meetings of his youth, and Richard was surely thinking to base a programme on this passage: We had for our grave musick, fancies of 3, 4, 5 and 6 parts to the organ; interpos’d (now and then) with some pavans, allmaines, solemn and sweet delightful ayres; all which were (as it were) so many pathetical stories, rhetorical, and sublime discourses ... so suitable and agreeing to the inward, secret and intellectual faculties of the soul and mind, that to set them forth according to their true praise, there are no words sufficient in Fretwork at ease: Richard Boothby sits to the right of the mirror.

BRODSKY QUARTET © ERIC RICHMOND | FRETWORK © CHRIS DAWES

SUNDAYS, 6.30 PM | HALL ONE 6 Jan LCMS New Year Concert 13 Jan Badke Qt & M. Todd 20 Jan Angell Piano Trio 27 Jan Allegri Qt: The Complete Beethoven Quartets – 9 3 Feb Yannoula-LomeikoZhislin-Harwood Quartet 10 Feb Navarra Quartet 17 Feb Chilingirian Qt: The Romantic Piano Quintets – 4 10 Mar Rosamunde Trio: The Complete Beethoven Piano Trios – 2 17 Mar Fine Arts Brass Ens. 24 Mar Madeleine Mitchell & Andrew Ball

language; yet what I can best speak of them, shall be only to say, that they have been to myself ... as divine raptures, powerfully captivating all our unruly faculties.’ He goes on to name the English and Italian composers of these pieces for viol consort, including Alfonso Ferrabosco, John Ward, Mr White, William Lawes, John Jenkins, Mr Coperario and one Monteverdi, ‘a famous Italian author’. The Lamentations of Jeremiah have been set by many composers, but those of Robert White and Thomas Tallis stand out. White’s setting was given pride of place at the opening of Robert Dow’s magnificently copied set of partbooks, from which most of the rest of the programme is drawn. On the Friday we mark the 450th anniversary of one of Britain’s greatest composers, John Dowland, by performing his extraordinary Lachrimae Pavans of 1604. The work is unique in explicitly combining viols and lute, and unique in its far-reaching structural ambition. He presents us with a mystical, transcendental journey based on his most famous song, ‘Flow my teares’, with a sequence that maps a voyage from despair to hope, minor to major. As the composer wrote in his dedication to Queen Anne of Denmark: ‘And though the title doth promise teares, unfit guests in these ioyfull times, yet no doubt pleasant are the teares which Musicke weepes, neither are teares shed alwayes in sorrow, but sometime in ioy and gladnesse.’

Fretwork: Lamentations, Teares and Remembrances 17–19 January See Listings pp52–53 for details

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10 HIGHLIGHTS

CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

A SEED SOWN WITH SCHUBERT When pianist William Howard formed The Schubert Ensemble, he never dreamed they’d still have a ‘to do’ list 30 years later…

Elizabeth Kenny

9 JANUARY

Sir Harrison Birtwistle Birtwistles in Residence with Nicolas Hodges (piano), Christian Dierstein (percussion), Andrew Watts (countertenor), Melinda Maxwell (oboe) Helen Tunstall (harp)

17 – 19 JANUARY

Fretwork performs the music of Robert White, Thomas Tallis and John Dowland 17 Feb Lamentations (with Alamire vocal consort) 18 Feb Dowland’s Lachrimae (with Elizabeth Kenny) 19 Feb Musick’s Monument

24 – 26 JANUARY

London A Cappella Festival

19 Feb Choir of Clare College

7 – 9 FEBRUARY

Britten at 100: Pianist; Collaborator; Artistic Crucible 7 Feb Songs With & Without Words 8 Feb The Pity of War 9 Feb Metamorphoses

13 – 16 FEBRUARY

Royal Academy of Music 14 Feb The Haydn Symphonies with the Royal Academy of Music Chamber Orchestra 15 Feb Royal Academy of Music Baroque Orchestra plays Bach

7 – 9 MARCH

Schubert Ensemble: 30th Anniversary 7 Mar Schubertiade 8 Mar Enescu: Neglected Genius 9 Mar Looking to the Future – 1: Chamber Music 2000+ 9 Mar Looking to the Future – 2: Schubert Ensemble Commissions

‘It all started because I wanted to play the Trout Quintet,’ recalls William Howard of the birth of The Schubert Ensemble 30 years ago. At the time he was part of a successful duo with violinist Paul Barritt but missed playing larger-scale chamber music. A group of friends gathered for a few performances, and found they needed a name: ‘We agonised and plumped for this in a hurry. I think it’s actually been a great advantage: we’ve always been adventurous in our repertoire, but people feel reassured by the idea of Schubert!’ In his honour, their Kings Place series begins with a ‘Schubertiade’, followed by concert that reflects their championing of less well-known repertoire, in this case Enescu’s First Piano Quartet. Initially there was no longterm plan, but Howard soon realised the time was ripe to explore a largely neglected piano quartet and quintet repertoire: ‘It was a fantastic opportunity.

WE STILL HAVE A LONG WISH LIST OF PIECES WE’D LOVE TO PLAY As we began to research, our enthusiasm grew and we assembled an amazingly long wish-list of pieces , which we still haven’t got through. There’ve been some real revelations – by Fauré, Enescu, Dohnányi, for example.’ The Ensemble’s 30-plus discography stands testament to the quality of these discoveries and performances. The spirit of adventure has extended to the creation of new work: the group have commissioned no fewer than 45 chamber pieces: ‘We’ve developed some very creative relationships with composers: those with Piers Hellawell, Judith Weir, Colin and David Matthews, Martin Butler, Joe Cutler, Pavel Novák and many

others have blossomed and produced several pieces.’ Their birthday series will culminate in a celebration of new work, including two new piano quartets by Huw Watkins and Edward Rushton. Reflecting on their history, Howard is particularly proud of their Chamber Music 2000 project: ‘It was a crazy idea, but we wanted to create a new body of work so that young pianists could become involved in playing new music with strings. It resulted in 30 amazing concerts and two recordings on NMC.’ The young Lawson Trio, whose concert will preface the final event, took the idea and ran with it, commissioning 12 new works themselves, some of which will be performed by student groups coached by the Trio.

Schubert Ensemble 30thAnniversary Celebrations 7–9 March See Listings pp68–69 for details

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE © JOHN CLARK | ANDREW SOLOMON © ANNIE LEIBOVITZ

Fretwork: Musick’s Monument


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SPOKEN WORD HIGHLIGHTS

KEATS’S POETRY DRAWS LIBERALLY ON THE MEDICAL LANGUAGE HE STUDIED

HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

January—March 2013

THE ANATOMY OF POETRY AND PEOPLE Graham Henderson from Poet in the City introduces a unique collaboration between poetry and medicine, featuring poet Jo Shapcott and oncologist Sam Guglani. Poet in the City has a long tradition of working on events which highlight the connections between poetry and areas such as medicine, mental health, science and maths. In the past these have included collaborations with the Wellcome Collection, The Royal College of Psychiatrists, Imperial College and other creative partners. The surprising thing is not only how much poetry has to say about a subject like medicine, but how successful an event of this sort is at connecting with new audiences for poetry. It’s clear that people in all walks of life realise the significance of poetry as an art form, and its amazing potential to speak to them about profoundly important life experiences. Once you start looking you also discover that many poets have had medical training, or come from medical families. Most famously, the poet John Keats was a medical student, and his poems draw liberally on both medical language and contemporary ideas about how the body and mind functioned. Many modern poets, too, draw on a similar depth of awareness and knowledge to communicate human aspects of the medical sciences. Distinguished poet Jo Shapcott, one of the patrons of Poet in the City, recently won the Costa Prize for her collection Of Mutability, which contains some subtle and truthful poems about the human body and illness, following her own experience of cancer, such as Hairless: ‘Can the bald lie? The nature of the skin says not:/ it’s newborn-pale, erection-tender stuff, /every thought visible – pure knowledge,/ mind in action – shining through the skull.’ It was Jo who suggested that we hold an event with the dynamic

MONDAYS, 7PM – HALL ONE Elkie Brooks

21 JANUARY

Elkie Brooks: Finding My Voice 28 JANUARY

Feeding Seven Billion

Global Food Security Debates: Intensification versus extensification of global agriculture

4 FEBRUARY

The Sebald Lecture

Boris Akunin: ‘Paradise Lost: Confessions of an apostate translator’

organisation Medicine Unboxed, of which she is also a patron. Run by senior oncologist Sam Guglani, and based in Cheltenham, Medicine Unboxed has been doing fabulous work, bringing poetry and medical audiences together: ‘Our organisation provides a forum to engage the public and healthcare professionals in a wider view of medicine’s aims and resonances: a view informed by art, philosophy and the imagination, as much as science,’ explains Guglani. Poet in the City hopes to recreate this magic at Kings Place, featuring some of the best poetry ever written about medicine and the body. It should appeal equally to poetry fans, those involved in the medical profession, and all those with experience of illness or caring for a loved one.

11 FEBRUARY

Howard Goodall: The Story of Music

Notes & Letters presents...

18 FEBRUARY

Benjamin Britten: A Life in the Twentieth Century Paul Kildea

4 MARCH

Poetry and Medicine Poet in the City presents...

11 MARCH

Rock’n’Roll Politics

with Steve Richards & Guests

18 MARCH

Pat Barker: Toby’s Room 25 MARCH

Coleridge

with biographer Richard Holmes

27 MARCH Words on Monday: Poetry and Medicine 4 March See Listings p68 for details

An Evening with Jodi Picoult

Book Launch: The Storyteller

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HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

January—March 2013

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

BRINGING THE DEAD TO LIFE

The novels of Pat Barker have cast a spotlight on the generation growing up before and during the First World War. Conjuring up the lives of literary figures such as Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, her Regeneration trilogy became a best-seller. With Life Class, she turned her attention to the visual arts, and her latest book, Toby’s Room, continues that story of a group of young artists trained at the Slade. Pat Barker will discuss her fascination with the Great War and the devastating aftermath that she chronicles so graphically – with its gruesome images of wounded soldiers undergoing rudimentary facial reconstruction, Toby’s Room is not for the squeamish. Nor, in some ways, is Richard Holmes’s masterly two-volume biography of Coleridge – no details of his opium-induced constipation are spared the reader – but Holmes’s affection for this gifted, infuriating and often misunderstood poet is infectious. Poet in the City’s event will provide an opportunity to hear some of Coleridge’s greatest poetry performed and to hear Holmes’s reflections on his life and times, a subject which led him to write on the poet’s scientific contemporaries such as Joseph Banks and Humphrey Davy in The Age of Wonder. For Holmes, biography is not only an art – ‘biography is also a vocation, a calling. The dead call to us out of the past, like owls calling out of the dark. They ask to be heard, remembered, understood.’

Distinguished novelist Pat Barker and biographer Richard Holmes will be reflecting on past lives in two key Words on Monday events this spring.

Words on Monday: Pat Barker on Toby’s Room 18 March Poet in the City: Coleridge with Richard Holmes 25 March See Listings p72 and p74 for details

PAT BARKER © ELLEN WARNER | AHAB © PETER DUNWELL

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FOLK HIGHLIGHTS

January—March 2013

THE BLESSINGS OF BUSKING From busking to festival headliner, ahab is an exciting young band firmly on the march. Callum Anderson wonders how it all happened…

HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

Is that how you evolved your trademark close harmonies? Yes. When you’re busking you think, what can you do that’s original? And we thought right, let’s try harmonies because that attracts a lot of attention, so rather than add a lot of instruments we added a lot of layers vocally. Who are your influences? Anybody who writes great songs. Nirvana, The Doors, The Eagles, Fleet Foxes, Kings Of Leon… anybody who writes great songs. Are you surprised how popular you’ve become in such a short time? Yes. We’re still coming to terms with the fact that people buy tickets to see us standing up and playing songs conceived in a kitchen one night. But it puts a lot of strain on the band. It’s easy to lose sight of what it was you were supposed to be doing in the first place so it’s been a blessing and a curse. Did you have a master plan? No, that’s our biggest problem. People kept asking us to play and we always said yes. We’ve done that for two years and we haven’t stopped, but we haven’t thought about any of it – the sort of band we wanted to look or sound like or what we should be putting out and how we want to be portrayed. Now is the time to do that. You haven’t done a studio album yet… We’ve had two EPs and one live album but we’ve been too busy to get a studio album done. We’ve got enough material and we know what we want to do.

Is it true you started as buskers? Yes. Dave (Burn) and I had a two-piece alt. folk/grungy band and we got offered this show in Nashville. We played it as a four-piece, liked each other and decided to be a band. We came back and didn’t have any gigs so just went busking. Somebody saw a video of us busking and gave us an opportunity and we’ve been playing ever since.

WE’RE STILL COMING TO TERMS WITH THE FACT THAT PEOPLE PAY TO HEAR US SING

You get categorised in all sorts of ways… folk, country, Americana… is that a problem? It’s fine at the moment. We don’t really know what we want to be so we’re quite happy for people to stick labels on us. We are essentially a song band and a harmony band and whether that’s in a country vein or a folk vein or a pop vein, it’s just guitars and vocals, so whatever anybody wants to call us is cool. If we ever decide ourselves what we want to be, we’ll tell everybody else.

Folk Union: ahab 18 January See Listings p53 for details

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14 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

FRIDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 11 JANUARY

Tim Edey

18 JANUARY

ahab

1 FEBRUARY

Lady Maisery 8 FEBRUARY An Evening with

Alistair Anderson 15 FEBRUARY

The Wagon Tales 22 FEBRUARY

Olivia Chaney & Friends 8 MARCH

Three Cane Whale 15 MARCH

Mawkin

22 MARCH

The Woes

FOLK HIGHLIGHTS 13 – 15 MARCH Alan Bearman Music presents

Hidden Treasure

featuring: Martin Simpson Roy Bailey & Tony Benn Marry Waterson & Oliver Knight Eliza Carthy, Bella Hardy, Lucy Farrell & Kate Young Brass Monkey Mawkin

PARTY TIME WITH THE WOES Take a deep breath, hold on tight and prepare to be amazed when US band The Woes hit Kings Place, says Colin Irwin. Nobody knows quite what to expect when The Woes are in town, least of all, seemingly, the band themselves, an unpredictably maverick and motley bunch from Brooklyn, New York, who may turn up with anything between seven and 30 musicians, delivering a dizzying mixture of styles. Ultimately they defy description… though plenty have tried. ‘Twisted alt.country’, ‘Tom Waits meets Bob Dylan’, ‘acid jazz’, ‘Americana skiffle’, ‘good-time blues’, ‘bayou funk’, ‘anti-folk’… these are some of the unlikely descriptions that have variously been applied to make some sense of their dizzying mix of styles, but in truth The Woes have an attitude and character that defy description. Here is a band in a category of one. Their front man is Osei Essed, a larger-than-life character with a hypnotically gruff voice, an arrestingly vibrant guitar style, a sharp sense of humour, a love of organised mayhem and an unstoppable flood of ideas. He formed The Woes in 2002 with Cicero Jones, a similarly adventurous experimentalist and free-thinker and they’ve operated as potent musical guerrillas ever since, eschewing the mainstream industry to turn up here, there and everywhere to play whatever they happen to fancy, unrestricted by commercial pressures or public expectation. Blending Essed’s guitar and banjo with Jones’s keyboards and French horn, they gradually assembled

a likeminded army of free musical spirits, including a formidable line-up of brass, accordion, steel guitar and a frantic rhythm section, drawn liberally from students at New York’s Purchase College of Theatre Arts. The raucously uplifting results have subsequently resulted in a series of highly regarded self-released cult albums joyously regenerating many unlikely backwaters of America’s hidden musical heritage, from Delta blues, Dustbowl folk, gypsy jazz and vaudeville to early bluegrass, hillbilly and a little punk ideology… But most of all, they reflect the desire to have a rollicking good time. Their 2004 album Coalmine alerted a lot of people to their devil-may-care wonder. That success compounded by That Coke Oven March a couple of years later and, in 2009, Heaven Knows, a veritable jamboree blending country tracks such as ‘Who’s On Your Pillow’ with vigorously edgy banjo-led romps such as ‘Hanging’s Fair’. Subsequent EP The Bird and The Bear also turned on a lot of people to the fact that there exists a fulfilling antidote to the sanitised homogeneity of popular music… it’s called The Woes. ‘We know how to have fun,’ says Osei Essed. You better believe it…

Folk Union: The Woes 22 March See Listings p73 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

West Country Whales Tim Woodall meets Pete Judge of Bristol trio Three Cane Whale, and finds out why runner beans and birdsong play a part in their story. ‘I usually tell people that it’s a misspelling of a mishearing of a misunderstanding,’ says Pete Judge of the origins of the name Three Cane Whale. His explanation is complex, involving an allotment and growing runner beans but the title does link intimately to the concepts underpinning the band. ‘It fitted because there are three intertwining instrumental voices and it alludes to the organic, landscape-inspired nature of our music,’ he continues. ‘And it is also because the name came from the local area.’

The region in question is Bristol, home to this innovative acoustic, multi-instrumental folk trio. ‘I don’t think the band would exist if we’d met in a different city,’ says Judge. ‘There’s an acceptance of all things left-field in Bristol, more so than in other places. There is cross-fertilisation between the different scenes: folk, jazz, world music and rock. Everything coalesces and finds its own shape.’

Three Cane Whale are living proof of this trend. Also a member of jazz rock band Get the Blessing, Judge plays soft-edged trumpet in Three Cane Whale alongside mandolin player Alex Vann, also a member of instrumental folk group Spiro, and guitarist Paul Bradley, who is behind experimental rock band Organelles. Together, the trio were looking for something new, a diversion perhaps from their other activities, and they found it in the quiet, delicate sound-world of acoustic instrumental pieces, music that has been described as chamber folk. Judge observes that they all found it ‘liberating’ to play music with no improvisation. Surely musicians usually say the opposite? ‘We’re used to working in collaboratively creative contexts, so we were pleasantly surprised by how exciting it is to play precomposed music,’ he says.

There’s an acceptance of all things leftfield in Bristol

the woes © Chris Windsor | three cane whale © Paul Wigens

HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

January—March 2013

Three Cane Whale recorded their eponymous debut album in a single session at a Bristol church, leaving at the end of just one day with 20 hushed, introspective and texturally detailed tracks in the can. ‘It was an epic shift, but it was really amazing to play in that space, for the acoustic, the ambience, the light and the birdsong outside,’ remembers Judge. This appreciation for the evocative aspect of creating music demonstrates the importance Three Cane Whale place on atmosphere. Accordingly, the band are planning to record their second album (which they hope to launch at their Kings Place gig) in multiple locations, including in the great outdoors: ‘We’re trying to record in places relevant to the tunes, because of the inspirations we take from the landscape.’

Folk Union: Three Cane Whale 8 March. See Listings p69 for details

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Mark Lockheart’s slow-burning Ellington project reaches fruition. Among the radical re-workings of Duke Ellington tunes which Mark Lockheart’s ‘Ellington in Anticipation’ concert will present at The Base on 23 March will be ‘Satin Doll’. Rumour has it that Lockheart has cloaked the 60-year-old tune in such a subtle arrangement, she probably won’t be recognised. ‘Satin Doll’ has never led the simple life. She courted controversy from the moment she saw the light of day in April 1953. Was she Billy Strayhorn’s mother? Or Ellington’s common-law wife? She spent her 40th birthday in 1993 in court, where Ellington’s and Strayhorn’s estates were fighting over her harmonic progression. Prize-winning saxophonist and composer Mark Lockheart is a former member of Loose Tubes. This project involves other Ellington compositions such as ‘Mood Indigo’, ‘Take The A Train’, ‘Creole Love Call’ and what Lockheart calls a ‘Persian/hippy’ version of ‘Caravan’. With a top-flight seven-piece band including pianist Liam Noble and drummer Seb Rochford, this concert, the fruition of work which has been in progress since 2010, will coincide with the release of a CD on Subtone Records.

KOLLER’S DREAM TEAM Distinguished German jazz composer Hans Koller comes to The Base with his dream team of international soloists to present two major new creative projects. It’s a dream come true, he tells Sebastian Scotney. ‘A dream project, a genuine one-off ’ is how Hans Koller describes his concert in The Base series on 9 February. The evening will contain two world premieres by the Bavarian-born composer who has lived for 20 years in the UK. It will also present a 10-piece ensemble of major talents from far and wide, gathered together especially for the occasion. They include players rarely heard in London, such as guitarist Jakob Bro from Copenhagen. Bro has toured and recorded with Bill Frisell, Paul Motian, Lee Konitz, Joe Lovano and Tomasz Stan´ko. Frisell has said of him: ‘Jakob has something going on, this ego-less thing. There’s a quality he has as a person that allows the music to happen.’ Koller will pair him with another world-class guitarist of the same generation, one equally capable of moving from sideman to soloist, Derby-born Phil Robson. Other players involved are delicatetoned tenor saxophonist François Théberge, originally from Quebec and now head of jazz studies at the Paris Conservatoire, and alto saxophonist John O’Gallagher from New York. ‘They’re all friends of my generation – they all have their distinct individual voices. It’s not a situation where the superstar just gets dropped in.’ The evening will present two new, contrasting, major compositional projects. Both are central to Hans Koller’s development. The first half will be a celebration of the spirit of Gil Evans. This project started off as a centenary tribute to the Canadian composer known best for his legendary projects with Miles Davis, but Koller has taken that original idea further: ‘The project has moved on,’ explains Koller. ‘It’s about his approach, more than his music. The style of each piece emerges by questioning.

JAZZ

LOCKHEART MEETS ELLINGTON

The Base: Ellington In Anticipation 23 March See Listings p73 for details

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

HIGHLIGHTS

TO ME, HÖLDERLIN’S POEMS SOUND LIKE A BLUES “What do I want to do now?” I ask myself. You go by intuition but let the intellect help you. You study intellectually what’s going on, but learn to trust happy accidents.’ The second half has a very different inspiration, the German lyric poet Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843), in translations by Michael Hamburger. Other contemporary composers such as Kaija Saariaho have been drawn to these poems by their sense of dislocation. What inspires Koller is the strength and directness of feeling. ‘They sound like a blues,’ he says. From the start of this project, Koller had the voice of Christine Tobin in mind. She will perform them for the first time in Hall Two.

The Base: Hans Koller Ensemble 9 February. See Listings p59 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

January—March 2013

SATURDAYS, 8PM – HALL TWO 12 JANUARY

Aquarium: ‘Places’ Jellymould Jazz Album Launch

19 JANUARY

Martin Speake Trio with Mike Outram and Jeff Williams

2 FEBRUARY

Roller Trio

9 FEBRUARY

Hans Koller Ensemble feat. Christine Tobin (voice)

16 FEBRUARY

Royal Academy of Music Big Band A Tribute to Sir John Dankworth feat. Alec Dankworth

9 MARCH

Alexander Hawkins Ensemble 16 MARCH

Get The Blessing

MARK LOCKHEART © BRANCA JUKIC | HANS KOLLER © WILLIAM ELLIS | GET THE BLESSING © SUPPLIED PHOTO

23 MARCH

Mark Lockheart: Ellington in Anticipation

JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS

GET THE BLESSING Get The Blessing have come a long way. In the late 1990s the quartet emerged from a Friday-morning rehearsal project in Bristol. These days they cross continents. They may not yet be in the ‘Low Earth Orbit’ described in a track from their 2012 CD ‘OC DC’ (Naim), but their recent tour of North American festivals certainly brought out big, appreciative crowds. As one

28 MARCH – 1 APRIL Global Music Foundation

French-Canadian journalist wrote of their appearance at the Montreal Jazz Festival: ‘Something happens when Get The Blessing arrive on stage ... We may be jet-lagged, ill or sleep-deprived, no matter. When the show gets going, our tiredness disappears.’ The Base: Get the Blessing 16 March. See Listings p71 for details

London Jazz Workshops & Music Festival

featuring: Bobby Watson’s International All Stars Claire Martin & Friends Perico Sambeat Quartet Kevin Dean & Jean Toussaint Barry Green Francesco Petreni Pete Churchill Trio and many more

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HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

They say jazz was born in New Orleans but grew up in Kansas City

Kansas hero down with the kids The Global Music Foundation returns to Kings Place this Easter for concerts and workshops with a vintage line-up including legendary saxophonist Bobby Watson, Bruce Barth, Claire Martin and Kevin Dean. Sebastian Scotney caught up with the Kansas-based Watson.

‘A soloist of real authority’ and ‘among the most sheerly enjoyable of musicians to hear in a live context’, is jazz historian Richard Cook’s verdict on Bobby Watson. The alto saxophonist, arranger and educator makes his Kings Place debut in Hall One this March, as part of the Global Music Foundation’s Easter Workshop and Festival, sharing the stage with Montreal-based trumpeter Kevin Dean and a trio led by pianist Bruce Barth. Watson has the ultimate jazz pedigree, membership of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers from 1977 to 1981. He was also the Messengers’ music director, a post he relinquished to a younger colleague in the band: Wynton Marsalis. Major projects since then have included 15 years with the energetic, theatrical 29th Street Saxophone Quartet, and various incarnations of the post-bop band Horizon. Watson is also renowned as a skilful composer/arranger for big band. One factor, he explains, is that as a teenager ‘I had the key to the band room and would take all the instruments home every night, and try them out.’ Arranger Frank Griffith, a huge admirer of Watson’s 1993 album Tailor Made, says: ‘What is so

distinctive about his writing is that he drives the band from the engine room of the rhythm section.’ There can be no mystery where that strong sense of rhythmic propulsion comes from. Watson’s home town is Kansas City, whose significance for jazz Watson explained eloquently when we spoke in September: ‘They say jazz was born in New Orleans but grew up in Kansas City. It’s where swing started, with Benny Moten. It’s where the bass began to walk.’ The roll-call of jazz musicians born in and around the city is unique: Charlie Parker, Ben Webster, Pat Metheny... Watson’s most recent record, Gates BBQ Suite (2010), is a homage to Kansas City… What was it that lured Watson back in 2000 after a quarter century in New York? ‘I was the first recipient of an endowed professorship in jazz.’ And what does he consider important in jazz education? ‘Individualism. Everyone has their own sound. You catch the students where they are and bring them out in their own way. You can’t have a class plan. You stretch their imagination.’ Watson will be in London to bring his experience as an educator to the GMF workshops. But the evening will showcase his playing. He’s a legend of the music world, and his visits to London are all too rare.

Global Music Foundation 28 March – 1 April See Listings pp74–75 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2013

COMEDY

INCENSE AND INSENSIBILITY…

Or Man-filled Park? With your help, Andrew Murray and the Milk Monitors will be improvising a new Jane Austen novel at Kings Place. He explains how to Helen Wallace.

10 JANUARY

Ian D Montfort: Unbelievable

17 JANUARY Bad Musical

24 JANUARY

Austentatious: An Improvised Jane Austen Novel

31 JANUARY

The Looking Screen

14 FEBRUARY

Impropera Valentine’s Special BOBBY WATSON © SUPPLIED PHOTO | AUSTENTATIOUS © IDIL SUKAN

21 FEBRUARY

Storytellers’ Club

7 MARCH

Rachel Stubbings is… Stubbing Out Problems

14 MARCH

Double Bill: Colin Hoult + Jonny & the Baptists

21 MARCH

The Complete Guide to Everything – Live!

28 MARCH

Rob Deering: The One

Sending the audience to sleep, or making them throw bottles. Unless they’re bottles of vintage port, which would be appropriate. Where was the idea born? Two of us, Amy and Rachel, came up with it and called up the other four of us. We gave the idea a few rehearsals, found our brilliant cellist Carol, and then launched the idea upon a frenzied public. What are your favourite audience titles for shows? Either titles which spoof Austen’s own works – Lust and Frigidity, say, or Man-Filled Park – or titles which just go completely off the rails. Time Travel, Jet Pack and The Lady Boys of Bangkok are all honourable examples.

HIGHLIGHTS

THURSDAYS, 8PM – HALL TWO

HIGHLIGHTS COMEDY

In a nutshell, what can we expect from an Austentatious show? An hour of an improvised, entirely made-up-on-the-spot Jane Austen. The audience writes lots of suggestions for a title (‘Incense and Insensibility’, say, or ‘Pride and Extreme Prejudice’) – and whichever of Jane’s ‘lost works’ we pick out of the hat, we perform. And it’s funny. Are we talking Downton Abbey on speed or Whose Line Is It Anyway? in period costume? It’s somewhere in the middle – it’s a full play, so it’s a bit more of a complete piece of work than Whose Line Is It Anyway?. Then again, it’s not by Julian Fellowes, so it’s not really like Downton. Imagine if Austen kept her subtle plotting, but turned her comedy a bit broader, and then wrote whatever she liked during an opium binge.

Does the audience have to have a working knowledge of Austen’s oeuvre? Not at all. Because it’s entirely improvised, we tend not to throw in references that only Austen buffs will understand. The show takes place in Austen’s universe, with all of those tropes, but it’s still enjoyable even if you’ve never so much as watched Pride and Prejudice on the telly. So you’re even conversant with Sanditon and The Watsons? Two of us studied Austen for a full term at university, so we’ve certainly done our homework! The work Jane wrote as a young girl is very cool, too – it’s much madder and more exciting than her later work. People get thrown out of windows or die unexpectedly. What are you trying to avoid doing with this show?

What’s been the most inspired suggestion ever? It’s a tie between Northanger Rabbi and Pride and Predator. Why the Milk Monitors? Four of us met in 2006, in a university improv group called the Oxford Imps. We’ve all worked together on and off since, and started doing this show in 2011. The Milk Monitors is just a fun name; I suspect we’re all the sort of people who would have been milk monitors at school. What’s your favourite Jane Austen character and why? Mr Collins from Pride and Prejudice has a peculiar kind of awfulness which is just unbeatable. The idea of being refused by the oldest sister in a household and turning your attention to the second-oldest is hilariously creepy… What’s your next big project? Getting Jane Austen into the O2, where she belongs...

Off with their Heads! Austentatious 24 January See Listings p55 for details

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mechanisms and so on. Some he will record and make into tape loops live, and then play back through the same system, recording again, looping and so on. This might serve as a selfsustaining ecosystem, except for Noetinger’s playful interjections. ‘Different kinds of interferences’ is how he describes them, and they ceaselessly explore the interface between the physical and the electronic. So microphones might be arranged to produce varying kinds of feedback howl, ping-pong balls might be left to bounce inside an active speaker membrane, the path of a tape loop might run over a bass drum skin. For a musician working with electroacoustic means, Noetinger’s methods are unusually tactile. ‘I love the possibility of

Immersive Interference Tim Rutherford-Johnson meets Grenoblebased Jérôme Noetinger, who finds inspiration in reel-to-reel tape and comes to Out Hear with saxophonist Antoine Chessex in February.

recording and processing live, the loop, the tape itself that you can touch,’ he tells me. The results are surprisingly rich. The first impression may be of an overwhelming mechanical sound, energised by different rhythms and textures, but still an industrial wall of noise, conditioned by the clunks and whirrs and hums of mechanical technology – tapeheads, motors, transport mechanisms. But close listening reveals detail and, if not quite warmth, then something vital, even charming, as the unpredictable results of all those interferences grow into life. Noetinger brings his unique approach to Kings Place with saxophonist Antoine Chessex, with whom he has played as a duo once before, in Geneva in 2011. Like Noetinger, Chessex works with his performance environment, using electronics to magnify the resonances of his saxophone and the architecture of the space. A video from their Geneva performance (available on YouTube), suggests that Hall Two can look forward to an immersive musical experience.

Out Hear: Jérôme Noetinger & Antoine Chessex 11 February See Listings p60 for details

CONTEMPORARY

Jérôme Noetinger’s onstage music desk looks more like the workshop of a 1960s radio ham than the tools of one of Europe’s leading improvisers. It’s strewn chaotically with various microphones, a mixing console, bare speaker cones, unnamed electronic devices and components – and lots of cables. At its heart is a Revox B77 reel-toreel tape recorder, a famous piece of vintage home audio hardware and Noetinger’s signature instrument. He first began working with reel-to-reel tape in 1986 as a composer. ‘At this time it was the way to record and work with sound. Then step by step I brought the machine on stage and played with it live.’ His music starts from automatically generated sounds – electronic hum, motor

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

HIGHLIGHTS

ping-pong balls might be left to bounce inside an active speaker membrane


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

January—March 2013

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LIXENBERG’S MANIFESTO Lore Lixenberg’s new project for Out Hear takes in Futurism and Fluxus, as she tells Kate Wakeling.

ARTISTS WANTED TO DEFINE THEMSELVES RATHER THAN BE DEFINED BY CRITICS

‘We have been up all night, my friends and I … illuminated by the internal glow of electric hearts.’ So begins the Futurist Manifesto of 1909, the text set to open Lore Lixenberg’s musical adventure through the word of the avant-garde manifesto this March. Electric hearts will continue to glow in this arresting programme that weaves together 20th-century experimental music and newly commissioned electronica. Curated by opera singer and experimental vocalist Lore Lixenberg, the programme centres around different artistic manifestos. Lixenberg explains: ‘I’m fascinated by how in the 20th century these art movements and music movements began moving together in a very practical way. It’s a treat for

me to explore them, and the culmination of many years of discovery.’ The programme presents each manifesto (spanning ‘feverish Futurism to the laid-back world of Fluxus’) as a vocal performance piece by Lixenberg, before spinning off into contemporaneous works from each era, including rarely heard gems such as Isou’s Poèmes joyeux and songs by ‘outsider artist’ Adolf Wölfli, alongside music by Cage and Duchamp, and newly commissioned works by composers Aleks Kolkowski and Federico Reuben. Lixenberg is eager to emphasise that the event has been conceived from an artistic not an academic standpoint. Indeed, an artistled approach is what, for Lixenberg, drove these early

manifestos: ‘You could argue that this is when performance art began, when artists wanted to define themselves rather than being defined by critics. They said: “this is what we are, what we do and how we’re going to do it”. Bam! They’ve got that extremity and energy to them.’ Extremity and energy will pulsate through Manifesto, which charts an intense but playful journey through the music and imagination of the 20th-century avant-garde. As the Dadaist Manifesto of 1916 advocates, ‘it’s a question of connections, and of loosening them up a bit to start with’.

Out Hear: Manifesto 4 March See Listings p68 for details

COLLECTRESS MEETS THE SPECTRAL JÉRÔME NOETINGER © MAT RANSON | LORE LIXENBERG © SAM BELINFANTE | WILL DUTTA © MICHAEL WILLIAMS

Producer and pianist Will Dutta brings together cutting-edge electronics and acoustic improvisation in his new project, Glitch. Will Dutta and his innovative Chimera Productions have been at the forefront of the new vogue for genrebending musical collaborations. Created in 2007 as ‘a home for our nonclassical projects and events,’ Dutta’s company has since specialised in staging daring new music events and masterminding inventive commissions, including Gabriel Prokofiev’s dazzling Concerto for Turntables & Orchestra. Dutta describes his mission as ‘connecting the dots between modern dance music and contemporary and experimental art music’, a challenge that his forthcoming Glitch programme meets head-on. Glitch brings together artists from both the electronic and acoustic worlds. Sound artist and 2012 Prix Ars Electronica-winner Jo Thomas will perform Alpha, described by Dutta as ‘an improvisation which

works intuitively with the spectral shape of sound. She creates a depth of sound unlike anything I’ve heard before.’ The resoundingly acoustic all-female ensemble Collectress complete the programme with Improvisations for an eclectic mix of strings, vocals, flute and bowed saw. ‘They bring such creativity and fun to their work’, says Dutta, ‘that I’ve challenged them to contrast Jo’s performance with an acoustic “play” on a soundworld more often associated with the leftfield corner of electronica.’ Renowned for their playful approach and billed as ‘a band of process and resourcefulness’, Collectress will doubtless answer the summons in style. Out Hear: Glitch 28 January. See Listings p56 for details

DUTTA CONNECTS THE DOTS BETWEEN MODERN DANCE MUSIC AND EXPERIMENTAL ART MUSIC


HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

MONDAYS, 8PM – HALL TWO

Jamie McDermott

14 JANUARY

Conversations with Sound: Opera of Surveillance 21 JANUARY

Lemur

28 JANUARY

Collectress with Jo Thomas: Glitch 4 FEBRUARY

Jennifer Walshe: ALL THE MANY PEOPLS 11 FEBRUARY

Music Concrete 18 FEBRUARY

ALSO PART OF BACH UNWRAPPED

Pekka Kuusisto: Bach and electronic improvisations 4 MARCH

Manifesto 11 MARCH

Decibel: Big, Noisy, Quiet 18 MARCH

Ensemble Plus-minus: New Propositions 25 MARCH

Karol Beffa Trio

THE RETURN OF THE NAKED VOICES… The London A Cappella Festival has become a popular fixture at Kings Place, to the delight of co-curators The Swingles. Tenor Oliver Griffiths talked to Helen Wallace about this year’s line-up. ‘It’s just taken off!ʼ exclaims Oliver Griffiths. ‘Last year there was a real growth in the audience catchment area – we had visitors from Taiwan, California and all over Europe. The feel of a community is building too, since the first festival in 2010. We showcase such diverse acts, each audience gets exposed to different musical styles, and the enthusiasm spreads from there.’ A long-held wish that the Kingʼs Singers join the festival has finally been granted, and they will share the billing with the Swingles on the final night: ‘I feel this year there’s an informal “Best of British” theme to the festival. We’ve always wanted the legendary Kingʼs Singers here. They’re the masters of ensemble and balance.ʼ Representing the English choral tradition will be the Choir of Clare College, Cambridge, ‘so vibrant but refined’, while The Magnets bring their ‘pop group magic’ to the proceedings. When we spoke, Griffiths had just had ‘his socks blown off’ in Stockholm by radical Danish group Postyr, whom they’ve also invited to the Festival: ‘They’re incredibly innovative, using electronics, looping

WE WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO TOUR THE WORLD IF IT WASN’T FOR BACH pedals, sampling epic beats and bringing an urban feel to their singing.’ The Swingles themselves celebrate 50 years in 2013 with what Griffiths assures me, ‘will be a big statement artistically, and will involve some surprising collaborations and original material as well as being a celebration of our legacy.’ He says the seven-strong group, who come from backgrounds as diverse as

jazz, musical theatre, and opera, are increasingly interested in creating their own songs: ‘We’re still quite purist in our approach, though, relying on our own voices and the complexity of the writing to create effects.’ The group return in May to sing in Bach Unwrapped, Bach being a composer central to that legacy: ‘We wouldn’t be able to tour the world if it wasn’t for Bach,’ laughs Griffiths. ‘His music remains a challenge and a joy.ʼ London A Cappella Festival 2013 24–26 January. See Listings pp54–55 for details

JAMIE MCDERMOTT © MANUEL VASON | THE MAGNETS, SWINGLE SINGERS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

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Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2013

HIGHLIGHTS FOOD & DRINK

Heering Bone: Brandy, Grand Marnier, Heering Cherry Liqueur, sugar, lemon juice, bitters.

CHRISTMAS COCKTAILS AND WINTER WARMERS Liz Reece, the Rotunda’s bar and restaurant manager, introduces some tempting winter cocktails and warming wines.

WE’RE GOING BACK TO THE CLASSICS, WITH AN ACCENT ON PARTICULARLY ENGLISH TIPPLES

‘The cocktail scene is very retro at the moment, so we’re going back to the classics, with an accent on particularly English tipples,’ says the ebullient Liz Reece of Rotunda. She’s selected three winter cocktails from the bar menu this season which win on taste and simple good looks. The aromatic ‘Heering Bone’ combines Heering Cherry Liqueur, first produced in the mid-19th century, with warming brandy, a dash of Grand Marnier and just the right twist of lemon and bitters. ‘Winter Mink’ is a lovely chocolatey froth spiced with traditional English quince liqueur, while the classic ‘Gentleman’s Club’ is a ruby-red melange of grenadine and Grand Marnier. ‘We’re getting away from the very fancy, visually stimulating cocktails and heading back to infusions and intense flavours,’ says Reece. For those wanting a nonalcoholic alternative, she recommends the delicious ‘Ginger Snap’, which ‘has a real kick’. If you would like to explore the art of cocktail-concocting further, gather a group of five to ten friends and book a Mixology class at the Rotunda. In these informal sessions you learn how to mix, shake and stir two classic cocktails from the resident expert. The price includes a glass of prosecco on arrival and Rotunda’s signature cocktail as well as those you make, and some nibbles to finish it all off. ‘I think some of our customers assume these sessions are only for youngsters, but we have all sorts coming along, from hen parties to

team-building groups. We even have groups where half of them want to make non-alcoholic “mocktails” and they love it.’ It's not just cocktails on the menu this Winter. Rotunda’s own-recipe mulled wine tops the list of popular drinks in the winter months. ‘Everyone loves a warming glass of mulled wine, but there’s nothing worse than too many cloves and too much sweetness,’ says Reece. ‘We use fresh clementines stuck with cloves, and the effect should be of drinking a red wine with a hint of spice. We also do a warm spiced rum which will bring some colour to the cheeks.’ Alternatively as an accompaniment to the rich stews, casseroles and meat dishes in the restaurant, Reece recommends full-bodied red wines like the Chilean Malbec: ʻThatʼs a great, ballsy, full-on wine but not heavy on the tannins. Donʼt overlook the whites when you are eating winter food: a white Viognier gives you a buttery, aromatic flavour, while the Gewürtztraminers and Rieslings make flavoursome aperitifs. Weʼve also got a Croatian Pinot Gris which has a beautiful lychee finish. Winter is a great season to try out all of these different tipples.ʼ

Mixology classes at Rotunda Bar; £30 pp (for groups of 5 – 12 people). Lasts 1.5 hrs To book : 020 7014 2840 enquiries@rotundabarandrestaurant.co.uk

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January—March 2013

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

ART HIGHLIGHTS

Jeremy Gardiner Evening, Mullion Cove 2010

The enduring Jurassic Ian Collins introduces the work of landscape artist Jeremy Gardiner, whose formidable visions of Dorset come to the Kings Place Gallery this spring.

Jeremy Gardiner makes art of many layers. Abstracted on the surface, his airy and excavatory pictures soar over and dig deep into the wide variety of coastal landscapes he dearly loves. ‘Dorset is the baseline for all my work, the one place I go back to,’ says this longterm traveller to Florida and New York, and to islands off the coasts of both Britain and Brazil. ‘It’s important to leave and then return to understand a place properly – you’ve got the contrast and context then.’ So, even amid a developing affection for Cornwall and lately for the Lake District, he has returned again and again for a complex exploration of the craggy and shingly swathe of Jurassic Coast ranging from Purbeck to Lyme Regis he has admired since childhood – charting fantastic formations of stacks, caves, arches and banks. Like the elements, he opens

the burial grounds of dinosaurs in an art taking in 185 million years of tumultuous history. Panoramic Gardiner pictures are deeply researched and densely structured, with added perspectives of time and distance. Gouged and constructed, as well as painted, they uniquely reveal the remorseless tides of accretion and erosion, generation and extinction, acting over immense ages. It’s the instant beauty of the imagery that captures our attention, but then, as he wishes, the contrast and the context of each very individual composition that holds us. This artist may note the constantly changing face of a field over the seasons (brown, green, gold) as he distils a moving timeframe into a single multi-faceted image worked in semi-cubist shards and planes of colour. But the visual effect usually echoes the encrustation of rock by shell and lichen, and


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HIGHLIGHTS ART

January—March 2013

ART HIGHLIGHTS GOUGED AND CONSTRUCTED, AS WELL AS PAINTED, THEY UNIQUELY REVEAL THE REMORSELESS TIDES OF ACCRETION AND EROSION

9 JANUARY – 3 MARCH Kings Place Gallery

Adam Birtwistle: Paintings 11 JANUARY – 22 FEBRUARY Kings Place Gallery

John Lessore: Paintings 11 JANUARY – 23 FEBRUARY Pangolin London

Terence Coventry: Three Decades of Sculpture & Works on Paper

SCULPTURES PHOTOS © PANGOLIN LONDON – STEVE RUSSELL

28 FEBRUARY – 9 MARCH weathering by wind and water in mineral time. And while people never appear in these pictures, an occasional boat, folly or chapel provides a minute motif – a note on scale and a little joke on the nature of time. Far more pressing presences are the fossils (ammonite, brittle star, ichthyosaur) looming large within and alongside some of his landscape paintings and monoprints. ‘It’s the intersection of space and time that gives a place significance for me,’ he says. ‘My pictures are all about recapturing past and lost time, so all my earlier thoughts and feelings are in there too.’ Although he is still building an archive of books, maps and vintage postcards, his investigation is now intensified with models and with contour patterns seen from the air and captured by LiDAR, an optical remote sensing technology measuring changes in landscape elevation via laser pulses. So dedicated a detective is also interested in other identities. Most tellingly, he has viewed Swanage through Paul Nash’s eyes, renting his hero’s former home at 2 The Parade – painting on the balcony and indoors, looking from shadow into light and from an enclosed space towards an expanse of sea and sky and the beacon of Ballard Point. But even then the result has been a series of highly personal pictures. A large number of major works so far into this millennium now stand as so many markers of intent – pointing to a place both in a line of pioneering artists and the romantic tradition of British painting. Jeremy Gardiner recreates the visual world in his own visionary image. Ian Collins is an art writer and curator whose recent books include a best-selling monograph on John Craxton.

Jeremy Gardiner: Unfolding Landscape 8 March – 26 April See Art Listings p76 for details

Pangolin London

Steve Russell Photography

COVENTRY’S CREATURES The story of how a successful Cornish pig-farmer and land-owner became one of Britain’s most distinguished sculptors is unique. Terence Coventry’s rugged animal and human forms are hewn with the integrity of his experience of nature and materials. Pangolin, whose Foundry played such a key role in his move into bronze casting, will exhibit his most recent work. Don’t miss it. Pangolin London: Terence Coventry 11 January – 23 February See Art Listings p76 for details

8 MARCH – 26 APRIL Kings Place Gallery

Jeremy Gardiner: Unfolding Landscape 20 MARCH – 20 APRIL Pangolin London

Jonathan Kenworthy: Celebrating 70 Years

TALKING ART 11 MARCH

Jeremy Gardiner: Unfolding Landscape Terence Coventry Woman on a Bench Bronze Edition of 10 Image courtesy of Pangolin London;

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January—March 2013

Amanda Holloway reports on an inspirational poetry project for local primary school children being rolled out at Kings Place.

INTERACT

YOUNG POETS ON A QUEST

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HIGHLIGHTS

‘Yeah! We’re poets, we’ve created our own poems.’ A 10-year-old with a passion for poetry is not something you find every day. Unless, that is, they’ve taken part in PoetryQuest, a dynamic children’s arts project coming to Kings Place in December. Project manager Thomas MacAndrew, from the Prince’s Foundation for Children & the Arts, says the charity’s aim is to get children into arts venues, ‘particularly children who have no experience of an arts venue and might think of it as an imposing, threatening place’. PoetryQuest doesn’t just get them through the door, it invites them onto the stage to perform poetry they’ve written themselves with the input of practising poets. ‘It improves their confidence and self-esteem,’ says Thomas, ‘and that in turn impacts on their schoolwork.’ The project starts with Year 5 and 6 classes attending a poetry performance in their local arts venue; those poets go into the schools to work with children on their poems, then the children themselves take to the stage. Working with Kings Place and schools from Islington and Camden are poet Francesca Beard and poet/rapper BREIS. They worked with PoetryQuest in Limehouse last year, and their charismatic performance style and inclusive approach went down very well with

PHOTOS © ELLIE FARMER

26 HIGHLIGHTS


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HIGHLIGHTS INTERACT

January—March 2013

INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS 26 JANUARY

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Panel Discussion

A panel discussion with leading figures from various musical backgrounds discussing the new trends in a cappella. Hall One 3.15pm

2 FEBRUARY

Academy of Ancient Music: The Bach Suites in Focus A full day to explore Bach’s music, culminating with a performance of the complete Orchestral Suites, a series of dances showcasing some of Bach’s most varied, grand and graceful music. PART I The English Suites – Concert with Commentary with Richard Egarr Hall One 1pm PART II Discovering Bach with Professor Christoph Wolff St Pancras Room 2.30pm PART III Playing Bach – the AAM players inconversation with Sara Mohr-Pietsch (BBC Radio 3)

YOU COULD REALLY EXPRESS YOUR IDEAS IN FRONT OF EVERYONE AND NO ONE WOULD SAY IT WAS GOOD OR IT WASN’T the children. Teacher Will Power also found the whole experience rewarding. ‘BREIS embodied the type of creative, fun person kids don’t normally get to experience at school. On top of this they were going through a process with someone who had writing at the centre of their life. This had an incredible impact on motivation.’ Many of the children had English as an additional language and found written work a challenge. But with his hip-hop background BREIS had no trouble

convincing them that poetry could be cool, and that they could do it too. ‘You could really express your ideas in front of everyone and no one would say it was good or it wasn’t. We were just able to have fun,’ said one afterwards. In other parts of the country the style is rather different. ‘In Exeter the poets worked with children in rural schools for whom going into Exeter was a rare event,’ says Thomas. ‘Their poetry was full of imagery about landscape and nature, whereas London was all hip hop and dangerously cool!’ Look out for those hip, cool, 10-year-old poets in Kings Place, Hall One, in February and March next year… Poetry Quest is an ongoing schools project involving students from four primary schools in London: Hungerford Primary School; St Mary’s Bryanston Square CE School, Holy Trinity & St Silas; St John the Baptist

8 MARCH

THE SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE: 30TH ANNIVERSARY

Pre-concert Talk Exploring Enescu

In this free talk, the members of the Schubert Ensemble give a players’ perspective on Enescu’s extraordinary First Piano Quartet, discussing the work and performing illustrative extracts. St Pancras Room 6.30pm

16 MARCH

BACH UNWRAPPED

Study Day

St John Passion with Dr Timothy Jones (RAM) I: Context and Style A presentation by 18th-century specialist Timothy Jones, illustrated by students from the RAM, on the context and musical style of the St John Passion. II: Performance Traditions Timothy Jones is joined by colleagues from the RAM to discuss what we know of Bach’s performances. St Pancras Room 10.30am–4.30pm

St Pancras Room 6pm

20 JANUARY; 10 MARCH

PART IV The Complete Orchestral Suites – Academy of Ancient Music with Richar Egarr

NYJC Young Musicians Programme

Hall One 7.30pm

7 & 9 FEBRUARY

BRITTEN AT 100: PIANIST, COLLABORATOR, ARTISTIC CRUCIBLE

Pre-concert Talks

On 7 February, Andrew Matthews-Owen talks to Martin Suckling and some of tonight’s other performers about Britten as composer, pianist and artistic director. Later in the series, Katie Derham (BBC Radio 3) and Frances Spalding discuss Britten’s working relationship with John and Myfanwy Piper. (9 February) St Pancras Rm 6.30pm & 5pm resp.

22 FEBRUARY

BACH UNWRAPPED

Pre-concert Talk This first programme by the Academy of St Martin in the Fields sets two stunning solo soprano arias – to be sung by Carolyn Sampson – alongside Bach’s concerto for two violins, and a second with harpsichord and flute. There will be a pre-concert talk prior to this performance. Further details to follow. St Pancras Room 6.30pm

NATIONAL YOUTH JAZZ COLLECTIVE

Workshops, jam sessions and performance opportunities for schoolaged young jazz musicians led by Issie Barratt, the NYCJ young musicians programme focuses on small group improvisation in streamed groups designed to support all levels of ability. Ends with an informal concert given to the students’ families and friends. Sundays 10am–5.30pm; 20 Jan, 10 Mar These dates are now fully booked, but there is a waiting list. To register your interest, contact judith@nyjc.co.uk A bursary scheme is available for young people in receipt of benefits. NYJC also offers a CPD programme for teachers on the same dates. Details at kingsplace. co.uk/interact/interact-events.

SPRING 2013

ChamberStudio

Sunday afternoon coaching and support sesions for up-and-coming post-college chamber groups. Eminent chamber players and teachers will provide coaching and guidance. Sessions at affordable rates. Observers are welcome. For more information and to book a session, go to www.chamberstudio.org

27


28 CLASSICAL

Recent research has dispelled the myth that Bach ridiculed the prototype pianos

January—March 2013

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January—March 2013

THE DIVINE INVENTOR

BACH UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © STEPHEN SWAIN WWW.KROP.COM/STEPHEN_SWAIN

Each age has remade Bach in its own image. So how does he fare in the 21st century, asks Simon Heighes, and what recent scholarship has influenced our current view?

Our grandparents would have been shocked. Bach is not the man today he was a century ago. He’s faster, slimmer and slicker – but is he any better? Bach’s music is probably more adaptable and resilient to change than that of any other composer. Since his death in 1750 each new age has sought to make him its own, dressing him in the current fashions and remoulding him practically and aesthetically. The secret of Bach’s supreme malleability lies in the linearity of his music – its ‘contrapuntal’ texture – a self-contained conversation between independent voices so intellectually rigorous that it loses little when translated or transplanted. Perhaps today we’ve lost the confidence of earlier generations, because rather than simply trying to perform Bach in a way which appeals to contemporary ears, our current obsession is with performing his music in a manner which Bach himself would have recognised. We no longer dare talk about absolute ‘authenticity’ since, over the past few decades, we’ve learnt that complete historical fidelity is not only impossible but also probably undesirable. But rather than constraining performers, the use of historically-informed performing styles and period instruments has in fact opened up

exciting new possibilities, objectively improving the clarity and tonal balance of Bach’s music. Played on a modern instrument the trumpet part in Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 drowns out its delicate solo partners, the recorder and violin; a quieter 18th-century trumpet blends more effectively, vindicating Bach’s daring instrumental combination. The biggest change in our approach to Bach’s music over the past 30 years has been the discovery that the composer himself actually performed his choral works – cantatas and Passions – with choirs of just one singer per part (with a back-up choir reinforcing the important moments). It’s a performance style which chimes in nicely with the current vogue for minimalism, and it certainly puts Bach’s Passions within the grasp of smaller ensembles and smaller budgets. For some, this crash diet has robbed Bach of his gravitas, turning the B minor Mass into the B minor Madrigal; for other listeners, it has inspired performances of much greater textural clarity and lightness, whatever the size of the choir and orchestra. Despite our present-day taste for the original colours of Bach’s sound world, the piano refuses to be silenced. Quite right. Recent research has dispelled the old myth

CLASSICAL BACH UNWRAPPED

that Bach ridiculed the prototype pianos he first heard. In fact, during the 1730s he helped Gottfried Silbermann transform the fledgling piano from its early light-weight design into something much more substantial. Bach liked the overall tonal palette of these early models, though he found the treble a little weak and the action rather stiff. Silbermann worked on Bach’s refinements for a decade before his new improved pianos hit the market in the mid-1740s. Frederick the Great snapped up 15 straightaway and invited Bach over to play them; he even persuaded him to improvise a fugue on one. So enthused was he, that Bach was soon marketing the pianos for Silbermann at Leipzig’s international trade fairs. But in later years the piano got carried away: Liszt- and Busoni-inspired arrangements of Bach’s keyboard music were allowed to proliferate; only since the death of Glenn Gould 30 years ago has the fashion for deeply personal – even eccentric – interpretations largely ceased. If Bach once served pianistic ego, today’s players seem more interested in utilising the piano’s unique touch-sensitive qualities to reveal as much about the music’s labyrinthine textures and rhetorical gestures as possible. Conversely, it’s now more often harpsichordists who are challenging us with the most passionate and exploratory new approaches to Bach’s preludes and fugues, toccatas, suites and inventions. Although musical archaeology hasn’t unearthed any new Bach masterpieces since the Neumeister Chorales in 1982, scholars have at least been able to restore several of Bach’s large-scale vocal works and concertos to the repertory, albeit in speculative reconstructions. Pieces like the little-known St Mark Passion were economically assembled by the busy composer from earlier music; reassembling them today has proved surprisingly effective, and in so doing we are reminded that, as on so many fronts, Bach was a profoundly practical musician – more man than god, more tired father and methodical teacher than self-absorbed genius. The true ‘authenticity’ which has so long eluded us is surely pure pragmatism. Our grandparents would indeed have been shocked by the way we have demythologised Bach, but in getting closer to the man and his world perhaps we are freer than ever to rediscover the essence of his music.

Bach Unwrapped Weeks 1–5 See Listings pp49–50, pp56–57, pp60–61, pp62–63, pp72–73 for details See also www.kingsplace.co.uk/bach for details

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CLASSICAL BACH UNWRAPPED

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January—March 2013

CAROLYN SAMPSON

JOURNEYS OF THE HEART

Bach has always been important to soprano Carolyn Sampson, but her move to Germany has brought his music even more vividly to life. Looking ahead to her appearances in Bach Unwrapped, she reflects on the composer.

WITH BACH YOU ARE NOT ALWAYS SINGING IN THE FIRST PERSON, BUT ON BEHALF OF THE TEXT

‘Bach is like an anchor in my musical life,’ says Carolyn Sampson. The well-loved British soprano who made her name singing Mozart, Handel, and Monteverdi opera roles, has graced many a treasured performance of Bach’s Passions and cantatas, rapidly rising as a soloist from out of the choral groups with whom she began her career. Calm, lucid and with an easy laugh, Sampson patiently waits for her young son Oscar to leave the room before recalling her earliest experiences of the composer: ‘The first pieces I played were the Brandenburg Concertos as an extremely bad violinist at school! I especially loved No. 3 – it’s an amazing feeling to experience the melody going through all the parts and to be in the middle of it. It gave me a sense of structure and musical form.’ Although her set work for A level was the first section of the St Matthew Passion, she didn’t enjoy it: ‘At that time I found Handel’s Dixit Dominus more immediately appealing, it’s easier to find your way into. The St Matthew is so complex, but it’s since become my Desert Island Disc. Its length invites such reflection; to perform it is to embark on a long journey. The arias took me a long time to understand, but they shouldn’t be facile, they are difficult, effortful, this is about Jesus carrying the cross. Think of those incredible outpourings of grief: “Gebt mir meinen Jesum wieder!” (“Give me back my Jesus”) and then “Mache dich, mein Herze, rein” (“Cleanse yourself, my heart”), the idea of taking everything Jesus suffered back into yourself. After you’ve been on that journey, you should feel something has been achieved; it’s incredibly moving.’ While she was still at university, Sampson began to sing with ExCathedra in the Passions and the B minor Mass, and was soon singing cantatas and motets with The Sixteen. An important moment came when Philippe Herreweghe chose her as a soloist in a ‘slew of cantatas’ with his Collegium Vocale Gent: ‘Herreweghe was always very clear on text; recitative is a big focus for him. It was really helpful in developing a style of singing Bach. He has a wonderful way of shaping the music from the text: it’s not just about dynamics, but a way of clearly defining each word, each phrase. He was also the first person to suggest to me that when you sing Bach you are not necessarily singing in the first person, but singing on behalf of the text. It’s not raw emotion you’re looking for, as you would be in a Handel opera, but something at one remove which is nevertheless personal. I’m still trying to find that balance between what is expressive and what is detached.’

CAROLYN SAMPSON © NICK WHITE | ELIZABETH WALLFISCH © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA

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She then became a soloist for Masaki Suzuki’s major Bach Collegium Japan recording project, ‘which was amazing. I found it was the religious aspects which informed Suzuki’s approach in a profound way, the theological significance. Working with both conductors was a hugely educational experience.’ For Bach Unwrapped, Sampson has devised a series of thrilling programmes with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields featuring some of the most challenging and colourful secular soprano cantatas along with some enchanting instrumental music: ‘Every time I’m asked to sing in a cantata and I seem to find a new one, and it’s always a delight. I’ve chosen No. 209 for my first concert with the ASMF: probably one of the most difficult and demanding in the whole repertoire, with a high coloratura. We’re also including ‘Ich habe genug’ as it’s not only beautiful and very famous, but it has an important flute solo and then we’re moving on to the Italian Concerto with its wonderful flute part. I think the great theme of ‘Ich habe genug’ is the anticipation of the afterlife: despite the sorrow, there is a peacefulness there. The same could be said for No. 199 with its first line ‘My heart is swimming in blood’ – what a vivid, painful image that is, but somehow contentment is finally found. When we speak, Sampson is spending the summer in England for performances of Purcell’s Fairy Queen at Glyndebourne, though her home is now in Freiburg, where her husband manages the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra. As she calls him to rescue her from Oscar’s now enthusiastic knocking on the door, she explains that her improving German has played a significant part in her deepening relationship with Bach’s music: ‘As I speak better German I find myself constantly discovering new meaning in Bach – I keep catching new nuances, new layers of reference, it’s fascinating.’ Though Carolyn would ‘miss an Easter without a Passion’, her repertoire is everexpanding: she recently sang Anne Trulove in Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress, and would love to sing in a Britten opera. She feels the two repertoires can coincide very happily: ‘I think a certain colour will creep into the voice when I’m playing with a Baroque flute rather than a modern one, and a modern violin will make a difference to my tone. But I don’t place any restrictions on my voice to sing Bach: I use all the colours.’

Bach Unwrapped – Academy of St Martin in the Fields with Carolyn Sampson: Concertos and Cantatas – 1 22 February See Listings p63 for details

January—March 2013

CLASSICAL BACH UNWRAPPED

ELIZABETH WALLFISCH

MY GREATEST ALLY

Bach is at the centre of Elizabeth Wallfisch’s musical life, as the violinist and director of the Wallfisch Band explains. If you could keep only one work of Bach in your memory, what would it be and why? ‘Am Abend’, and then ‘Mache dich, mein Herze, rein’, from the St Matthew Passion. It makes me weep just to think of it. It brings to mind those deeply beloved people in my life whom I have lost, brings the grief up in an instant, the tears flow, and then pass, in the beauty of the music and the text. I have happy memories of 18 years at the Carmel Bach Festival, with Sanford Sylvan singing in this recitative and aria (who’ll be joining us in our concerts). You cannot imagine the colours he brings to the text… When you are teaching young players about performing Bach do you have some basic principles? Yes, three things inform the whole performance: text, text, text! There are so many layers of text: the words themselves and the way they are pronounced (consonants, articulations, phrasing of sentences). Bach has a special way of using words, dividing and repeating, going back over parts of the sentence, as the music illustrates the text, enhances the meaning. The ‘word painting’ of Bach is also important, the emotions brought to the fore by the text, and the spiritual

meanings therein. Technically we, as instrumentalists, have to learn to speak the text in our playing: that is a big challenge! Then there are the origins of the texts and the liturgical contexts in which they are used, and so on… What or who has influenced the evolution of your own Bach performing over the last 30 years? Gustav Leonhardt, for his attention to the details of text, and his complete honesty, passion for and understanding of this musical language, and his sense of wonder. Another big influence has simply been being part of an orchestra in hundreds of performances of Cantatas in the last 30 years, each one an enlightenment. I’ve been fortunate to live in a time in musical history when we can explore the delicacies, strengths, passions and fundamentals of the styles of the period. Playing Baroque violin has also been inspirational, with all its colours and potential to speak and sing, and bring meaning to music rhetorically. What place does his music occupy in your musical life? No.1: I cannot conceive of life without Bach. He is the centre of the wheel of my life, musical and

otherwise. He is my greatest teacher, friend, ally, comforter, inspiration. He challenges me constantly to deeper understanding, and better execution, to play better, to teach better... How would you introduce a child to Bach? To sing and shout with, the opening of the Gloria of the B minor Mass. To dance to, the Osanna from the B minor Mass. For suspense and then joy, ‘Mache dich, mein Herze, rein’, and the Gratias from the B minor Mass. For ‘spooky’ music, the opening of the St John Passion. For a baby, ‘Schlummert ein’.

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CLASSICAL BACH UNWRAPPED

January—March 2013

years and that’s the best way to get to know him, I realise in retrospect. I also listened to the English Baroque Soloists, Academy of Ancient Music, The Engalish Concert as well as Harnoncourt and Musica Antiqua Köln making their old instruments sing in a non-conventional way and I yearned to do the same... The first time I had a go on a Baroque violin was when my family hosted a Baroque violinist from the Hamburger Barockorchester, and I found it very difficult to make the sound I’d so clearly and easily imagined in my head. It became clear to me that some involvement was required to get to know the best way of playing such an instrument...

RACHEL PODGER

DIVINE SPARK Celebrated Baroque violinist Rachel Podger, who will play all Bach’s Partitas and Sonatas, reflects on a deepening relationship.

You’ve said you were told when you were younger that you needed to be very mature before playing Bach; do you feel that was misguided? Yes, my ambitious Polish violin teacher in Kassel, Germany, where I grew up, was adamant about the necessity of being at least 40 years old before attempting to play any Bach! He told me this when, as an 11-year-old, I voiced an interest in playing the A minor Concerto. I think I knew instinctively that it couldn’t do me any harm to practise some Bach, and I played plenty at home. Bach solo violin music I attempted later on, but that was a mixed blessing as I felt strongly at odds with the style of all my teachers’ playing... One from the Russian school made me copy his bowings and fingers into my part of the B minor Partita in ink! When I challenged a bowing he asked me whether I had been infected by the illness of the ‘authentic movement’!

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Is dance always at the forefront of your mind when playing the solo Partitas? Yes, it is! I have always loved dancing, organised or free style, and learnt ballet, folk dancing and ballroom as a child and teenager, so it has always been part of me. You can’t help but be aware of the dance elements in Baroque music, but especially in Bach which has such compelling rhythmic writing. I often try and ‘dance’ the pulse of a particular movement with its various musical events – it helps me to bring that essential rhythmic quality into the body and to transform anything sluggish or unclear into something meaningful.

BACH INDUCES A CLARIFYING, YET INVIGORATING EFFECT ON BODY, SOUL AND MIND

Which came first – your acquaintance with period practice and instruments or your own sense of how Bach should be played? His music had always felt straightforward and crystal clear in its style and meaning to me, even if I couldn’t execute and articulate it at that time. I sang a lot during my school

You’ve said you have a deeper relationship with Bach’s music than with that of any other Baroque composer, can you articulate why? Bach has the knack of inducing a clarifying, calming yet invigorating effect on body, soul and mind. Playing and listening to Bach is like a therapy... after the birth of my second child I took a break from playing concerts in order to take care of my toddler and new baby. This was of course a new and wonderful experience, but I missed playing in general terribly, and I remember thinking, ‘if only I could play some Bach now, everything would fit together better and be in the right place again inside me and the world would seem in order’. His connection with the divine is apparent in everything he writes, whether it be slow or fast, spirited or contemplative, and I think he enables us to relate to that divinity and the spark of it we all carry within us. All we need to do is to recognise his language and let it speak through us...

RACHEL PODGER © JONAS SACKS

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If the ending of the Cold War had truly brought about the end of history, there would be no need or purpose for a magazine like Standpoint. But we all know what happened

BR ITA IN’S LE A DINGL Cu LTu R A A ND L poLITICA E IN z A m AG

Tom Stoppard

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34 Contemporary

January—March 2013

if truth be told... Leonard Cohen was a poet before he turned songwriter, influenced by Jewish cantors and French chansonniers – and a vocation to tell the truth. Dorian Lynskey on the subject of a tribute event at Jewish Book Week.

One night in the late 1980s, Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan went for coffee after a show in Paris and wound up talking about songwriting. Dylan asked how long Cohen had taken to write Hallelujah, not yet the modern standard it has since become. ‘Two years maybe, at least,’ Cohen estimated. He asked Dylan the same question about his song I and I. ‘Fifteen minutes,’ Dylan replied. Even allowing for exaggeration in both directions, the incident highlights the differences between pop music’s two great Jewish poets. To Dylan a song is a lump of wet clay to be moulded before it sets fast; to Cohen it’s a slab of rock to be chipped into shape with immense dedication and care. ‘There’s a real slowness to the way he works and it takes a long time for his songs to form,’ said one of his admirers, Nick Cave. ‘They’re really high art.’ ‘High art’ is a loaded term when it comes to songwriting, and one that Cohen would regard with his usual bone-dry selfdeprecation, but, uniquely among the emergent singer-songwriters of the 1960s, Cohen had experienced a creative life outside the recording studio. He was born

in 1934 — just a few years before Dylan, but a significant generational gulf. Trading his bourgeois Jewish upbringing in Montreal for more bohemian pursuits, he won acclaim (though not many readers) as a poet and novelist before turning to song in his early 30s, and his first listeners sensed that his roots were more literary than musical. In an early write-up, the Canadian folk singer Buffy Sainte-Marie wondered ‘whether or not the original quality of his melodies comes from simply not knowing what he is doing’. Influenced by Jewish cantors and French chansonniers rather than folk singers, Cohen didn’t know the rules of the game he was joining, so he was free to make up his own. ‘I certainly never had any musical standard to tyrannise me,’ he once said. ‘I thought that it was something to do with the truth, that if you told the story, that’s what the song was about.’ Cohen has often mocked the limitations of his singing voice, which stvarted out low to the ground and has since become increasingly subterranean, but it is the perfect vehicle for his carefully chosen words. Nothing is lost in translation. To his

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January—March 2013

For Cohen a song is a slab of rock to be chipped into shape with immense dedication and care

CONTEMPORARY JEWISH BOOK WEEK

fans, from those who first encountered him on 1967’s The Songs of Leonard Cohen to younger converts who fell under his spell at Glastonbury 42 years later, he conveys the weight of experience. He sings like a man who has seen his fair share of beauty and horror, and has acquired a few grains of wisdom in the process. On his most recent album, Old Ideas, he mentions writing ‘a manual for living with defeat’, which is both a sincere ambition and a mordant joke from a man whose sense of humour is perennially underrated. It’s what makes Cohen so compelling, this lack of self-importance even as he is profoundly serious about his work. As an influence, however, he is as daunting as he is inspiring. While his craft has been a beacon to almost every songwriter who cares about finding the right words, from indie troubadours to major stars such as Bono and Michael Stipe, his patience and persistence are harder to emulate. Unusually for someone who has made a living from music for almost half a century, he has released nothing disposable: no tossed-off B-sides or contract-fulfilling stopgaps. Each album is an effort to get at the truth of things, to examine the hidden mechanics of love, sex, war, religion and death. The same quest is visible in his life. While honouring his Jewish heritage – one grandfather was a rabbi, the other a Talmudic scholar, and Cohen loyally flew to Israel to entertain troops during the 1973 Yom Kippur War – he has studied Buddhism since the 1970s and even, at one point, investigated scientology. His inquiries have led him down some dark paths, glimpsed in the acidic pessimism of Everybody Knows (1988) and The Future (1992), although since the floodwaters of depression subsided around a decade ago, his outlook has mellowed, and he has never quite submitted to despair. In the oft-quoted words of Anthem (1992): ‘There is a crack in everything/That’s how the light gets in.’ At a press conference last year he answered a question about old age and death by saying, ‘I’ve come to the conclusion, reluctantly, that I am going to die. So naturally those questions arise and are addressed. But, you know, I like to do it with a beat.’ Jewish Book Week: Leonard Cohen Tribute  23 February See Listings p64 for details

35

Leonard Cohen © Rex Features

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January—March 2013

In the beginning...

Novelist Amos Oz and his historian daughter Fania Oz-Salzberger know all about the exchange of words between generations. In this extract from their new book, they ponder the power of written words in the Jewish collective memory.

Jewish continuity has always hinged on uttered and written words, on an expanding maze of interpretations, debates, and disagreements, and on a unique human rapport. In synagogue, at school, and most of all in the home, it has always involved two or three generations deep in conversation. Ours is not a bloodline but a textline. There is a tangible sense in which Abraham and Sarah, Rabban Yohanan, Glikl of Hameln, and the present authors all belong to the same family tree. Such continuity has recently been disputed: there was no such thing as a ‘Jewish nation,’ we are told, before modern ideologues deviously dreamed it up. Well, we disagree. Not because we are nationalists. One purpose of this book is to reclaim our ancestry, but another is to explain what kind of ancestry, in our view, is worth the effort of reclaiming. We are not about stones, clans, or chromosomes. You don’t have to be an archeologist, an anthropologist, or a geneticist to trace and substantiate the Jewish continuum. You don’t have to be an observant Jew. You

don’t have to be a Jew. Or, for that matter, an anti-Semite. All you have to be is a reader. In his wonderful poem ‘The Jews,’ the late Israeli poet Yehuda Amichai wrote: The Jews are not a historical people And not even an archeological people, the Jews Are a geological people with rifts And collapses and strata and blazing lava. Their annals must be measured On the scale of a different measurement. A geological people: this unique metaphor may speak a deep truth about other nations, too. It need not be only about the Jews. But it resonates very powerfully for us when we reflect on Jewish continuity as primarily textual. The ‘historical,’ ethnic, genetic Jewish nationhood is a tale of rift and calamity. It is a landscape of geological disaster. Can we claim a biological pedigree dating, say, to Roman-era Galilean Jews? We doubt it. So much blood of both converts and enemies, of emblematic Khazars and Cossacks, might be flowing in our veins. On the other hand, geneticists today seem to tell us that some of our genes

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have been on the ride with us for a while. This is interesting. But totally beside our point. There is a lineage. Our annals can be gauged, our history told. But our ‘scale of a different measurement’ is made of words.[...] The Jewish model of intergenerational conversation merits close attention. Ancient Hebrew texts are continually engaged with two crucial pairings: parent and child, teacher and pupil. These pairs are arguably more important, even more important, than woman and man. The word dor, generation, appears dozens of times in both Bible and Talmud. Both opuses love recounting chains of generations, harking from the distant past and pointing to the distant future. A great deal is said about the chain’s most basic link, the Father and the Son. From Adam and Noah to the destruction of the Judean and Israelite kingdoms, the Bible zooms in and out on particular fathers and sons, most of whom belong to meticulously listed genealogies. This is by no means unique. Many cultures, probably all cultures, possess patrofilial paradigms at the roots of their collective memory, mythology, ethos, and art. There is a universal context to the numerous biblical dramas of fathers and sons. These are the perennial tales of love and hate, loyalty and betrayal, resemblance and dissimilarity, inheritance and disinheritance. Almost all societies have cherished the imperative of intergenerational storytelling. Almost all cultures have gloried in the passing of the torch from old to young. It has always been a primary duty of human memory—familial, tribal, and later national. But there is a Jewish twist to this universal imperative. ‘No ancient civilization,’ Mordecai Kaplan writes, ‘can offer a parallel comparable in intensity with Judaism’s insistence upon teaching the young and inculcating in them the traditions and customs of their people.’ Is such a generalization fair to other ancient civilizations? We do not pretend to know or judge. But we do know that Jewish boys, by no means only the rich and privileged ones, were put in touch with the written word at a staggeringly young age. Here is one astounding constant of Jewish history since (at least) Mishnaic times: every boy was expected to go to school from the age of three to the age of thirteen. This duty was imposed on male children and their parents, administered and often subsidized by the community. At school, often a tiny one-room, one-teacher, multiage affair, the boys studied Hebrew—not their mother tongue, and not a living language even in Talmudic times—at a level sufficient for both reading and writing.

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36 SPOKEN WORD


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This ten-year study was unconditional, independent of class, pedigree, and means. Some boys surely dropped out prior to becoming a Bar Mitzvah, but few remained illiterate. The secret was to teach them a great deal in their earliest years, and wisely pamper them with sweets to munch with their first alphabet. Where other cultures left boys in their mothers’ care till they were old enough to pull a plough or wave a sword, Jews started acculturating their youngsters to the ancient narrative as soon as the tots could understand words, at two years old, and read them, often at the ripe age of three. Schooling, in short, began soon after weaning. The Jewish twist also pertained to the vessel in which the ancient narrative was served up to the scions. Early in our history we began to depend on written texts. On books. The great story and its built-in imperatives passed from generation to generation on tablets, papyri, parchments, and paper.

January—March 2013

JEWISH BOYS WERE PUT IN TOUCH WITH THE WRITTEN WORD AT A STAGGERINGLY

SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Today, as we write this book, the historian among us checks all our references on her iPad, and she cannot resist the sweet reflection that Jewish textuality, indeed all textuality, has come full circle. From tablet to tablet, from scroll to scroll. This brings us to our second twain, the teacher and student. All bookish cultures are bound to generate them. Who were our first Teacher and Pupil? Jewish tradition positions Moses as the teacher of all teachers; but neither Aaron nor Joshua, later tagged as Moses’s students, behaves like a student. Nor do they become great teachers. We therefore pinpoint the earliest teacher-student couplet with Eli the priest and his pupil Samuel the prophet. Note that Eli’s two biological sons turned evil, whereas his spiritual son did exceedingly well. Therein lies a poignant truth: children can become a great disappointment, but a good pupil will seldom let you down. This is an extract from Jews and Words, which will be published by Yale University Press in November 2012

Jewish Book Week: Fania Oz-Salzberger 26 February. See Listings p66 for details

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38 CONTEMPORARY

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January—March 2013

THE STRANGER THE BETTER 10 JANUARY Teitur

with special guests The Singing Adams + Abi Wade

11 JANUARY Gravenhurst

with the Ralfe Band

12 JANUARY Meursault

Impresario Howard Monk presents a host of intriguing bands in his mini-festival at Kings Place, from Teitur, and Gravenhurst to Meursault. What’s the link? High quality, existential songwriting, he tells Kate Mossman.

You need only to have been within sniffing distance of the Green Man Festival to see that folk music, for a whole generation, is not a rosy-cheeked exercise in British heritage and fol-di-rol but a young man in a plaid shirt getting to grips with a loops pedal. And that ‘psych’ has nothing to do with LSD, Haight-Ashbury or the Chocolate Watch Band any more – and a lot to do with people whose parents had Bert Jansch records in the house, and whose school friends were listening to The Smiths. The lingering, bucolic fantasies of the Sixties

have been absorbed into the lo-fi, do-ityourself aesthetic of indie music, giving rise to the sort of magical, ghostly records that sound like they’d disappear into dust if you opened the curtains – like David Thomas Broughton’s experimental meditation Outbreeding, or last year’s Seasons On Earth from New Jersey’s Meg Baird. As it becomes harder to make money from the record industry, and bedroom technology becomes easier to navigate, there’s a growing subset of these mysterious, Stig-ofthe-dump folk musicians with their plaintive

NOTES & LETTERS ILLUSTRATION © HARDIE / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM

with Sons of Noel and Adrian + Woodpecker Wooliams


TGRAVENHURST © LUCY JOHNSTON | HOWARD MONK © BENJAMIN HARTE | TEITUR, MEURSAULT © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

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voices, laptops and twelve-string guitars – and a cult following from Dalston to Williamsburg. Promoter Howard Monk, whose three-day festival comes to Kings Place in January has named it The Stranger the Better: ‘It’s really a celebration of excellence in songwriting,’ he says proudly, of a line-up that includes Bristol doom-folk outfit Gravenhurst, the uncharacterisable Ralfe Band, a cult mainstay, the Scottish group Meursault, and Brighton’s strange and delicate Woodpecker Wooliams (a lady). ‘British pastoral excellence – and musical innovation,’ he continues. He’s also invited the well-connected Faroese troubadour Teitur, who’ll appear with a string quartet and special guests Singing Adams and cellist Abi Wade. Gravenhurst (aka songwriter Nick Talbot), who brings his new album The Ghost In Daylight to Kings Place, has been at the front of this ‘new psych’ scene since the late 1990s. Johnny Marr inspired him to pick up the guitar; Richard Thompson showed him you didn’t have to use a finger pick – but poet and ‘psycho-geographer’ Iain Sinclair may have had the strongest influence on his lyrics, which connect the ancient and modern through abstract refractions of location, memory and internal human conflict. ‘The sun is sinking palebluesaltwaterbreathing / It hits me again’, he writes in ‘The Diver’. In ‘Fitzrovia’ (about the anti-fascist riots of 1936) it’s ‘riot scenes on Cable Street / government boots on civilian dreams / a lost event consigned to history’. Talbot has a singularly English perspective; his sound may be fairly modern – reverb, synths, Pentangle harmonies – but his connection to history lies in his natural pose at one remove from modern life, surveying time and event with a poet’s eye. Gravenhurst itself is not just Talbot’s band (which lately includes Geordie singer Rachel Lancaster) but a fantasy concept – an entire imaginary village he has created as a repository for all his lyrical ideas, from snatches of old murder ballads to the mundane, modern chill of lines like ‘cigarette burns and the tide line / of last night’s cries of despair’ (‘The Prize’). ‘I like the idea of listening to Gravenhurst as being to some degree an active rather than passive experience,’ Talbot says. ‘The songs offer clues and form maps to a place that is partly given, and partly open to the listener to construct as they wish.’ Meursault (named after the character in Camus’s novel L’Etranger) have coined the phrase ‘epic lo-fi’ to describe their music, though others have coined the term ‘folktronica’. There are seven of them, led by Neil Pennycook, and they often perform with a string quartet too; among their number is multi-

January—March 2013

CONTEMPORARY THE STRANGER THE BETTER

Gravenhurst

Howard Monk

THERE’S A GROWING SUBSET OF THESE MYSTERIOUS, STIG-OF-THE-DUMP FOLK

instrumentalist Rob St John, whose stunning solo debut Weald (2011) was another exercise in reading the landscape, with Lancashire moors, Yorkshire waterfalls and mysterious islands all explored in his lush baritone. ‘Meursault are unapologetic when talking about their “art” and their “craft”,’ says Howard Monk, ‘and yet they’re completely

Meursault

unpretentious too – this is essentially alternative rock sung in a Scottish accent.’ The band’s albums have amusing titles like Something For The Weakened and Pissing On Bonfires / Kissing With Tongues, and their ominous chord progressions are softened by warm, double-tracked vocals not a million miles from King Creosote. Many of these musicians are part of the same extended new-folk family, after all – Monk once ran a well-known club-night in Crouch End where Creosote, Tunng, Bonnie Prince Billy and others rubbed shoulders, and many interesting collaborations were born. He hopes there’ll be some at Kings Place too. Looking back, Monk observes, he came to psych folk in a roundabout way: ‘I used to be the drummer in a post-rock band. But people kept telling me to turn it down…’ The Stranger, The Better: New Existential Songwriting 10–12 January See Listings pp51–52 for details

39


40 CLASSICAL

January—March 2013

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BRITTEN AT 100: PIANIST, COLLABORATOR, ARTISTIC CRUCIBLE 7 FEBRUARY Songs With and Without Words 8 FEBRUARY The Pity of War

SUFFOLK LODESTAR Two young pianists, John Reid and Andrew MatthewsOwen, discuss their Britten tribute with Helen Wallace, focusing on his role as an artistic catalyst.

Benjamin Britten rehearsing with Peter Pears, 1 December 1946, Photo by George Rodgers, Time Life Pictures

NOTES & LETTERS ILLUSTRATION © HARDIE / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM

9 FEBRUARY Metamorphoses


BENJAMIN BRITTEN & PETER PEARS © GETTY IMAGES | JOHN REID © BENJAMIN HARTE | ANDREW MATTHEWS-OWEN © NICHOLAS DAWKES

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January—March 2013

‘It’s exhausting even to read Britten’s biography – he was just so unbelievably productive, composing, performing, organising,’ says pianist John Reid who, with fellow pianist Andrew Matthews-Owen, curates a three-concert series centred around Britten as a collaborating musician, a catalyst for bringing talents together. ‘In his music he sets the scene in a single chord, the economy, the precision of his writing, ambiguous yet clear, derives from an incredibly well-ordered brain.’ These two enterprising young pianists identify closely with Britten the performer and programmer: both work as soloists, recitalists with singers, and as chamber musicians, while Reid is resident pianist for Aurora Orchestra and Matthews-Owen is also Artistic Director of the Louise Blouin Concert Series. Both are familiar with the burdens of responsibility that fall to collaborating pianists: ‘Like Britten, we work with singers who are often away touring while we are sorting out the music, getting the song translations, making practical arrangements,’ explains Matthews-Owen. ‘Because of the solitary nature of our existence we were particularly keen to collaborate: it’s rare for pianists to work together like this and to bring different colleagues on to the stage. The early Aldeburgh Festival must have been like that, with Britten introducing his most respected friends to each other, and producing something of extraordinary musical richness.’ Each of their three concerts will take up a Brittenesque theme, with works by the composer interleaved with others by living composers inspired by him, by his own contemporaries and by composers he himself loved to perform. In Songs With and Without Words cellist Oliver Coates will present Britten’s poignant Ciaccona from the Second Cello Suite

John Reid

Andrew Matthews-Owen

BECAUSE OF THE SOLITARY NATURE OF OUR EXISTENCE, WE WERE PARTICULARLY KEEN TO COLLABORATE

and the elegiac Tema ‘Sacher’ alongside piano works by Fauré and Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin, in a version with piano interludes specially composed by Martin Suckling. John Reid, who will accompany tenor Nicholas Mulroy, takes up the story: ‘It was one of those 3 o’clock in the morning ideas that worked out! I was wondering what would happen if you expanded the narrative of the cycle. Martin’s written one piece at the beginning, and two at its turning point. The big possessive song ‘Mein!’ erupts into Martin’s ‘Toccata’. Then there’s the song ‘Pause’, which morphs into a reflective, but rather desperate rhapsody that acts to fill the suggested time passing.’ Pianist Christine Croshaw, with whom Reid and Matthews-Owen have studied, will be performing Fauré, a composer whose music Britten regularly played for sheer pleasure at home: ʻChristine plays this wonderfully ambiguous music better than anyone,ʼ says Matthews-Owen. ʻShe lost her sight some years ago, and has had to learn it left hand, right hand, slowly and by heart: I actually think itʼs the only way, as you need to absorb this music into your muscles. Itʼs so sophisticated, elusive and spectral. Fauré complained, “Why do people play my music with only half their energy?” and thatʼs important: you have to put everything into it, with no inhibitions.ʼ Their second event, The Pity of War, contrasts Britten with a composer who shared many of his beliefs, Michael Tippett. Reid finds the contrast fascinating: ‘In many ways he and Britten were Yin and Yang. Where Britten composed with consummate ease, you can feel Tippett wrestling with the process, but he so often produces this special ebullience and joy. Even in a work like The Heart’s Assurance, in which he’s dealing with violence and death, there’s a powerful redemptive quality.’ Tenors Nicky Spence and Nicholas Mulroy will also perform Britten’s spare Canticle III Still Falls the Rain and Finzi’s Farewell to Arms. For the final concert, folk-song settings of Hoddinott and fellow Welsh composer Grace

CLASSICAL BRITTEN

Williams will be interleaved with Britten’s own. Andrew Matthews-Owen is keen that this three-way relationship is highlighted: ‘Grace took Britten under her wing when he was at the Royal College of Music, and remained an affectionate friend. I worked closely with Alun and I remember him telling me that even when he was an established composer, he would receive postcards from Grace after a broadcast of one of his pieces with “a few suggestions”. It was the same for Britten; she managed to make them both feel like schoolboys! We don’t hear nearly enough of her music: her settings are complex, more like Lieder than folksongs. We’ll include a beautiful one called The Loom.’ Also in this evening Claire Booth will premiere both Simon Holt’s The Wasp Queen, and a new scoring of Jonathan Dove’s Seven Angels alongside Britten’s Metamorphosen for solo oboe. Resonant pictures by Britten’s great friend and collaborator John Piper will be projected above the stage at each event and biographer Frances Spalding will be discussing the relationships between Britten and John and Myfanwy Piper, librettist for The Turn of the Screw, Death in Venice and Owen Wingrave. What would the composer have made of their tribute? ‘Britten’s music divides me unlike any other,’ says Reid. ‘His great skill lay in controlling atmosphere, but the power of his work lies in its profound, dark ambiguity.’ Andrew Matthews-Owen takes up the theme: ‘It’s strange, but people are still a little scared of Britten… think he’d enjoy the fact that his music still has the ability to shock and unsettle us today.’

Britten at 100: Pianist, Collaborator and Artistic Crucible 7–9 February See Listings pp58–59 for details

John Piper, Death in Venice II, 1973

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42 SPOKEN WORD

January—March 2013

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Sport and Jews don’t mix. Or do they? Anthony Clavane finds that British Jews have had an important – and largely unrecognised – part to play in the development of the Beautiful Game in this country. country

In the film Airplane, a stewardess asks a passenger if he’d like something to read. ‘Do you have anything light?’ he says. She brings him a leaflet entitled Famous Jewish Sports Legends. My new book Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here? examines the stereotype that Jews don’t do sport; that we are a cerebral rather than a physical culture. Our greatest Anglo-Jewish novelist, Howard Jacobson, perpetuated that myth in Coming From Behind. ‘In the highly improbable event of his being asked to nominate the one most un-Jewish thing he could think of,’ he wrote, ‘Sefton Goldberg would have been hard pressed to decide between Nature and football.

But he would almost certainly have come down finally on the side of football. The game was not Jewish.’ But we Jews have bodies as well as minds. True, the first generation of immigrants, refugees from Tsarist Russia, had very little to do with football for both cultural and religious reasons. But by the 1920s, watching the game had, for large numbers, become part of the Saturday ritual – after first going to the synagogue of course. And there were already many top players emerging. Louis Bookman starred for West Bromwich Albion. An East End boy called Harry Morris (pictured, left) banged in the goals for Swindon, becoming the club’s all-time leading goalscorer with 229 goals. Leeds United’s Leslie Goldberg would have been the first Jew to play for England had the Second World War not intervened. Spurs had a succession of Yiddisher stars – like Harry Gilberg, David Levene, Bert Goodman and Micky Dulin. Then, after the war came Mark Lazarus, who is still considered a club legend at Queens Park Rangers, David Pleat, who went on to manage Spurs and Barry Silkman, who is now an agent. Harry Zussman’s involvement at Leyton Orient led to the club’s only ever promotion to the top flight and the 1992 ‘revolution’ – the

Louis Bookman was the first Jew to play in England’s First Division


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creation of the Premier League – would not have been possible without the likes of David Dein and Irving Scholar. And yet the Jewish contribution to English football’s transformation from a working-class pursuit played in crumbling arenas to a global entertainment industry has not, until now, been properly acknowledged. As classic outsiders, the footballing pioneers in my book all share one trait: they all overcame prejudice to become the very model of thoroughly anglicised Jews. So anglicised in fact that their role has often been a hidden one. Hence the subtitle: ‘The story of English football’s forgotten tribe’. Writing about a hidden history, by definition, presents problems in terms of sources. One of the reasons Jews have been invisible in football is a reluctance to discuss ethnic identity. The interesting thing is that the groundbreaking research into this area has been pursued by two Gentile academics:

LONDON JAZZ WORKSHOP & MUSIC FESTIVAL

28 March – 1 April 2013

ILLUSTRATION © FROM A NEWSPAPER IN THE COLLECTION OF JOYCE LEVY

IT’S ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO BE JEWISH AND MALE AND NOT INTERESTED IN FOOTBALL Professor Tony Collins’ brilliant essay on antisemitism and sport paved the way and the historian David Dee, who will be also be speaking at Jewish Book Week, has written a fine new book, Sport and British Jewry. Dee argues that sport ‘acted as a powerful force in the erosion and re-construction of Jewish ethnicity’. In Britain today, as David Baddiel has observed, ‘it is virtually impossible to be Jewish and male and not interested in football’. And yet some people would rather keep schtum about their passion. There is always the risk of supplying ammunition to conspiracy theorists, especially those on the far right who continue to fantasise about the existence of a ‘kosher nostra’. But cultural history is far too important to be left to the anti-semites. My book shows how an immigrant community has integrated into Britain – and how its desire to belong has driven its involvement in the Beautiful Game. Jewish Book Week: Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here? 3 March See Listings p67 for details

featuring: Bobby Watson Bruce Barth Claire Martin Perico Sambeat any many more


44 ART

FATHER AND SON

Adam Birtwistle’s debut show at Kings Place Gallery will be marked by a concert of music by his father, Sir Harrison Birtwistle. Here they tell Fiona Maddocks about their own and each other’s art. The artist Adam Birtwistle (b. 1959), born in the UK but resident in France, is best known for a body of portraits which are at once stark and playful, idiosyncratic and immediately recognisable. Six are on public display at Glyndebourne, East Sussex, well known to diners in the Mildmay restaurant, and two are owned by the National Portrait Gallery – of Elvis Costello and of Birtwistle’s father, the composer Sir Harrison Birtwistle (b. 1934). The eldest of three brothers, Adam grew up surrounded – as he explains here – by musicians, rather than music, which ignited his interest in portraiture. His debut exhibition at Kings Place will coincide with a concert of music by Sir Harrison Birtwistle performed by the London Sinfonietta.

Adam Birtwistle

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January—March 2013

ADAM BIRTWISTLE ‘Most of the works in the show will be portraits, whether from life or from my head. Some will be of animals – I’ve just been doing some cats – but not so they look soppy. For a long time now I’ve been developing my own version of the kind of Old Master portrait you see of wigged man or woman against a dark background. Usually in mine there is more background than person. Sometimes I add in objects, especially on their head. When I painted my father, I put a ship on his head. Why? I don’t know why. I’m always flipping through a huge book I’ve got full of images. I especially like old toys, and the kind of objects you find in Sears Roebuck mail order catalogues from the 1920s. I’ve just done a diptych of two very very fat girls in red dresses, each with a cat on their head… They’ll be in the Kings Place exhibition. I’ve also been writing tiny poems and illustrating them. I hope there’ll be a few of those too. The way I work depends on who I’m painting and how long they give me. I once did a portrait of [the composer] Luciano Berio. He said “I’ll give you five minutes”! Usually it’s more like two hours or half a day. When I did Michael Tippett I spent the weekend at his house. So basically I work with what I’ve got – and that may mean doing loads of sketches and taking photos too which I take back and work on in the big barn in Normandy which is my home as well as my studio. I work with tempura on paper. I love the sheen you can get according to how much gum Arabic you use. It’s almost like oil but you can see all the layers, like real skin. In some ways it’s harder to work with than oil because it dries so much quicker, but it’s the medium I like best. As a child I always wanted to draw and paint. My father encouraged me. We are close but he’s quite elusive. Although he is a composer there wasn’t any music round the house except a tiny radio in the kitchen. I remember buying a record player when I was about 14 and annoying my father by playing pop music when he was trying to work… My mother didn’t say much one way or the other about my art but they both let me do what I wanted, were always behind me and never obstructed me. Even when I failed all my ‘O’ and ‘A’ levels I still managed to get into art school – you could in those days, around 1980, if you showed you really wanted to do it. At Chelsea I did sculpture mainly and then thought “what do I now?” By then my parents were living in France so I went there and began painting Harry. I was lucky that a lot of their friends who came to stay were people I could paint, so I began to earn a living: Pierre Boulez, Alfred Brendel, Morton Feldman, Hans Werner Henze. That’s where it all really started.’ Adam Birtwistle: Paintings  9 January – 3 March Kings Place Gallery; See Art Listings p76 for details


January—March 2013

ART BIRTWISTLE

45

I REMEMBER BUYING A RECORD PLAYER WHEN I WAS 14 AND ANNOYING MY FATHER BY PLAYING POP MUSIC

PIA188906 Sir Harrison Birtwistle (b.1934) 1993 (tempera & gouache on paper) by Birtwistle, Adam (b.1959); 76.2x50.8 cm; National Portrait Gallery, London, UK; Photo © Piano Nobile Fine Paintings, London; British, in copyright PLEASE NOTE: This image is protected by the artist’s copyright which needs to be cleared by you. If you require assistance in clearing permission we will be pleased to help you.

ADAM BIRTWISTLE © MATTHIAS PARILLAUD | PAINTING: ADAM BIRTWISTLE/PIANO NOBILE FINE PAINTINGS; LONDON/BRIDGEMAN

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ART BIRTWISTLE

HARRISON BIRTWISTLE I can’t immediately think of any other situation quite like ours, where the father is a composer, the son a painter, though they must exist. This overlapping of our worlds – Adam’s show and my concert – is a first for us, and it’s touching. As the parent, even when the child is well into adulthood, you continue to feel anxious – will it be all right, will he choose the right pictures, that kind of thing. You take those worries about your children forward all your life.

We’re very much opposites in the way we work. Ever since he was a young boy Adam has always had amazing flair and intuition as a painter. I don’t see myself, or my work, in that way at all. I think I’m more of a traditionalist, and perhaps more insecure. For instance we are both cooks. Adam cooks and I cook. But I doubt he’s ever read a recipe in his life… Even as a child he was very self-willed and independent. He didn’t need

THERE’S ALWAYS BEEN AN UNRESOLVED PAINTER IN ME, SOMETHING I’VE NEVER FULFILLED

ADAM BIRTWISTLE (b.1959) Victoria, 2012

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January—March 2013

any encouragement. He knew what he wanted to do. It was never like that in my case… There’s always been an unresolved painter in me, something I’ve never fulfilled. I think I’m sensitive, visually, and make many allusions to pictures. In some ways painters have an easier job. If a painter makes a mark, it’s immediately realised – it’s there for you to see. If I make a mark like a tadpole, it needs an instrument, a player, a listener to realise it. It exists only in time and memory, whereas painting is immediate, and in that sense permanent. The music in the concert isn’t connected with Adam’s work in any way. The Axe Manual, for piano and percussion, is a virtuoso piece for two players. Nicholas

Hodges is the pianist. I’ve just written him a new piece, Gigue Machine, and I’m working on another a sarabande, called In the Nick of Time, which is a pun on his name… The Orpheus Elegies, for voice, harp and oboe, relate to a set of Rilke poems but they’re meditations on them, rather than settings, using only fragments of text. The oboe, not the singer, is the figure of Orpheus. Each piece is like a miniature postcard. I suppose, very distantly, you might see an echo in the tiny, surreal cautionary tales Adam has written and illustrated all his life. Maybe…

Harrison Birtwistle 9 January See Listings p50 for details

HARRISON BIRTWISTLE © HANYA CHLALA, ARENA PAL | PAINTINGS: ADAM BIRTWISTLE/PIANO NOBILE FINE PAINTINGS; LONDON/BRIDGEMAN

46


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JANUARY–MARCH 2012

STARTING JANUARY 2012, PERFORMERS INCLUDE:

three men go wild in albion Contemporary

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biosphere, deaf Center Cage rattling with the wire

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brahms Unwrapped elgar Up Close nights with the brodsky

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Brahms Unwrapped Sibelius: Inner Voices Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo Music for a Monarch

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evan, robin blaze, allan Clayton, iestyn avies, rosemary Joshua, Carolyn Sampson, ndrew tortise, elin manahan thomas, Sally ruce-Payne, James oxley, Jimmy holliday, atya apekisheva, avi avital, alasdair beatson, ne Katrine bryndorf, terence Charlston, hristoph denoth, Kenneth hamilton, Pekka uusisto, robert d. levin, Charles owen, aniel-ben Pienaar, rachel Podger, Christoph chter, maxim rysanov, ivor Setterfield, ffrey Siegel, dmitry Sitkovetsky, miki Skuta, shley Solomon, Penelope Spencer, marcin wiatkiewicz, wolfgang Zerer, Family Concerts, udy days, and more

BRODSKY’S SHOSTAKOVICH | SIBELIUS: INNER VOICES | SONGLINES

xteen, Swingle Singers, apollo’s Fire, Chris arrick Quartet, Florilegium, Fretwork, gwilym

mcock Quartet, Keller Quartet, onyx brass, LE espectable groove, wallfisch band, Sophie

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Brahms Unwrapped Dante Quartet: Britten New Zealand in London

BRAHMS SILHOUTTE BY OTTO BOEHLER © THE TULLY POTTER COLLECTION

APRIL–JUNE 2012

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN Y 2012 GOULD PIANO TRIO AND MANY MORE... ORION QUARTET RTIN SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE A PHILIP DUKES WITH THE COMPLETE music+art+restaurants OV KATYA APEKISHEVA SHOSTAKOVICH CYCLE urora orchestra, academy of ancient music, CHARLES cademy of St martin in the Fields, london OWEN nfonietta, orchestra of St John’s, orchestra of WHAT’S ON SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2012 Contemporary e age of enlightenment, oxford MIKHAIL Philomusica, RUDY Francesco Tristano oyal academy of music baroque orchestra, hoir of King’s College, Cambridge,IVO new College VARBANOV Percussions Claviers de Lyon TETla nuova musica, Platinum Consort, hoir, the

CLAUDIA AURORA – LIFEM | NOTES & LETTERS | SONGBOOKS

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN music+art+restaurants IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA Spoken Word & Letters: WITH MAXIM RYSANOV WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2012Notes Will Self THE SIXTEEN Jonathan Coe CONCERTS Philip Ball NATALIE CLEIN AT Marina Warner KINGS GOULD PIANO TRIO BANQUET OF BOOKS Classical PLACE ORION QUARTET DURING The Sixteen SIMON SCHAMA AT SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE Cooper 2012 JEWISH BOOK WEEK Imogen music+art+restaurants Mozart Unwrapped PHILIP DUKES KATYA APEKISHEVA Jazz Spoken Word N1 9AG | Box Office: 020 7520Robert 90 York Way, London 1490 CHARLES OWEN Glasper WHAT’S ON APRIL–JUNE 2012 Jewish Book Week: Classic Songbooks: MIKHAIL RUDY Henry Goodman on Ulysses Joni Mitchell, Umberto Eco IVO VARBANOV Bob Dylan and more

London Sinfonietta with Matthew Bourne / Nils Økland

Folk Fiddles on Fire Arctic Circle Emily Barker

Jazz Orphy Robinson Dennis Rollins

World Darbar Songlines Encounters

The Labèque sisters LIFEM: Mari Boine

Contemporary

A Cappella Festival Manu Delago

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Jay Phelps, Soweto Kinch and Alex Wilson

Comedy

Tim Minchin Lady Garden

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Girls in Airports Dave Stapleton

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The Epstein

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duotone maia

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marcus roberts 1982 trio

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LISTINGS 49 57 67 76 77 78

January February march ART LISTINGS ARTISTIC HIRES CALENDAR

In the following pages, you will find details of our fantastic Spring 2013 Season. From classical, jazz, folk and world music concerts to spoken word and comedy nights, with so many events to choose from and tickets going very quickly, book early to secure your seats!

BOOK NOW ONLINE SAVERS £9.50 www.kingsplace.co.uk Box Office: 020 7520 1490 Cellist Abi Wade (left) will be one of the special guests at Teitur’s performance on 10 January. See ‘The Stranger, The Better’  pp 38–39 and pp 51–52 Photo: Abi Wade © Kenny McCraken


THIS WEEK’s FOCUS NEW YEAR CONCERTS AND BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 1

Sunday 30 December NEW YEAR AT KINGS PLACE BACH UNWRAPPED

Florilegium: Christmas & New Year Cantatas

30 DECEMBER – 4 JANUARY

LISTINGS 49

January 2013

JS Bach Cantata for the third day of Christmas: ‘Süsser Trost, mein Jesus kömmt’, BWV 151 Concerto in A for oboe d’amore and strings, BWV 1055 Partita in A minor for solo flute, BWV 1013 Cantata for New Year’s Day: ‘Gott, wie dein Name, so ist auch dein Ruhm’, BWV 171 Florilegium Ashley Solomon flute (director) Alexandra Bellamy oboe d’amore Elin Manahan Thomas soprano Sally Bruce-Payne mezzo-soprano James Oxley tenor Jimmy Holliday bass

by distinguished alto Michael Chance, and the expressive early Weimar cantata BWV 12, with its keen, lamenting quality. Elizabeth Wallfisch will bring her virtuosic verve to the Concerto in C for three violins, reconstructed from the Concerto for three harpsichords (BWV 1064). ‘Elizabeth Wallfisch’s playing is intelligent, stylish and expressive … consistently enthralling.’ Chicago Classical Review Hall One 6pm £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 Online Savers £9.50 Wallfisch Band

CLASSICAL Leading early music ensemble Florilegium open our Bach Unwrapped year with an appropriately seasonal programme. Soprano Elin Manahan Thomas will sing the glorious opening aria of Cantata, BWV 151 for the third day of Christmas, with its melting accompaniment of flutes, violins and oboe d’amore, the instrument featured in the lovely Concerto in A, while Ashley Solomon will not only direct the blazing New Year’s Day Cantata, BWV 171, but also perform the delightful Partita for solo flute. Hall One 3pm £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 Online Savers £9.50

Monday 31 December

FLORILEGIUM © AMIT LENNON | WALLFISCH BAND © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | ABI WADE © KENNY MCCRAKEN

Florilegium

NEW YEAR AT KINGS PLACE BACH UNWRAPPED

Wallfisch Band: Cantatas 170 & 12

Florilegium launch Bach Unwrapped, KINGS PLACE’s exciting new series FOR 2013 Bach Unwrapped, our most ambitious composer series yet, launches this week with a delightful programme from Florilegium and continues with the vibrant Wallfisch Band, La Nuova Musica, cellist Christoph Richter and the Gwilym Simcock Quartet, who’ll be giving an imaginative twist to Bach’s D minor Concerto, BWV 1052 with the OSJ. See Bach Unwrapped feature pp28–32

JS Bach Overture No. 6 in G minor, BWV 1070 Cantata: ‘Vergnügte Ruh’, beliebte Seelenlust’, BWV 170 Cantata: ‘Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen’, BWV 12 Concerto in C for three violins, strings & continuo Anna Fraser soprano Michael Chance alto Stuart Jackson tenor Sanford Sylvan baritone Wallfisch Band CLASSICAL Join the youthful Wallfisch Band for a most civilised New Year’s Eve, featuring the exquisite solo cantata BWV 170, to be sung

January Tuesday 1 January NEW YEAR AT KINGS PLACE BACH UNWRAPPED

Wallfisch Band: Cantatas 22 & 131 JS Bach Cantata: ‘Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe’, BWV 22 Overture in A minor, BWV 1067a (arr. for strings) Cantata: ‘Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir’, BWV 131 Anna Fraser soprano Michael Chance alto Stuart Jackson tenor Sanford Sylvan baritone Wallfisch Band CLASSICAL In this dazzling concert for New Year’s Day, the Wallfisch Band is joined by a quartet of distinguished singers for two substantial cantatas. ‘Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe’ was Bach’s trial piece when he applied for the post of Thomaskantor in Leipzig and is full of original invention, including a famously serene final chorale over flowing instruments and walking bass. Tenor Stuart Jackson and baritone Sanford Sylvan feature in Bach’s expansive Cantata, BWV 131, full of dramatic block chords and aching suspensions, written at the request of a pastor in Mühlhausen. Hall One 1pm £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

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50 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January 2013

Wednesday 2 January

Thursday 3 January

Wednesday 9 January

BACH UNWRAPPED

BACH UNWRAPPED

sir HARRISON BIRTWISTLE

Jazz Bach! OSJ with the Gwilym Simcock Quartet

La Nuova Musica with Robin Blaze: Cantata 169 & Psalm 51

Birtwistles in Residence

OSJ Voices Gwilym Simcock Quartet Orchestra of St John’s John Lubbock conductor CLASSICAL jazz The Orchestra of St John’s and jazz stars from the Gwilym Simcock Quartet bring a whole new approach to Bach in this lively event combining ‘straight’ movements from famous concerti with jazz improvisations. Says conductor Lubbock, ‘As a member of the Swingle Singers in the 1970s I remember how wonderfully Bach’s music could be embraced by the jazz world and with Gwilym Simcock and his colleagues we have the perfect collaborators.’ Gwilym will be playing the Harpsichord Concerto in D minor, BWV 1052, followed by improvisations, while the OSJ Voices will sing some chorales with saxophone obbligati. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50 Gwilym Simcock

Cantata: ‘Gott soll allein mein Herze haben’, BWV 169 Overture to Orchestral Suite No. 1 in C, BWV 1066 Concerto in C minor for violin and oboe, BWV 1060 Psalm 51: ‘Tilge, Höchster, meine Sünden’, BWV 1083

Robin Blaze Philippe Graffin

Nicolas Hodges piano Christian Dierstein percussion Andrew Watts countertenor Melinda Maxwell oboe Helen Tunstall harp

Robin Blaze countertenor Helen-Jane Howells soprano La Nuova Musica David Bates director CLASSICAL Rising stars David Bates and La Nuova Musica, described by The Times as ‘as lively a collection of instrumentalists and singers as the world offers’, are delighted to be joined by countertenor Robin Blaze for this concert featuring choral and vocal masterpieces alongside some of Bach’s most ebullient instrumental music. Like Handel, Bach borrowed and recycled, often with surprising results. ‘Tilge, Höchster’ will be more familiar to listeners as Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater, while movements from ‘Gott soll allein’ recall Bach’s own instrumental concerti and the St Matthew Passion.

CLASSICAL

is contrasted with the poignant Sonata in G minor before the concert culminates in the most ambitious suite of all, the radiant D major, written for a five-string cello, which achieves organ-like scale and resonance. Richter will return to complete the set in April and December 2013. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

£14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

LCMS New Year Concert Beethoven String Trio in G, Op. 9 No. 1 Britten Phantasy Quartet in F minor for oboe and string trio, Op. 2 Brahms Piano Quartet No. 2 in A, Op. 26

Christoph Richter cello Alasdair Beatson piano CLASSICAL

Christoph Richter

Performance – Hall One 8pm Post-performance interview 9.15pm

BACH UNWRAPPED

Suite No. 1 in G for solo cello, BWV 1007 Sonata in G minor for cello and piano (originally for viola da gamba and harpsichord, BWV 1029) Suite No. 6 in D for solo cello, BWV 1012

The first of three recitals this year given by celebrated cellist Christoph Richter with pianist Alasdair Beatson, taking in the Solo Suites for cello and the Sonatas for cello and keyboard. In this programme, Richter will play the magnificent First Suite for cello in G major with its famously flowing Prelude and piquant dances. This

On the day painter Adam Birtwistle’s debut show opens at Kings Place Gallery, we host a special concert featuring the music of his father, Sir Harrison Birtwistle. The programme is based around two main works – the Orpheus Elegies for voice, oboe and harp to a text by Rilke which were first performed complete at the Lucerne Festival in 2004, and The Axe Manual for piano and percussion, described in Gramophone as ‘an exuberant, and, in its central stages, delicate essay in “extending” piano sound by means of metal and wood percussion’. Sir Harrison Birtwistle will be in conversation during a post-concert interview.

Sunday 6 January

Friday 4 January

Christoph Richter: The Cello Suites and Sonatas – 1

with Sir Harrison Birtwistle in conversation during a post-concert interview Saraband: The King’s Farewell for piano 26 Orpheus Elegies (2003–04) for voice, oboe & harp Ostinato with Melody (2000) for piano Gigue machine (2011) for piano The Axe Manual (2000) for piano and percussion

Philippe Graffin violin Roger Chase viola Amy Norrington cello TBC oboe Alasdair Beatson piano CLASSICAL An invigorating musical start to 2013, with one of Beethoven’s marvellous Op. 9 string trios (every bit as exciting and audacious as his first set of quartets), the beautiful A major Brahms Quartet for piano and strings, and the first of our centenary celebrations of Britten’s birth – his youthful Oboe Quartet, dating from the early 1930s. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sir Harrison Birtwistle Nicolas Hodges


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LISTINGS 51 LISTINGS

January 2013

THIS WEEK’S FOCUS THE STRANGER, THE BETTER

GWILYM SIMCOCK © MARY DUNKIN | ROBIN BLAZE © DOROTHEA HEISE | PHILIPPE GRAFFIN © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | SIR HARRISON BIRTWISTLE © HANYA CHLALA/ARENA PAL | NICOLAS HODGES © MARCO BORGGREVE | GRAVENHURST © LUCY JOHNSTON | TEITUR, IAN D MONTFORD © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

10 – 12 JANUARY

Teitur

THURSDAY 10 JANUARY THE STRANGER, THE BETTER

Teitur with special guests Singing Adams + Abi Wade CONTEMPORARY

Nicholas Daniel

Gravenhurst

London live-music promoters The Local present an intriguing line-up of bands in a three-day mini-festival of modern-day existential songwriting. The opening night features idiosyncratic Faroese singer-songwriter Teitur who has toured with artists such as Suzanne Vega, Aimee Mann and John Mayer, and whose songs are known for their classical simplicity and beauty. Tonight he plays with a string quartet and some very special guests. Singing Adams frontman Steven Adams (ex Broken Family Band) is a sardonic master-craftsman of the song, self-effacing, witty and incredibly subtle. Stunningly inventive cellist/percussionist Abi Wade has been compared to Joanna Newsom and Regina Spektor. Hall One 7.30pm

THE BEST IN CONTEMPORARY SONG-WRITING FROM TEITUR AND GRAVENHURST TO MEURSAULT Expect the unexpected in this exciting three-day minifestival of modern-day existential song-writing. The Local presents a host of intriguing bands, from the understated art of Gravenhurst’s Nick Talbot (above) to the haunting folktronica of Meursault, the unclassifiable Faroese troubador Teitur to cult British mainstay the Ralfe Band. See Feature on The Stranger, The Better pp38–39

£12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Ian D Montfort: Unbelievable COMEDY Ian D Montfort BSc (pseudo) will not only have jaw-dropping messages from beyond the grave but will use pseudoscientific methods to prove ESP, homeopathy and past-life regression aren’t rubbish. ‘Funny and baffling’ The Scotsman ‘An astonishing finale that leaves the audience shaking their heads in disbelief. Montfort has certainly got the tricks ... an absolute treat’ ***** Metro

Ian D Montford

‘Binns is the epitome of what a comedy mindreader should be. ... a faultless guise ... an absolute highlight of the Edinburgh Festival ... completely unmissable’ EdinburghSpotlight.com ‘Critics’ Choice’ The Times, The Guardian, The Observer Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

FRIDAY 11 JANUARY THE STRANGER, THE BETTER

Gravenhurst with Ralfe Band + Woodpecker Wooliams CONTEMPORARY The second gig in London live-music producers The Local’s mini-festival. Gravenhurst features Warp Records singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer Nick Talbot. Dark and atmospheric, ever-changing and conjured from disparate ingredients, Gravenhurst’s roots lie in the melodic noise of My Bloody Valentine, the lush vocal harmonies of Simon and Garfunkel, the alchemical guitars of Richard Thompson and Johnny Marr, and the widescreen ambient visions of Brian Eno. ‘A mellow masterpiece … Nick Talbot has made an album as good as anything Warp has released in the last decade.’ Q Magazine ‘Terrific understated songs … Talbot is one of music’s best-kept secrets.’ The Guardian ‘Ralfe Band are a British cult mainstay … The band appeared in “The Mighty Boosh” – enough said.’ The Guardian Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Online Savers £9.50


52 LISTINGS FOLK UNION

Tim Edey FOLK Tim Edey is the current BBC Radio Two Folk Musician of the Year. He has played, toured and recorded with a Who’s Who of the Celtic and acoustic music scene. On the road worldwide since he was 15, he played his earliest gigs with his guitarist father and Irish singer Enda McCabe. He then joined guitar master Ed Boyd’s band Red Ciel, touring the UK and Scandinavia as a box player. He recorded his debut album at the age of 17, produced by the legendary Steve Cooney. ‘An extraordinarily versatile and unpredictable guitarist and button accordion player’ BBC Music online Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Aquarium

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January 2013

aka singer-songwriter Gemma Williams, writes unusual, modern and intriguing songs. Originally based on vocals and harp, her recent work encompasses an altogether fuller, electronic sound.

THIS WEEK’S FOCUS FRETWORK: MUSICK’S MONUMENT

Hall One 7.30pm

17 – 19 JANUARY

£12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

Aquarium: ‘Places’ Jellymould Jazz Album Launch Sam Leak piano James Allsopp tenor saxophone Calum Gourlay double bass Joshua Blackmore drums JAZZ Sam Leak’s quartet Aquarium launch their second album, Places, at Kings Place. Their debut, was listed as the 6th-best album in MOJO magazine’s 2011 International Jazz chart, and they were tipped by Jazzwise as ‘ones to watch’ in 2012. Following on from rave reviews in the national press, extensive airplay on BBC Radios 2 and 3, and a successful national tour, this promises to be a very exciting event. Don’t miss it! ‘Multi-faceted and smart as a pin, this is poetic chamber jazz of a very high order.’ MOJO ‘Leak is a subtle storyteller who keeps the grooves and colours changing.’ The Guardian Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Meursault

SATURDAY 12 JANUARY THE STRANGER, THE BETTER

Meursault with Sons of Noel and Adrian + Woodpecker Wooliams CONTEMPORARY The third and last gig in The Local’s minifestival. A shifting interplay of electronic and traditional instruments, Scottish indie rock band Meursault’s songs are based on the themes of separation and estrangement. BBC Music describes their sound as ‘a deft melding of pastoral folk, lo-fi electronics and the haunting ambience of band leader Neil Pennycook’s soaring vocals’. With their latest album Knots, Willkommen Collective founders Sons of Noel and Adrian have departed from their folk roots to explore influences rooted in Chicago’s pre-millennial post-rock, jazz and avant-pop. Woodpecker Wooliams,

SUNDAY 13 JANUARY Fretwork

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Badke Quartet with Michelle Todd Haydn String Quartet in D, Op. 20 No. 4 Respighi Il Tramonto (after Shelley) for soprano and string quartet (1914) Ravel String Quartet in F Badke Quartet Michelle Todd soprano CLASSICAL The excellent Badke Quartet, performing one of the best early quartets by Joseph Haydn, with its haunting slow movement, and Ravel’s ravishing quartet from 1903. The quartet is joined by soprano Michelle Todd in the beautiful Il Tramonto – Respighi’s 1914 setting of Shelley’s poem The Sunset. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

LAMENTATIONS, TEARS AND REMEMBRANCES: FRETWORK PAY TRIBUTE TO A FOUNDING MEMBER Musick’s Monument will reconstruct a fascinating programme described by Thomas Mace in his 1676 book of that name. It was the unrealised dream of viol-player Richard Campbell, who died in 2011. His art is also recalled in performances of Dowland’s exceptional Lachrimae Pavans, and the Lamentations of Jeremiah by Robert White and Thomas Tallis. See Classical Highlights p9


Monday 14 January

Bad Musical

OUT HEAR

Conversations with Sound ‘Opera of Surveilance’ Created by artist vocalist composer Jamie McDermott of internationally acclaimed performance orchestra art pop group The Irrepressibles, Conversations with Sound are an improvisational organism, a live performance installation, a multi-lingual Art-Pop choir. Their present site specific, contextualised, and conversation improvisations with voice, plus composed works for voice by McDermott and the choir. Their first performances included site specific ‘gorrilla’ performances on tube trains, installations created in public tunnels and performances in public houses in 2005. They then went on to be commisioned in 2009 by Grimeborn Opera Festival where they presented a short exerpt of Opera of Surveillance, a performance piece created in real time purely through interaction with the audience. They will present the fully realised choreographed performance of this piece, interspersed with electrochoral composed works by McDermott and new contemporary classical works by the choir. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 17 January MUSICK’S MONUMENT

Fretwork with Alamire: Lamentations

ALL ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

£14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50 which most of the rest of this programme is drawn. Thea Musgrave’s Wild Winter I, written for Fretwork in 1993, is a multilingual lament for the folly of war, setting texts by Owen, Trakl, Lorca, Petrarch and Pushkin, among others. Fretwork are delighted to be joined by outstanding vocalists Alamire, under the direction of David Skinner. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Bad Musical COMEDY The worst musical ever written! From The Trap, creators of the most excruciatingly bad shows ever conceived (the hit Edinburgh BAD PLAY series) comes the culmination of a decade spent creating theatrical cack. For the first time anywhere, witness the horror and sing along to the last word in entertainment poison. ‘Superb comedic trio’ Time Out. ‘Extremely funny’ The Guardian. ‘One of the funniest and most inventive sketch groups ever’ Chortle. ‘Deliciously subversive ... sheer comedic genius’ **** The Scotsman Hall Two 8pm

Robert Parsons In Nomine; Ave Maria Christopher Tye Fantasia: ‘Rubum quem’ Robert White In Nomine Thomas Tallis Lamentations of Jeremiah Robert White Lamentations Thea Musgrave Wild Winter I

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Alamire vocal consort Grace Davidson, Clare Wilkinson, Nicholas Todd, Simon Wall, Greg Skidmore, Robert Macdonald

Fretwork: Dowland’s Lachrimae

David Skinner director Fretwork viol consort Liam Byrne, Asako Morikawa, Reiko Ichise, Richard Tunnicliffe, Richard Boothby CLASSICAL The Lamentations of Jeremiah have been set by many composers over the centuries, but the settings of Robert White and Thomas Tallis stand out from the crowd. White’s was given pride of place at the opening of Robert Dow’s magnificently copied set of partbooks, from

called Lachrimae, in which seven pavans are linked by a single theme, based on his most famous song, Flow my teares. Adrian Williams wrote his poignant reflection on these pavans in his Teares to Dreams in 2004, injecting a contemporary sensibility into the 17th-century form. Hall One 7.30pm

CONTEMPORARY

Friday 18 January MUSICK’S MONUMENT

Dowland Lachrimae or Seaven teares figured in seaven passionate pavans: with divers other pavans, galiards, and almands… Adrian Williams Teares to Dreams (2004) Fretwork viol consort with Elizabeth Kenny lute CLASSICAL John Dowland, the finest lutenist of his generation and one of England’s greatest composers, was born 450 years ago this year. In 1604 he published the extraordinary collection of dance music for viols and lute

LISTINGS 53

January 2013

FOLK UNION

ahab FOLK The most exciting harmony-infused Americana/pop to emerge on the scene since Mumford & Sons. Outstanding songs, a huge sound and an unrivalled stage presence – with looks and boyish charm to top it off! ahab had a truly incredible 2011 which saw them playing at over 20 festivals throughout the UK and Europe, releasing their second EP kmvt and a tour support with the mighty Bellowhead. With two hugely popular EPs under their belt, an album in the pipeline, a sell-out headline gig at HMV’s Next Big Thing Festival and rave support (and frequent airplay) from Bob Harris and Simon Mayo, ahab continue their climb to the top. Highly recommended.

(1676), detailing the viol consort evenings he held with friends in his earlier days: ‘We had for our grave musick, fancies of 3, 4, 5 and 6 parts to the organ; interpos’d (now and then) with some pavans, allmaines, solemn and sweet delightful ayres … The authors of such like compositions, have been divers famous English men, and Italians … Mr Alfonso Ferabosco, Mr John Ward, Mr Lupo, Mr White, Mr Richard Deering, Mr William Lawes, Mr John Jenkins, Mr Christopher Simpson, Mr Coperario and one Monteverdi, a famous Italian author.’ Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

Martin Speake Trio with Mike Outram and Jeff Williams JAZZ

Saturday 19 January

This trio brings together all of Martin’s musical influences, and his favourite musicians. Expect improvising in the moment, and compositions from their new CD. ‘Subtle, soft-toned alto player with an angular, highly contemporary approach to improvisation lines up with classy, funkedged modern jazz guitarist Mike Outram and superb London-based US drummer Jeff Williams.’ Time Out ‘Martin Speake is one of the most interesting and rewarding alto saxophonists now playing jazz on any continent.’ Thomas Conrad, Jazz Times

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

MUSICK’S MONUMENT

Hall Two 8pm

Fretwork: Musick’s Monument

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

William Lawes Consort in F set in five parts Richard Deering Fantazy for five viols John Ward Fantazy No. 1 Dolce languir William White Fantasy for five viols No. 3 John Jenkins Four-part aires John Coprario Fantazia for five viols Illicita Cosa Claudio Monteverdi Dolcemente dormiva la mia Clori (Tasso) from the Madrigals, Book II (1590) Ward In Nomine in five parts Christopher Simpson four-part aires Alfonso Ferrabosco II Hexachord Fantasy in four parts Thomas Lupo Pavan in three parts Lawes Consort in C set in five parts

Sunday 20 January

Fretwork viol consort CLASSICAL This unique programme is constructed from the fascinating memoir of Thomas Mace, who wrote Musick’s Monument

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Angell Trio Haydn Piano Trio in C, Hob. XV:27 Martinu˚ Piano Trio No. 2 in D minor, H327 Brahms Piano Trio No. 1 in B, Op. 8 CLASSICAL The Angell Trio, regular visitors to the LCMS series for more than 12 years, perform a wonderful programme featuring one of Haydn’s late London Trios, (composed in the 1790s), another late work, the second of Martinu˚ ’s three trios (composed in New York in 1950), and Brahms’s B major trio, composed when he was in his 20s but completely revised at the end of his career. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

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January 2013

THIS WEEK’S FOCUS LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

MONDAY 21 JANUARY

Austentatious

WORDS ON MONDAY

CURATED BY SWINGLE SINGERS & IKON ARTS MANAGEMENT

Elkie Brooks: Finding My Voice Jewish Book Week presents

24 – 26 JANUARY

SPOKEN WORD Elkie Brooks, the ‘British Queen of Blues’, has a career that has spanned five decades and most musical genres. At 15, Elaine Bookbinder auditioned for Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne and music manager at the Palace Theatre, Manchester. Her career was launched that night. Blessed with one of the richest and most distinctive voices of her generation, she has worked with some of the finest musicians along the way, including her mentor Humphrey Lyttelton, and was named the most-charted female album-seller. In an evening of conversation with a few songs thrown in, the singer reflects on a varied and fascinating career.

COMEDY

CONTEMPORARY

Hall Two 8pm

Norwegian all-star composer/improviser quartet Lemur combine classic composition, noise, chamber music and free jazz. Their unusual line-up of acoustic instruments and a novel approach to musical craftsmanship make for a surprising and unique blend of contemporary sound. Formed in 2006 they’ve performed in Europe, the UK, Taiwan, Macau and China. Their two albums on +3db have been met with critical acclaim. They’ve collaborated with Paul Lytton, Julia Eckhardt, Amit Sen, Mats Gustafsson, John Hegre, Dickson Dee, Trondheim Sinfonietta, N Ensemble and Tom Løberg. They also contributed to the punk poet Patrick Fitzgerald’s 2007 release, Spirit of the Revolution.

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

OUT HEAR

Lemur

This is the fourth London A Cappella Festival to be held at Kings Place, and it just keeps getting bigger and more popular. Co-curators the inimitable Swingle Singers and Ikon Arts Management, who celebrate their 50th anniversary on Saturday night, have created a varied menu of legendary British vocal groups and hot new voices, including boundary-breaking Danish outfit Postyr. Book early to avoid disappointment.

An Improvised Jane Austen Novel

Bjørnar Habbestad flutes Hild Sofie Tafjord horn Lene Grenager cello Michael Duch double bass

£9.50

A BEST OF BRITISH AT THIS YEAR’S FESTIVAL WITH THE KING’S SINGERS, THE MAGNETS & THE SWINGLE SINGERS

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Austentatious Austentatious: An Improvised Novel is an hour-long comedy play spun in the inimitable style of Jane Austen – and based entirely on audience suggestions! Following a five-star run at the Edinburgh Fringe, the cast of Austentatious offer you an eloquent, irreverent and 100% improvised take on the works of Britain’s best-loved novelist. Performed in period costume with live cello accompaniment, this is an immersive and hilarious treat for fans of Austen and improvised comedy alike. Previous titles have included Northanger Rabbi, Pride and Predator, and Darcy Does Dallas. Join us for an impromptu literary masterpiece! ‘Supersmart and terrifically funny’ Scotsman ‘Witty, silly and gloriously funny...’ ***** The Skinny, Edinburgh 2012

Hall One 7pm

The King’s Singers

THURSDAY 24 JANUARY

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Choir of Clare College, Cambridge Britten, Poulenc, Arvo Pärt and more CLASSICAL The Choir of Clare College and its director Graham Ross present a sumptuous programme of 20th-century choral masterpieces. Bridging the traditional and modern, the choir’s programme includes secular and sacred works by composers including Poulenc, Arvo Pärt and Britten. Founded as a mixed-voice ensemble in 1971, the choir has since gained an impressive international reputation. ‘If you ever needed confirmation of the fantastically high standard of choral singing that exists in the UK, look, or rather, hear no further than the Choir of Clare College, Cambridge.’ Classical Source Hall One 7pm

See Contemporary highlights article p22

Lemur

£14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50


A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

The Magnets

The Magnets

Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

CONTEMPORARY Rajaton

Postyr

Hall One 9pm

A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Rajaton CONTEMPORARY Triple-platinum-selling Finnish a cappella favourites Rajaton explore the beautiful Nordic soundscapes through pop classics and contemporary originals. With their infectious energy, ensemble virtuosity and true richness of sound, Rajaton have won the hearts and acclaim of audiences and critics, and become a phenomenon on the world stage.

THE KING’S SINGERS © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | AUSTENTATIOUS © IDIL SUKAN | CHOIR OF CLARE COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE © NICK RUTTER | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Hall One 9pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

£16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 26 January A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Purely A Cappella! Vocal Workshops INTERACT Continuing the huge success of last year’s workshops, singers and choirs of all ages and abilities are invited to join industry experts and professionals in a series of workshops focusing on various aspects of singing and a cappella performance. Hall Two 10am, 11.15am, 12.30pm, 16.30pm

Friday 25 January A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Postyr CONTEMPORARY Pioneering innovation in vocal music, Postyr create a distinctive and evocative soundworld combining the human voice and electronics. Singing catchy pop tunes, heartfelt ballads and experimental avant-  garde pop, the five Danish singers take their audience on a journey that not only entertains, but captivates and intrigues the listener. This is a vocal experience beyond the ordinary.

£9.50 per workshop

A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Retrocity Support Act: Vive CONTEMPORARY For pure ‘acappellatude’, look no further than Canadian a cappella sensations Retrocity. Performing your favourite tunes from the 80s and beyond – from Sting to   Salt-n-Pepa – they cover musical vintages of all kinds from jazz to soul to funk, capturing an astonishing and utterly unique range of instrumental imitation.

Hall One 7pm

Hall One 1.45pm

£13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 £15.50 £18.50 £21.50 Online Savers £9.50

Devised by composer/cellist Philip Sheppard

A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

MUSIC / FILM / COMEDY

Panel Discussion

Top musicians perform spontaneous soundtracks to the world’s greatest silent films. Improvisation begins as the film starts to roll as none of the musicians have watched the films in advance. The films will include comic heroes Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd. The atmosphere will be relaxed and club-like… and there’ll be room for some very sophisticated mucking about. Sunday afternoons will never be the same again!

SPOKEN WORD Join us in a panel discussion with leading figures from various musical backgrounds discussing the new trends in a cappella. Hall One 3.15pm FREE. Tickets required. Call Box Office

A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

The King’s Singers CONTEMPORARY Cornerstones of British vocal harmony Grammy-award-winning The King’s Singers are one of the world’s most celebrated ensembles. They have enjoyed global success for over 40 years, enchanting audiences with their instantly recognisable spot-on intonation, impeccable vocal blend, flawless articulation of the text and incisive timing. This is a class act with a delightfully British wit. The gig will feature an exclusive collaboration with the Swingle Singers. Don’t miss it – book early!  ‘Suave, quintessentially English answer   to the barber-shop tradition’ The Times

Hall One 2.30pm £12.50 £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Not So Silent Offer: Ticket + Bloody Mary + Roast Lunch: All for just £29.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Allegri Quartet: The Complete Beethoven Quartets – 9 Pre-concert Talk with Dr Robert Hanson Beethoven String Quartet No. 11 in F minor, Op. 95 Serioso Shostakovich String Quartet No. 11 in F minor, Op. 122  Beethoven String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 131

Hall One 6pm

CLASSICAL

£19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 Online Savers £9.50

The celebrated Allegri Quartet reach   the end of their monumental Beethoven-  Shostakovich cycle. Beethoven’s beautiful F minor Quartet, is followed by the latter’s 11th Quartet from 1966, ostensibly in the same tonality of F minor, but cast in seven short interlocking movements. The cycle is completed with Beethoven’s Op. 131 Quartet, one of the most profound utterances in the quartet medium.

A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Swingle Singers Support Act: The Exchange CONTEMPORARY Since the ’60s, the unmistakable sound of ‘Swingle singing’, virtuosic vocal blend combined with high-level entertainment, has thrilled audiences around the globe. Launching their 50th-anniversary celebrations at the festival, the current line-up of young and talented voices represents the group’s transformation from pioneering classical/ jazz crossover artists to contemporary vocal super-group. Hall One 8.30pm

Choir of Clare College, Cambridge

Sunday 27 January NOT SO SILENT MOVIES

Support Act: All the King’s Men A ‘six-man sound machine’, The Magnets wow audiences with their blend of razor-  sharp harmonies, slick vocal stunts and infectious groove. After selling out Roundhouse, and making a series of electrifying appearances across the globe, they’ve emerged as one of the must-see acts on the current British music scene.   ‘A sonic phenomenon you have to see and hear to believe.’ The Guardian

LISTINGS 55

January 2013

£19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 Online Savers £9.50

Pre-concert Talk – St Pancras Room 5pm Performance – Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Swingle Singers

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January 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS Bach unwrapped week 2

Monday 28 January

29 January – 2 February

Tuesday 29 January

WORDS ON MONDAY

BACH UNWRAPPED

Feeding Seven Billion

St Matthew Passion

University of Cambridge Global Food Security Debates II: ‘Intensification vs extensification of global agriculture’

St Matthew Passion, BWV 244

Dr Marion Guillou INRA (French National Institute for Agricultural Research) Prof. Judi Wakhungu African Centre for Technology Studies Sam Dryden Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation SPOKEN WORD What is the optimal agricultural system to feed tomorrow’s world? A debate on the relative merits of agricultural intensification as opposed to expanding output by increasing cultivated area. How do alternative strategies for increasing agricultural productivity maximise food production, providing sustained livelihoods for poor farmers, staying within ecological limits, and leaving enough space for competing land uses? Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

Collectress with Jo Thomas: Glitch Collectress Improvisations Jo Thomas Alpha Live

James Gilchrist Evangelist David Wilson-Johnson Christus Joanne Lunn soprano James Laing countertenor Thomas Walker tenor Stephan Loges bass, Pilate The Choir of King’s College, Cambridge Academy of Ancient Music Stephen Cleobury conductor CLASSICAL Perhaps the greatest and best beloved of all Bach’s works is the monumental St Matthew Passion. This performance boasts the ideal partnership of The Choir of King’s College and the Academy of Ancient Music under Stephen Cleobury, with tenor James Gilchrist as the Evangelist ‘now unsurpassed among lyric tenors in sweetness and technical security, and for his musical intelligence’ (The Independent). He is joined by distinguished baritone David Wilson-Johnson as Christ, Stephan Loges as a sonorous Pilate. Countertenor James Laing will sing the heart-stopping ‘Ebarme dich’ and Joanne Lunn such expressive arias as ‘Aus Liebe’. Hall One 6.30pm £19.50 £29.50 £39.50 £49.50 Online Savers £9.50

CONTEMPORARY

Richard Egarr

Suites with Richard Egarr, the st matthew Passion from king’s college choir This week, the Academy of Ancient Music focus a whole day on Bach’s Orchestral Suites and his English Suites for keyboard. King’s College Choir under the baton of Stephen Cleobury present the great St Matthew Passion, featuring James Gilchrist as the Evangelist, and Rachel Podger begins her journey through the Violin Sonatas and Partitas. See Bach Unwrapped p26

2012 Prix Ars Electronica-winner Jo Thomas presents Alpha Live, a 21-minute multispeaker performance journeying into the spectral shape of sounds. Expect an inventive performance from Collectress: ‘We fill our music with stories and pictures. In performance the sound of our music is met by a strong visual play: enormous paper eggshells with signature portraits to be cut through to the sound of birds’ eggs hatching. A woman wearing a ringing telephone hat which plays Beethoven when she answers it. We have fun with the ridiculous and enjoy its suggestiveness.’ Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Saver £9.50 Collectress

Wednesday 30 January BACH UNWRAPPED

Rachel Podger & Marcin Swiatkiewicz: Bach Violin Sonatas and Partitas – 1 Sonata No. 1 in G minor for solo violin, BWV 1001 Sonata No. 4 in C minor for violin and harpsichord, BWV 1017 Sonata No. 1 in B minor for violin and harpsichord, BWV 1014 Partita No. 1 in B minor for solo violin, BWV 1002 Rachel Podger violin Marcin Swiatkiewicz harpsichord CLASSICAL Rachel Podger is one of the most inspirational and creative figures on the classical music scene today, and an acknowledged authority on the Baroque violin, with a string of awards for her recordings of Bach’s solo and accompanied sonatas. In this first of


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‘Stunning show … Pitch-perfect operetta’ Metro Scotland ‘A wonderful musical tale of attraction, love and despair in the internet age’   ***** Three Weeks ‘Thought-provoking and funny’ **** Fringe Review

Hall One 7.30pm

February

£16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

CLASSICAL

BACH UNWRAPPED

London Sinfonietta

Miki Skuta: Goldberg Variations

JS Bach Sonata in G for viola da gamba and harpsichord, BWV 1027  Steve Reich Cello Counterpoint Bach Flute Sonata in E minor, BWV 1034 Steve Reich Vermont Counterpoint Bach (arr. Stravinsky) Four Preludes and Fugues from The Well-Tempered Clavier Stravinsky Concerto in E flat Dumbarton Oaks

CLASSICAL

RICHARD EGARR © MARCO BORGGREVE | LADY MAISERY © ELLY LUCAS | THE ROLLER TRIO © LISA TAYLOR | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Miki Skuta’s recording of Bach’s Goldberg Variations was released to critical acclaim, receiving the following review in BBC Music Magazine: ‘Slovak player Miki Skuta succeeds brilliantly in one of the most impressive piano performances that I’ve yet heard. If he does not usurp the benchmark status enjoyed by Glenn Gould in his 1955 recording of the Goldbergs he probably deserves to share it.’ Hall One 7.30pm £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

The Looking Screen COMEDY A one-woman operetta about a girl’s desperate pursuit for love on the internet. Written and composed by Anne Chmelewsky (The Office: The Opera, Comic Relief 2009), The Looking Screen stars Clare Presland, who is accompanied on piano by Elizabeth Challenger.  

with the Academy of Ancient Music

Join the Academy of Ancient Music   to explore Bach’s music. The day culminates with a performance of the complete Orchestral Suites, a series   of dances showcasing some of Bach’s   most varied, grand and graceful music. AAM Music Director Richard Egarr   gives a solo lunchtime performance of Bach’s English Suites. Two talks give insights into Bach’s music: pre-eminent Bach scholar Prof. Christoph Wolff   shares stories from a life researching   the composer, and BBC Radio 3’s   Sara Mohr-Pietsch leads a discussion   with AAM players about playing Bach.

BACH UNWRAPPED

Miki Skuta piano

BACH UNWRAPPED

The Bach Suites in Focus

£9.50

FRIday 1 February

Goldberg Variations, BWV 988

Saturday 2 February

Hall Two 8pm

Thursday 31 January

Tim Gill cello Michael Cox flute London Sinfonietta

Part I: The English Suites Concert with Commentary Suite No. 3 in G minor, BWV 808  Suite No. 4 in F, BWV 809  Suite No. 6 in D minor, BWV 811 Richard Egarr harpsichord Hall One 1pm | Lasts ~60 mins

Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Lady Maisery BBC Radio 2 Folk Award nominated vocal trio Lady Maisery use their adventurous vocals to breathtaking effect, with fresh interpretations of songs and ballads. Whether singing unaccompanied, or with backing from their combined instrumental talents on accordion, harp and fiddle, they will enchant you with their rich harmonies and sumptuous clashes.  ‘Fabulous’ The Independent Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Roller Trio James Mainwaring saxophone/FX Luke Wynter guitar/FX Luke Reddin-Williams drums JAZZ Roller Trio are a new young talent. Still in their early 20s, they met studying at Leeds College of Music. As soon as they started playing and jamming together it was apparent that they had a special chemistry. Their music is a fresh, visceral stew of stonking rock riffs, angular drums, electronic loops – and James’s powerful tone and use of circular breathing and multiphonics. A powerful new band – and one with its own unique voice.  ‘A band destined for greatness’ Jazz FM ‘Dark, menacing, bass heavy – the   new sound of UK jazz!’ Gilles Peterson, BBC Radio 6 music

Part II: Discovering Bach The world’s pre-eminent Bach scholar   and researcher Prof. Christoph Wolff   offers a fascinating insight into the composer’s life and work. He will also invite discussion from the audience.

Sunday 3 February

£9.50 (or £4.50 to ticket holders of 1pm concert) Part III: Playing Bach BBC Radio 3’s Sara Mohr-Pietsch   hosts AAM players in a discussion   about performing the Orchestral Suites. St Pancras Room 6pm | Lasts ~ 45mins FREE to ticket holders to 7.30pm concert Part IV: The Complete Orchestral Suites Suite No. 3 in D, BWV 1068  Suite No. 1 in C, BWV 1066  Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067  Suite No. 4 in D, BWV 1069

Hall One 7.30pm Lady Maisery

THE BASE

Hall Two 8pm

Academy of Ancient Music Richard Egarr director Clare Presland & Elizabeth Challenger

The Roller Trio

£12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Online Savers £9.50

St Pancras Room 2.30pm

FOLK

LISTINGS 57 LISTINGS

three concerts, she and harpsichordist Marcin Swiatkiewicz perform the first and fourth accompanied sonatas, while she tackles the remarkable Solo Sonata in G minor, with its majestic fugue and brilliant perpetual motion Presto. Bach himself was a skilful violinist, and mined the potential of the solo instrument as perhaps no other composer has since done. ‘Podger’s infectious charm and unaffected musicianship are hard to resist.’   BBC Music Magazine

January/February 2013

£19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Yannoula-LomeikoZhislin-Harwood Quartet LCMS Fundraising Concert Mozart String Duo No. 1 in G for violin and viola, K423  Schumann Piano Quartet in E flat, Op. 47 Schubert String Trio Movement in B flat, D471  Walton Piano Quartet in D minor CLASSICAL A varied programme of some of the most popular works in the classical chamber music repertoire, and an opportunity to hear a wonderful early piece by William Walton – his Quartet for piano and strings, composed in 1919 and revised in the 1970s. We’re particularly grateful to Natalia Lomeiko, Yuri Zhislin, Richard Harwood and  Vicky Yannoula, for generously donating their services for this concert, in order for us to raise funds for the LCMS concerts. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50


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February 2013

voice to emerge from Ireland in the past 20 years’ (The Irish Times), Walshe is known for her extended vocal techniques and virtuosity. Her maverick composition ALL THE MANY PEOPLS, features text sourced from Amazon.com message boards (vampire physiology, conspiracy theorist Francis E. Dec, the Courage Wolf meme, 4Chan and Google Autocomplete) with recordings of interstellar sonic phenomena and much, much more. Walshe will also perform Irish Dadaist sound poetry from 1921.

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS BRITTEN AT 100: PIANIST, COLLABORATOR, ARTISTIC CRUCIBLE 7 – 9 FEBRUARY

Boris Akunin

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Monday 4 February WORDS ON MONDAY

The Sebald Lecture by Boris Akunin ‘Paradise Lost: Confessions of an apostate translator’ SPOKEN WORD

Claire Booth

a celebration of britten as creative catalyst, collaborator and inspiration Pianists John Reid and Andrew Matthews-Owen have drawn together a fabulous group of singers and instrumentalists to explore themes in Britten’s music, though his own works and those by composers he loved to perform. Artists include Nicky Spence, Claire Booth (above), Nicholas Mulroy, Christine Croshaw and Oliver Coates. See feature Suffolk Lodestar on pp40–41

The annual Sebald Lecture on Literary Translation is given by Boris Akunin, one of the most widely read authors in Russia, who has been compared to Gogol, Tolstoy and Arthur Conan Doyle. His best-selling detective novels are translated into English by Andrew Bromfield. But in his previous life, Boris Akunin was Grigory Chkhartishvili, a translator of Japanese literature into Russian. In his lecture, Boris Akunin will talk about his love for translating, how translating both helped and hindered his work as a writer, and why he misses it now. Akunin’s lecture will be preceded by a programme of readings, and the presentation of The Society of Authors’ Translation Prizes 2012. These prestigious, long-established awards will be presented by Sir Peter Stothard, editor of the TLS. Awarded for fiction, poetry and non-fiction, this year they feature translations from the original Arabic, Dutch, French, German, Greek (modern), Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Swedish. In collaboration with the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Society of Authors.

Thursday 7 February BRITTEN AT 100

Songs With and Without Words with Pre-Concert Talk Britten Tema Sacher’ for solo cello (1976) Fauré Nocturnes and Barcarolles (selection) Britten Ciaccona from Cello Suite No. 2 Schubert Die Schöne Müllerin, D795 Martin Suckling Lieder ohne Worte (2010) Oliver Coates cello Nicholas Mulroy tenor Christine Croshaw piano John Reid piano CLASSICAL Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears were two of the finest song recitalists of their time, and Schubert’s immortal cycle Die schöne Müllerin was central to their repertoire. In this programme of homages, Schubert’s songs sit alongside Martin Suckling’s companion piece, Lieder ohne Worte. One of Britten’s responses to Purcell complements piano pieces by Gabriel Fauré. Before the performance, pianist and co-curator Andrew Matthews-Owen interviews

Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

Jennifer Walshe: ALL THE MANY PEOPLS CONTEMPORARY Award-winning Irish composer and performer Jennifer Walshe performs her own work in experimental composition and film. ‘The most original compositional

Jennifer Walshe


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LISTINGS 59 LISTINGS

February 2013

CHRISTINE CROSHAW © NICHOLAS DAWKES | OLIVER COATES © NATHAN GALLAGHER | ANDREW RADLEY © BENJAMIN HARTE | HANS KOLLER © WILLIAM ELLIS | ALISTAIR ANDERSON © BRADLEY | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Christine Croshaw

composer Martin Suckling and tonight’s performers about Britten as composer, pianist and artistic director. Pre-concert Talk: St Pancras Rm 6.30pm Performance: Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50 The pre-concert talk is free but requires separate tickets. Please contact Box Office to reserve a seat.

Friday 8 February BRITTEN AT 100

The Pity of War Finzi Farewell to Arms Schubert Auf dem Strom Hoddinott The Silver Hound Britten Canticle No. 3 (Still Falls the Rain) Sir Peter Maxwell-Davies Sea Eagle (for solo horn)  Tippett The Heart’s Assurance Nicky Spence tenor Nicholas Mulroy tenor Tim Thorpe French horn Andrew Matthews-Owen piano John Reid piano CLASSICAL Born in 1913, Britten grew up and came   of age under the shadow of the two major conflicts of the 20th century. The theme   of war (and a longing for peace) would preoccupy him for the rest of his life.   This concert explores four creative responses to conflict from Britten, Finzi, Hoddinott and Tippett, alongside music   by Schubert and Sir Peter Maxwell-Davies.

Oliver Coates

Tim Thorpe

Nicholas Mulroy

Alistair Anderson

Joby Burgess and Janey Miller

Nicky Spence

Andrew Radley

Hans Koller

FOLK UNION

An Evening with Alistair Anderson FOLK As a touring soloist, with 37 tours of the USA, 5 trips to Australia and countless European tours to his credit, Alistair Anderson is internationally recognised   as the master of the English concertina and a leading Northumbrian piper. He introduces the music of Northumberland and the Scottish borders with melodies dating back to the 17th century, alongside his own compositions. ‘He is a treat to watch. His involvement and delight in the music are infectious. Beautiful music, played with skill, taste and affection.’ fRoots ‘A master musician who pushes the boundaries of traditional music’ EDS Hall Two 8pm

Nicholas Mulroy tenor Joby Burgess percussion Janey Miller oboe Andrew Matthews-Owen piano John Reid piano CLASSICAL Two new works for voice, piano and percussion and oboe by leading British composers Simon Holt and Jonathan Dove form the backbone of this concert, counterbalancing settings of folksongs   by Britten, some of his distinguished contemporaries, and one bête noir (Brahms). Before the performance, Katie Derham of BBC Radio 3 and art historian and critic Frances Spalding discuss Britten’s working relationship with   John and Myfanwy Piper. Pre-concert Talk: St Pancras Rm 5pm Performance: Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

The pre-concert talk is free but requires separate tickets. Please contact Box Office to reserve a seat. 

Saturday 9 February

THE BASE

BRITTEN AT 100

Metamorphoses

Hans Koller Ensemble Jakob Bro, Phil Robson guitars Christine Tobin vocals

with Pre-Concert Talk

JAZZ

Hall One 7.30pm

Britten Metamorphoses for solo oboe Simon Holt The Wasp Queen* Roger Marsh Lullaby Jonathan Dove Seven Angels* Folksong settings by Britten, Brahms, Grainger, Hoddinott, Vaughan Williams & Grace Williams * world premiere

£14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

Claire Booth soprano Andrew Radley countertenor

Hans Koller Ensemble returns to   The Base with a completely new set of music, and some very special international guests. The concert is   being recorded for Jazz on 3. The first set features the two guitars of Jakob Bro   (Paul Motian, Tomasz Stanko) and Phil Robson, in a celebration of the spirit of   Gil Evans. The second part of the evening presents new settings of poems by the

19th-century German poet Friedrich Hölderlin, music written for celebrated singer Christine Tobin. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 10 February LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Navarra Quartet Haydn String Quartet in C, Op. 33 No. 3 The Bird James Francis Brown String Quartet No. 2 world premiere Brahms String Quartet in C minor, Op. 51 No. 1 CLASSICAL The Navarra Quartet is one of the UK’s best young quartets, and this is their debut in the LCMS series. They perform Haydn’s Bird quartet (so called because of a bird-like repeating figure in the first movement), one of Brahms’s most impressive chamber works, completed in Bavaria in summer 1873 after a long gestation, and an important premiere of a new quartet by celebrated British composer James Francis Brown. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Navarra Quartet


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February 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS Bach unwrapped week 3 Royal Academy of Music

Monday 11 February WORDS ON MONDAY

Howard Goodall: The Story of Music SPOKEN WORD

13 – 15 February

Howard Goodall

The story of music is the story of our urge to invent, connect, rebel – and entertain. In this whirlwind one-hour talk, one of TV’s favourite music broadcasters and composers gives us a taste of his energetic tour through 30,000 years of music, from prehistoric instruments to contemporary avant-garde. Howard Goodall is an Emmy, BRIT and BAFTA award-winning composer (Vicar of Dibley, Red Dwarf, QI, Blackadder) a distinguished broadcaster, and author of Big Bangs: The Story of Five Discoveries that Changed Musical History. He’s been England’s first-ever National Ambassador for Singing, Classical Brit Composer of the Year, and Classic FM’s Composer-in-Residence.

A Concert with Commentary Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue in D minor, BWV 903 Toccata in D, BWV 912 Italian Concerto, BWV 971 Fantasy and Fugue in C minor, BWV 906

Jérôme Noetinger tape Antoine Chessex saxophone CONTEMPORARY

Lawrence Cummings conducts the Royal Academy of Music Baroque Orchestra in a rich menu of concerti, a motet and Lutheran Mass No. 2 in A, featuring outstanding young talent. Jeffrey Siegel expounds on Bach as inspiration to Busoni in his concert with commentary, Bach the Spellbinder, including the tumultuous Chaconne in D minor. See Bach Unwrapped feature p28–32

BACH UNWRAPPED

Keyboard Conversations® Bach the Spellbinder

£9.50

Jérôme Noetinger & Antoine Chessex: Musique Concrète

a lutheran mass, Harpsichord concertos and busoni’s visions of JS bach

Wednesday 13 February

Hall One 7pm

OUT HEAR

Laurence Cummings

Jeffrey Siegel

French sound artist Jérôme Noetinger is an improviser and composer of electroacoustic music based in Rives, France. He runs the record label and record distributor Metamkine, and writes in the French magazine Revue & Corrigée. In this performance he presents work produced with a Revox B77 tape machine. He is accompanied by Swiss composer and musician Antoine Chessex on saxophone. Chessex’s sonic researches include compositions for ensembles, solo works, transdisciplinary collaborations and sound installations. The two will present their own solo sets, followed by a duet. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Jérôme Noetinger

Questions & Answers Jeffrey Siegel piano CLASSICAL Piano masterpieces that speak to the heart with dazzling virtuoso performances and captivating commentary by a world-class pianist. Programme includes some of Bach’s most enthralling works: the exhilarating Italian Concerto, the vivacious and poetic Toccata in D, Busoni’s stupendous transcription of the famous Chaconne for violin – and more! A lively, upbeat programme for the seasoned music-lover and the newcomer to great music. ‘Jeffrey Siegel’s Keyboard Conversations programme is unique, informative and very entertaining. A piano virtuoso and first-class communicator, Jeffrey Siegel makes you leave the theatre hungry for more music.’ David Suchet Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £19.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

Antoine Chessex


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Friday 15 February

ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC BACH UNWRAPPED

The Haydn Symphonies Haydn Symphony No. 91 in E flat (arr. by John Goldie-Scot) Symphony No. 67 in F   (arr. by Timothy Jones) Symphony No. 90 in C Royal Academy of Music Chamber Orchestra Paul Brough conductor

LAWRENCE CUMMINGS © SHEILA ROCK | Jérôme Noetinger © MAT RANSON | JEFFREY SIEGEL © STEVE PURCELL | PAUL BROUGH © RUTH JAMIESON | CHILINGIRIAN QUARTET © GRAHAM TOPPING | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

CLASSICAL This concert is part of the Royal Academy of Music’s Dr Haydn’s Inexhaustible GeniusBox, an ambitious project of performances and workshops of all his symphonies over the next decade. Haydn himself sanctioned arrangements of some of his most popular works (notably the variations on Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser and the Seven Last Words), and several of his symphonies were arranged for chamber ensembles and Harmonie groups during his lifetime. In this spirit, the original orchestral score of the sparkling and witty Symphony No. 90 – written for Count D’Ogny in 1788 – is performed alongside newly commissioned arrangements of its mellower companion-piece Symphony No. 91   and the gallant Symphony No. 67 (composed at Esterházy at the end   of the 1770s). Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £16.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Impropera’s Songs From The Heart COMEDY A special one-off performance for Valentine’s Day. Using their unique   blend of classically trained voices, virtuoso musicianship and improvised ingenuity, Impropera create soaring   songs of heartfelt romance, passion   and love, inspired by objects of   the audience’s affections. So, if   romance is in the air for you, come   to Kings Place and surprise your   loved one with a song created from   the things that make them special to   you. And if it isn’t, perhaps Impropera’s lonely hearts aria will change all that.

Royal Academy of Music Baroque Orchestra plays Bach JS Bach Concerto No. 2 in E for harpsichord and orchestra, BWV 1053   Concerto No. 2 in C for two harpsichords  and orchestra, BWV 1061  Motet: ‘Der Gerechte kommt’ from   Fürchte dich nicht, BWV 228 Lutheran Mass No. 2 in A, BWV 234 Royal Academy of Music Baroque Orch. Laurence Cummings director CLASSICAL This programme combines familiar masterpieces with rare treasures. We encounter Bach the arranger, Bach the borrower and Bach the family man. The glorious A major Mass combines choral forces, orchestra and solo voices with great variety and expressivity and includes movements from cantatas and beautiful obbligatos for two flutes. For ‘Der Gerechte kommt’ Bach takes Kuhnau’s motet ‘Tristis est anima mea’ and adapts it, translates it into the vernacular German for his congregation’s comprehension and adds orchestral accompaniment. The Harpsichord Concerto in E major is an arrangement   of a lost oboe concerto which Bach transcribed for one of his sons to play in Zimmermann’s coffee house in Leipzig. No doubt he wrote the C major Double Harpsichord Concerto to play himself alongside one of his many talented sons as the good citizens of Leipzig enjoyed their newfound guilty pleasure, coffee. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

The Wagon Tales FOLK For the last couple of years, The Wagon Tales have been steadily establishing themselves as London’s most exciting alternative bluegrass band. Deeply respectful of tradition but never afraid to step beyond it, the band deliver classic bluegrass and intriguing original material with a virtuosity and passion usually only seen in stateside outfits. Equally at home tearing into incendiary instrumentals at breakneck speed and delivering delicate vocal harmonies, The Wagon Tales captivate their audiences. The sheer joy of their music is infectious.

The Wagon Tales

THE BASE

Royal Academy of Music Big Band A Tribute to Sir John Dankworth featuring Alec Dankworth Nick Smart director   JAZZ

Stephen Hill conductor with guest performers from the West End

A homage to the compositions and arrangements of Sir John Dankworth, one of the defining figures of British Jazz, and his wife Dame Cleo Laine. The evening also includes the presentation of the 2013 Dankworth Composition Prize, and a performance of the winning piece. From the Johnny Dankworth Seven in 1950 through to the seminal Big Band of the 1960s and 70s, Dankworth’s music was characterised by a unique sound and unusual instrumentation. This evening recreates that sound. Presented in association with the Worshipful Company of Musicians.

CONTEMPORARY

Hall Two 8pm

A selection of musical theatre from the 1940s to the present day, this concert explores the vocal and musical styles of Broadway and the West End over the years. Includes excerpts from the more traditional Carousel, My Fair Lady and Candide through Wicked, Legally Blonde and We Will Rock You to the brand-new Book of Mormon.

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 16 February ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

A Musical Theatre Celebration Royal Academy of Music Musical Theatre Company

Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £16.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 17 February LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Chilingirian Quartet The Romantic Piano Quintets – 4 Haydn String Quartet in C, Op. 74 No. 1 [Hob. III:72]  Britten String Quartet No. 3, Op. 94 Dvorˇák Piano Quintet No. 2 in A, Op. 81 Chilingirian Quartet Michael Dussek piano CLASSICAL

Paul Brough

Royal Academy of Music Big Band

Impropera

Chilingirian Quartet

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Valentine’s Special Offer: Ticket + 3 courses + a glass of Prosecco.   All for £29.50

LISTINGS 61 LISTINGS

Thursday 14 February

February 2013

Another in the Chilingirian Quartet’s survey of famous Romantic piano quintets. They are joined by Michael Dussek in the beautiful Dvorák Quintet, composed in 1887. The quartet also perform a mid-period Haydn quartet and, in celebration of his centenary, some music by Britten − his final quartet, composed at the very end of his life in 1975. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50


62 LISTINGS

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February 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS Bach unwrapped week 4 18 – 22 FEBRUARY

Monday 18 February WORDS ON MONDAY

Benjamin Britten: A Life in the Twentieth Century Paul Kildea SPOKEN WORD CLASSICAL The former Head of Music at the Aldeburgh Festival, writer and conductor Paul Kildea talks about his major new biography of Benjamin Britten. He will play clips to show how Britain’s greatest 20th-century composer recreated English music in a fresh, modern, European form. Kildea will also discuss the two disadvantages faced by Britten: his passionate pacifism and his homosexuality, helping us understand the relationship between his music and his life. Hall One 7pm £9.50 | or £6.50 if booked with any of the Britten at 100 concerts (see pp 58-59)

OUT HEAR BACH UNWRAPPED

Pekka Kuusisto: Bach and electronic improvisations Bach Partita in D minor, BWV 1004 with electronic improvisations based on funeral chorales and Finnish funeral tunes Pekka Kuusisto violin & electric violin CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL

Pekka Kuusisto

Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto is one of the most versatile and distinctive musicians working today. Always demonstrating his extraordinary individuality and imagination, he is Paul Kildea

Pekka Kuusisto improvises chorales on electric violin; the art of fugue by fretwork In this fourth week of Bach Unwrapped we welcome Finnish dynamo violinist Pekka Kuusisto, who will improvise on funeral chorales between movements of the Partita in D minor. Soprano Carolyn Sampson joins the Academy of St Martin in the Fields and Fretwork will perform their highly successful transcription of The Art of Fugue. See Bach Unwrapped feature p28–32

acclaimed for the spontaneity and freshness in his playing. He is set apart from most other violinists of his generation by his ability to improvise, and his love of different musical styles. ‘Pekka Kuusisto is the very embodiment of joyful music-making’ The Toronto Star Hall Two 8pm £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Wednesday 20 February BACH UNWRAPPED

Fretwork: The Art of Fugue The Art of Fugue, BWV 1080 Fretwork viol consort Liam Byrne, Asako Morikawa, Reiko Ichise, Richard Tunnicliffe & Richard Boothby CLASSICAL Just as the fugal form itself was becoming unfashionable, Bach produced its apotheosis in the immensely rich Art of Fugue. Traditionally played on the keyboard, it’s been arranged for orchestra and string quartet, but for Richard Boothby of Fretwork, it translates extremely well to viol consort: ‘Bach would probably never have heard the antiquated viol consort, but the range of pitches and homogeneity of timbres makes it ideal for this work … We bring the great tradition of 16th – and 17th – century English music to this last great flowering of contrapuntal ingenuity.’ Hall One 7.30pm £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 Online Savers £9.50 Fretwork


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LISTINGS 63 LISTINGS

February 2013

Thursday 21 February BACH UNWRAPPED

vPEKKA KUUSISTO © KAAPO KAPU | KATYA APEKAISHEVA © JACK LIEBECK | CAROLYN SAMPSON © ANNELIES VAN DER VEGT | OLIVIA CHANEY © PATRICK WILLIAMS | SARAH BENETTO © GISABELLE ADAM | ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS © CHRIS CHRISTODOULOU | OTHER ARTISTS © PROMO PHOTOS

Katya Apekisheva: Inventions & Sinfonias and Italian Concerto Inventions & Sinfonias (Two- and Three-Part Inventions), BWV 772–801  Italian Concerto, BWV 971

Alwynne Pritchard

Langham Research Centre

Sarah Bennetto

Olivia Chaney

Katya Apekisheva piano CLASSICAL Leeds prize-winner Katya Apekisheva performs the Book of Two- and Three-Part Inventions, the album through which so many young pianists discover Bach. In his journey through the keys, Bach created two sets of 15 masterful miniatures, each with a contrasting character, technically rigorous yet highly expressive and designed to help students ‘learn to play two voices clearly … and to achieve a cantabile style of playing’. Apekisheva follows these with the much-loved Italian Concerto, a three-movement solo work in the Vivaldian tradition, of tremendous energy and appeal.  ‘Astute colours and brilliant technique.’ The Times

Katya Apekisheva

Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Storytellers’ Club with Sarah Bennetto & Friends COMEDY Late one winter’s night, Sarah Bennetto gathers her comedy friends round   a brilliant ̒faux-log campfire ̓ to tell witching-hour tales to blow your mind and break your heart. Special guest storytellers from the comedy and music world, just telling stories. Brilliant ones. Simple as that really. Storytellers’ Club is the cult creation of stand-up comic Sarah Bennetto, springing to life in 2006, after an evening of comics and musicians telling stories ‘round the campfire’. Shortly after, a monthly club was born, now resident year-round at Pleasance Islington, and appearing at UK music / arts festivals, the Melbourne Comedy Festival, and the Edinburgh Fringe. Full line-up to be announced very soon. Storytellers’ Club: you show, we tell.  ‘A magical idea.’ The Metro, London ‘Unashamedly literate and lo-fi.’   The Independent, UK Hall Two 8pm £9.50

Carolyn Sampson

Friday 22 February BACH UNWRAPPED

Academy of St Martin in the Fields with Carolyn Sampson: Concertos and Cantatas – 1 with Pre-concert Talk Cantata ‘Non sa che sia dolore’, BWV 209  Concerto in A minor for flute, violin   & harpsichord, BWV 1044  Concerto in D minor for two violins,   BWV 1043  Cantata ‘Ich habe genug’, BWV 82 Carolyn Sampson soprano Soloists from the Academy of St Martin in the Fields CLASSICAL The first in a series of three concerts which are part of the year-long Bach Unwrapped. The orchestra is joined by renowned soprano Carolyn Sampson in programmes which set some of Bach’s most beautiful cantatas alongside each of the concertos composed for violin – solo, doubled, or alongside another instrument. This programme sets two stunning solo

Academy of St Martin in the Fields

soprano arias alongside Bach’s Concerto for two violins, and a second for harpsichord and flute. Pre-concert Talk – St Pancras Rm 6.30pm Performance – Hall One 7.30pm £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 Online Savers £9.50 Pre-concert talk is FREE, but requires separate ticket. Contact Box Office to reserve your seat.

MONday 25 February OUT HEAR

Langham Research Centre: OBAMIX + John Cage

FOLK

Felix Carey tape, radio Iain Chambers tape, radio Andrew McGregor newsreader Alwynne Pritchard soprano Philip Tagney synthesizer, tape, radio Robert Worby radio, tape, effects Jo Langton radio

Olivia trained as a pianist, singer and composer at Chetham’s School of Music and the RAM. She taught herself guitar and harmonium and has carved out her own sound. Obvious influences are songwriters of the 60s, the origins of opera, and folk music from all over. Her writing, performing and collaborations are subtle, powerful and wide-reaching.  ‘Haunting, majestic and truly stunning’ Bearded Magazine ‘Pure-voiced romanticism’ MOJO

The premiere of Langham Research Centre’s OBAMIX, a unique musique concrète chorale for open-reel tape machines and soprano Alwynne Pritchard. It examines the rhetorical flourishes of the speech-maker, drawing its libretto from three of Barack Obama’s defining speeches. It invites us to question the assumed choreography of speech-giving,   and how our physical bodies serve our words. In addition to OBAMIX, LRC will perform John Cage’s rarely-heard Speech (1955).

Hall Two 8pm

Hall Two 8pm

£9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Olivia Chaney & Friends

CONTEMPORARY


64 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

February 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS JEWISH BOOK WEEK curated by Hester Abrams & Mekella Broomberg 23 February – 3 March

Saturday 23 February JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Double-Bill: Leonard Cohen Tribute – Part 1

Bernard Avishai: Promiscuous

SPOKEN WORD Leonard Cohen has had many incarnations: seen by many as a living musical legend, he has been a novelist, poet, folk singer, and Buddhist monk. Admitting to influences as wide ranging as Hebrew prayer and Lorca, Cohen himself has in turn inspired generations of artists. Salman Rushdie said, ‘If I could write like that, I would.’ Jewish Book Week, in conjunction with the Jewish Music Institute and Faber Books presents an evening of appreciation for Cohen’s poetry, prose and lyrics. In the first part of the evening, poets and musicians will discuss Cohen’s lyrics and continuing legacy. Speakers to include Sophie Solomon and music journalist Dorian Lynskey. Hall One 7.30pm £9.50 | £19.50 with the 9.30pm event

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Double-Bill: Leonard Cohen Tribute – Part 2 CONTEMPORARY The event will culminate in a set of covers of Cohen’s songs by a selection of outstanding musicians. Full line-up soon to be announced at kingsplace.co.uk Hall One 9pm £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50 £19.50 with the 7.30pm event

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

a rich tapestry of ideas, debate, NEW VOICES, FILM, music and PERFORMANCE at jewish book week Jewish Book Week is back at Kings Place bursting at the seams with writers, historians, photographers, musicians and artists, including Simon Schama, John McCarthy, Howard Jacobson, Fania Oz-Salzberger, Naomi Alderman, Edmund de Waal, Rachel Lichtenstein, Carlo Ginzburg plus a Leonard Cohen tribute in words and music. See Jewish Book Week features on pp 34, 36 and 42

Sunday 24 February

Dilemmas of Difference

A biography of Portnoy’s Complaint SPOKEN WORD Portnoy’s Complaint provoked instant, powerful reactions when first published in 1969 and retains an enduring hold over the imagination today. In Promiscuous, Bernard Avishai offers a definitive biography of the satiric masterpiece, based on Philip Roth’s own writings, teaching notes, and personal interviews. Hall One 11am £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

John McCarthy: You Can’t Hide the Sun SPOKEN WORD Journalist and broadcaster John McCarthy endured captivity for five years as a hostage in Lebanon in the late 1980s. The mystique of the Middle East and its myriad complexities have drawn him back. In his latest book, You Can’t Hide the Sun, McCarthy weaves moving testimony from Israeli Palestinians with his own experiencte. Hall One 12.30pm £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

My Sister Rosalind Franklin Jenifer Glynn SPOKEN WORD

Four generations after the Holocaust, Europe’s fastest-growing Jewish community faces new challenges, from Günter Grass’s anti-Israel poem What Must Be Said, to furious debate over the legality of circumcision and assaults against Jews in the street. Join writers of two generations for a keynote discussion on what it means to be Jewish and German today. It will raise provocative questions about difference and identity that resonate with all multicultural societies.

Rosalind Franklin was perhaps the 20th century’s most famous woman scientist. Her outstanding abilities as a crystallographer led to the key X-ray image that provided the basis for Crick and Watson’s famous cracking of the structure of DNA. Franklin has often been portrayed as a feminist scientist valiantly battling against a male-dominated scientific world. In this personal, family view of the brilliant young woman overlooked for the Nobel prize, her younger sister Jenifer Glynn captures the impression of a warm and rounded personality, who loved science for its own sake.

Hall Two 7.30pm

St Pancras Room 12.30pm

£9.50

£6.50

German Jews, Jewish Germans SPOKEN WORD


LISTINGS 65

Naomi Alderman: The Liar’s Gospel

ancient Persia, collector René Braginsky will present gems from his collection of illuminated scrolls of the Book of Esther.

discussion with AD Miller about his debut novel, which won the 2011 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature.

Hall Two 5pm

Hall Two 6.30pm

SPOKEN WORD

£9.50

£9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

SPOKEN WORD

AB Yehoshua: The Retrospective

‘Father of the atom bomb’ Oppenheimer is among the most contentious figures of the 20th century. Of German-Jewish ancestry, he went on to oversee the successful effort to beat the Nazis in developing the first atomic bomb. But his was not a simple  story of assimilation, scientific success and world fame. Renowned biographer Ray Monk traces the elusive Jewishness of this most brilliant and divisive of men.

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Naomi Alderman, one of the most   exciting writers of her generation, talks   to Giles Fraser about her latest novel,   in which she explores the inception of   Christianity. She unravels the story of Yehoshuah, a Jew who wanders   Roman-occupied Judea giving sermons and healing the sick. One year after   his death, four narrators – his mother, best friend, the High Priest and a rebel leader – offer their own versions of events... a̒ nd either something miraculous happened, or someone lied’. Hall One 2pm £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Howard Jacobson: How to Make Love to Your Mother-in-Law

David Miliband on Tony Judt and the Left ‘Tony Judt, Europe and the future of the Left’ The late Tony Judt was a towering historian of the 20th century and a fearless commentator on world affairs, including the challenges for the Left after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Former Foreign Secretary David Miliband reflects on the challenges facing Europe now, in this conversation with David Aaronovitch about Judt’s influence and the options for renewal of left-wing politics. Hall One 6.30pm

Hall One 8pm

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Man Booker Prize-winning author   Howard Jacobson discusses his latest novel, Zoo Time, with Rodge Glass. Guy Ableman is a disenchanted novelist facing a world where fiction might be dead but desire is alive and thriving in inappropriate places. Enjoy a frank  and funny discussion about love –   love of literature, laughter and women (particularly mothers-in-law).

JEWISH BOOK WEEK The Elusive Jewishness of J Robert Oppenheimer

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

Monday 25 February

Ray Monk

One of the world’s most esteemed   writers, AB Yehoshua, author of Mr Mani and Friendly Fire, amongst others, returns to the festival with his latest   novel, The Retrospective. This beautiful and meditative novel centres on an   Israeli filmmaker who travels to Spain   for a retrospective of his work. Whilst   there, he sees a painting which triggers   a memory and drives him to explore the relationship between life and art, an artist and his muses.

SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK ILLUSTRATION © HARDIE / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM | AUSTIN RATNER © NINA SUBIN | JAMI ATTENBERG © MICHAEL SHARKEY | OTHER SPEAKERS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

February 2013

St Pancras Room 1pm £6.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Good Living Street Tim Bonyhady

David Miliband

Francesca Segal

Austin Ratner

Jami Attenberg

Hall One 3.30pm £9.50

SPOKEN WORD Tim Bonyhady’s family were leading art patrons in fin-de-siècle Vienna. The portrait of his great-grandmother Hermine Gallia   is the only Klimt in London’s National Gallery. In Good Living Street he remembers three generations of his family, who had lived in unimaginable luxury before the German takeover of Austria forced them to flee. In 1938 his family left for a small flat in Australia, taking with them the best private collection of art and design to escape the Nazis. The past was rarely discussed and it was 50 years before Bonyhady discovered the remarkable arc of his family’s fortunes. St Pancras Room 5.30pm

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

René Braginsky’s collection of Esther Scrolls SPOKEN WORD Meet the man behind what has been called the world’s most remarkable private collection of Hebrew manuscripts. To mark Purim, the festival which commemorates the saving of the Jews from annihilation in Howard Jacobson

FREE

JEWISH BOOK WEEK JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

The Jump Artist

Marriage in the Suburbs

Austin Ratner

Francesca Segal & Jami Attenberg

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

Philippe Halsman was famous for photographing the 20th-century’s greatest names jumping in mid-air   – from Dali to Monroe, Hitchcock to Picasso. But his professional renown masked a shocking tragedy haunting   his life. In 1928, aged 22, Halsman was unjustly accused of murdering his   father in the Austrian Alps in a   sensational trial whose anti-semitism foreshadowed the Holocaust. Austin Ratner comes to Britain for this  

Two witty and generous portraits of suburban family life, Jewish style. In The Innocents, Segal’s childhood sweethearts Adam and Rachel are set for a life of domestic bliss in Hampstead Garden Suburb. In Chicago, setting for The Middlesteins, Attenberg’s Edie, matriarch of the Middlesteins, is eating herself to death and her family can’t stop her.

Schama’s latest book is expected to be hotly discussed in 2013. Accompanied by a major BBC TV series, it is a landmark history from the time of Moses to our own. Schama joins us for a preview presentation of a story of journeys from Brooklyn to Berlin, passages to India, slow boats to China, a richly-peopled intellectual territory from the invention of a single God to the horrors of the 20th century.

Hall Two 8pm

Hall One 7pm

£9.50

£9.50

Simon Schama’s History of the Jews

LISTINGS

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66 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

February 2013

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Chief Rabbi’s 22 years of Writing and Reading

Fania Oz-Salzberger: How did the Jews Remain Jews?

And Europe Will Be Stunned

The Chief Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

In August 2013 Lord Sacks retires as Chief Rabbi of the Commonwealth and spiritual head of the largest orthodox synagogue body in Britain. He has led the post with wisdom and authority through turbulent times for Jews and earned worldwide renown for his writing on multiculturalism, tradition, continuity and belief. In this valedictory lecture, Sacks reflects on his intellectual legacy. Timed for the publication of essays in his honour, this is a journey into the mind of a man of our times.

Historian Fania Oz-Salzberger comes to the festival to discuss Jews and Words, which she wrote together with her father, the celebrated Israeli novelist Amos Oz. They trace a rich Jewish history of the spoken and written word from the Bible to today. Through a blend of storytelling, scholarship, conversation and argument the book explores a ‘textline’ of ties between Jews that has been passed on through generations and shaped a people.

Hall One 8.30pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Hall Two 8.30pm £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Tuesday 26 February JEWISH BOOK WEEK

We Are Here Voices from Lithuania SPOKEN WORD American journalist Ellen Cassedy travelled to the land of her forbears and found herself face to face with memory and moral dilemmas. She explores Lithuania’s efforts to build a civil and tolerant society on the site of a bloody history. We Are Here shines a light on fragile efforts toward mutual understanding and asks how heritage can be honoured without perpetuating the fears and hatreds of the past. St Pancras Room 1pm £6.50

Carlo Ginzburg: Jews and Christians

Poland and the Loss or Return of the Jews Film Screening & Panel Discussion SPOKEN WORD An evening dedicated to new interpretations of Poland’s Jewish past and the potential of art to imagine a different future. A discussion between Polish cultural activist Sławomir Sierakowski, Polish-Jewish intellectual Stanisław Krajewski, writer Eva Hoffman, scholar François Guesnet and art historian Tamar Garb follows a screening of the visionary trilogy And Europe Will Be Stunned. The event also previews the 2013 opening of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews on the site of the Warsaw Ghetto. Hall Two 7.30pm; Interval 8.30pm; Panel Discussion – 8.50pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

A Story of Ambivalence SPOKEN WORD

Eva Hoffman

Ginzburg, the pioneer of ‘micro-history’, is considered by many to be the outstanding European historian of his generation. Best known for The Cheese and the Worms, an account of a 16th-century miller burned at the stake for heresy, this profoundly original thinker talks with fellow Renaissance scholar Lisa Jardine about the ambivalent relationship between Christians and Jews over the centuries.

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Rachel Lichtenstein: Diamond Street The Hidden World of Hatton Garden SPOKEN WORD Rachel Lichtenstein uncovers Hatton Garden, ‘one of the most secret streets in England’. Intimately connected to the area both personally, through her family’s jewellery business, and as an artist-archivist of London streets, Lichtenstein explores the extraordinary and vanishing history of this mysterious quarter, a hub of ancient burial sites, diamond workshops, underground vaults, subterranean rivers, monastic dynasties and forgotten palaces.

Hall One 8.30pm

Wednesday 27 February

Edmund de Waal

Thursday 28 February

Hall One 7pm £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Yehuda Avner: The Prime Ministers

The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Beginnings of Midrash

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

Boianjiu comes to the festival for the UK launch of his debut novel, The People of Forever are Not Afraid, which is a disconcerting and often surreal coming-of-age story set in the Israeli army. Written in English by a 25-year-old Israeli dubbed a hot new literary talent, it introduces three girlfriends conscripted into endless boredom and danger, entering adulthood with guns.

The Prime Ministers has been called ‘the ultimate insider’s account’ of politics and top-secret decision-making by five Israeli prime ministers. Top political aide Yehuda Avner worked beside Levi Eshkol, Golda Meir, Yitzhak Rabin, Menachem Begin and Shimon Peres, and was present for major moments including Begin’s 1981 decision to bomb an Iraqi nuclear reactor and Rabin’s handling of the 1976 Entebbe airport rescue mission. He talks to David Pryce-Jones.

One of the things the Dead Sea Scrolls have shown is what Jews in ancient times thought about the Bible, even before its last chapters were written. The scrolls have provided some of the most ancient written examples of traditional Jewish interpretation, and a snapshot of how that interpretation, known as ‘Midrash’, arose. Renowned Jewish biblical scholar James Kugel traces the patterns of meaning that began in the time of the Second Temple.

In 1939, Helga Weiss, 11, began a diary of life in Nazi-occupied Prague, keeping it for three years in Terezín and resuming aged 151/2 on returning home after Auschwitz. Helga, who lives today in the apartment where she was born, comes to Jewish Book Week to present her remarkable and rare first-hand contemporary record of the Nazi era, which has been compared to that of Anne Frank.

St Pancras Room 5.30pm

Hall One 7pm

Hall Two 5.30pm

Hall Two 7pm

FREE

£9.50

FREE

£9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Shani Boianjiu: The People of Forever are Not Afraid SPOKEN WORD

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Helga’s Diary A rare account of surviving the Holocaust SPOKEN WORD


JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Edmund de Waal: The Exiles Return

compelling, and what can we expect to see next on our screens? Hall One 7.30pm £9.50

SPOKEN WORD The ceramicist and acclaimed author   of The Hare with the Amber Eyes turns a new page in his family’s story. He comes to Jewish Book Week to present a new edition of his grandmother’s novel about her experiences in Nazi-occupied Austria. Elisabeth De Waal’s book follows four exiles as they return to Vienna in the early 1950s, 15 years after their escape. The publication marks 75 years since the Anschluss. Hall One 8.30pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

From The Feminine Mystique to Fifty Shades – 50 Years On Bidisha, Julie Bindel, Kira Cochrane & Leah Thorn

EDMUND DE WAAL © HANNAH JAMES | RACHEL LICHTENSTEIN © JAMES PRICE | THOMAS HEATHERWICK © ELENA HEATHERWICK | EVA HOFFMAN © SUPPLIED PHOTO

SPOKEN WORD ‘The book that pulled the trigger on history,’ The Feminine Mystique created an instant impact on its publication in 1963, altering consciousness, culture and lives. Fifty years on, Jewish Book Week looks at the continued reverberations of Betty Friedan’s feminist rallying cry, in a discussion including two generations of women. Hall Two 8.30pm £9.50

march SATURDAY 2 March JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Israeli TV Drama Takes the World By Storm Sayed Kashua & Ron Leshem SPOKEN WORD Viewers the world over have been glued to terrorism drama Homeland, an American version of Prisoners of War, which was originally made for home consumption in Israel. The country’s screenwriters and producers are in high demand as TV concepts are bought by international companies and hit the global mainstream. So what makes Israeli television drama so

Sunday 3 March JEWISH BOOK WEEK

The Art and Photography of Marianne Breslauer Christina Feilchenfeldt SPOKEN WORD Breslauer was a young photographer in Weimar Germany who captured the essence of life in an era coming to a close.   She knew Man Ray and Marlene Dietrich, and later, in Switzerland, ran one of the most significant art dealerships of the time.  Her granddaughter Christina Feilchenfeldt comes from Berlin to tell an extraordinary story of art and the avant-garde. Hall One 11am £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Orlando Figes & Nancy K. Miller: Traces of the Past SPOKEN WORD How do a historian and a literary critic recreate the pasts of people they’ve never met, with little more than papers and a few objects to go on? In conversation with Henrietta Foster, Orlando Figes and Nancy   K. Miller share the challenges of building a picture of ordinary lives, in a discussion of his new book based on the largest cache ever found of letters from the Gulag, and her American family chronicle. Hall Two 11am £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Sayed Kashua: Exposure SPOKEN WORD Celebrated author Sayed Kashua portrays Palestinian Israelis with complex and conflicted identities with a wry wisdom   that he made his own in two novels and   a popular Israeli TV sitcom, Arab Labour. Here the Hebrew-writing author presents his third novel, Exposure, in a discussion with Ariel Kahn as part of the Arab-Israeli Book Club. Hall One 12.30pm £9.50

LISTINGS 67

February–March 2013

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Rachel Lichtenstein

Inside the Courts of the Chassidim Gil Cohen-Magen SPOKEN WORD News photographer Gil Cohen-Magen spent a decade getting to know the closed world of Israel’s ultra-orthodox, persuading community elders to let him record their daily lives, family ceremonies and religious rituals in a project that changed his own perceptions. Cohen-Magen comes to London to open a lens on a little-known world.

Thomas Heatherwick

St Pancras Room 12.30pm £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here?

Thomas Heatherwick: Making

Anthony Clavanne & David Dee SPOKEN WORD A secret social history of beautiful games: two writers upset the widely held belief that Jews and sport don’t mix. Anthony Clavane celebrates the unsung pioneers who played a key role in English football’s transformation from working-class pursuit to global entertainment industry, and Dave Dee shows the impact British Jews have had on a century of sport, from football to boxing and golf. Hall Two 3.30pm £6.50

SPOKEN WORD Visionary designer Thomas Heatherwick has been called the ‘Leonardo da Vinci   of our times’. From his London studio have come the 2012 Olympic Games cauldron, a revamp of London’s double-decker Routemaster bus, a Seed Cathedral, and creations all over the world that combine beauty with thought, process and function. Heatherwick comes to Jewish Book Week to share the conceptual genius behind his creations, exploring the material and the spiritual. Hall One 8pm £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Nights Out in Cosmopolitan London

Walking with the Light

Judith Walkowitz

Jonathan Wittenberg

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

In the years up to WWII, Soho was transformed from a dark quarter infamous for sex and crime into a mecca of shopping,  restaurants and night-life entertainments. Judith Walkowitz looks at the particular contribution of Jews ‘up West’, from the schleppers of Berwick Street market to the tailors of Savile Row and the musicians   of the Lyon’s Corner Houses.

North London rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg talks about his journey from the site of his grandfather’s destroyed Frankfurt synagogue to his own. With his dog Mitzpah by his side, in 2010 he walked 300 miles with a ̒Ner Tamid’, an eternal light, reflecting on Jewish life past and present, and meeting Christians and Muslims across northern Europe.

Hall Two 5pm

Hall Two 8pm

£9.50

£9.50

Jewish Book Week Ticket Offers Group Booking* Group of 6 or more people for one event  20% discount

Multi-event discount* Book 3 or 4 events and save 15% Book 5 or 6 events and save 20% Book 7 or more events and save 30% * Excludes Online Savers

LISTINGS

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68 LISTINGS

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March 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS THE Schubert Ensemble: 30th Anniversary 7 – 9 March

Monday 4 March WORDS ON MONDAY

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE AT 30

Poetry and Medicine

Schubertiade

Curated by Poet in the City in association with Medicine Unboxed

Schubert String Trio Movement in B flat, D471 Piano Quintet in A, D667 The Trout Piano Trio No. 2 in E flat, D929

SPOKEN WORD Poetry can bring new perspectives to the ideas we have about medicine and health. This exciting and innovative event, in collaboration with Medicine Unboxed, will feature acclaimed contemporary poets who have written about health from outside the medical profession, with contributions from experts from within it. Featuring Costa Prize winning poet Jo Shapcott (Of Mutability, 2010), Dr Sam Guglani, Curator of Medicine Unboxed and Baroness Sheila Hollins. Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

MANIFESTO I. Futurist Manifesto II. Dadaist Manifesto III. Vorticist Manifesto III. Lettrist Manifesto V. Fluxus Lore Lixenberg voice with Aleks Kolkowski, Rob Worby, Federico Reuben & Greg Rose CONTEMPORARY An exciting evening that centres on performances and readings of avant-garde manifestos from the 20th century by experimental vocalist and opera singer Lore Lixenberg. She uses her voice to present the manifestos as they have never been heard before. Lixenberg introduces extracts from of rarely heard gems where art, music, performance and philosophy combine, alongside music that comes from the time of the manifestos themselves.

the schubert ensemble celebrate 30 glorious years with the classics and the new The Schubert Ensemble began life with a performance of The Trout. Thirty years on they celebrate their rewarding journey with a Schubertiade, an exploration of some of the repertoire they have brought to prominence, here Enescu’s First Piano Quartet, and look to the future with the Lawson Trio, with whom they perform a bevy of brilliant new commissions. See Classical Highlights p10

Thursday 7 March

Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

The Schubert Ensemble Simon Blendis violin Douglas Paterson viola Jane Salmon cello Peter Buckoke double bass William Howard piano CLASSICAL Early in 1983, The Schubert Ensemble came together for the first time to play Schubert’s Trout Quintet at St Martin-inthe-Fields. This much-loved and sparkling work, which gives the Ensemble their distinctive line-up with double bass, forms an appropriate centrepiece to the opening concert of their 30th-anniversary celebrations. Starting the programme is the 19-year-old Schubert’s charming and lyrical String Trio Movement in B flat, and in the second half is his E flat Piano Trio, a late work of incredible virtuosity, passion and beauty. Its vast emotional landscape makes it without doubt one of the greatest works in the whole chamber repertoire, and one of Schubert’s crowning achievements. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Rachel Stubbings is… Stubbing Out Problems COMEDY After a sell-out run at the Edinburgh Fringe, Rachel brings her agony aunt show to Kings Place for an exciting extended show. Bad breath? Up the duff with a man old enough to be your dad? Rachel can help. When she realised she had a gift for healing, Rachel set up Stubbing Out Problems – her own online agony aunt business. Now she’s pulled all the best bits together into a live multimedia show. Come watch her heal people by every means possible! **** The Metro ‘Original and intelligent ... Her performance is perfectly polished and professional ... it’s easy to become captivated by her weird little world.’ **** Broadway Baby Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50


Friday 8 March

Sunday 10 March LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE AT 30

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE AT 30

Looking to the Future 1

with Pre-Concert Talk: ‘Exploring Enescu’

Cheryl Frances-Hoad Marathon, Relay, Walk, Sprint! Anthony Powers Piano Trio (2010) and ‘Chamber Music 2000’ pieces performed by student groups

The Schubert Ensemble CLASSICAL The Schubert Ensemble have always   had a passion for championing neglected works of the past that deserve a wider hearing. This concert offers a rare chance to hear Ensecu’s brilliantly colourful and virtuosic First Piano Quartet (1909) played by musicians who have taken this composer to their hearts. The performance also features the darkly passionate Second Piano Quartet by Gabriel Fauré, one of Enescu’s most important teachers. The pre-concert   talk gives a players’ perspective on the Enescu Quartet, illustrated with extracts. Pre-concert Talk – Hall One 6.30pm Performance – Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50 Pre-concert talk is FREE, but requires separate  ticket. Contact Box Office to reserve your seat.

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE © JOHN CLARK | BRASS MONKEY © SAM URQUHART | THREE CANE WHALE © PAUL WIGENS | ALEXANDER HAWKINS © EMILE HOLBA

Three Cane Whale Exclusive Album Launch Alex Vann mandolin, bowed psaltery, music box, zither  Paul Bradley acoustic guitar, miniature harp   Pete Judge trumpet, harmonium, lyre, glockenspiel, dulcitone FOLK Multi-instrumental acoustic trio Three Cane  Whale show the influences of folk, minimalism, classical and film music. Their music evokes a diversity of landscapes, journeys, atmospheres and incidents. Alex Vann is mandolinist with the hugely innovative Spiro, Pete Judge plays trumpet for the equally highly-  regarded Get The Blessing (BBC Jazz Award-  winners) and Paul Bradley is currently touring as the one-man band for Fleur Darkin’s Dance Company. The band’s eponymous debut album was recorded live in an 11-hour shift in an 18th-  century Bristol church, and was chosen by Cerys Matthews as one of her ‘Top Five modern folk albums’ (Sunday Telegraph). Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Rosamunde Trio: The Complete Beethoven Piano Trios – 2

Chamber Music 2000+

Brass Monkey

Lawson Trio Annabelle Lawson piano Fenella Humphreys violin Rebecca Knight cello with student groups

£4.50 | or FREE to ticket holders for the 7.30pm concert

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE: 30TH ANNIVERSARY

Looking to the Future 2 Schubert Ensemble Commissions Huw Watkins Piano Quartet (2012) Joe Cutler Slippery Music (2010)* Edward Rushton Piano Quartet (2013)** JS Bach (arr. John Woolrich) Five Chorales (2000) Pavel Zemek Novák Unisono (2011)* David Knotts Night Song and Garden Quadrille (2010) David Matthews Five to Tango (1993) Martin Butler American Rounds (1998) * London premiere | ** World premiere

The Schubert Ensemble CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL The anniversary celebrations culminate in a fascinating and varied programme drawn  from the 45 works they’ve commissioned. This concert features the world premiere of a new Piano Quartet by Edward Rushton,  the London premiere of Joe Cutler’s quirky and playful Slippery Music, and colourful and lyrical works by David Knotts and Huw Watkins. David Matthews’ 70th

Beethoven Piano Trio in C minor, Op. 1/3 Variations in G, Op. 121a Kakadu Piano Trio in E flat, Op. 70/2 CLASSICAL

CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL Chamber Music 2000 was set up in 1998 by The Schubert Ensemble to create a repertoire of works for piano and strings for young and amateur musicians. In this concert, the Lawson Trio perform a work written for them by Anthony Powers, together with a movement from Cheryl Frances-Hoad’s witty Five Rackets For Trio Relay for double piano trio. The rest of the 45-minute programme consists of Chamber Music 2000 pieces performed by student groups. This concert celebrates the launch of Chamber Music 2000+, a new edition of pieces commissioned by The Schubert Ensemble and the Lawson Trio. Hall One 6pm

FOLK UNION

LISTINGS 69

Saturday 9 March

Enescu & Fauré: Neglected Genius Enescu Piano Quartet No. 1 in D, Op. 16 Fauré Piano Quartet No. 2 in G minor, Op. 45

March 2013

Three Cane Whale

birthday (on the day of the concert) is celebrated with his Five to Tango, and there are two beautiful and distinctive homages to Bach and his family by John Woolrich and Pavel Zemek Novák. Martin Butler’s American Rounds is one of the Ensemble’s best-loved commissions.

The Rosamunde Trio, a piano trio of international soloists, continues its Beethoven series. This concert features one of the early works from the 1790s   and the delightful Kakadu Variations, alongside the wonderful second of the Op. 70 Trios, too often overshadowed by the Ghost Trio, with which it was published. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

HIDDEN TREASURE

Brass Monkey Exclusive Album Launch

Hall One 7.30pm

FOLK

£14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

Now, marking their third decade together, Brass Monkey are back after their massive success at recent festivals, sounding as fresh and original as ever! 2012 saw the band’s 30th anniversary and, following a number of sporadic reunions over the years, they celebrated in style. They now launch a new CD and DVD Brass Monkey – The Best Of Live on Park Records, capturing the magic of those celebratory concerts. Original members Martin Carthy, John Kirkpatrick, Roger Williams and Martin Brinsford were joined first by trumpeter Paul Archibald and more recently by Shane Brennan to form a six strong line-up, playing concerts and festivals across the UK. A band as ready to move forward as they were to look to the past, they are recording a new album – their first as a six-piece in spring 2013. Brass Monkey are back – as bright, exciting and loud as ever.

There'll be a post-concert reception in St Pancras   Room, also featuring a surprise premiere by the Schubert Ensemble. Members of audience who have booked all performances may reserve their place via Box Office until 7 Feb 2013. Limited availability. Book early to avoid disappointment.

THE BASE

Alexander Hawkins Ensemble Alexander Hawkins piano Dylan Bates violin Neil Charles double bass Otto Fischer electric guitar Shabaka Hutchings clarinets Tom Skinner drums JAZZ Pianist and composer Alexander Hawkins has been described as ‘unlike anything else in modern creative music’. His highly individual soundworld is a result of his search to reconcile his love of free improvisation with his fascination with composition and structure. One early reviewer said ‘the range of tonal colours and breadth of activity that this ensemble can actualise is staggering’. The Ensemble, now in its second incarnation, expands the palette to even more daring ends.  ‘A colossal talent’
Jazz on 3 Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Hall Two 8pm £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Alexander Hawkins

LISTINGS

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70 LISTINGS

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March 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS hidden treasure

Monday 11 March TALKING ART

Jeremy Gardiner: Unfolding Landscape

curated by alan bearman music

SPOKEN WORD

13 – 15 March

Jeremy Gardiner’s paintings are effectively an artistic excavation of the geology of landscape: how it is shaped by human activity and the forces of nature. His artistic exploration has taken him from the Jurassic coast of Dorset to the rugged coast of Cornwall, passing through the dramatic American landscape, the rough volcanic islands of Brazil, the arid beauty of the island of Milos in Greece and more recently the Lake District and its numerous waterfalls. His paintings become a symbolic map, interpreting and capturing the impact of human and natural events, the activities in time and space that have shaped, textured and coloured the landscape to give it a unique, contemporary depth and beauty. St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

Irish composers. Formed in 2003 by Irish composer Ed Bennett, and recently described in The Guardian as an ensemble performing ‘Unclassifiable, raw-nerve music of huge energy and imagination’, Decibel explore experimental, energetic, extreme and unusual work between or outside the usual categories. They play contemporary music, combining a direct amplified instrumental ensemble sound with electronics, improvisation and theatrical elements. The group’s CD My Broken Machines was Time Out Chicago’s No. 1 Contemporary CD of 2011. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Wednesday 13 March HIDDEN TREASURE

Double Bill: Carthy, Hardy, Farrell & Young + Marry Waterson & Oliver Knight FOLK

WORDS ON MONDAY

Rock’n’Roll Politics with Steve Richards & Guests SPOKEN WORD

Martin Simpson

Award-winning BBC broadcaster and Independent columnist Steve Richards takes you behind the scenes of British politics and the media – the characters, the absurdities, the tragedies. Laugh and cry as you are taken on a whirlwind tour from Harold Wilson and David Bowie in the 1970s to Cameron, Clegg and Miliband, via Blair and Paul McCartney. ‘Rock’n’Roll Politics’ was a smash hit at the 2012 Edinburgh Festival – don’t miss your chance to glimpse another side of Westminster! Hall One 7pm £9.50

a treasure trove of folk greats, FEATURING martin simpson, a bevy of fiddlers and ROY BAILEY AND TONY BENN Celebrated folk programmer Alan Bearman has assembled a wonderful cast for his series, Hidden Treasure. After a special Brass Monkey gig (p69), the series features Martin Simpson, a double header with fiddle quartet Carthy, Hardy, Farrell & Young and Waterson & Knight plus Bailey & Benn’s On The Wall and Britfolk’s brightest new guns; Mawkin.

OUT HEAR

Carthy, Hardy, Farrell and Young brings Eliza Carthy, one of the most impressive and engaging performers of her generation, together with three other fine fiddler singers. Bella Hardy’s captivating voice spins her stories with a balance of strength and sensitivity. Lucy Farrell has sprung to prominence through her work with Jonny Kearney. Kate Young is Scotland’s rising folk pioneer, conveying traditional and world music with passion and drive. Marry and Oliver moved out of the shadow of their mother, folk legend Lal Waterson, with last year’s The Days that Shaped Me album, for which they were nominated for a BBC Folk Award. Their new album, Hidden, showcases the vivid stories and characters inhabiting Marry’s songs. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

Decibel: Big, Noisy, Quiet Ed Bennett New Work for violin and ensemble (Premiere) Joe Cutler Extended Play (Premiere) Sean Clancy I See Now Why People Hide Laurence Crane Classic Stride and Glide Howard Skempton Rising to a Crescendo Michael Wolters German Folk Tunes Damien Harron So Macho

Carthy, Hardy, Farrell & Young

Decibel | Ed Bennett artistic director Daniele Rosina conductor CONTEMPORARY

See Q&A with Alan Bearman on p82

A wild and diverse rhythmic extravaganza of music by the freshest British-based and

Marry Waterson & Oliver Knight


March 2013

Thursday 14 March HIDDEN TREASURE

Tony Benn & Roy Bailey The Writing on The Wall FOLK Benn and Bailey have been entertaining audiences together for 30 years. They won   BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards’ ‘Best Live Act’ in 2003, and they still sell out wherever they go. Witty, perceptive and thought-provoking,  Benn’s memories and anecdotes from a lifetime at the forefront of British politics are interspersed with protest folk from the excellent Bailey, ‘the very soul of folk’s working-class ideals’ (Mojo) and ‘the greatest socialist folksinger of his generation’ (Tony Benn).   ‘Majestic. Provocative. Inspiring’ Mojo

Bach drew on Leipzig Passion traditions and his experience as a composer of church cantatas when he composed and revised the Passion. II: Performance Traditions Timothy Jones is joined by colleagues from the Royal Academy of Music to discuss what we know of Bach’s performances, how new traditions of performing the Passion developed in the mid-19th century, and how they have changed during the era of sound recording.

Hall One 7.30pm

St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm; 2pm–4.30pm

£14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION HIDDEN TREASURE

Mawkin

Hall One 7.30pm

FOLK

£14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

Folk rebels Mawkin are forging a bold new sound that strengthens their instrumental roots and embraces a new, exuberant exploration of the traditional folk canon from the British Isles and beyond. The ‘unconditionally mighty’ (Mojo) four-piece have augmented their sound with the addition of long-time producer and Richardson on drums and percussion. Expect the mesmerising guitar playing of David Delarre, the carnal beats of drummer and percussionist Lee Richardson, richly-textured bass lines from Danny Crump. Add a host of emotive melodies from the frenetic fiddling fingers of James Delarre interplaying with Nick Cooke’s virtuosic melodeon and you have Mawkin.

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Double Bill: Jonny & the Baptists + Colin Hoult COMEDY Surreal, satirical and occasionally sexy, Jonny & the Baptists have taken the comedy world by storm with a riotous collection of songs covering everything from library closures and loneliness to   the decline of the British pub.   **** ‘A triumph’ Chortle Colin Hoult is a razor-sharp character comedian and Writers Guild Comedy Award-winner. Television work includes Ricky Gervais’s Life’s Too Short (BBC) and Russell Howard’s Good News (BBC). **** ‘Rivetingly original ... delightfully  funny’ The Daily Telegraph MARTIN SIMPSON © DAVID BAILEY | COLIN HOULT © IDIL SUKAN | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Simpson. His own songwriting has produced some real gems, from the truck-  stop epic Love Never Dies to the profoundly moving Never Any Good and One Day. Martin has been nominated an astounding 26 times in the 12 years of the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards – more than any other performer – with nine consecutive years as nominee for Musician of The Year, which he has won twice. He is 60 this year, and is marking the occasion with a new album in the spring.

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Colin Hoult

£39.50 | Includes tea & coffee during break

BACH UNWRAPPED

St John Passion St John Passion, BWV 245 John Mark Ainsley Evangelist Roland Wood Christus Sophie Bevan soprano Iestyn Davies alto Andrew Tortise tenor David Stout Pilate | bass The Choir of Clare College, Cambridge Aurora Orchestra Nicholas Collon conductor CLASSICAL Condensed, searingly dramatic and starkly original, no wonder the St John Passion has lent itself to operatic staging. Renowned British tenor John Mark Ainsley as the Evangelist leads a fabulous young cast, including alto Iestyn Davies and soprano Sophie Bevan, under the baton of Nicholas Collon, with Aurora Orchestra and the Choir of Clare College. From its turbulent opening to the use of viole d’amore to voice Christ’s suffering the moving soprano aria ‘Melt my heart’, this Passion sweeps all before it with its urgent pace of invention. An Easter event not to be missed. Hall One 7.30pm

Hall Two 8pm

£29.50 £39.50 £49.50 £59.50 Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

Friday 15 March HIDDEN TREASURE

Saturday 16 March

Martin Simpson

BACH UNWRAPPED

FOLK

Study Day

Widely acknowledged as one of the finest acoustic and slide guitar players in the world, Martin Simpson is unpredictable, individual and a guitarist of immense subtlety. His interpretations of traditional songs are masterpieces of storytelling. There is no one who has more successfully combined the diverse elements of British, Afro-American and old-timey music than

St John Passion with Dr Timothy Jones (Royal Academy of Music) CLASSICAL Interact I: Context and Style A presentation by 18th-century specialist Timothy Jones, illustrated by students from the RAM, on the context and musical style of the St John Passion. It will discuss how

Get The Blessing Pete Judge trumpet & electronics Jake McMurchie saxophone & electronics Jim Barr electric bass Clive Deamer drums JAZZ Rarely has a band taken the jazz scene by the scruff of the neck and given it as good a shaking as Get The Blessing have. Winners of the BBC Jazz Award 2008 for their debut album All Is Yes, they are one of the UK’s most exciting live bands with   a signature sound that defies easy

LISTINGS 71 classification, yet never loses sight of thumping tunes, monstrously infectious beats, or joyous collective spontaneity. With influences ranging from Ornette Coleman and Tortoise to Blondie and Samuel Beckett, GTB consistently confound expectation. Prepare to be teased, beguiled, soothed, spooked, jolted, and ultimately uplifted. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 17 March NOT SO SILENT MOVIES

Silent Movies with Live Improv Band Devised by composer/cellist Philip Sheppard MUSIC / FILM / COMEDY Top musicians perform spontaneous soundtracks to the world’s greatest silent films. Improvisation begins as the film starts to roll as none of the musicians have watched the films in advance. The films will include comic heroes Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd. The atmosphere will be relaxed and club-like… and there’ll be room for some very sophisticated mucking about. Hall One 2.30pm £12.50 £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Not So Silent Offer: Ticket + Bloody Mary + Roast Lunch: All for just £29.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Fine Arts Brass Ensemble Graham Fitkin Trevor (1997) JS Bach (arr. Roberts) Prelude & Fugue in C minor, BWV 549 Ireland (transcr. Lenton) Comedy Overture Robin Holloway Divertimento No. 5, Op. 67 Stravinsky (arr. Lenton) Pulcinella Suite Bernstein (arr. Lenton) Overture to Candide; ‘Simple Song’ from Mass Falla Suite from the ballet El amor brujo Various Tin Pan Alley Brass Suite CLASSICAL The LCMS is pleased to welcome one of Europe’s most famous brass quintets. The Fine Arts Brass Ensemble perform a wide range of music, from original compositions by Fitkin and Holloway to arrangements of Bach, Stravinsky, Bernstein and Falla. Their two trumpets, horn, trombone and tuba will make a rich brass sonority to reverberate around the wooden panelling of the Kings Place concert hall. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

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72 LISTINGS

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March 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS Bach unwrapped week 5

Monday 18 March WORDS ON MONDAY

Pat Barker: Toby’s Room Chaired by Claire Armitstead

Dmitry Sitkovetsky

SPOKEN WORD

20 – 24 March

The highly acclaimed author of the Regeneration trilogy and Booker Prize winner for The Ghost Road returns with her first novel in five years. Toby’s Room is a riveting drama of identity, damage, intimacy and loss set in the period from the summer of 1912 through to the battlefields of France and wartime London in 1917. Barker discusses her fascination with WWI and its long-lasting damage, the background to many of her novels, and a particularly influential art teacher and surgeon, Henry Tonks, who recorded soldiers’ facial injuries. Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

Newton Armstrong New work Joanna Bailie Artificial Environments Nos. 1–5 James Weeks New work Jennifer Walshe same person/not the same person Vicky Wright clarinets Mark Knoop accordion, conductor Roderick Chadwick piano Serge Vuille percussion Tom Pauwels guitar Marcus Barcham-Stevens violin Séverine Ballon cello Jennifer Walshe voice Newton Armstrong electronics CONTEMPORARY

Brandenburg concertos from the OAE, plus st john Passion with clare College CHOIR John Butt conducts the first in three OAE concerts devoted to the Brandenburg Concertos this Friday. Join their principal keyboardist Robert Howarth on 23 March for a day singing Bach’s Passions, or delve deeper into the St John Passion on 16 March (p71), a day which culminates in a performance by Clare College Choir and Aurora Orchestra. See Bach Unwrapped feature pp28–32

Dmitry Sitkovetsky: The Art of Transcription JS Bach Three-part Sinfonias, Nos. 1–15, BWV 787–801 Goldberg Variations, BWV 988 (arr. Sitkovetsky for string trio) Dmitry Sitkovetsky violin Yuri Zhislin viola Luigi Piovano cello CLASSICAL

Ensemble Plus-Minus: New Propositions

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

Wednesday 20 March BACH UNWRAPPED

Plus-Minus presents a concert of works tracing the ensemble’s unique range of interests – from alternative notions of music theatre through to the micro-investigation of sound and high-concept approaches to contemporary music-making. Two UK premieres by Jennifer Walshe and Joanna Bailie sit alongside new pieces written for the group by Armstrong and James Weeks. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Charles Owen

Sitkovetsky first wrote a transcription for string trio of Bach’s Goldberg Variations in 1984, but 25 years later felt it was the right moment to re-visit the work. He has made some changes in orchestration, influenced by his string orchestra transcription, but his main objective was to inject fresh energy to give the piece momentum. Sitkovetsky hopes that listeners will share his journey through the Goldberg Variations and his love of the music – indeed in the first publication of the Variations, Bach stated that the spirit of the piece is ‘for the enjoyment of music lovers’. Hall One 7.30pm £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 21 March BACH UNWRAPPED

Charles Owen: Partitas – 1 JS Bach Partita No. 1 in B flat, BWV 825 Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826 Partita No. 4 in D, BWV 828 Charles Owen piano CLASSICAL This is first of three recitals to be given by gifted interpreter Charles Owen. ‘The six Partitas represent the ultimate experience of Bach’s dance-inspired keyboard suites’, says Owen. ‘A wonderful richness, diversity and complexity are found throughout these works. The concept and ambition of the pieces are enormous, ranging from the slim-line, almost Vermeer-like B flat Partita, with which I’ll begin this series, to the epic final work in E minor, dominated


by a powerful grief comparable to the   St Matthew Passion.’ Along the way we encounter the melancholy elegance of the C minor Partita and the resonant joy of the Fourth in D major.

virtuosity of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 and, like each concert in this series, also includes two of Bach’s too-little-known cantatas, which contain some of his most masterful music.

Hall One 7.30pm

Hall One 7.30pm

£14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

£19.50 £29.50 £39.50 £49.50 Online Savers £9.50

Joint ticket offer: 25% off. Available with ‘Partitas 2’  event (2 May). To book, please call Box Office.

Joint ticket offer: 30% OFF. Available with ‘Cantatas & Brandenburg Concertos – 2 and 3’ events   (19 April & 17 May). Requires booking all three events. To book, please call Box Office.

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

The Complete Guide to Everything – Live!

The Woes

with additional show on Wed 20 Mar

FOLK

COMEDY

Sunset through your backyard windows, the labels on good whisky bottles, the Great Depression, dustbowl, aviator sunglasses, American sedans of the 50s, the TV Show Twin Peaks, laughter with large groups of people, Spencer Tunic photographs… and the list goes on. ‘These are some descriptions of things’, frontman Osei Essed says, ‘that we might remind you of while you’re listening to us.’ Our records are good, our live show is also good – we know how to have fun.’ Come and enjoy.

Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds are the Brooklyn-based writers and comedians who host The Complete Guide to Everything, a weekly podcast with over 3.5 million downloads. The show is part of the Splitsider Podcast Network and has a devoted following throughout the US and UK. The duo have sold out numerous live comedy shows in New York, London and Manchester. They’ve also been featured in The New York Times, Metro (UK) and as an Editor’s Pick and Top 10 Comedy Podcast in Apple’s iTunes Store (US and UK). ORCHESTRA OF THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT © ERIC RICHMOND | CHARLES OWEN © JACK LIEBECK | DMITRY SITKOVETSKY © HENRY FAIR | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

FOLK UNION

Hall Two 8pm (on Wed & Thu; different contents – requires separate tickets) £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 22 March BACH UNWRAPPED

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment: Cantatas & Brandenburg Concertos – 1 JS Bach Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G, BWV 1049  Cantata ‘Komm, du süße Todesstunde’,   BWV 161  Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D, BWV 1050  Cantata ‘Est ist das Heil uns kommen her’,   BWV 9 Soloists of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Choir of the Enlightenment John Butt director

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 23 March BACH UNWRAPPED

OAE Tots! CLASSICAL INTERACT The OAE’s ever-popular series of events for the very youngest of music lovers returns to Kings Place. These 45-minute sessions for those aged 2–6 and their friends and families are fun, friendly and lively. Participation is actively encouraged! Hall Two 11am; 12.15pm | Lasts 45 mins £4.50 Child; £6.50 Adult Family Offer: £16.50 Family of 4 (at least 1 adult) £19.50 Family of 5 (at least 1 adult). To book, please call Box Office.

opportunity to get to know some of the choruses better to enrich your listening experience, in the company of OAE principal keyboardist Robert Howarth. We’ll be taking a closer look at some of the more dramatic choruses, both in terms of their music and context, and also singing them, with a professional soloist taking the role of the Evangelist. Suitable for all singers. Familiarity with the Passions beneficial, but not essential. Hall Two 2pm – 5pm (incl. short break) £19.50 Penelope Spencer

THE BASE

Mark Lockheart: Ellington in Anticipation Mark Lockheart saxophone Seb Rochford drums Liam Noble piano Tom Herbert bass Finn Peters alto saxophone James Allsop clarinets Emma Smith violin JAZZ A brand-new project inspired by the music of Duke Ellington. Taking many of Ellington’s most revered compositions, such as Satin Doll, Mood Indigo, Take The A Train, It Don’t Mean A Thing and Creole Love Call, saxophonist/composer Mark Lockheart has deconstructed and arranged  these characterful melodies into a fascinating set of new music, rich in orchestration and concept and entirely respectful to Ellington’s original creations. Featuring an all-star ensemble, this radical project combines the old with the new – beautifully .

Sing the Passions! CLASSICAL INTERACT

The first of three concerts this year given by the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment as part of Kings Place’s Bach Unwrapped series, all directed by the renowned Bach expert John Butt. This first concert starts with the extreme

Every Easter, Bach’s Passions are performed up and down the country   – as much a part of the musical calendar   as Handel’s Messiah. This is a unique

BACH UNWRAPPED

Penelope Spencer: Bach Violin Sonatas JS Bach Suite in A for violin & harpsichord, BWV 1025 Sonata in E minor for violin   & continuo, BWV 1023 Sonata in G for violin & continuo, BWV 1021 Fugue in G minor for violin   & continuo, BWV 1026 Sonata in C minor for violin   & continuo, BWV 1024 Penelope Spencer violin Lynda Sayce lute David Roblou harpsichord An opportunity to hear rarely performed but important music by JS Bach. The virtuosic Fugue in G minor for violin and   harpsichord is his earliest surviving piece of  chamber music. Bach and his lutenist friend Leopold Weiss collaborated on the A major ‘Suite’, and Bach used the bass line of BWV 1021 for teaching purposes (it appears again in the Trio Sonata, BWV 1038 which is probably by a Bach son). The beautiful Sonata in C minor, now possibly attributed to Johann Pisendel, gives insights into the characteristic style of Bach’s preferred violinist. Hall One 11.30am | Lasts ~60 mins £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Madeleine Mitchell & Nigel Clayton Beethoven Violin Sonata No. 4 in A minor, Op. 23  Respighi Violin Sonata in B minor David Matthews Romanza for violin and piano, Op. 119a (London premiere)  Elgar Violin Sonata in E minor, Op. 82 Madeleine Mitchell violin Nigel Clayton piano CLASSICAL

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Robert Howarth keyboard, director, speaker

Sunday 24 March

CLASSICAL

BACH UNWRAPPED

CLASSICAL

LISTINGS 73

March 2013

Mark Lockheart’s Ellington in Anticipation

Madeleine Mitchell and Nigel Clayton have now performed and recorded together for 20 years. Elgar’s Violin Sonata is a favourite, which they have twice broadcast for BBC Radio 3: here they pair it with Respighi’s romantic Sonata written the year before, in 1917. David Matthews is the latest of many distinguished British composers to have written works for Madeleine, and this concert celebrates his 70th birthday. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


74 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March 2013

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS Global Music Foundation

Monday 25 March

London jazz workshop and music festival 2013 28 March – 1 april

WORDS ON MONDAY

SPOKEN WORD SPECIAL

Coleridge Curated by Poet in the City

An evening with Jodi Picoult

SPOKEN WORD

Book Launch: The Storyteller

A celebration of one of the most important poets in the English language. To celebrate this great Romantic poet, The Poet in the City is delighted to present Coleridge’s acclaimed biographer Richard Holmes. From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner to Kubla Kahn, join us for a fascinating evening of live poetry and discussion. Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

Karol Beffa Trio Karol Beffa Supplique for violin solo Ligeti Dialogo for cello solo Beffa piano improvisations Elgar Salut d’amour for violin and piano sospiri for cello and piano Handel/Halvorsen Passacaglia for violin and cello Beffa Masques 1 for violin and cello Bartók Rumanian dance Khachaturian Sabre Danse for piano, violin and cello Brahms Hungarian Dance Karol Beffa piano Geneviève Laurenceau violin Gemma Rosefield cello CONTEMPORARY

Claire Martin

bruce barth, claire martin, kevin dean, bobby watson for all-star easter weekend

Contemporary French composer and pianist Karol Beffa appears with French violinist Geneviève Laurenceau and British cellist Gemma Rosefield. Tonight’s programme will introduce the audience to some of Beffa’s own music, which is interwoven with other classical works that have inspired him. Hall One 8pm

SPOKEN WORD Sage is a young woman whose new friend, retired teacher and pillar of the community Josef Weber, tells her he was an SS guard at Auschwitz – and he wants her to help him die. Sage’s grandmother is a Holocaust survivor. What do you do when evil lives next door? Jodi Picoult explores justice, retribution and forgiveness in The Storyteller, her mesmerising – and heartbreaking – new novel. Presented in association with Woman & Home. Hall One 7pm £12.50 (includes a copy of the book) Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 28 March OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Rob Deering: The One COMEDY The award-winning comedian, multiinstrumentalist and consummate showman brings his latest, greatest show to London. He’s a one-mansupergroup in a live-music stand-up comedy event: The Best Rob Deering Album In The World… Ever. ‘A massively engaging intelligent comic offering a cracking mix of songs and silliness’ The Guardian ‘An evening in his company is nothing less than a joy’ Independent on Sunday Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Somogyi, Sanz & Keogh

+ special guest Guillermo Rozenthuler

Kevin Dean & Jean Toussaint

The Global Music Foundation returns for a dazzling series of workshops and performances, featuring Kansas legend Bobby Watson (who will share the stage with trumpeter Kevin Dean), pianist Bruce Barth and our very own Claire Martin. Also featured are Francesco Petreni, the Perico Sambeat Quartet and Jean Toussaint. See Jazz highlights on p18

WEDNESday 27 March

‘Remember the Messengers’

Barry Green ‘Green’s Blues’

Rob Deering

Somogyi, Sanz & Keogh Arnie Somogyi bass Albert Sanz piano Stephen Keogh drums Guillermo Rozenthuler vocals


Kevin Dean and Jean Toussaint Band Kevin Dean trumpet Jean Toussaint saxophone Bruce Barth piano Chris Hill bass Eddie Hick drums Barry Green piano Francesco Petreni drums Jeremy Brown bass and very special surprise guests JAZZ The festival opening concert is a triple   bill of great music with some of the   UK’s, USA’s and Europe’s finest jazz musicians. Three very distinct approaches to the music. The leaders of these three groups are adept composers and arrangers, and masterly performers.   Each one with a strong individual voice while at the same time integrated into   the whole. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Jazz Jam JAZZ Come along and enjoy the music created by the students, teachers and special guests at this late-night jam session. Hall Two 10pm

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Perico Sambeat Quartet

Perico Sambeat Quartet Perico Sambeat alto saxophone Barry Green piano Chris Hill bass Stephen Keogh drums JAZZ A double bill comprising some of today’s finest jazz artists. Opening this great double bill is alto star Perico Sambeat with inspiring music from a truly exciting quartet packed with talent. He is considered to be one of the most important Spanish jazz musicians to have emerged in recent years, and one of the best alto saxophonists in the world. He has made over 100 recordings, working with outstanding musicians as Brad Mehldau, Michael Brecker, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tete Montoliu and Pat Metheny, among others. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

BOBBY WATSON, FRANCESCO PETRENI © MELODY MCLAREN | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Jazz Jam JAZZ

Boppin’ at Lunchtime with Kevin Dean

Come along and enjoy the music created by the students, teachers and special guests at this late-night jam session.

JAZZ

Hall Two 10pm

In this lecture and concert trumpet maestro Kevin Dean plays and talks   about some of the great bebop small groups of the 50s and 60s. It will feature his own compositions along with those   of some of the legendary trumpet players from that golden era, like Lee Morgan, Donald Byrd and Clifford Brown. Kevin   has performed in concert and recorded with numerous legendary jazz artists including Jimmy Heath, Benny Golson,   Joe Henderson and Barry Harris. He is   one of the great trumpet players in jazz today yet not as widely known as he should be. This concert is a real treat   and not to be missed.

£4.50

Hall Two 1.30pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

GMF London jazz workshop and music festival 2013

with Friends Old and New

Claire Martin, Friends Old and New Claire Martin voice Bruce Barth piano Libor Šmoldas guitar Bruce Barth piano Jeremy Brown bass Eddie Hick drums

Saturday 30 March GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Latin Lunch with Francesco Petreni JAZZ In this lecture/concert percussion master Francesco Petreni talks about the music of Brazil and how rhythms have moved from   drums and percussion to other musical instruments found in a modern-day ensemble. Together with members of the faculty he will demonstrate by playing samba, maracatu, baião, and partido alto,

LISTINGS 75

Free Events

Claire Martin

£4.50

Friday 29 March

March/April 2013

Perico Sambeat

Bobby Watson

as well as songs by Jobim, Ivan Lins and other composers from the region. Thoroughly enjoyable and informative.

A varied programme of free concerts and events will run at lunchtime and early evening each day. Full details will soon be available at kingsplace.co.uk Rainbow Harp Ensemble led by Miriam Keogh London Vocal Project led by Pete Churchill A Brush with Jazz Singers Corner 

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Jazz Jam

Hall Two 1.30pm

JAZZ

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Come along and enjoy the music created by the students, teachers and special guests at this late-night jam session.

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Bobby Watson International All Stars

Hall Two 10pm £4.50

Pete Churchill Trio

‘Songs and Stories’ feat. Kevin Dean Bobby Watson alto saxophone Kevin Dean trumpet Bruce Barth piano Chris Hill bass Stephen Keogh drums JAZZ Great artists have one thing in common: they can connect with an audience in visceral, vital ways that transcend our usual modes of communication. Alto sax star Bobby Watson possesses that magical  connecting ability. His artistic focus enables  him to captivate an audience with alluring, inventive improvisations. Bobby is best known for his four years with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, but his career also includes work with Max Roach, Betty Carter, Wynton Marsalis and Carlos Santana. His all-star band features Bruce Barth, who is widely considered to be one of the finest jazz pianists and composers of his generation. Opening this double bill with his Trio is Pete Churchill, whose beautiful relaxed vocals and piano always leave a warm afterglow. With a carefully chosen selection of songs from the Great American Songbook, along with one or two originals of his own, he is joined by the melodic virtuosity of Kevin Dean on trumpet, the astonishingly talented Flo Moore on bass and Italian percussion maestro Francesco Petreni. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

Monday 1 April GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Guitar Magic at Lunchtime with Libor Smoldas & Guests JAZZ The final concert in this short lunchtime series features Libor Šmoldas, one of the most exciting musicians to have emerged from the Czech Republic in recent years.   A natural improviser gifted with astonishing virtuosity and good taste.   He leads a group that will play material from his latest album. This is treat for guitarists and non-guitarists alike as   there will be surprise appearances by some special guests. Hall Two 1.30pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

GMF LONDON FESTIVAL

Students’ Concert JAZZ After five days of intensive workshops, jams and concerts, all the students and teachers who have taken part in the GMF London Jazz Workshops come together for a final concert. Hall One 6pm £4.50

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


ART LISTINGS

76 ART LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January–March 2013

Terence Coventry Tree of Jackdaws Bronze Edition of 10 Image courtesy of Pangolin London;

8 MAR – 26 APR KINGS PLACE GALLERY

Jeremy Gardiner Unfolding Landscape ART

John Lessore Garden Walk, Shoreditch

Jeremy Gardiner Evening, Mullion Cove 2010

Adam Birtwistle Cherie Blair 2011

11 JAN – 22 FEB KINGS PLACE GALLERY

John Lessore Paintings ART Under Helen Lessore’s direction the Beaux Arts had the best smell of any gallery in London. It exuded linseed oil and turpentine and told you that it was a place dedicated to painting. As a young artist growing up, her son John must have inhaled it and absorbed the lingering odours of exhibitions by Auerbach, Kossoff and others of the School of London. With Sickert as his uncle he had developed a sturdy set of values, albeit out of kilter with today’s relativism. From childhood he had known that there was more to painting than novel imagery and meretricious ironies and, in the words of Bill Gregory, his contemplative paintings occupy ‘an extreme position in contemporary art: the view that in painting it is all there if you have the eyes to see it’. One might equally call him a contrarian, not least because of his devotion to the familiar. Without didactic intent he abjures the sensational, the nihilistic and the transgressive, preferring to capture the remarkable in ostensibly homely events: as Michael Peppiatt defined it, ‘the magic in the ordinary, the memorable in the everyday’. Whether it is

a group of women seen from his studio in Peckham or sunbathers on the beach at Collioure, the light (often softly out of focus) and the colour (often subdued) is sensitively calibrated. Moreover, his earthy, limited-palette domestic scenes, many from Norfolk, powerfully evoke Dutch 17th-century interiors.

11 JAN – 23 FEB PANGOLIN LONDON

Terence Coventry Three Decades of Sculpture & Works on Paper ART This one-man show includes work from the past three decades of Terence Coventry’s career, tracing the development of his themes and preoccupations from 1985 to the present day. Exploring the influence of the Cornish landscape and wildlife in his work, exhibition highlights include the unique carved elm Torso from 1985 and new work Corten Bird I, in which Coventry revisits one of his familiar themes using a new medium. His background as a pig farmer has long fed Coventry’s creativity and has certainly nurtured his affinity with nature. This exhibition demonstrates the sculptor’s great talent for breathing life and humanity into his striking human and animal forms.

9 JAN – 3 MAR KINGS PLACE GALLERY

Adam Birtwistle

Jeremy Gardiner’s paintings are effectively an artistic excavation of the geology of landscape: how it is shaped by human activity and the forces of nature. Aware of distinct geologies, he attempts to interpret the hidden subterranean realms that contain the marks and secrets of their own distant formation. His artistic exploration has taken him from the Jurassic coast of Dorset to the rugged coast of Cornwall, passing through the dramatic American landscape, the roughness of volcanic islands in Brazil, the arid beauty of the island of Milos in Greece and more recently the Lake District and its numerous waterfalls. His paintings become a symbolic map, simultaneously interpreting and capturing the impact of human and natural events, the activities in time and space that have shaped, textured and coloured the landscape to give it a unique depth and beauty. His spatially probing and texturally explicit pictures transform the lessons learnt from pioneering modern British landscape painters such as Tunnard, Ben Nicholson,and Peter Lanyon and American artist Richard Diebenkorn.

Paintings ART

20 MAR – 20 APR

Described as ‘one of our most distinguished portrait painters in what is, presently, a Golden Age of Portraiture in Britain’, Adam Birtwistle is known for his deeply revealing portraits. Instead of the flattering conventions of 18th-century Grand Manner portraiture, he diminishes the grandeur and deflates the ego of everyone who sits for him. ‘There are many ways of revealing the real person,’ says Birtwistle. ‘I set out to make them feel uncomfortable by ordering them around. Then I confuse them. I tell them it’s all going to be very easy, then I make them sit down, tell them not to move and hold their heads in a fixed position for a very long time. I ask them, what’s the worst thing you have ever done? Quite soon they’re looking shaky, just as I want them.’

PANGOLIN LONDON

28 FEB – 9 MAR PANGOLIN LONDON

Steve Russell Photography ART

Further details of this exhibition will soon be available at www.pangolinlondon.com

Jonathan Kenworthy Celebrating 70 Years ART Further details of this exhibition will soon be available at www.pangolinlondon.com

OPENING TIMES Pangolin London Monday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm Closed during Easter break 29 Mar – 1 Apr 2013 FREE admission | 020 7520 1480 www.pangolinlondon.com

Kings Place Gallery Monday – Friday, 10am – 6pm, Saturday – Sunday, 12pm – 6pm Closed during Easter break 29 Mar – 1 Apr 2013 FREE admission | 020 7520 1485 www.kingsplacegallery.co.uk


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk | Prices shown are for online booking

ARTISTIC HIRES 77 ARTISTIC HIRES LISTINGS

January–March 2013

Kings Place auditoria are now available for artistic hire, offering world-class acoustics and an unparalleled level of technical support.

For more information: 020 7520 1456 | artistic.hires@kingsplace.co.uk

TUESDAY 15 JANUARY KINGS PLACE HALL ONE © KEITH PAISLEY | TERENCE COVENTRY SCULPTURE PHOTO © STEVE RUSSELL

ARTISTIC HIRES

Isabelle Bond Gold Medal Competition 2013 Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance Sarah Denbee soprano Claire Iselin harp Theo Jamieson composition Alex McManus jazz drums Mikhael Shilyaev piano Helen Whitaker flute CLASSICAL Join us for an exhilarating evening showcasing six talented musicians from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. Performers taking part in the Showcase Concert for the Isabelle Bond

Gold Medal Award for Excellence in Performance are nominated by Heads of Departments for their high standard of performance and contribution to the musical life of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. The origins of this annual Award go back over 100 years to 1905 when the Tallis Gold Medal was presented to Isabelle Beatrice Bond in recognition of her outstanding mark in the Trinity Licentiate Diploma examination. Isabelle’s son inherited the medal and generously returned it to the Conservatoire in memory of his mother. This opportunity to hear the elite scholars and prize-winners showcase their talents will also see one of them honoured with this prestigious award.

Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23 Ballade No. 2 in F, Op. 38 Ballade No. 3 in A flat, Op. 47 Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52 Polonaise in F sharp minor, Op. 44 Mazurka in A minor, Op. 17 No. 4 Mazurka in C, Op. 68 No. 1 Mazurka in A minor, Op. 67 No. 4 Waltz in D flat, Op. 64 No. 1 Waltz in A flat, Op. 69 No. 1 Largo in E flat, Op. posth. Polonaise in A flat, Op. 53 Jean Muller piano

‘Chopin Recital’. After a highly anticipated recital in Carnegie Hall, New York, Jean Muller will make his debut in London with a poetic and powerful all-Chopin programme. Muller, a Luxembourgish pianist of French-German-Polish origins is a performer of extraordinary artistic genuineness. The specialised press underlines the astonishing mixture of authenticity and originality he achieves, which sometimes even gives the impression that the composer himself is at the piano. Due to his intellectual, technical and emotional mastery, Muller performs a wide range of repertoire. He is today one of the finest Chopin interpreters alive. ‘Few pianists of any age or nationality have recreated the storming codas of the First and Fourth Ballades with such brilliant fury.’ Gramophone Critic’s Choice.

Hall One 7pm

CLASSICAL

Hall One 7.30pm

£9.50 £11.50 £14.50 Online Savers £6.50

Jean Muller on tour with the programme of his tremendously successful new CD

£12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

TUESDAY 19 FEBRUARY ARTISTIC HIRES

Jean Muller: Chopin Recital


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January–March 2013

CALENDAR

JANUARY

CALENDAR

78 CALENDAR

JANUARY– MARCH 2013

NEW YEAR AT KINGS PLACE | BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 1

30 Sun

Hall One

3pm

New Year/Bach Unwrapped – Florilegium perform Bach: Christmas & New Year Cantatas

Classical

31 Mon

Hall One

6pm

New Year/Bach Unwrapped – Wallfisch Band: Bach Cantatas 170 & 12

Classical

1 Tue

Hall One

1pm

New Year/Bach Unwrapped – Wallfisch Band: Bach Cantatas 22 & 131

2 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Jazz Bach! OSJ with the Gwilym Simcock Quartet

Classical Jazz

3 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – La Nuova Musica: Bach Cantata 169 & Psalm 51

Classical

4 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Christoph Richter: Bach Cello Suites and Sonatas – 1

Classical

6 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – LCMS New Year Concert

Classical

Classical

THE STRANGER, THE BETTER 9 Wed

Kings Place Gallery FIRST DAY

Adam Birtwistle – Paintings

9 Wed

Hall One

Sir Harrison Birtwistle – Birtwistles in Residence

8pm

Art Classical

10 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

The Stranger, The Better – Teitur (with string qt + The Singing Adams + Abi Wade)

10 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Ian D Montfort: Unbelievable

Contemporary

11 Fri

Kings Place Gallery FIRST DAY

John Lessore – Paintings

11 Fri

Pangolin London

FIRST DAY

Terence Coventry – Three Decades of Sculpture & Works on Paper

11 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

The Stranger, The Better – Gravenhurst with Ralfe Band

11 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Tim Edey

12 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

The Stranger, The Better – Meursault with Sons of Noel & Adrian + W. Wooliams

12 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Aquarium: ‘Places’

13 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Badke Quartet with Michelle Todd (soprano)

14 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Conversations with Sound: Opera of Surveillance

15 Tue

Hall One

7pm

Artistic Hire – Isabelle Bond Gold Medal Competition 2013

Classical

17 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Musick’s Monument – Lamentations: Fretwork with Alamire vocal consort

Classical

17 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Bad Musical

18 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Musick’s Monument – Dowland’s Lachrimae: Fretwork with Elizabeth Kenny (lute)

18 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – ahab

19 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Musick’s Monument – Musick’s Monument: Fretwork viol consort

19 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Martin Speake Trio

20 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Angell Trio

21 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Elkie Brooks: Finding My Voice

21 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Lemur

24 Thu

Hall One

7pm

London A Cappella Festival – Choir of Clare College, Cambridge

24 Thu

Hall One

9pm

London A Cappella Festival – Rajaton

Comedy Art Art Contemporary Folk Folk Contemporary Jazz Classical

FRETWORK: MUSICK’S MONUMENT Contemporary

Comedy Classical Folk Classical Jazz Classical

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL Spoken Word Contemporary Classical Contemporary

24 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Austentatious: An Improvised Jane Austen Novel

25 Fri

Hall One

7pm

London A Cappella Festival – Postyr

Contemporary

Comedy

25 Fri

Hall One

9pm

London A Cappella Festival – The Magnets

Contemporary

26 Sat

Hall Two

10am

London A Cappella Festival – Purely A Cappella! Vocal Workshops

Interact

26 Sat

Hall Two

11am

London A Cappella Festival – Purely A Cappella! Vocal Workshops

Interact

26 Sat

Hall Two

12.15pm

London A Cappella Festival – Purely A Cappella! Vocal Workshops

26 Sat

Hall One

1.45pm

London A Cappella Festival – Retrocity

26 Sat

Hall Two

3pm

London A Cappella Festival – Purely A Cappella! Vocal Workshops

26 Sat

Hall One

3.15pm

FREE London A Cappella Festival – Panel Discussion

Interact Contemporary Interact Spoken Word Contemporary


FEBRUARY

CALENDAR 79

January–March 2013

26 Sat

Hall One

6pm

London A Cappella Festival – The King’s Singers

26 Sat

Hall One

8.30pm

London A Cappella Festival – Swingle Singers

Contemporary

27 Sun

Hall One

2.30pm

Not So Silent Movies – Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

27 Sun

St Pancras Room

5pm

FREE London Chamber Music Society – Pre-concert Talk with R Hanson

27 Sun

Hall Two

8pm

London Chamber Music Series – Allegri Quartet: The Complete Beethoven Quartets – 9

Contemporary Music/Film/Comedy Spoken Word Classical Classical

BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 2 28 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – ‘Feeding Seven Billion’ Debates II: Global agriculture

28 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Collectress with Jo Thomas: Glitch

Spoken Word

29 Tue

Hall One

6.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – St Matthew Passion – King’s College Choir + Academy of Ancient Music Classical

30 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Rachel Podger & Marcin Swiatkiewicz: The Violin Sonatas & Partitas – 1 Classical

31 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Miki Skuta: Goldberg Variations

31 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – The Looking Screen

1 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – London Sinfonietta

1 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Lady Maisery

2 Sat

Hall One

1pm

Bach Unwrapped – AAM The Bach Suites in Focus Part I: The English Suites

Classical

2 Sat

St Pancras Room

2.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – AAM The Bach Suites in Focus Part II: Discovering Bach

Classical

2 Sat

St Pancras Room

6pm

Bach Unwrapped – AAM The Bach Suites in Focus Part III: Playing Bach

Classical

2 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – AAM The Bach Suites in Focus Part IV: The Complete Orchestral Suites Classical

2 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – The Roller Trio

3 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – LCMS Fundraising Concert

4 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – The Sebald Lecture by Boris Akunin

4 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Jennifer Walshe: ALL THE MANY PEOPLS

7 Thu

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

FREE Britten at 100 – Pre-concert Talk with A Matthews-Owen + guests

7 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Britten at 100 – Songs With and Without Words: O Coates, N Mulroy, C Croshaw & J Reid

Classical

8 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Britten at 100 – The Pity of War: N Spence, N Mulroy, T Thorpe, A Matthews-Owen & J Reid

Classical

8 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – An Evening with Alistair Anderson

9 Sat

St Pancras Room

5pm

FREE Britten at 100 – Pre-concert Talk with Katie Derham (BBC Radio 3)

Contemporary

Classical Comedy Contemporary Classical Folk

Jazz Classical

BRITTEN AT 100: PIANIST, COLLABORATOR, ARTISTIC CRUCIBLE Spoken Word Contemporary Spoken Word Classical

Folk Spoken Word Classical

9 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Britten at 100 – Metamorphoses: Booth, Radley, Mulroy, Burgess, Miller, M-Owen, Reid

9 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Hans Koller Ensemble

Classical

10 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Navarra Quartet

11 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Howard Goodall: The Story of Music

11 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Jérôme Noetinger & Antoine Chessex: Musique Concrète

13 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Keyboard Conversations® – Bach the Spellbinder

Classical

14 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Royal Academy of Music – RAM Chamber Orchestra: The Haydn Symphonies

Classical

14 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Impropera’s Valentine Special: Songs from the Heart

15 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Royal Academy of Music – RAM Baroque Orchestra plays Bach

Jazz Classical

BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 3 | ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC Spoken Word Contemporary

Comedy Classical

15 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – The Wagon Tales

16 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Royal Academy of Music – A Musical Theatre Celebration

Folk

16 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Royal Academy of Music: A Tribute to Sir John Dankworth

17 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Chilingirian Quartet: The Romantic Piano Quintets – 4

18 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Benjamin Britten: A Life in the Twentieth Century – Paul Kildea

18 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear | Bach Unwrapped – Pekka Kuusisto

19 Tue

Hall One

7pm

Artistic Hire – Isabelle Bond Gold Medal Competition 2013

Classical

20 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Fretwork: The Art of Fugue

Classical

21 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Katya Apekisheva: Inventions & Sinfonias and Italian Concerto

Classical

21 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Storytellers’ Club with Sarah Bennetto & Friends

22 Fri

Kings Place Gallery LAST DAY

John Lessore – Paintings

22 Fri

Pangolin London

FIRST DAY

Steve Russell – Photography

22 Fri

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

FREE Bach Unwrapped – Pre-concert Talk

Contemporary Jazz Classical

BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 4 Spoken Word

Contemporary Classical

Comedy Art Art Spoken Word Classical

CALENDAR

JANUARY

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk


FEBRUARY MARCH

CALENDAR

80 CALENDAR

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January–March 2013

22 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Academy of St Martin in the Fields with Carolyn Sampson – 1

22 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Olivia Chaney & Friends

Classical Folk

JEWISH BOOK WEEK 23 Sat

Pangolin London

LAST DAY

Terence Coventry – Three Decades of Sculpture & Works on Paper

23 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Double-Bill: Leonard Cohen Tribute: Panel

Art

23 Sat

Hall One

9.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Double-Bill: Leonard Cohen Tribute: Performance

23 Sat

Hall Two

7.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Dilemmas of Difference: German Jews, Jewish Germans

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall One

11am

Jewish Book Week – Bernard Avishai: Promiscuous

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall One

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – John McCarthy: You Can’t Hide the Sun

Spoken Word

24 Sun

St Pancras Room

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Jenifer Glynn: My Sister Rosalind Franklin

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall One

2pm

Jewish Book Week – Naomi Alderman: The Liar’s Gospel

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall One

3.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Howard Jacobson: How to Make Love to your Mother-in-Law

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall Two

5pm

Jewish Book Week – René Braginsky’s Collection of Esther Scrolls

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

Jewish Book Week – David Miliband: ‘Tony Judt, Europe and the future of the Left’

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall Two

6.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Austin Ratner: The Jump Artist

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall One

8pm

Jewish Book Week – AB Yehoshua: The Retrospective

Spoken Word

24 Sun

Hall Two

8pm

Jewish Book Week – Marriage in the Suburbs with Francesca Segal & Jami Attenberg

Spoken Word

25 Mon

St Pancras Room

1pm

Jewish Book Week – Ray Monk: The Elusive Jewishness of J Robert Oppenheimer

Spoken Word

25 Mon

St Pancras Room

5.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Tim Bonyhady: Good Living Street

Spoken Word

25 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Jewish Book Week – Simon Schama’s History of the Jews

Spoken Word

25 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Langham Research Centre: OBAMIX + John Cage

25 Mon

Hall One

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – The Chief Rabbi’s 22 years of writing and reading

Spoken Word

26 Tue

St Pancras Room

1pm

Jewish Book Week – We Are Here: Voices from Lithuania

Spoken Word

26 Tue

St Pancras Room

5.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Shani Boianjiu: The People of Forever are Not Afraid

Spoken Word

26 Tue

Hall Two

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Fania Oz-Salzberger: How did the Jews Remain Jews?

Spoken Word

26 Tue

Hall One

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Carlo Ginzburg: Jews and Christians: A Story of Ambivalence

Spoken Word

27 Wed

Hall One

7pm

Jewish Book Week – Yehuda Avner: The Prime Ministers

Spoken Word

27 Wed

Hall Two

7.30pm

Jewish Book Week – And Europe Will Be Stunned

Spoken Word

28 Thu

St Pancras Room

1pm

Jewish Book Week – Art of the Short Story

Spoken Word

28 Thu

Hall Two

5.30pm

FREE Jewish Book Week – The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Beginnings of Midrash

Spoken Word

28 Thu

Hall One

7pm

Jewish Book Week – Rachel Lichtenstein: Diamond Street

Spoken Word

28 Thu

Hall Two

7pm

Jewish Book Week – Helga’s Diary: A rare account of surviving the Holocaust

Spoken Word

28 Thu

Hall One

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Edmund de Waal: The Exiles Return

Spoken Word

28 Thu

Hall One

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – From the Feminine Mystique to Fifty Shades – 50 Years On

Spoken Word

3 Sun

Hall Two

11am

Jewish Book Week – Orlando Figes & Nancy K. Miller: Traces of the Past

Spoken Word

3 Sun

Hall One

11am

Jewish Book Week – The Art and Photography of Marianne Breslauer

Spoken Word Spoken Word

Spoken Word Contemporary

Contemporary

3 Sun

Hall One

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Sayed Kashua: Second Person Singular

3 Sun

Hall Two

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Gil Cohen-Magen: Inside the Courts of the Chassidim

Spoken Word

3 Sun

St Pancras Room

3.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here?

Spoken Word

3 Sun

Hall Two

5pm

Jewish Book Week – Judith Walkowitz: Nights Out In Cosmopolitan London

Spoken Word

3 Sun

Hall Two

8pm

Jewish Book Week – Walking With The Light

Spoken Word

3 Sun

Hall One

8pm

Jewish Book Week – Thomas Heatherwick: Making

Spoken Word

3 Sun

Kings Place Gallery LAST DAY

Adam Birtwistle – Paintings

Art

THE SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE: 30TH ANNIVERSARY 4 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Poetry & Medicine

4 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – MANIFESTO

7 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

The Schubert Ensemble – Schubertiade

7 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Rachel Stubbings is… Stubbing Out Problems

8 Fri

Kings Place Gallery FIRST DAY

Jeremy Gardiner – Unfolding Landscape

8 Fri

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

FREE The Schubert Ensemble – Pre-concert Talk: Exploring Enescu

8 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

The Schubert Ensemble – Enescu & Fauré: Neglected Genius

8 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Three Cane Whale

Spoken Word Contemporary Classical Comedy Art Spoken Word Classical Classical Folk


CALENDAR 81

January–March 2013

9 Sat

Pangolin London

LAST DAY

Steve Russell – Photography

9 Sat

Hall One

6pm

The Schubert Ensemble – Looking to the Future 1: Chamber Music 2000+ Contemporary Classical

Art

9 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

The Schubert Ensemble – Looking to the Future 2: Ensemble Commissions Contemporary Classical

9 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Alexander Hawkins Ensemble

10 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Rosamunde Trio: The Complete Beethoven Piano Trios – 2 Classical

10 Sun

Hall Two

8pm

Jazz

Hidden Treasure – Brass Monkey

Folk

HIDDEN TREASURE 11 Mon

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

Talking Art – Jeremy Gardiner: Unfolding Landscape

11 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Rock’n’roll Politics

Spoken Word

11 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Decibel: Big, Noisy, Quiet

13 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Hidden Treasure – Double Bill: Carthy, Hardy, Farrell & Young | Marry Waterson & Oliver Knight

Folk

14 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Hidden Treasure – Tony Benn & Roy Bailey: The Writing on The Wall

Folk

14 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Double Bill: Jonny & The Baptists + Colin Hoult

15 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Hidden Treasure – Martin Simpson

15 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union | Hidden Treasure – Mawkin

16 Sat

St Pancras Room

10.30am–4.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Study Day: St John Passion with Dr Timothy Jones

16 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – St John Passion with the Choir of Clare College + Aurora Orchestra

16 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Get The Blessing

17 Sun

Hall One

2.30pm

Not So Silent Movies – Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

Music / Film / Comedy

17 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Fine Arts Brass Ensemble

Classical

Spoken Word Contemporary

Comedy Folk Folk Classical Interact Classical Jazz

BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 5 18 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Pat Barker: Toby’s Room

18 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Ensemble Plus-Minus: New Propositions

Spoken Word

20 Wed

Kings Place Gallery FIRST DAY

Jonathan Kenworthy – Celebrating 70 Years

20 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Dmitry Sitkovetsky: The Art of Transcription

20 Wed

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – The Complete Guide to Everything – Live!

21 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Charles Owen: Partitas – 1

21 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – The Complete Guide to Everything – Live!

Comedy

22 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – OAE: Cantatas & Brandenburg Concertos – 1

Classical

Contemporary Art Classical Comedy Classical

22 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – The Woes

23 Sat

Hall Two

11am

Bach Unwrapped – OAE Tots! – 1

Classical Interact

Folk

23 Sat

Hall Two

11am

Bach Unwrapped – OAE Tots! – 2

Classical Interact

23 Sat

Hall Two

2pm–5pm

Bach Unwrapped – Sing The Passions!

Classical Interact

23 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Mark Lockheart: Ellington In Anticipation

24 Sun

Hall One

11.30am

Bach Unwrapped – Penelope Spencer: Bach Violin Sonatas

Classical

24 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Madeleine Mitchell & Nigel Clayton

Classical

Jazz

GMF LONDON JAZZ WORKSHOP AND MUSIC FESTIVAL 2013 25 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Coleridge

25 Mon

Hall One

8pm

Out Hear – Karol Beffa Trio

28 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Rob Deering: The One

28 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

GMF London – Somogyi, Sanz & Keogh with special guest Guillermo Rozenthuler

Spoken Word Contemporary Comedy Jazz

+ Kevin Dean & Jean Toussaint + Barry Green 28 Thu

Hall Two

10pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Jazz Jam

Jazz

29 Fri

Hall Two

1.30pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Boppin’ at Lunchtime with Kevin Dean

Jazz

29 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Claire Martin + Perico Sambeat Quartet

Jazz

29 Fri

Hall Two

10pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Jazz Jam

Jazz

30 Sat

Hall Two

1.30pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Latin Lunch with Francesco Petreni

Jazz

30 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Bobby Watson International All Stars

Jazz

+ Pete Churchill Trio: ‘Songs and Stories’ featuring Kevin Dean 30 Sat

Hall Two

10pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Jazz Jam

1 Apr

Hall Two

1.30pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Guitar Magic at Lunchtime with L Šmoldas Jazz

Jazz

1 Apr

Hall One

7.30pm

GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival – Students’ Concert

Jazz

CALENDAR

MARCH

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk


82 FOLK

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2013

Q&A ALAN BEARMAN Alan Bearman is a folk music promoter, agent and programmer, and Artistic Director of Sidmouth FolkWeek, among other festivals. He has co-curated many series for Kings Place. In March his latest, Hidden Treasure, will include Martin Simpson and Marry Waterson How did you first get into folk music? I found myself listening to Bob Dylan at primary school when my peers were listening to The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. That led me to a folk club at secondary school and concerts featuring the likes of Fairport Convention. I went to my first festival, Cambridge, in the early Seventies and that opened doors to a wider range of British traditional and American music which I’ve been happily exploring ever since. I started my first folk club with a couple of friends in Walthamstow in 1976. That eventually brought an invitation to be Song Producer at Sidmouth Festival in 1987. I’ve been lucky enough to programme a variety of festivals, including Towersey for

25 years, and specialist events like Ards International Guitar Festival in Northern Ireland. What did you learn from your 18 years at Sidmouth? With over 700 events in 20 venues over eight days, it taught me how to build a programme and how to match events to venues. I developed a network of advisors who specialised in particular genres and traditions. I still lean on their knowledge and enthusiasm. Most of my mistakes came from programming music I didn’t like or understand, so I learned to play to my strengths.   Which musicians are you most proud of promoting? I was always very happy to book

traditional singers and musicians at Sidmouth and was keen to rebuild that when I rejoined the team there last year. Standout memories include an early booking of La Bottine Souriante, the development of the Shooting Roots youth project, and a number of Festival commissions such as Flame, which led to the formation of the remarkable Morris Offspring. How would you describe the recent Revolution of British folk? When I started out the scene revolved around folk clubs. Now it’s much more diverse with a strong festival scene and a wide variety of venues. There’s been a remarkable increase in the number of excellent young performers coming through over the last 15 years or so. What’s surprised you most? I would never have predicted the huge growth of interest among the young in recent years and the impact of a new wave of performers. Also, the return to the stage of both Nic Jones and Norma Waterson has been a surprise and a delight. What has proved timeless? Traditional music itself is timeless and, amidst all the innovations and interpretations of recent years, it remains the touchstone of quality. Pure class is timeless too, as witnessed by the number of young artists influenced by Nic Jones over the 30 years when he has been unable to perform and his albums have been scandalously unavailable.   Highlights of your work at Kings Place? Chris Wood’s Commonplace series gave us a chance to place the music alongside a

TRADITIONAL MUSIC ITSELF IS TIMELESS AND REMAINS THE TOUCHSTONE OF QUALITY wider community, including poets, politicians, writers and photographers. Jon Boden’s after hours Big Sing in the foyer remains in the memory as does Karine Polwart’s harmony workshop which spilled out of its room and filled the building with soaring harmonies. Martin Simpson’s Purpose and Grace series gave me the chance to put together a dream team of Martin, June Tabor and Dick Gaughan. What’s Kings Place’s unique selling point? It gives artists the chance to develop ideas and connections, to do more than one-off concerts. The regular Friday Folk Union slot offers a range of diverse music that a single promoter would struggle to achieve. Tell me about the series you are working on for next spring. Hidden Treasure features Martin Simpson marking his 60th year in 2013 with a new album. Then there’ll be the talented quartet of fiddlers Eliza Carthy, Bella Hardy, Lucy Farrell and Kate Young, plus Marry Waterson and Oliver Knight.

Hidden Treasure 13–15 March See Listings pp70–71 for details


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What's On at Kings Place Jan-Mar 2013  

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