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WHAT'S ON DECEMBER 2013 – MARCH 2014 Classical NEW Sunday Coffee Concerts Ian Bostridge & Fretwork Aurora goes American

Spoken Word

Jewish Book Week Jeanette Winterson

Jazz

Gwilym Simcock The Golden Age of Steam Nikki Iles, Reuben Fowler

Folk

Eliza Carthy & Norma Waterson in Custom-made Winter

Contemporary The Real Group Cutting-edge Cello

THE NEW HOME OF CHAMBER MUSIC

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED


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WELCOME TO THE WINTER 2013 SEASON AT KINGS PLACE Iʼm very excited to be launching our new year-long series for 2014, Chamber Classics Unwrapped, Top 50 Chamber Works as voted by you. In association with BBC Music Magazine we held a poll last year to find out what your favourite pieces of chamber music were. We then distributed the top 50 among a host of brilliant ensembles and soloists who have created imaginative programmes around the works. Weʼre thrilled with the results and hope you will be too. The line-up features groups of the highest calibre, from the established Quatuor Mosaïques to our cover artists, the young Navarra Quartet. The Navarra provide a good example of a quartet who have not only graced our stage through the London Chamber Music Society and our own series, but have benefited from ChamberStudio, the unique mentoring project hosted by Kings Place each Sunday. Seasoned veterans give

inspirational masterclasses to up-and-coming ensembles, who have a chance to perform in the foyer and may graduate to Hall One. It makes Kings Place not just an ideal venue for chamber music, but also an important hub for nurturing the next generation. Before our big series kicks off, we celebrate Christmas in style with a fabulous folk week, ʻCustom-made Winterʼ (12–14 Dec), and some great seasonal concerts, including A Ceremony of Carols, Messiah, and the finale of our Bach Unwrapped series, the B minor Mass. Look out too, for seasonal menus at the Rotunda, fire pits, rugs and hot mulled wine on the terrace. December also brings the launch of our new Sunday morning Coffee Concerts, which will begin in style with Lucy Parham hosting a celebrity gala (8 Dec). Contributors to her series Word/Play include Andrew Kennedy, Tim Hugh, Edward Fox, Martin Jarvis and Henry Goodman.

January sees Gwilym Simcock, one of the UKʼs most distinctive and talented jazz pianists, curate his own series (9–10 Jan). More jazz comes in the form of AIR Sessions (13–15 Mar), featuring Magnus Öström, Marius Neset, Julia Biel, Troyka and many more. In February weʼre delighted to welcome Jewish Book Week (22 Feb–2 Mar) to Kings Place once again, with its lavish line-up of stimulating speakers, authors and poets. Book early for the fifth edition of the London A Cappella Festival (23–25 Jan) with its stellar line-up, and look out on the website for details of a brand-new series from the Americana Music Association UK (13–15 Feb), featuring some top North American and British bands.

NAVARRA QUARTET (COVER) & PETER MILLICAN (ABOVE) © NICK WHITE

CONTRIBUTORS

Colin Irwin previews ‘Custom-made Winter’, which features some legends of the folk world. He is a regular contributor to MOJO, The Guardian and fROOTS, and has several books to his name, including In Search Of The Craic and In Search Of Albion.

Sophie Solomon, who writes on Joceyln Pook’s new music theatre work for Jewish Book Week, Drawing Life, is Artistic Director of the Jewish Music Institute. A leading klezmer violinist, sheʼs a founder member of Oi Va Voi, and also composes for film, TV and theatre.

Philip Vann who writes on the art of Lucy Jones, is author of the critically acclaimed Face to Face: British SelfPortraits in the Twentieth Century, and other books on modern British and Irish artists, including Dora Holzhandler and William Crozier.

Helen Wallace writes on Chamber Classics Unwrapped and interviews cover artists the Navarra Quartet. She is an author, broadcaster and critic as well as Editor-in-Chief of Kings Place’s What’s On and Consultant Editor of BBC Music Magazine.


SARAH BENNETTO © SUPPLIED PHOTO

SARAH SARHANDI © TOMEK SIEREK

BLAIR DUNLOP © MARIO ROTA

DAWN LANDES © SUPPLIED PHOTO

FOLK

CLASSICAL

CONTEMPORARY

COMEDY

FOLK HIGHLIGHTS

CONTEMPORARY HIGHLIGHTS

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS

08 Bostridge sings Dowland Fretwork and Elizabeth Kenny join the celebrated tenor 09 Join Our American Road Trip Aurora Orchestra mix up American classics with folk singer Dawn Landes (above) 32 HOME TRUTHS Helen Wallace looks at the challenges and rewards of a life in chamber music with the Navarra Quartet and mentors from ChamberStudio 44 SUNDAY MORNING MUSIC Lucy Parham introduces her new Sunday morning Coffee Concert series Word/Play

10 Custom-made Winter Mother-daughter team Norma Waterson along with KAN and Eliza Carthy feature in a mini folk festival

14 Keeping it Real Swedenʼs The Real Group is just one of the international visitors to the London A Cappella Festival 16 Karachi Kaleidoscope Sarah Sarhandi (above) brings a host of collaborators to her Out Hear event 82 Q & A: GÉNIA The pianist, composer and creator of Piano-Yoga® is the great-great-neice of Vladimir Horowitz

17 The Melbourne Method Story-telling comedian Sarah Bennetto (above) weaves a winterʼs tale from her own home town

EDITORIAL TEAM

CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS

Publisher Kings Place Music Foundation Contact +44 (0) 20 7520 1440 mag@kingsplace.co.uk www.kingsplace.co.uk

12 Running in the Blood for Blair Dunlop Blair Dunlop (above) brings his new trio to Folk Union 13 A Reeling Ride to the Highlands Scots fiddler Duncan Chisholm

Editor-in-Chief Helen Wallace Editorial Team Emrah Tokalaç Janie Nicholas Michael Green Alice Clark (web) Lindsay Garfoot (web)

Art Direction Moira Gil Picture Research Sunita Sharma-Gibson Proofreading Susannah Howe Print Artisan Press, Leicester

Thanks to Peter Millican, Jen Mitchell, Alister Hussain, Amy SibleyAllen, Hannah Cooke, Zoë Jeyes, Geraldine D’Amico, Chris Nye, Holly Thomas, Hervé Bournas, Rachel Jackson, Aurelie Gillson, Andrew Clawson, Graham Newlands, Nell Halford,

© Kings Place 2014 All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of Kings Place is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at the time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Kings Place.


SPOKEN WORD

CHRISTMAS PARTIES © GREEN & FORTUNE

LUCY JONES SERENITY © FLOWERS GALLERY, LONDON

DYLAN THOMAS © GETTY IMAGES

JAMES ALLSOPP © ALEX BONNEY

JAZZ

ART/INTERACT

CHRISTMAS

JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS

SPOKEN WORD HIGHLIGHTS

ART HIGHLIGHTS

FOOD & DRINK

18 Nikki & The Printmakers Nikki Iles brings her ideal band to The Base 19 Fowlerʼs Prize-Winning Band Reuben Fowler makes his debut

22 The Beast, the Angel and the Madman Gwyneth Lewis pays tribute to Dylan Thomas in the year of his 100th anniversary

26 Looking Out, Looking In The work of painter Lucy Jones by Philip Vann

30 Go Off-Piste this Winter Great ideas for Christmas parties and get-togethers at Kings Place

21 Taking to the Air A rare visit from Magnus Öström, Marius Neset and stars from the Air Artist Agency

25 Words to Beat the Blues Stephen Grosz in conversation with Jeanette Winterson on the Most Depressing Day of the year

40 IMPOSSIBLE GENTLEMAN Gwilym Simcock tells Oliver Condy about his new curated series with admired British and European friends

46 DRAWING LIFE Sophie Solomon introduces Jocelyn Pookʼs new music theatre work inspired by the poems and drawings of children in Terezín

WHAT'S ON DECEMBER 2013 – MARCH 2014

CONTENTS

28 Beyond Cello Matthew Barley gathers a bevy of cellist pioneers

38 THE NIGHTS BEFORE CHRISTMAS Seasonal music to suit every taste LISTINGS 50 Listings 78 Calendar

REGULARS

20 Welcome to Bat Country James Allsopp (above) and his Golden Age of Steam

24 Flying Feet take to the Page Dancer Carlos Acosta discusses his new novel

INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS

03 06 07 08 32 50 51

Welcome Ticket Information Planning Your Week Highlights Features Listings December

57 64 73 77 78 82

January February March Art Listings Calendar Q& A with Génia


06 TICKETS

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December 2013 — March 2014

TICKET BOOKING & VENUE INFORMATION

BOOKING Tickets for all performances from £9.50 online Tickets are cheaper if booked online. (The online ticket prices are shown in the listings.) Please add £2 per ticket to the online price if booking by telephone or in person. Kings Place do not charge any additional booking or postage fees.

Tue 10–6pm; Sun 12–7pm (closed Bank Holidays). Opening Hours are subject to change – please call the Box Office for more details. 90 York Way, London, N1 9AG £9.50 Saver Seats can only be purchased online and are limited in availability

VENUES

ONLINE Secure online booking 24hrs a day. www.kingsplace.co.uk

BY PHONE Kings Place Box Office +44 (0)20 7520 1490

IN PERSON Box Office Opening Hours Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri & Sat 12–8pm;

HALL TWO

All seating is unreserved and general admission – choose your own seat on arrival. Some events may be standing only.

GROUP BOOKINGS Buy six or more tickets per event, and save 20%. Group discounts are available through the Box Office only and are not bookable online. May not be applicable for some events and subject to availability.

One and Two, with hearing advancement headsets available for audience members who do not use a hearing aid. Neck loops are also available to use with hearing aids switched to the ‘T’ position. All areas of Kings Place are accessible to those with Guide & Hearing Dogs.

ST PANCRAS ROOM

HALL ONE Assigned Seating – Choose your own seat when booking. £9.50 Saver Seats can only be purchased online and are limited in availability You are guaranteed a seat. Its location will be allocated by the Box Office. Tickets may be collected at any time during the hour before the performance.

All seating is unreserved and general admission – choose your own seat on arrival. Some events may be standing only.

ACCESS Kings Place aims to be accessible to everyone, and all performance spaces offer suitable seating for wheelchair users. Please inform the Box Office Staff of any access requirements when booking. There is an induction loop at the Box Office Welcome Desk to assist those with hearing aids. An infrared system is installed in Halls

ARRIVING LATE We will endeavour to seat latecomers at a suitable break in the performance, although this may not always be possible and in some instances latecomers may not be admitted at all. Tickets are non-refundable.

TAKING PICTURES The use of cameras, video or sound recording equipment is strictly prohibited during performances, concerts and exhibitions. Kings Place may take pictures during your visit that are later used for promotional purposes.

RETURNS POLICY Tickets cannot be refunded or exchanged, except where an event is cancelled or abandoned when less than half of the performance has taken place.


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

December 2013 — March 2014

PLANNING YOUR WEEK 07

JOURNEY

WEEKLY FOCUS

KINGS PLACE IS SITUATED JUST A FEW MINUTES', WALK FROM KING'S CROSS AND ST PANCRAS STATIONS, ONE OF THE MOST CONNECTED LOCATIONS IN LONDON AND NOW THE BIGGEST TRANSPORT HUB IN EUROPE. SEE MAP BELOW FOR DETAILED TRAVEL ADVICE

WEDNESDAY/THURSDAY – SATURDAY EACH WEEK A COLLABORATIVE MIX OF ARTISTS, CURATORS, ORGANISATIONS AND PRODUCERS PRESENTING AN EXCITING SERIES OF EVENTS

al an sC nt’ ge Re

Central Saint Martins d rd R Wha

Battlebridge Basin

St Pancras International Thameslink Euston Station

British Library

d nR sto Eu

PUBLIC TRANSPORT The Transport for London Journey Planner provides live travel updates and options on how to reach Kings Place quickly and accurately. You can also call London Travel Information on +44 (0)343 222 1234.

TUBE

The nearest tube station is King’s Cross St Pancras, on the Circle, Metropolitan, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Northern and Victoria lines. The station has step-free access from platform to street level. From the tube station the quickest way to Kings Place is via the new King’s Boulevard. You can also walk up York Way.

BUS

The bus route to York Way is the 390. Other services running to nearby King’s Cross St Pancras are routes 10, 17, 30, 45, 46, 59, 63, 73, 91, 205, 214, 259 and 476.

CAR

Kings Place is easily accessible by car and is clearly signposted in the immediate area.

Ca led on ian Rd

King’s Cross

90 York Way London N1 9AG

Wharfdale Rd

York Way

d sR cra Pan

d dR lan Mid

Kin g’s Bou leva rd

NCP Car Park

Crinan St

ay ds W Goo

ville Rd Penton K ing ’s C ros sR Gr d ay ’s Inn Rd

The building is outside the Congestion Charge Zone. The nearest car park is NCP London St Pancras (www.ncp.co.uk) on Pancras Road, open 24 hours, 7 days including Bank Holidays. If you are using sat nav our postcode is N1 9AG.

BIKE

There is a Barclays Bike Hire Docking Station right next door to Kings Place on Crinan Street. For its latest status and recommended cycling routes to Kings Place, please visit the Transport for London website: www.tfl.gov.uk/roadusers/cycling or call London Travel Information: +44 (0)343 222 1234.

FOOT

If you live in King’s Cross or the surrounding area then why not walk to Kings Place? We are located right on the Grand Union Canal towpath.

TAXI

Visitors can pick up taxis either on York Way and the streets immediately surrounding Kings Place or at the taxi ranks at King’s Cross and St Pancras Stations.

PLANNING YOUR WEEK SUNDAYS

CLASSICAL FRIDAYS

FOLK

P08 P10

SUNDAYS

CONTEMPORARY P14 THURSDAYS

COMEDY SATURDAYS

JAZZ MONDAYS

SPOKEN WORD

P17 P18 P22


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HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS

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December 2013 — March 2014

BoSTrIdGe SInGS dowLAnd Fretwork are joined by renowed tenor Ian Bostridge for a delectable programme of Dowland this season. Richard Boothby looks ahead

For viol consort Fretwork, this year has been an incredibly active one, dominated by John Dowland’s intricate instrumental music as they marked the composer’s 450th anniversary. You may well have last seen them performing on the recent BBC series Music and Monarchy, demonstrating the music of Dowland, Lawes and Gibbons. In February they will be joined in a very special concert by tenor Ian Bostridge and lutenist Elizabeth Kenny for a programme of some of Dowlandʼs most famous songs combined with the famous sequence of Seven Pavans. Tenor viol player Richard Boothby explains their choice of soloists: ‘Ian spends a lot of time singing a totally different repertoire – Romantic lieder and a huge amount of Britten too. But we’re keen to work with artists who donʼt specialise in early music, and Ian brings another aesthetic. His experience of the intimate, literary, highly expressive lieder repertoire finds a keen resonance in Dowland. One of our players, Richard Tunnicliffe, has played continuo for Ian when he’s been Evanglist in

the Bach Passions, so there’s a great respect between us already. As for Elizabeth Kenny, she really is the pre-eminent lutenist in this field and we’ve long wanted to work with her.’ The programme will interweave lute songs like ‘Flow my teares’ and ‘Time stands still’ with instrumental lachrimae. The project began life at a sold-out BBC Proms chamber music concert this September, which Fretwork are taking on a ten-concert tour of America this winter, including to St Thomas’s Church in New York, ‘a curious outpost of Anglicanism’, where they perform Gibbons’s verse anthems and a new work connected to Gibbons by young American Nico Muhly. Dowland’s reputation is in safe hands with these passionate ambassadors of his art. Fretwork with Ian Bostridge 12 February See Listings p67 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

December 2013 — March 2014

HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

09

Join our AmericAn roAd Trip

IAN BOSTRIDGE © SIMON FOWLER | FRETWORK © CHRIS DAWES | DAWN LANDES © SUPPLIED PHOTO | THOMAS GOULD © LAURA LAJBER

Aurora Orchestra plans to hit the road in style for its opening concert of the 2014 season, which finds echoes in Chamber Classics Unwrapped too

Aurora Orchestra, Kings Place’s resident chamber orchestra, has become adept at turning the tables on standard programming and is famous for its unparalleled appetite for collaboration. Its New Year concert in Hall One is a bracing example. An all-American road trip is the theme, starting in the Appalachians with Copland’s blazing ballet Appalachian Spring, moving north for Ives’s evocative Three Places in New England and crossing to California for John Adams’s invigorating Chamber Symphony. But that’s not all: the orchestra will be joined on its journey by some special guest travellers who will splice these folk-inflected orchestral masterpieces with folk and popular songs. One will be Kentucky-born, Brooklyn-based singer Dawn Landes (pictured left), who will join the orchestra to play some folk arrangements by composer Nico Muhly especially written for her, and not heard on these shores before. Muhly has said he’s ‘drawn to folk music where there is really a sharp contrast between the beauty of the melody and grimness of the lyrics.’ He has already worked on the tragic song ‘Lord Thomas and Fair Eleanor’ with Landes: ‘it’s about a marriage gone wrong; everyone ends up dying. There are so many versions, all with 15 million extra verses you didn’t know about.’ Landes collaborated on Muhlyʼs ballet score Two Hearts, choreography by Benjamin Millepieds for New York City Ballet last year. Muhly has gone on to create exquisite, plangent instrumental arrangements which brilliantly set off Landesʼ effortless, jewel-like voice. One review mentions her ‘ability to go from fun to serious in one twang of her guitar’. Another described her as a performer whose ‘unique style showcases her ability to whisper a lulling hush as well as a rock-meets-alt-country wail’. She certainly slips easily between satin mezzo and glistening high soprano (catch Muhly’s version of ‘Lord Thomas and Fair Eleanor’ on www.dawnlandes.com). Aurora hope to record the three orchestral pieces (by Copland, Ives and Adams) and the songs as part of a future album based on this concert. And for more Americana catch Aurora’s charismatic leader, Thomas Gould (pictured left), on 21 March 2014, when he’ll play John Adams’s 1995 violin sonata Road Movies with Alasdair Beatson as part of Chamber Classics Unwrapped.

oTHer cLASSicAL HiGHLiGHTS cHriSTmAS & neW YeAr AT kinGS pLAce 19 dec Christmas Oratorio 20 dec Britten: A Ceremony of Carols

22 dec Handelʼs Messiah:

Orchestra of St Johnʼs

31 dec New Yearʼs Eve: OAE 01 JAn New Yearʼs Day: OAE 04 JAn Aurora Orchestra: Road Trip

endYmion'S 30THAnniverSArY ceLeBrATionS 06 FeB Brahms Horn Trio 07 FeB Debussy Sonata pArT oF cHAmBer cLASSicS unWrApped

08 FeB Brahms on Clarinet

iAn BoSTridGe & FreTWork 12 FeB Dowland songs

and Lachrimæ with Elizabeth Kenny

SundAYS, 6.30 pm | HALL one 01 dec Maggini Quartet 08 dec Allegri Quartet with Martin Outram

15 dec Sir Roger Norrington

& Cambridge University

Chamber Orchestra

05 JAn Emperor Quartet

&Sarah Beth-Briggs

12 JAn Wihan Quartet 19 JAn Charles Owen

& Katya Apekisheva

Aurora Orchestra: Road Trip 4 January See Listings p57 for details Chamber Classics Unwrapped John Adams: Road Movies Thomas Gould & Alasdair Beatson 21 March See Kings Place website for details

26 JAn Tippett Quartet with Stephanie Gonley

02 FeB London Soloists Ensemble

09 FeB Clare Presland Eniko Magyar

&Vicky Vannoula

16 FeB Raphael Wallfisch & John York

09 mAr Tamsin Waley-Cohen & Huw Watkins


HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

FoLK HiGHLiGHts

December 2013 — March 2014

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

Custom -made Winter Colin Irwin welcomes a boutique winter folk festival featuring legends of the British scene, including KAN and mother-and-daughter team Norma Waterson and Eliza Carthy

You wouldn’t get far into any analysis of great British folk singers past and present without the Carthy/Waterson clan looming large. The vivacious harmonies of the Yorkshire family ignited the folk revival in the 1960s and continued to do so for several decades until, as the scene itself hit the doldrums, Eliza Carthy – daughter of Norma Waterson and Martin Carthy – stepped forward with sensual vocals, faithful fiddle and bold new ideas to play a key role in its resurrection. With her hugely varied Wayward Daughter compilation celebrating two decades as a progressive, free-thinking professional – in which time she’s also evolved into a hugely imaginative songwriter – Eliza’s all too rare appearances with Norma, sadly the only surviving member of the three Waterson siblings, are to be treasured. Their Kings Place night will feature The Gift Band from their 2010 Gift album, which mixed hardy traditional song with unexpected leftfield choices such as Ukulele Lady and the Longfellow poem Psalm Of Life. It was justly festooned with awards and now, following Norma’s recovery from major illness, their effortless, empathetic magic can resume. Both mother and daughter have provided profound inspiration for the impressive new wave of young artists who’ve lit up Brit folk in recent years – none more convincingly than Bella Hardy. A deeply emotive singing fiddle-player from Derbyshire’s Peak District, she recently released her sixth album, Battleplan, to ecstatic reviews, using the tradition as a root for her own inventive and challenging songs. Her first, Three Black Feathers, written during a maths exam, was nominated for a BBC Folk Award and is now regarded as a classic; while The Herring Girl, a delicious tale of female retribution, went on to win Best Song at those same awards last year.

motHer and dauGHter Have provided inspiration For tHe impressive neW Wave oF younG artists

KAN © ALLAN MACDONALD | BELLA HARDY © DECARLO | NORMA WATERSON AND ELIZA CARTHY © SUPPLIED PHOTO

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Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

December 2013 — March 2014

HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

Now backed by an accomplished band, The Midnight Watch, which includes the outstanding Scottish guitarist Anna Massie, Hardy has made great strides with each album and, given the time of year, her Kings Place night will doubtless include songs from her Christmas collection Bright Morning Star, which features daringly enterprising versions of Yuletide favourites such as Rocking Around The Christmas Tree and Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas. Another highlight of the season is an appearance by KAN, the folk supergroup featuring Lau’s Aidan O’Rourke on fiddle, Brian Finnegan of Flook on flute, Ian Stephenson on guitar and bass and Jim Goodwin on percussion. Blending Irish and Scots tunes with Breton dance, modern jazz and their own complex and excitingly innovative arrangements, their Sleeper album is considered a modern classic. Custom-made Winter 12–14 December See Listings p54 for details and Christmas Music feature on pp38–39

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12

HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

December 2013 — March 2014

Running in the blood foR blaiR dunlop Tim Woodall talks to awardwinning singer-songwriter Blair Dunlop, who brings his new trio to Kings Place for the first time this December

The son of British folk legend Ashley Hutchings (Fairport Convention and the Albion Band), young British singer-songwriter and guitarist Blair Dunlop has nevertheless ploughed his own furrow as a musician. You’re from a folk family, and grew up around the music. At what age did the music bug hit? I was always surrounded by music but I actually started playing relatively late on. I messed around with indie guitar and then got completely sucked into the guitar on hearing Nic Jones albums and the like. The rest is already history.   To someone who had never heard your music before, how would you describe it in a few sentences? Folk is in my DNA but I don’t necessarily see myself as a folk artist. With influences as wide as Jackson Browne and John Mayer there is a strong American influence in my music as well. To summarise, I would say I’m a singersongwriter with folk influences from both the UK and USA. Tell us about the performance you’re bringing to Kings Place, and the musicians you’ll be playing with. I have a new trio. The wonderful Angharad Jenkins from the band Calan is playing fiddle and (at the time of writing) I have been playing with Mark Hutchinson on guitar. The tour is a

celebration of the most amazing year where so much has happened for me, but also a look to the future with an introduction to some new material as well. Your debut album, Blight & Blossom, has a lovely, light touch and soft, contemplative quality. What inspires you as a songwriter? I love great songwriters who have something to say. I’m not a fan of meaningless love songs. It takes me a long time to write and I like to think about the story within each song… I guess that’s the contemplative folk artist in me!

You won the Horizon Award at the 2013 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards, a gong that’s gone to great folk artists. What did that meant to you? It meant so much as it is recognition from peers: a nod from the heritage of folk music, so to speak. I was delighted to win it but it also already seems so long ago. Folk Union: Blair Dunlop 6 December See Listings p52 for details


HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

December 2013 — March 2014

13

FridAys 8PM – hAll tWo

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

i deCided to MAke PhysiCAl Journeys in My Mind For WhiCh i Would then CreAte A soundtrACk 6 deCeMBer

Blair Dunlop 13 deCeMBer (10PM)

KAN

Part of Custom-made Winter

31 JAnuAry

Jim Causley

with Lukas Drinkwater The Poetry of Charles Causley

7 FeBruAry

Chris Wood 14 FeBruAry

Police Dog Hogan with The Vagaband Part of Americana

A reeling ride to the highlAnds

BLAIR DUNLOP © MARIO ROTA | DUNCAM CHISHOLM © SUPPLIED PHOTO

Scots fiddler Duncan Chisholm promises to evoke the beauty of his Highland home when he comes to Kings Place in February, as he tells Tim Woodall

Scottish fiddle player Duncan Chisholm has spent half a decade or more creating, recording and performing music dedicated to his roots and, more specifically, his particular neck of the woods in the Highlands. The Chisholm clan have had lands near Inverness and Loch Ness for hundreds of years. It is the spectacular beauty of this area that Chisholm explored and celebrated with his Strathglass Trilogy of albums, released between 2008 and 2012. ‘The making of the Trilogy was about creating soundscapes for the places that I know and love so well,’ says Chisholm. ‘I decided to make physical journeys in my mind for which I would then create a soundtrack. I saw these journeys in cinematic episodes, coloured by weather and landscape.’ The result was a collection of music at once soaring and warmly atmospheric, all bound together with Chisholm’s expressive violin playing. ‘I have always aspired to have a vocal quality in my playing and I believe I am as close to that as I have ever been in my life,’ he says of his own particular fiddle style.

Understandably unwilling to say goodbye to the Strathglass project, Chisholm created a suite from the albums, which he performed with a quintet of traditional players and 20-piece orchestra at the 2013 Celtic Connections Festival in Glasgow. He subsequently released the live recording of this gig and he brings a stripped-down version of the suite to Kings Place. ‘The performance should take the audience to a different place, to let them escape the confines of the hall,’ he says. ‘Having fewer musicians means a more intimate space to really get to the heart of the music. With Jarlath [Henderson] on pipes/whistles and Matheu [Watson] on guitar I can attain all the musical colouring that I need to express myself fully.’ Folk Union: Duncan Chisholm 28 February See Listings p73 for details

28 FeBruAry

Duncan Chisholm 7 MArCh

Ewan McLennan 14 MArCh

Tony McManus

other Folk highlights 12–15 deCeMBer

Custom Made Winter

with The Albion Xmas Show, Norma Waterson & Eliza Carthy with The Gift Band, KAN and Bella Hardy

13–15 FeBruAry

Americana

with Laura Cantrell, Sturgill Simpson, Police Dog Hogan, The Vagaband, Will Kaufman, Emily Barker & The Red Clay Halo, Austin Lucas and Hatful of Rain


14

HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

CONTEMPORARY HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

December 2013 — March 2014

REAL RHYTHM FROM THE REAL GROUP Swedish star singers The Real Group join an international line-up including House Jacks, The Songmen, SLIX and The Swingles at this year’s London A Cappella Festival. Helen Wallace talked to soprano Katarina Henryson, a founding member of the super group

How did you find each other in the beginning? Amazingly, we all went to the same choir school in Stockholm as children. Four got together at the Royal Stockholm Academy and invited me to join. I was more interested in pop singing then, and was quite resistant. Now I realise that this was the right thing to do. As I get older I become more aware of – and more emotional about – the power of the human voice to connect people, and I’m glad I’ve dedicated my life to singing. What are you working on at the moment? I’ve just spent the morning practising some new songs we are singing in LevelEleven, the group we formed with our Finnish friends Rajaton. We’re about to do a tour of Scandinavia with them, it’s lots of fun… perhaps we’ll be invited to Kings Place one of these days! What’s interesting for you in coming to London’s A Cappella Festival? To be part of the world A Cappella community is a joy: we reconnect with lots of friends, and there’s such warmth and openness to new ideas. Also, it’s an opportunity to see The Swingle Singers, who co-curate the festival, and are such an inspiring institution. We love their current line-up. Are you always looking to push the boundaries of your music-making? Yes, although Anders Edenroth is our main arranger, we all find songs and create music. It’s vital our material evolves with new voices: Emma Nilsdotter and Morten Vinther have brought their own special musicianship to

our work. Yes, we’re always looking out for new songs: we went to South Korea recently and did our version of ‘Gangnam style’ in the posh Gangnam area of Seoul – I cannot describe the level of the reaction, people screamed! Your incredibly fluid rhythm is a very striking aspect of your music-making – how is it achieved? The short answer is: a very clever arrangement. But there are no free lunches in this business – it may sound spontaneous and fluid, but we have to work very, very hard on those complex scores, and we are not fast learners. Do you ever make your arrangements available to others? Absolutely, we have a score store on our website, though we do find that because our bass Anders Jalkeus sings unusually low, other groups sometimes have to change the key. How do you work as ambassadors for the Star for Life charity? We travel all over the third world singing in schools and for gala events to raise money. Witnessing the Star for Life vocal group performing in Stockholm was very moving. On a personal level, I learn a huge amount from visiting places like South Africa, the singing culture is so strong. What’s the secret of a healthy voice? I do one and half hours of Ashtanga yoga every day. I drink plenty, sleep plenty, and try to be kind to myself.


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You famously sang ‘Dancing Queen’ with Abba’s Anni-Frid Lyngstad. What’s your favourite Abba track? I grew up singing Abba songs with my skipping rope as a microphone with no idea of what any of the English words meant. The other day I heard ‘Knowing me, knowing you’ and realised that there’s real lived experience behind that song, it’s very sad.

December 2013 — March 2014

HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

15

What can we expect to hear at your LACF gig? I can’t give too much away, but we’ll be doing a Daft Punk song, and some jazz… London A Cappella Festival 2014 The Real Group 24 January See Listings p62 for details

SunDayS, 4pM – haLL TWO 1 DECEMBER

Miniaturised Concertos Double piano concertos, commissioned by Kate Halsall

8 DECEMBER

Lazy Modem 2 feat. Howlround Reel-to-reel tape machines Curated by Esther Ainsworth e_s_t

15 DECEMBER

FOUND

Music, electronics, dance & poetry Curated by Sarah Sarhandi Music

12 JanuaRy

Anarchy in the Organism An exploration of our relationship with complexity Curated by Kate Romano

19 JanuaRy

Fitzwilliam Quartet Absolutely! Album Launch

26 JanuaRy

nu:nord feat. Tre Voci Cello Ensemble and Silje Aker Johnsen 2 FEBRuaRy

We Spoke: Song Exploring the cultural heritage of song

9 FEBRuaRy

GéNIA and Max de Wardener 16 FEBRuaRy

Mechanical Air

A Hyper~Graphic Score

THE REAL GROUP © TINA AXELSSON

2 MaRCh

Will Dutta Pargenon Live

9 MaRCh

Beyond Cello Workshops, concerts & cabaret celebrating the alternative cello


HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

December 2013 — March 2014

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Karachi Kaleidoscope Sarah Sarhandi brings a fascinating collection of collaborators to her Out Hear event in December

Sarah Sarhandi is a violist with a difference: trained at the Royal Academy of Music, she draws on her Pakistani heritage to create unique audio-visual works. While solo performance is central to her work, she’s composed music for dance (most notably with Russell Maliphant in the award-winning Sheer) and worked with Damien Hirst and others on the installation Agongo. She’ll be coming to Out Hear with a host of collaborators on 15 December, to launch her new project, Found. She created the piece of music in 2012, inspired by footage and sounds of traffic in Karachi, Pakistan. She’s always been aware of the spaces between different strands of her ancestry, and has always looked for ways to cross those gaps: ‘There are spaces actual and imagined, especially between my Muslin and Western cultures. I’m interested in integration. Perhaps here’s a new space we can inhabit, where violent polarisation dissolves. I felt I had reached that space when I was creating Found, the sound of my viola seemed to be a thread drawing everything together in this turbulent millennial flow we inhabit.’

The sound of my viola seemed To be a Thread drawing everyThing TogeTher in This TurbulenT flow Her music has been described as ‘a whispering collage’ and she herself speaks of ‘finding a sound that moves me’ and weaving together ‘a vibration, a noise, a homemade fairy tale’. In her Out Hear set she’ll be joined by Jemima Burrill, trumpeter Yaniv Fridel, Gina Birch on bass, poet and artist Ana Corbero and singers Lore Lixenberg and Lauren Kinsella. Her set will involve a string of short works, songs, some mini-operas, each presented through a fresh visual treatment. Out Hear FOUND: Sarah Sarhandi 15 December See Listings p55 for details

SARAH SARHANDI © TOMEK SIEREK | SARAH BENNETTO © SUPPLIED PHOTO

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comeDy tHursDays, 8Pm – Hall two

HiGHliGHts

3 December

Storytellers’ Club: Crumby Christmas

December 2013 — March 2014

He'D askeD for a latte witH sucH flamboyance sHe'D assumeD He was italian

tHe melbourne metHoD Australian comedian Sarah Bennetto, who comes to Kings Place with the Storytellers’ Club in December, returns to her roots for a barista’s mystery

They always beamed when she asked ‘the usual?’ It was an educated guess, in honesty; most customers had an unwavering preference for café latte. She’d nod, smooth her apron and turn to the gleaming La Marzocco. With a ding and a buzz and a tap, tap, tap, the ritual began. He first walked into the café during the last embers of the Melbourne summer and he’d been coming ever since. He didn’t have a ‘usual’. In fact, everything about him was unusual, irregular, in flux. One wintry Wednesday he walked in, his heavy coat dripping a trail to the counter. ‘Affogato, please,’ he rasped, sotto voce. He smiled, but never spoke more than necessary. She commenced the ding and the buzz and the tap, tap, tap of his order. She could’ve sworn he was European. Though, today, his accent had a suggestion of Estuary English. Back in summer, he’d asked for a latte with such flamboyant affectation, she’d assumed he was Italian. She dismissed the idea the following week when he asked for a ’blazing hot espresso!’ with decidedly Aussie machismo. She smiled, startled. She must have been mistaken. The outfits changed with searing frequency too. At first, he wore leather trousers, luxuriant shirts and military boots, finished with an inky lick of fringe in one eye. Within a week he was back for a decaf Americano, with cropped hair, jeans and a sartorially offensive Hawaiian shirt. Next he wore a stiff suit and spent the afternoons curtly muttering into a phone about shares, while stirring a flat white, teaspoon deftly tracing the cup’s edge with a ping, ping, ping. Now, during winter’s icy onslaught, he resembled a mountain man: corduroy trousers, checked shirts, thickening beard. ‘What’s the filter coffee like today?’ he asked, in a deep North American drawl. ‘It’s good,’ she responded, peering towards the rain-lacquered front window. ‘Hey, great scarf. Looks pretty warm.’ Curiosity had taken hold; she was going for it. ‘Thanks, it’s for work.’ he replied. ‘Right… and… where is it you work?’ She tried to mask the pitch shift in her question, walking to the table, cup and saucer leading the way. ‘Everywhere, really. I’m a park officer in Yosemite right now. And last month I worked on Wall Street. In autumn I was in an Italian folk band. Then I was a jewel thief from Sydney.’ ‘An actor?’ He nodded and took a sip. ‘Is that why you order the different drinks?’ she chortled. ‘Yep, whatever the character wants.’ She shook her head. He was found out, ‘Well, actually, I’m an extra.’ Silence fell for a beat between them. ‘But… the clothes, the haircuts… the accents! For weeks!’ He shrugged, ‘Yeah, I just get really into it.’ She baulked at this madness, ‘You use Method as an extra?’ His gaze arced upward to hers for the first time, ‘Well, I figure, why not go for it, you know?’ A moment passed. Then she reached into her apron pocket, and pulled out a tiny loyalty card. ‘Well, then you’re going to need one of these. You’re always welcome here. All of you.’ The door shuddered open. A family lurched in, shivering, shaking umbrellas by the mat. ‘Latte?’ she asked them, as she headed back towards the La Marzocco. In the booth by the window a park officer smiled to himself, tucking his new loyalty card deep in his damp coat pocket.

12 December

Impropera’s (Not So) Bleak Midwinter

more sHows to be announceD soon! keeP an eye on our website.

HIGHLIGHTS COMEDY

Off with their heads! Storytellers’ Club: Crumby Christmas 3 December See Listings p52 for details

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HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

December 2013 — March 2014

JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS

Nobody workS HArder THAN ILeS AS AN ImmeNSeLy PoPuLAr JAZZ educATor

NIkkI ANd THe PrINTmAkerS Sebastian Scotney pays tribute to pianist Nikki Iles, who makes a welcome return to The Base in December

One short trip to the US in 2010 finally brought pianist Nikki Iles the level of recognition that she had deserved for a very long time. She went into a studio in Englewood, New Jersey and recorded an album with one of the great jazz bassists, Rufus Reid, and drummer Jeff Williams. The resulting CD, Hush (Basho, 2012), has had the superlatives flowing: ‘For sheer enjoyment this calm, lucid teamwork is unsurpassed.’ (Observer) Trips across the Atlantic are rare, however, because Nikki Iles is so busy in the UK. Nobody works harder than her as an immensely popular educator; she criss-crosses the country as a constantly in-demand pianist, and is the firstchoice accompanist for many singers. The band which she leads is The Printmakers (The Base, 7 December, a concert to be recorded by BBC Radio 3), a sextet featuring vocalist Norma Winstone and guitarist Mike Walker. Iles always looks forward to playing with Walker: ‘He can play incredibly tenderly, yet there can be amazing  fireworks.’ The band has the perfect anchor of Steve Watts’ bass, and the variety and emotional depth of Mark Lockheart’s saxophone playing. The core of the sextet formed for the 1994 Manchester Jazz Festival, when Iles was asked ‘ to form any band I liked’. The name, Iles explains, uses the analogy of what a printmaker does. ‘Like a print, each subsequent performance is not a copy of the first impression, but  unique.’ The Printmakers have an age range between oldest bandmember (Norma Winstone) and youngest (drummer James Maddren) of more than 40 years, with Iles – as ever – in the middle. The Printmakers were on a UK tour this summer celebrating her 50th birthday. ‘It’s been great, with quite a few sell-out gigs,’ she comments. When The Printmakers come to Kings Place they will have just recorded an album in Ambleside, Cumbria. Plans for 2014 include a German tour and preparation work on the release of the new CD. And how would she describe her method as bandleader? She sums up the secret of her success simply: ‘Not telling the musicians how to play, but allowing their personalities to take the music wherever they want it to go.’ The Base: Nikki Iles and The Printmakers 7 December See Listings p52 for details

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490


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December 2013 — March 2014

FOWLER'S PRIZE-WINNING BIG BAND The Royal Academy of Music made a clever decision when it awarded Reuben Fowler a prize to make his first recording, says Sebastian Scotney

HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

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SATURDAYS, 8PM – HALL TWO 7 DECEMBER

Nikki Iles

50th Birthday Celerbation with The Printmakers, featuring Norma Winstone and Stan Sulzmann

14 DECEMBER

Mercury Quartet 21 DECEMBER

The Golden Age of Steam

NIKKI ILES © SUPPLIED PHOTO | NORMA WINSTONE © PETRA KEMPER | REUBEN FOWLER © DAVE STAPLETON

Welcome to Bat Country

FOWLER'S BIG BAND PERSONNEL COMBINES PLAYERS OF HIS OWN GENERATION WITH TOP-DRAWER LONDON MUSICIANS

The Kenny Wheeler Jazz Prize has some smart thinking behind it. It gives one jazz student each year graduating from the Royal Academy of Music the opportunity to produce a recording on Edition Records, whose label boss Dave Stapleton is on the awarding panel, alongside long-term Kenny Wheeler associate Evan Parker, and the Academy’s Head of Jazz Nick Smart. 23-year-old Wakefield-born trumpeter Reuben Fowler (The Base, 18 January) won the prize in 2012. He struck lucky, as he admits, to be offered the mentoring of Dave Stapleton to supervise the recording, but his good fortune continued. A few months later, he received a Peter Whittingham Award from the Musicians Benevolent Fund. This prize offered more top-level musical mentoring, so, combining the prizes to his advantage, Fowler enlisted the help of trumpeter/ arranger Guy Barker. Barker, who will direct this concert for Kings Place’s The Base, is unstinting in his praise for his younger trumpet/ composing colleague, and for the newly-released, acclaimed CD Between Shadows (Edition), the result of the whole process. Barker marvels ‘that someone can achieve that level of musicality, can sound that mature when he’s only just left college’. Fowler’s big band personnel combines players of his own generation with top-drawer London musicians such as trumpeter Mike Lovatt and trombonist Gordon Campbell. His writing draws inspiration from the greats – Gil Evans, and Kenny Wheeler – but is fresh, forceful and individual. Guy Barker emphasises that Fowler doesn’t just have brief flashes of inspiration: ‘It’s all interesting, it all works so well.’ The Base: The Reuben Fowler Big Band 18 January See Listings p60 for details

18 JANUARY

Reuben Fowler Big Band Featuring Stan Sulzmann, Jim Hart & Guy Barker

1 FEBRUARY

Dakhla Brass 8 FEBRUARY

Tim Richard’s HEXTET 15 FEBRUARY (7PM)

Matthew Halsall & The Gondwana Orchestra

15 FEBRUARY (9.15PM)

GoGo Penguin Mammal Hands

OTHER JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS 9–10 JANUARY

Gwilym Simcock & Friends Featuring Johannes Berauer and Celine Bonacina Trio

13–15 MARCH

AIR Sessions

Curated by Air Artist Agency Featuring Magnus Öström, Marius Neset, Troyka, Daniel Herskedal, Michael Wollny, Tamar Halperin, Julia Biel and Anthony Strong


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HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

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December 2013 — March 2014

Welcome to Bat country Sebastian Scotney pays tribute to the talent of saxophonist James Allsopp, who brings his Golden Age of Steam to The Base this December

The graduating class of 2003 from the Royal Academy of Music’s jazz course has proved to be a vintage crop. James Allsopp, leader of The Golden Age of Steam (21 Dec), was the saxophone colossus in a cohort which also included pianists Gwilym Simcock and Ivo Neame. Ten years on, the reputation for limitless technique and adaptability makes Allsopp first call for many different bands. What’s his own view of his prodigious virtuosity? ‘Technique is the means to an end, allowing me to do things the saxophone doesn’t normally do.’ His band The Golden Age of Steam, he says, ‘is increasingly about a big textural, atmospheric thing, not just highlighting distinct solos’. It’s certainly a vehicle for Allsopp’s eclectic compositions and go-anywhere improvisatory attitude, spiced with his energy and imagination. The Golden Age of Steam’s two albums – whose titles also point to his quicksilver sense of the absurd – underline this direction. Raspberry Tongue, 2009 (Babel), was for a trio with the acclaimed drummer Tim Giles and the protean pianist Kit Downes. Welcome to Bat Country, 2012 (Basho), explores the richer sound palette of a quintet with Alex Bonney (on trumpet/electronics), and the subtly propulsive bassist Ruth Goller. Surreal humour is a feature of an Allsopp gig, and Downes has described the latest album as ‘circus music for the insane, including brass bands, waffle thrones and butterdomes’. The Base: The Golden Age of Steam 21 December See Listings p56 for details


THE GOLDEN AGE OF STEAM © JAZZ IN THE ROUND | JAMES ALLSOPP © ALEX BONNEY | MAGNUS ÖSTRÖM © GÖRAN PETERSSON

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Jazz has always been about connections: fusions with other musical styles, conversations between players, direct emotional ties with its audience. These three days, curated by Air Artist Agency, are centred round contemporary music that highlights these connections. It provides a vivid portrait of the vitality of this music in 2014. Magnus Öström felt the lure of the beat early on. At the age of eight he turned his father’s paint tins into a drum kit; by 13 he was playing drums with a similarly music-obsessed kid from across the road, pianist Esbjörn Svensson. Fast forward 30 years and the pair were touring concert halls around the world as two-thirds of e.s.t. – the most successful European jazz group of modern times. It had been a beautifully arcing career which echoed the way Öström builds a piece of music. But this arc stopped suddenly at its zenith. Esbjörn Svensson died in a diving accident and in the aftermath Öström considered giving up music. That the beat has restorative properties is clear from the drummer’s subsequent work as band leader. Öström has found a compelling way of making connections between jazz and rock, adding electric guitar on top of the piano trio and drawing his structures and ethos from prog-rock. His quartet’s recent album, Searching for Jupiter, is filled with rich electro-acoustic constructions underpinned by his slow-build foundations. They have both rock power and jazz pliability. For this night, entitled Visions, British trio Troyka achieve a similar, albeit edgier, synthesis with a mash-up of their diverse musical tastes, which include both Aphex Twin and cutting-edge jazz. The results can be spiky or lyrical. The evening before this double bill, Voices, focuses on singers and song-writing. With no instrument to act as a barrier, the singer makes a particularly strong relationship with the audience – they look each other in the eye. Anthony Strong turns songs that were evergreen when his grandparents were teenagers into muscular modern pop-jazz; Julia Biel, on the other hand, looks to the singersongwriters of the ‘70s as her role models, translating their work nto fresh, original 21st century compositions. The third evening, Duets, makes connections between musicians, introducing five eloquent conversationalists to the stage. Some pairs – saxophonist Marius Neset and tuba maestro Daniel Herskedal; pianist Michael Wollny and pianist/harpsichordist Tamar Halperin – know each other well. But conversations between relative strangers can be as fascinating as those between good friends. And with Magnus Öström added to the mix, all manner of new and surprising links are going to be made in the heat of the moment – so be there to hear it.

Air Sessions 13 March: Voices 14 March: Visions 15 March: Duets Featuring Magnus Öström, Marius Neset, Troyka, Daniel Herskedal, Michael Wollny, Tamar Halperin, Julia Biel and Anthony Strong 13 – 15 March See Listings pp75–76 for details.

December 2013 — March 2014

HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

Taking To The air Peter Bacon welcomes drummer Magnus Öström, formerly of e.s.t., along with a clutch of exciting stars from the Air Artist Agency, including Marius Neset, Troyka and Anthony Strong, for a mini-series in March

ÖsTrÖm has found a compelling way of making connecTions beTween jazz and rock

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HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

December 2013 — March 2014

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SPOKEN WORD

THE bEaST, THE aNGEL aND THE maDmaN One hundred years after Dylan Thomas’s birth, Poet in the City celebrates Wales’s greatest poet. Former Welsh Poet Laureate Gwyneth Lewis, who appears at the event in February, discusses a misunderstood genius with Helen Wallace

HIGHLIGHTS

‘The charge against Thomas is often that he was drunk on the sound of words,’ observes poet Gwyneth Lewis, on the phone from her home on the South Pembrokeshire coast. ‘The implication is that there was nothing behind the surface music of his poetry. But the more I’ve re-read Thomas, the less true that appears: he was not just a great poetic talent, his intellect matched the music.’ She, like many of her generation in Wales, was brought up on A Child’s Christmas in Wales, Richard Burton’s mesmerising recording of Under Milk Wood and the ‘trophy’ poems such as Do not go gentle into that good night. In her adulthood she’s re-discovered the startlingly fine, but lesser-known poems. ‘Some of them have taken

me a long time to understand: they’re not simple, there’s real substance, and some very serious ideas there.’ She picks out the short, but hard-hitting lyric about political despotism, The hand that signed the paper, and his momentous, inventive birthday poems, reciting lines from Twenty four years:

Twenty-four years remind the tears of my eyes. (Bury the dead for fear that they walk to the grave in labour.) In the groin of the natural doorway I crouched like a tailor Sewing a shroud for a journey By the light of the meat-eating sun.


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HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

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This event will be part of the official Dylan Thomas 100 celebrations and supported by the Welsh Government. For more information on anniversary events see www.dt100.info Words on Monday Dylan Thomas: In My Craft curated by Poet in the City 10 February See Listings p67 for details

MONDAYS, 7/7.30PM

‘He was, without doubt, a prodigy, and wrote some of his most brilliant pieces while very young,’ Lewis explains. ‘But when you have such an instinctive gift, at some point you have to make a difficult transition to a more conscious, mature style and I think he was trying to work that out when he died, when he was only in his late thirties.’ She’s also keen to dispel the myths over that death: ‘He’s saddled with the image of a drunken Welshman, so people tend to think he died of drink, but he was actually suffering from pneumonia. There’s no doubt that he was an alcoholic, but you have to remember that there was less understanding at that time about the hazards of addiction, and its connection with mental illness. He said of himself “I hold a beast, an angel and a madman in me, and my enquiry is as to their working, and my problem is their subjugation and victory, downthrow and upheaval, and my effort is their self-expression”. She hopes that the event, which will include Thomas’s biographer Andrew Lycett and young Welsh poet Owen Sheers, will also paint a fuller picture of Thomas: ‘He wasn’t just a poet: he was a great, comic prose writer, a screen-writer and a pioneer of talking books. He was a very generous performer, and we’re lucky to have recordings of the poetry of his contemporaries which he also chose to read. His wonderful anthology of the poetry he liked to read, The Colour of Saying, is one of my absolute favourites, and still in print.’

December 2013 — March 2014

2 DECEMBER

Literary Death Match

feat. Stephanie Merritt, Mark Billingham & Andi Magnason

2 DECEMBER

Edna O’Brien The Love Object

9 DECEMBER

Carlos Acosta Pig’s Foot

16 DECEMBER

Rock’n’ Roll Politics Steve Richards & Guests

13 JANUARY

The Shelf-Help Sessions

12 Reasons to Feel Better

with Jeanette Winterson and Stephen Grosz

20 JANUARY

Grammar

with David Marsh

27 JANUARY

Germain Greer The Rainforest Years

3 FEBRUARY

Bedsit Disco Queen: Tracey Thorn 10 FEBRUARY

DYLAN THOMAS © GETTY IMAGES | GWYNETH LEWIS © KEITH MORRIS | OWEN SHEERS © EMYR YOUNG

Poet in the City presents...

THE MORE I'VE RE-READ THOMAS, THE MORE I SEE HIS INTELLECT MATCHED THE MUSIC OF HIS POETRY

Dylan Thomas: In My Craft 17 FEBRUARY

Connecting Conversations 3 MARCH Photovision

Nick Danziger 10 MARCH

Reprieve Clive Stafford Smith


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HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

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December 2013 — March 2014

flying feet take to tHe page Dancer Carlos Acosta caught the writing bug when he penned his autobiography. Now his first novel has been published, says Amanda Holloway, and he’ll discuss it at Kings Place in December

Carlos Acosta is probably the most famous ballet dancer in the world, and certainly the most famous Cuban after Fidel Castro. He’s also The Royal Ballet’s popular Principal Guest Artist, an impresario whose company performs all over the world and a published writer – his page-turning autobiography, No Way Home: A Cuban Dancer’s Story, came out in 2007, and his debut novel set in Cuba, Pig’s Foot, has just been published. The rags-to-riches story he recounts in No Way Home is inspiring, but full of heartache. A young boy from a poor suburb of Havana, he was sent away to ballet school by his lorry-driver father to keep him off the streets. ‘Junior’ Acosta, as he was known, struggled to fit in. He was athletic and strong but he despised dance and dreamed instead of being an international footballer. Once he accepted his fate, he became an exciting performer with extraordinary classical technique, and after he won the Prix de Lausanne at 16, his career took off. He joined The Royal Ballet in 1998 and has tackled the most demanding of roles – and the most romantic (he was The Royal Ballet’s first black Romeo). Today Acosta is a hero in Cuba, spearheading plans to create a new ballet school, but there’s still a trace of that uncertain boy. He is charming, quietly spoken and thoughtful, still surprised to find himself on the world stage. He started writing his autobiography in the hope that the process would be a sort of therapy. ‘I’d reached the top of my profession, yet it didn’t satisfy me,’ he said. Looking back on his years at the ballet boarding school he realised that he’d missed out on time with his family and friends. But he pays tribute to a father who taught him what mattered in life – to work hard and to value the talent he had been given. His new book, which he’ll discuss at Words on Monday, is a magic-realist historical saga that follows a Cuban family from the 1800s to the present day. It took him ‘three or four years’ to write, mainly in his dressing room, and he’s not sure he could do it again, as he said in a recent interview: ‘It really is so lonely, so painful. I can tell a story, help you have a good time, but I don’t consider myself a writer.’ Some disagree: he was recently chosen as one of the Waterstones Eleven, their list of the best new writers.

He was atHletic and strong but He despised dance and dreamed instead of being an international footballer

Words on Monday Carlos Acosta dicusses his new novel ‘Pig’s Foot’ 9 December See Listings p54 for details


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December 2013 — March 2014

HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

Great Writers can tell us a story and actually make us think in a different Way

Words to beat the blues

CARLOS ACOSTA © CORBIS | PIG’S FOOT BOOK COVER © BLOOMSBURY | JEANETTE WINTERSON © CORBIS | STEPHEN GROSZ © BETTINA VON ZWEHL

Psychoanalyst and author Stephen Grosz talks about The Most Depressing Day of the Year, about which he’ll be finding twelve reasons to feel better, with author Jeanette Winterson

‘It may be that some epidemiological psychologist has proved statistically that 13 January is the most depressing day of the year,’ says Stephen Grosz, ‘but in my experience any day can be The Worst Day: some people are quite happy on the darkest, dreariest day of the year, and others are in the depths of depression in the height of summer.’ The quietly spoken American, author of The Examined Life, concedes, though, there are some specific reasons why January might cause suffering: ‘People do find the winter holiday period very difficult, that’s certainly true. If their hopes and expectations aren’t met by friends and family it can be a time of disappointment, and even New Year itself can be a moment to reflect on loneliness or lack of achievement or change.’ He’s always favoured the American holiday of Thanksgiving over Christmas because it’s so simple, and doesn’t come freighted with the trauma of present-buying and receiving. ‘Thanksgiving is just a big get-together, you can enjoy each other’s company and there are no obligations. The trouble with gift-giving at Christmas is that gifts can be taken the wrong way, or that people can be defensive or aggressive about receiving them.’ He feels his profession has been guilty of not taking sufficient account of environment when treating patients, and Seasonal Affective Disorder is something he recognises. ‘If I’m planning with a patient to take them off anti-depressants, I would certainly try to make the end date the beginning of spring, for example, rather than the shortest day of the year. Light certainly has an impact on us.’

So does he find self-help books too simplistic, prescriptive and onedimensional? ‘Lots of self-help books about meditation, mindfulness and such things are very helpful. It would be foolish to ignore their findings. Ultimately, though, I think I learn more by reading literature. Great writers can tell us a story and actually make us think in a different way; thinking in a new way gives us a lift and a sense of possibility. If you can think differently, you can act differently. It’s the first step.’ He cites Jeanette Winterson, with whom he will share the Words on Monday event, as one of those writers who has changed him: ‘I particularly loved Jeanette’s latest book Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal. I know of nobody who read that who wasn’t changed by it. It’s a very powerful piece of writing. When I was listening to her reading it on the radio I had to stop the car and listen. She deals in it with profoundly painful truths about her real and adoptive mother. But the way she writes is elegant, simple but so direct – right to the heart, electrifying. I shall be so fascinated to speak with her about it.’ He names Andrew Solomon’s book Far from the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity and Katherine Boo’s account of life in a Mumbai slum, Behind the Beautiful Forevers, as other examples of writing that have enlarged his perspective, changed him. He firmly believes that his own role with patients is to help them find their own story. ‘It was Karen Blixen who said “all sorrows can be borne if you put them into a story or tell a story about them” and I think that’s so true. My work is to help people tell their own stories, especially when the story seems to be telling them, when they’ve lost control or don’t understand the narrative any more.’ Referring to Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Grosz likens himself to the three ghosts who show Scrooge a new way of thinking. ‘I think we have to haunt our patients a little, to make them think about things they might be avoiding. The ghost is a good analogy.’ Come and see the distinguished analyst in flesh and blood on Monday 13 January, in conversation with author Jeanette Winterson. Words on Monday The Shelf-Help Sessions: Twelve reasons to feel better Jeanette Winterson and Stephen Grosz in conversation 13 January See Listings p59 for details

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HIGHLIGHTS ART

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December 2013 — March 2014

ART HIGHLIGHTS

Lucy JoneS: LookInG ouT, LookInG In

Philip Vann welcomes a new exhibition of Lucy Jones’s paintings at Kings Place Gallery, opening in January 2014

Born in London in 1955, Lucy Jones is a painter of both provocatively disquieting self-portraits (one contains the words ‘who the hell do you think you are’ dyslexically scrawled in mirror-image across the canvas) and unpeopled landscapes of flaring colours and raw, wild beauty. Her landscape paintings preclude, she says, ‘overt human narrative, so I’ve left people out. My landscapes are about looking out into the world; my self-portraits are the other side of the coin.’ At Camberwell School of Art, an expressionist affinity was nurtured by visiting tutors the painters Frank Auerbach and Leon Kossoff. Living for many years in London (until moving to Shropshire in 2004), she painted incandescent riverscapes of ‘the simple architectural spaces’ around the South Bank.

Creating early self-portraits, ‘I had not liked looking at myself in the mirror. I felt sexless (unlike Frida Kahlo)... Things have changed quite a lot in the last years and depression is far less prominent. I met my husband 25 years ago and my confidence grew. I began to paint the whole of me and paint the awkwardness of how I look – which is both personal and common to all. I still use a mirror every time... in my studio I have two full-length mirrors and another smaller one.’ Looking Over My Glasses (2012) is painted against a black background which ‘rather as in Russian icons, makes the colours stand out with jewel-like vividness’. She comments on ‘the resolved triangular geometry of the pose’ and likens the piercing autobiographical regard to the way ‘Rembrandt used eyes very powerfully to transfix the viewer’s’.

(Left) Fall of the Year, 2013 Oil on canvas, 130 x 180cm. Lucy Jones

(Above right) Wheelie, 2012 Oil on canvas, 180 x 120cm. Lucy Jones


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HIGHLIGHTS ART

December 2013 — March 2014

art highlightS 15 noveMber – 24 January Kings Place Gallery

Ørnulf Opdahl

Paintings and Prints

13 – 23 deceMber Pangolin London

Christmas Show 9 January – 15 february Pangolin London

Pangolin London Showcase 31 January – 21 March Kings Place Gallery

Lucy Jones

Looking Out, Looking In

January (date tba) Pangolin London

Sculpture Trail Relaunch 21 february – 29 March Kings Place Gallery

Ralph Brown

Memorial Exhibition

paInTInGS By LUCy JOnES © SUppLIED pHOTOS

She'S a painter of provocatively diSquieting Self-portraitS and unpeopled landScapeS of flaring colour and raw, wild beauty Central to her artistic practice is a Bonnard-like appreciation of the quite musical role of complementary colours and tones in making a painting cohere and sing. The prominent arc-like eyelids are echoed here in the slightly ruddier tints of the decorative crosses on the cardigan, whose startling turquoise appears as high-pitched in tone as the eyelids themselves. Other recent self-portraits feature poignantly matter-of-fact ‘props’, including a wheelie walking frame, clinically bleak in form and hue, whose sculptural ‘pose’ wittily echoes that of the standing artist herself, resplendent in psychedelically striped jumper. Exploring the Marches (her local terrain) by car, she will kneel on the ground, in front of the landscape, for several hours. These literally painstaking, consummately absorbed sessions result in intensively worked drawings and watercolours, which she repeatedly uses later in the studio as studies for oil paintings.

In Fall of the Year (2013), a gorgeous autumnal tree flows like a tongue of flame onto the mauve hedgerows and over lush green verges, counterpointed in this painting – which is, in effect, an exquisite colourist, calligraphic choreography of diverse arboreal forms – against a tree with delicate branches and sparse foliage. The reflected treescape in Serenity (2010) shows the artist’s predilection for off-black paint to help evoke (in this case) a scintillatingly dappled atmosphere of contemplative retreat. ‘I think’, she says, ‘you need blacks or greys for relief against the heightened colours, to create a rhythm through the painting.’ Kings Place Gallery: Lucy Jones 31 January – 21 March See Art Listings p77 for details

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HIGHLIGHTS INTERACT

December 2013 — March 2014

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InTeRACT

Beyond Cello Matthew Barley directs an extraordinary day showcasing a host of pioneers in the cello firmament who are pushing at the boundaries of the instrument. He shared his plans with Helen Wallace

HIGHlIGHTS

‘The profile of cellists has changed beyond recognition in the last decade or two,’ says cellist and collaborator extraordinaire Matthew Barley. ‘The cello’s role used to be that of a Romantic hero – now we’re branching out into sophisticated looping and interactive electronics, singer-songwriting, cabaret and the most amazing new techniques influenced by instruments from other cultures. And London is home to a lot of these innovators, so I thought it would be good to gather them round and look into the future together.’

He decided it was time to expose a new generation of young cellists to the creative potential of this versatile instrument. Of course, he himself is one of the most high-profile innovators and has inspired others. ‘When I was at college none of this was going on, it was unimaginable. But I do know that one young cellist, Peter Gregson, came along to hear me doing some mutli-tracking once and was inspired to follow that path. Peter will be joining us, and he’s done some amazing things since becoming professional. So it’s important to

plant those seeds, to spread the word that with the cello, anything is possible.’ The sheer diversity of talent is striking. Barley himself will be giving a concert with jazz legend Julian Joseph, showcasing their ground-breaking Brazilian programme. In the final cabaret he’ll be joined by Ayanna WitterJohnson, the award-winning singer-songwritingcellist who has collaborated with just about everyone from rappers to Björk and Courtney Pine, ‘Celloman’ Ivan Hussey, well-known for his phantasmagoric loops and ‘arpezzato’


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technique which combines the finger techniques of flat bass guitar with those used on ouds, and Zoë Martlew, famous for her bondage cabaret act. ‘Cellists really are the most collegiate lot, so I’m hoping we’ll be able to work together in this event to create some chemistry on the night, where everyone gets a chance to shine and bounce ideas off each other.’ During the day there will be workshops with Ivan Hussey and Matthew himself and an audience with the éminence grise of this cellistic world, Dutchman Ernst Reijseger, a rare visitor to these shores. His iconic recordings on the Winter + Winter label reveal an artist who is willing to use every inch of both the instrument and his body to create fascinating music. ‘Ernst does unbelievable things, he’s a real adventurer among cellists, his creativity is boundless. He’s hardly known here so this is a compelling reason to come along.’

December 2013 — March 2014

The event is being run through the London Cello Society and Barley is expecting an audience made up of 50% young cellists from the colleges, and 50% interested amateurs and listeners – ‘and other instrumentalists’, he adds, ‘they’ve got a lot to learn from us!’ Violinists, take note. Beyond Cello 9 March See Listings p74 for details

Ivan Hussey (Celloman)

INTERACT INTERACT

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INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS CHAMBERSTUDIO ChamberStudio Masterclasses SUNDAY AFTERNOONS (2.30pm & 4.30pm) A year-round base where outstanding chamber groups can be supported as they develop and establish themselves in the early stages of their careers with the guidance of international chamber musicians. FREE admission for observers. Tickets can be reserved by phone at the Box Office. Full details at chamberstudio.org 1, 8 & 15 DECEMBER 5, 12, 19 & 26 JANUARY 9 & 16 FEBRUARY 9 & 16 MARCH 2 FEBRUARY – Junior Masterclass Day (1–6.30pm) followed by an informal concert in Hall Two (7pm) 23 MARCH – Public Masterclass with guest Professor Shmuel Ashkenasi (11am–3pm)

PIANO-YOGA® CERTIFICATE COURSES Foundation Course (10am–1pm) Course One (2pm–5pm) 1 DECEMBER Visionary Russian virtuoso pianist GéNIA returns with the Piano-Yoga® Certificate Courses to give pianists from advanced-beginner to advanced level everything they need to transform their playing whilst enhancing their well-being. piano-yoga.com

IT'S IMPORTANT TO SPREAD THE WORD THAT WITH THE CELLO, ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE

MATTHEW BARLEY © ALISTAIR MORRISON | IAVN HUSSEY © MEL CORRIGAN | AYANNA © SUPPLIED PHOTO

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014 All Things Vocal: Workshops 25 JANUARY Enthusiastic singers and choirs of all ages and abilities are invited to join international industry experts and performers in a series of workshops focusing on various aspects of singing and vocal performance. Early booking is a must to avoid disappointment! Please note that all workshops are standing events with limited seating.

Ayanna

Workshop I: Brazilian Rhythms & Body Percussion (10am) Workshop II: Pitch Perfect Unpicked with Deke Sharon and Nick Girard (11.30am) Workshop III: The Craft with Bob Chilcott (1pm) Workshop IV: Pass me the Jazz with The Real Group (3.45pm) Workshop V: Dominic Peckham’s Total Vocal (4.45pm)


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HIGHLIGHTS FOOD & DRINK

FOOD & DRINK HIGHLIGHTS

December 2013 — March 2014

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

GO OFF-PISTE THIS WINTER Prepare for glittering transformations at Kings Place this winter for the Christmas party season, with a range of seasonal features to inspire and delight This Christmas at Kings Place promises rather more than a decorated tree in the foyer, as Emma Williams, General Manager of Green and Fortune, explains: ‘After the success of our Christmas party nights last year and the popularity of the Great British Summerthemed terrace, we decided we should make the most of this unique outside space in the winter too. We’ve taken our inspiration from Alpine ski resorts where people sit out, drink and party no matter how cold the weather!’ So the canal-side terrace surrounding the Rotunda Restaurant is to be transformed into a cosy, candle-lit hideaway with rugs, fire pits, rattan chairs, outdoor heaters, mulled wine and toasted marshmallows – on offer for allcomers. For those who want to make the most of this ‘Winter by the Water’ scene, events can be pre-booked for dates between 2 and

24 December. Small groups (a minimum of 10 people) can find packages from as little as £24.50 per head which include an assortment of seasonal bites and bevvies for informal, standing gatherings: pigs in blankets, Christmas cocktails and Cashel Blue cheese croquettes all appear on that menu. Larger groups can request exclusive space on the terrace, and menus in the private dining room start at £40, which includes a three-course winter menu – home-cured salmon, 12-hour slow braised shoulder of lamb and winter berry trifle are just some of the tempting choices – rising to a £60 menu of scallops, venison and melt-inthe-middle chocolate sponge. The Rotunda Bar and Restaurant is also offering a £36.50 per head Christmas party package throughout the season which can be booked but will also run alongside


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CHRISTMAS PHOTO © GREEN & FORTUNE

Jack Frost is booked to conJure up a spectacular alpine retreat within the battlebridge room

December 2013 — March 2014

HIGHLIGHTS FOOD & DRINK

the à la carte menu for walk-in customers. Rotunda Head Chef Nicky Foley has used the best of the season’s produce including potted organic pork belly, Roast Goosnargh turkey with duck-fat roasted potatoes and ‘traditional Christmas pudding, the Foley way’, to create a mouth-wateringly festive menu. ‘As well as the great food, everyone will enjoy festive table games and crackers as a given but we can also add extra special touches like champagne, canapés or winter warmers on arrival,’ says Emma. ‘And the Secret Santa DJ app will allow you to choose the soundtrack to your own party.ʼ For larger office or corporate groups (80+ people) Jack Frost is booked at the end of November to conjure up a spectacular Alpine retreat within the Battlebridge Room. Enter the white-out and be surrounded by crackling log fires; seek out your table through a forest of snowy trees. At a cost of £70 per person, you can have exclusive use of the transformed Battlebridge Room, a meal, decorated tables and five hoursʼ unlimited house wine, bottled beer and soft drinks. There will be a choice of specially-themed seasonal menus, ranging from a buffet, to bowl food to a sit-down three-course meal. For those looking for an alternative to the traditional turkey dinner there’s Northumbrian beef, roast cod, honey and mustard glazed salmon and sweet potato, butternut squash and ricotta strudel, while mouth-watering desserts include winter spiced plum and frangipan tart and bitter chocolate mocha torte with caramelised pecans. Says Williams, ‘We’re calling the Battlebridge Room our Off Piste party package as it promises something quite different. While Winter by the Water can be enjoyed by all our customers from 7 November until the end of January, Off-Piste will just run for pre-booked parties through December until Christmas.’ Whether it’s some seasonal nibbles and drinks with a group of friends, a high-end Christmas lunch in the private dining room, spontaneous winter warmers one icy night on the terrace or a sparkling office party to remember, there’s something to suit all budgets at Kings Place this winter.

For Winter by the Water bookings: enquiries@rotundabarandrestaurant.co.uk T +44 (0) 20 7014 2840 For Off-Piste: events@kingsplaceevents.co.uk T +44 (0)20 7014 2838

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32 CLASSICAL

December 2013 — March 2014

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The young Navarra Quartet is fast establishing itself on the international circuit, while making the most of opportunities at Kings Place, from ChamberStudio coaching to performing in Chamber Classics Unwrapped. Cellist Brian O’Kane tells Helen Wallace about the rewards and sacrifices of a career in chamber music

It was always Brian O’Kane’s goal to perform chamber music. Now, as a member of the Navarra Quartet, prizewinners at Florence, Melbourne and Banff, and poised to launch its own festival in Holland, he’s achieved it. So why does the young Irishman describe the experience as ‘thankless’? ‘The sheer amount of work you have to put in is beyond comparison with almost anything else in music. Four different people have to find a way of working together, of balancing four opinions, of making their musicianship gel. There are endless possibilities and nuances in the quartet dynamic, the rehearsals have to be very, very long. Believe me, playing an Elgar Cello Concerto is a piece of cake in comparison!’ The pay-off, of course, is the repertoire. ‘You do it for the love of the music. For me, the string quartet repertoire is better than any symphony, concerto, sonata – anything! It tells us a huge amount that Beethoven, Bartók, Britten, Schubert and Shostakovich, to name but five, devoted their last months to this medium. It’s the one through which composers find their strongest, most personal voice. The string quartet is such an intimate form it seems that composers discover it can express their most profound, complex emotions. It’s a huge challenge, though, to create performances of some of these great masterpieces. Every

member must have quartet playing as their primary motivation. What’s important is what the four of us combined can achieve.’ As the Navarra’s second violinist Marije Johnston put it simply in a recent film: ‘We really love playing string quartets and that’s what we want to do for the rest of our lives.’ Putting individual ego to one side and pursuing a joint musical goal takes a special sort of musician with an intense focus, especially in a city like London with its mass of musical opportunities, from playing in orchestras pit bands to session work. ‘Here there are many ways in which we could make a quick buck, and it’s hard sometimes to say, “No, the quartet has to come first.” Sacrifices have to be made, quality of life, standard of living, it’s really tough. If we had a round of big subscription concerts in a territory like Germany we’d only need a certain number a year to live. But in this country the bread and butter work is still regional musical societies, and one can only survive by combining that with other dates, festivals and tours – and playing in other guises.’ Lead violinist Magnus Johnston also heads up the acclaimed Aronowitz Ensemble (who will perform in Chamber Classics Unwrapped, 15 May 2014), while O’Kane is involved with the Irishbased Cappa Ensemble, alongside duo recitals and concerto appearances. He can be heard

again, for instance, performing Bach with James Galway in his Chamber Classics Unwrapped concert (12 December 2014). He concedes there’s an upside to this varied life: ‘I think we all enjoy doing our other work and it helps the dynamic of the quartet, which can get so intense. Playing chamber music with other people keeps us fresh.’

the sheer amount of work you have to put in is beyond almost anything in musiC

Juggling four individual careers is only one of many challenges facing a young quartet. Some are purely practical: where does an ensemble find a space to rehearse in a crowded city where they won’t disturb others at all times of day or night? Although they can squeeze into small rooms, such a space doesn’t allow them to prepare for a concert hall acoustic. ‘A young quartet needs a lot of support to survive. We are incredibly


NAVARRA QUARTET © NICK WHITE

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fortunate in knowing some people who really love chamber music, and allow us to use their houses to rehearse in from time to time, for the whole day and most of the night if necessary. Without that, and all those supporters, be they family, friends, fans, we wouldn’t be here.’ There’s also the question of building a repertoire and a reputation: the members of the Navarra Quartet left college some time ago, but mentors are still vital. The quartet was awarded the ChamberStudio Mentorship 2012/13, supported by the Musicians Benevolent Fund, which has enabled them to select mentors to work with them at Kings Place. ‘That’s been tremendously helpful. We wanted to work with Professor Eberhard Feltz but it would simply not have been affordable to go to Berlin. ChamberStudio has enabled us to invite him over to London and have masterclasses here. Time spent with Eberhard is invaluable – his almost mystical understanding of any score, combined with his vivid imagination, is so invigorating. He can reference a passage in one chamber work with so many others. We played Beethoven in the key of E minor, and he explained how composers choose E minor because of its specially fervid energy – seeing music through his eyes gives our performance a whole new context. It’s possible to get rather stuck inside ourselves – he opens doors for us, gives us a wider perspective.’ Through ChamberStudio they have also worked with David Waterman, cellist of the Endellion Quartet: ‘It’s particularly good to work with David for me, because he’s such a fantastic cellist and musician, but we find his guidance so valuable too, especially on our career choices and what we should be doing.’ One decision was to enter the prestigious 2013 Banff International Quartet competition in August, at which they won third prize. Other decisions focus on learning pieces that both make the quartet distinctive and useful to concert promoters: ‘We need a repertoire which will be useful in all sorts of situations but will give the quartet its own identity,’ O’Kane explains. ‘If you say yes to every request, you may be learning works that you will only play once. So you have to become smart about building your repertoire gradually and making it work for you.’ The Navarra learnt three quartets by Latvian composer Pe̵ teris Vasks for a Challenge Classics recording, a project that has reaped rewards, as those will know who heard them perform the Third Quartet at their London Chamber Music Society concert earlier this year. ‘Since the recording we’ve programmed the Third Quartet a number of times. It’s a stunning piece, and audiences seem to love it.’

December 2013 — March 2014

CLASSICAL NAVARRA QUARTET

composers discover they can express their most profound, complex emotions through the string quartet

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CLASSICAL NAVARRA QUARTET

December 2013 — March 2014

As every quartet knows, spending hours together can put musicians under strain, even the best of friends. Marriage can help, as the Brodsky Quartet’s cellist and violist have shown, and Magnus and Marije Johnston are newly-weds, but the Navarra – like many quartets – has already gone through several incarnations since its founding at the Royal Northern College of Music. How does one keep an identity alive? ‘Quartet life is complicated,’ says O’Kane. ‘It won’t always suit everyone in the long term. Magnus was originally lead fiddle of the Elias Quartet when it was called the Johnston Quartet. I’ve been playing with the Navarra for just over a year. It’s quite common for the second violinist and viola to be the core, and that’s the case for us with Marije and Simone, who’ve been best of friends since they were young.’ He describes them as forming the body of the quartet, with the lead violin as the head and cellist the legs – or, as Siegmund Nissel (second violinist of the Amadeus Quartet) famously used to say: a string quartet is like a bottle of wine, first violin is the label, the bottle is the cello, and the content is provided by the middle voices. It’s an appropriate analogy for the Navarra, whose name was chosen not – as I had assumed – in

tribute to cellist André Navarra, but from the label on a rather nice bottle of Spanish wine. I ask him how he’s found performing in Hall One? ‘Wonderful. What matters to me is whether a hall is properly proportioned for chamber music, whether I can hear everyone clearly and we don’t have to cram together.ʼ He describes the London audience as wellinformed, if sometimes a little reserved, in comparison with Dutch audiences ‘who leap to their feet after your first bow!’ As we look at the list of the Top 50 chamber works chosen by the Kings Place audience and readers of BBC Music Magazine he comments that it wouldn’t look so different had it been chosen by musicians. ‘The works that have risen to the top are those I would happily play every day: the Mendelssohn Octet, the Schubert Quintet and the Trout Quintet, yes, that makes complete sense.’ Those he feels should be there and aren’t include the quartets of Britten and Dutilleux’s Ainsi le nuit: ‘That’s a question of knowledge. As a string quartet player one gets to know works deeply, and there are quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven which are not here but are among the finest ever written, but perhaps not so well known to audiences. That’s why it’s good that

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this series has allowed each group to create their own programme around the ‘Top 50’ works: so we’ve placed Borodin’s gorgeous Second Quartet (No. 21) with Mozart K159 and Beethoven’s Op. 74.’ Others have juxtaposed Henning Kraggerud with Bartók, Thea Musgrave with Nielsen, David with Schubert or Panufnik with Mozart. To whet your appetite for the series, come and hear the Navarra Quartet play Schubert’s Quintet in C at the ChamberStudio’s concert in November, and catch it again in February at Chamber Classics Unwrapped, one of several young quartets showcasing fascinating programmes, including the Finnish Meta4, the American Escher Quartet, and German Signum and Kuss Quartets. With such imagination, dedication and spirit, the future of chamber music appears to be in good hands.

Chamber Classics Unwrapped begins on 15 January Navarra Quartet concerts at Kings Place ChamberStudio Annual Concert: 10 November Chamber Classics Unwrapped: 20 February See Listings p70 for details


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December 2013 — March 2014

CLASSICAL KRYSIA OSOSTOWICZ

Words from the Wise

NAVARRA QUARTET © NICK WHITE | KRYSIA OSOSTOWICz & RICHARD IRELAND © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Krysia Osostowicz, who will perform in Chamber Classics Unwrapped with the Dante Quartet and Endymion Ensemble, is also a mentor for ChamberStudio. Here she and Richard Ireland, formerly of the Chilingirian Quartet, and Artistic Director of ChamberStudio, reflect on the subtle art of chamber music

AgAiN ANd AgAiN, i Come BACk to the ideA of A CoNversAtioN. thAt is the esseNCe of ChAmBer mUsiC

Krysia Osostowicz feels ‘enormously privileged’ when asked to mentor a young quartet for ChamberStudio. ‘It’s a special occasion. I know they will have prepared the work to a high level, developed their own ideas and will be receptive to input. I know I’ll also learn something.’ She says the essence of string quartet playing is ‘the idea of a conversation: I come back to that again and again. Quartets can have “good” ensemble, and bring things “together” and even give a “polished” performance, but if they’re focusing too much on the finished product, without seeing how the music is working, they won’t engage the audience. They need to be aware of their own roles in the conversation, when they need to come forward, when fall back, when they are travelling, developing, when they have arrived, and also where they are in the narrative of the whole piece.’ Richard Ireland concurs: ‘In the end it’s all about developing powerful communication. How can you recreate this amazing music for an audience so that it lives?’ His passionate belief in the value of all young musicians engaging in chamber music, has led to his allocating certain ChamberStudio sessions to school ensembles: ‘The skills learnt in playing chamber music – of listening, combining and balancing sound, refining technique, communication, musical awareness – provide the best possible grounding for orchestral and solo performance too.’ Growing up in a family of string quartet players (his father was a founder member of the Allegri, his brother Robin in the Lindsay) he knows all about that ‘elusive personal chemistry’ that can exist between four people: ‘You can discuss how you are going to play as much as you like, but if you’re not comfortable making music with those other three people nothing will keep you together.’ For Krysia, there are no easy answers, and no one piece of advice: ‘When four musicians see eye to eye and are prepared to devote themselves to the work, it’s a rare and lucky happenstance. And when that shared commitment is there, it radiates through their playing, and promoters and audiences feel it, even with the inevitable changes of personnel.’ She says there’s nothing like the way you can go deeply into the repertoire with a long-term ensemble: ‘To come home to a Haydn or Beethoven quartet again after 20 years of performing it, one always finds something new. It’s like reading Shakespeare. When young quartets have got beyond competitions, they can start the life-long work of exploring this extraordinary music.’ Both agree that the really hard years are not the early ones, but a decade later, when players reach their 30s. ‘That’s when you are not the new kids on the block any more, the quartet interferes with family life and you have to work very hard to sustain your identity,’ says Krysia.

ChAmBerstUdio iN ACtioN

ChamberStudio masterclasses are open to a limited number of public listeners, free of charge, on Sunday afternoons. On 23 March 2014 there will be a public masterclass with special guest Shmuel Ashkenasi in Hall Two, tickets at £9.50. ChamberStudio’s new mentorships for the 2013/14 season have been awarded to the Bernadel Quartet, the Busch Ensemble and Ruisi Quartet. The Busch Ensemble makes its Kings Place debut in the ChamberStudio gala concert on 10 November, featuring the Navarra. The Bernadel will perform in one of the free foyer concerts that preface the London Chamber Music Society concerts on a Sunday evening, a new Kings Place initiative. Come along half an hour before the LCMS concert, have a drink in the foyer and listen to stars of the future, playing music that casts an illuminating side-light on the main programme.

The Navarra Quartet will have an open masterclass with Eberhard Feltz on 10 Nov at 4.30pm. See Interact Highlights (p29) for other ChamberStudio events

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CLASSICAL CHAMBER CLASSICS

What

do the

top

50 choices

say about

you? Helen Wallace, who wrote about each of the 50 great works of chamber music for our new series brochure, considers what the list says about tastes audience today

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

December 2013 — March 2014

Trends in classical music evolve slowly, but the 2012 vote cast by the Kings Place audience and readers of BBC Music Magazine holds up a mirror to our times. The quartets of Bartók, Janácˇek and Shostakovich loom large: highprofile recording projects of the 1980s and ʼ90s led to ‘complete’ live performances and boosted familiarity. More significantly, there works are ʻup close and personal.ʼ The strongly confessional nature of Shostakovich and Janácˇek quartets suits our self-obsessed times: while Shostakovich indicated his quartets were private diaries, Janácˇek revealed his were the expression of his illicit passion for a younger woman. There’s a harsh directness to their communication which suits our no-holdsbarred sensibilities – emotion red in tooth and claw. But while both composers appeal to our voyeuristic fascination with private worlds, both would have found the 21st-century ‘selfie’ culture entirely alien, and probably abhorrent. We exist in an overwhelmingly visual culture, where image often wins over sound. While Beethoven’s Archduke and Ghost Trios, his Spring Sonata, Dvorˇák’s American, Schubert’s Trout and Death and the Maiden are all indelible masterpieces, how keenly their names resonate: opus numbers rarely brand the memory in the same way. We love a headline story too: the ‘newest’ piece in our list is Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time, a miraculous meditation by any standards and at any time, but its back-story set in a freezing German prisoner-of-war camp underpins its message so effectively, it’s become the most frequently performed ‘quartet’ of the postwar period, despite its unusual line-up. Of the Second Viennese school, we have only Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht, a pivotal work in the history of music, but, crucially to the audience today, the realisation of a profoundly romantic drama. Looking at concert programmes from 50–60 years ago, the core of the classical quartet repertoire – Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert – dominates. From our new list it’s clear that the quartets of Haydn and Mozart now suffer from a lack of recognition. The sophisticated conventions within which Haydn and Mozart were working can present a barrier: here is musical discourse of high abstraction and formality, while we seem to need to feel personal struggle – the stock of Beethoven’s mighty ‘late’ quartets has never been higher. Happily, the musicians themselves, for whom Haydn and Mozart remain a burning inspiration, have programmed quartets by these two in their Chamber Classics Unwrapped concerts. The number of piano trios, piano quintets, string quintets and clarinet quintets in this list

(including the top three – two quintets and an octet) would suggest that modern ears find something a little ascetic and unyielding about the pure string quartet texture in its Classical incarnation; we seem to want it leavened or offset by other sonorities. When Bartók, Debussy and Ravel explode that texture, saturating it as they do with new colours in their quartets, we are all ears again. How might this list look in 50 years? I would expect the majority of the great works to remain, with perhaps a few 19th-century pieces falling out of fashion to be replaced by shining gems lost in time from Lawes, Couperin and Guillemain to Britten, Dutilleux, Nørgard and Hosokawa…

For details see Listings pp59–60, 65–66 & 69–70

'DEATH AND THE MAIDEN' ILLUSTRATION © JEAN JULLIEN

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SHOWCASE 2014 THU 13 FEB 7.30PM

Laura Cantrell Sturgill Simpson • FRI 14 FEB 7.30PM

Police Dog Hogan The Vagaband • SAT 15 FEB 5.30PM

Woody Guthrie:

Hard Times & Hard Travellin’

(A multi-media show by Professor Will Kaufman)

• SAT 15 FEB 7.30PM

Emily Barker

& The Red Clay Halo Austin Lucas Hatful of Rain

Online Savers £9.50 | kingsplace.co.uk/ama


38 CHRISTMAS

December 2013 — March 2014

Christmas comes but once a year, and Kings Place has something for every taste in its musical stocking, plus a sophisticated New Year celebration

Ivor Setterfield

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

December 2013 — March 2014

KINGS PLACE CHRISTMAS SPECIAL

IVOR SETTERFIELD © ORIGINAL VERSION BY SIM CANETTY-CLARKE | THE ALBION BAND © MICHAEL HUGHES

THE ALBION BAND PROMISE YOU THE PERFECT ANTIDOTE TO THE CORPORATE CHRISTMAS

There’s nothing like music to evoke the Christmas season, and this year Kings Place audiences will find a treasure trove of aural treats under the tree, from timeless Baroque masterpieces such as Handel’s Messiah and Bach’s Christmas Oratorio to toe-tapping folk airs from all regions of the British Isles. First up on 12 December comes the Albion Christmas Show, on its 15th-anniversary tour and part of the ‘Custom-made Winter’ week featuring stars of the folk firmament. Described as ‘the perfect antidote to the corporate Christmas’ (Guardian), this beguiling evening is led by the legendary Ashley Hutchings (founder of Fairport Convention, Steeleye Span and The Albion Band), who’s joined by guitarist Simon Nicol (Fairport Convention), singer Kellie While (The Albion Band) and Simon Care (currently with Edward II), an expert in traditional English dance and song and the leading exponent of the comical Monkseaton Egg Dance. Together they’ll cook up a delicious mixture of carols, irreverent readings, songs and dances. They promise a dose of festive fun for all ages, and to pull out your favourites from their back catalogue of Christmas albums. Next in line come two star-studded concerts which form a celebratory finale to our highly successful Bach Unwrapped year. The Platinum Consort, which embraces a stellar cast of soloists, present the complex and varied Christmas Oratorio along with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment on 19 December. For many, Bach’s magisterial B Minor Mass represents the pinnacle of his achievement, and it forms an ideal way to complete your

Bach Unwrapped experience. Hear it performed by the Aurora Orchestra with soloists Rosemary Joshua, Andrew Kennedy, Benedict Nelson, Jennifer Johnston and William Towers and the Choir of Clare College, Cambridge under the baton of Nicholas Collon on Saturday 21 December, the winter solstice. With such a focus on the music of Benjamin Britten in his anniversary year, we couldn’t leave 2013 without a performance of his enchanting A Ceremony of Carols, provided for us by Barts Chamber Choir under the direction of Ivor Setterfield. From the haunting, icy setting of Southwell’s ‘In Freezing Winter Night’ to the thrilling, cascading canons of ‘This Little Babe’, Britten’s masterpiece traverses the centuries of English verse and liturgy to create a vivid drama, drawing on both religious and pagan traditions. In the second part of the evening, the audience will be invited to join in with some best-loved carols along with jazz improvisations from pianist Chris Lee. Nothing in all music can beat the glorious ‘Hallelujah!’ Chorus for sheer, spirit-lifting power. Come along and hear it sung on Sunday 22 December when the Orchestra and Choir of St John’s under John Lubbock perform Handel’s Messiah with four talented young vocal soloists. To herald in the New Year, join the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment either on New Year’s Eve (6pm) or on New Year’s Day (3pm) when they will be presenting a rich tapestry of Baroque gems. The programme includes Bach’s Second Brandenburg Concerto with its resplendent baroque trumpet solos given by the distinguished David Blackadder,

who will also perform more intimate music by Telemann and Biber, while soprano Ruby Hughes sings Dido’s indelible Lament (from Dido and Aeneas) and Bach’s lively Wedding Cantata BWV 202. With mulled wine, winter cocktails and decorations galore (see Food and Drink, pp30–31) Kings Place will mark the season in style this year, so book well in time.

CHRISTMAS – NEW YEAR CALENDAR 12 December Custom-made Winter – Albion Christmas Show 19 December Bach: Christmas Oratorio with Platinum Consort/OAE 20 December Britten: A Ceremony of Carols with Barts Chamber Choir/Ivor Setterfield 21 December Bach: B Minor Mass with Choir of Clare College and Aurora Orchestra/Nicholas Collon 22 December Handel: Messiah with OSJ Voices and Orchestra of St John’s/John Lubbock 31 December & 1 January Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 OAE/Matthew Truscott, director/violinist David Blackadder, trumpet Ruby Hughes, soprano See Listings pp59–60, 65–66 & 69–70

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40 JAZZ

December 2013 — March 2014

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Is there nothing jazz pianist and composer Gwilym Simcock cannot do? You’ll see him play in his own trios and quintets, compose for orchestra, perform piano concertos and now he’s curating a miniseries at Kings Place with European mates. Oliver Condy heard the latest Hailed as an ‘original’ and a ‘creative genius’ by none other than Chick Corea, pianist, arranger and composer Gwilym Simcock is, at just 32, one of jazz’s most versatile and accomplished musicians. Originally classically-trained at Manchester’s Chetham’s and Trinity College, London in composition, piano and French horn before attending the Royal Academy of Music as a jazz pianist, Simcock shot to worldwide attention with his dazzling 2007 album, Perception. Since then, his highly imaginative solo playing and brilliant work with numerous ensembles, including the Impossible Gentlemen, The Lighthouse Trio, Acoustic Triangle and Blinq have won him much acclaim, including a Mercury Nomination for his Keith Jarrett-esque 2011 solo album Good Times at Schloss Elmau. In 2006, Simcock was chosen as the very first jazz musician to be admitted onto the BBC New Generation Artist scheme. Away from the piano, Simcock is in demand as a composer, and has written widely for ensembles and orchestras, including a major work, Progressions, for the 2008 BBC Proms, a concerto for Germany’s NDR Big Band and Jackie’s Dance for the Britten Sinfonia. Simcock will be curating and performing in a twoday piano series at Kings Place this coming January.


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December 2013 — March 2014

You’re clearly a musician of many facets – but who are your main jazz influences? Keith Jarrett and Pat Metheny are certainly big figures. There’s some music of theirs which changed my life and got me into jazz. Then there are people like [pianist] Jason Rebello and especially John Taylor, who’s a fantastic pianist. He’s always been a warm, loving spirit in the way that he makes music. And I’m getting to that age when people ten years younger than me are starting to make great music – musicians like Kit Downes. I taught him and it’s wonderful to see him become such a fantastic, individual musician. The lovely thing about jazz is that you don’t always have to learn from people older than you: you learn it from the people around you from any generation. You’ve chosen to bring Johannes Berauer’s ‘The Vienna Chamber Diaries’ to Kings Place: a real mesh of contemporary classical music and jazz. Tell us about it. I met Johannes a couple of years ago when he came to my concerts in Vienna at a club called Birdland. He thought that the style I play in – and having a classical background – could be interesting to use in The Vienna Chamber Diaries. So we went over to Austria and just recorded it. It was a very special couple of days. Johannes’s music is wonderful – it does have a serious classical structure to it, but also the space for improvisation. And it’s very accessible, too.

GWILYM SIMCOCK © RON BEENEN | MICHEL BENITA & GABI SWALLOW © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Michel Benita

JAZZ GWiLYM SiMCOCK

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The lovely Thing abouT jazz is ThaT you don'T always learn from people older Than you: you learn from The people around you from any generaTion

The European jazz scene, particularly among young players, is quite extraordinary at the moment, isn’t it? Oh yeah. Go to any of the countries, it’s just amazing. It’s an interesting situation because there are more music colleges than ever doing jazz courses all over the world, which means that there are so many more wonderfully well-trained musicians all over Europe than there ever have been. It feels like a very vibrant scene today. And your job is to bring them over to the UK! Well, that works two ways. One of the other concerts in January is with Céline Bonacina, who’s a lovely saxophone player from France, and bass player Michel Benita who plays with Andy Sheppard, among others. Because they’re both based in France we thought it might be a nice idea to get something happening. It’s difficult for British musicians to find their way into a different scene, just as it’s difficult for French musicians to get into the English scene. So we thought it might be a nice way of opening up those possibilities for everybody involved.

Gabi Swallow


JAZZ GWILYM SIMCOCK

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December 2013 — March 2014

On the same day you’re doing the trio, you’re going to be leading the Gwilym Simcock Quintet, a unique group of musicians, including a classical violinist and cellist; not the usual ensemble you expect from a jazz pianist! No! I recorded half an album in November last year with the City of London Sinfonia, for whom I’d written a 30-minute suite for chamber orchestra and piano trio. The other half of the album will be a suite for this quintet – Simple Tales – which originally came about as a commission for the Britten Sinfonia. When the opportunity came up last year to record the CD, which we’ll launch at the concert, I wanted to upgrade the commission a bit, to add bass and drums and slightly rework it. I thought that there was something in the work that I wanted to pursue and get it performed again. [Violinist] Tom Gould is a fantastic person to work with – he’s got two very accomplished feet, from the jazz and classical worlds, so he was a natural choice to play this music. And Gabby [cellist Gabriella Swallow] is probably one of my oldest friends in the world. Will the classical musicians be expected to improvise? I’m definitely going to leave some space to let everyone have a chance to play a little. They’re all massively up for doing that. Yuri, who’s playing bass, is an amazing improviser, both pizzicato and also with the bow, so it’ll be like having a little string trio. I’m looking forward to that.

Johannes Berauer

When the weekend is over, what will you be working on next? I’ve just finished an Impossible Gentlemen album and I recorded a duo album with Yuri the bass player in Schloss Elmau when we stayed there – that comes out in 2014. I’ve got some more Lighthouse gigs later this year, too, and quite a lot of classical commissions, including one for the City of London Sinfonia and clarinettist Michael Collins. I’ve got to play Rhapsody in Blue in concert in November, and I’m on tour with Nigel Kennedy before that, so that’ll be fun! Gwilym Simcock and Friends 9–11 January See Listings p58 for details Celine Bonacina

there are more wonderfully welltrained musicians around europe than there ever have been JOHANNES BERAUER © PAUL | CELINE BONACINA © DOCMAC-PHOTO.COM

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44 COFFEE CONCERTS

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December 2013 — March 2014

Sunday Morning MuSic Lucy Parham introduces her brand-new series of monthly Coffee Concerts at Kings Place, Word/Play

There can be few better-connected pianists in the UK than Lucy Parham, as her new Sunday morning concert series reveals. When you meet her it’s easy to see why: she wears her considerable talent lightly, is the most engaging and confiding of conversationalists, twinkles with a mischievous sense of humour but has the discretion of a career diplomat. She’s carved a unique niche for herself in the UK music world by creating dramatic recitals which play to her repertoire strengths – the Schumanns, Brahms, Debussy, Liszt and Chopin – and feature some of our finest actors, including Dame Harriet Walter, Edward Fox,

Juliet Stevenson, Martin Jarvis, Alex Jennings and Henry Goodman. She’s drawing on her unique network of musicians and musically inclined actors for her brand-new Coffee Concert series at Kings Place, Word/Play, which kicks off with a glitzy Celebrity Carnival gala event on 8 December. A host of amateur celebrity pianists will contribute one of Schumann’s delightful Kinderszenen miniatures, including actors Simon Russell Beale, Juliet Stevenson, Alistair McGowan and Edward Fox, broadcaster Sarah Walker, Philharmonia Orchestra CEO David Whelton, Oldie editor Richard Ingrams and

Guardian Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger, whose recent book Play It Again: An Amateur Against the Impossible gave an insight into his titanic struggle to learn Chopin’s First Ballade during the height of the Wikileaks and phonehacking scandals. How does Lucy persuade and prepare these sometime-pianists for such a concert? ‘I always make it clear to everyone that this should be a morning of fun – no one is expecting them to play like Alfred Brendel. My golden rule is to practise as much as possible and I’m willing to help anyone with that who’d like me to! I also remind them that


ALAN RUSBRIDGER © DAVID LEVENE | ALEX JENNINGS & SIMON RUSSELL BEALE © SUPPLIED PHOTOS | LUCY PARHAM © SVEN ARNSTEIN

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all professionals feel tense before playing, so that’s natural, but the great thing is that we are all in it together.’ She certainly will be, taking up one of the four piano parts for Saint-Saëns’s Carnival of the Animals in the second half, along with actor Simon Russell Beale – ‘He’s really very good, everyone wants to sit beside him!’. When I saw the actor and presenter later he hastened to add that he was intending to put in ‘some really proper practice’ before the event. He means business: he was preoccupied with learning Ancient Greek at the time. Parham’s monthly concerts will all have powerful themes, both comic and serious. ‘I’d like the Kings Place Sunday morning concerts to have a distinct identity from other coffee concert series in London, and the collaboration of actors gives us that. I like matching big theatrical names to subjects in which they have a real interest. I’m hugely looking forward to Martin Jarvis and Richard Sisson’s Just William event (26 January). I could listen to Martin reading Richmal Crompton all day – bliss! – and Richard Sisson will be brilliant at devising musical interludes. And I know that the superb Janie Dee’s cabaret (23 March) is going to be very sophisticated and entertaining.’ Theatre critic Michael Billington certainly thought so when he last saw the actress do cabaret: ‘Her range is remarkable. She can be wistfully romantic in Sondheim, and lend Mick Jagger’s ‘Satisfaction’ an extra layer of sultry suggestiveness. She can also be very funny.’ (The Guardian) From comedy to tragedy: The Dark Pastoral (16 February) promises to be a beautifully curated sequence of poetry and song associated with the First World War. Alex Jennings will be the reader and leading tenor Andrew Kennedy will sing, accompanied by pianist and broadcaster Iain Burnside, in this programme of words and music, devised by Dr Kate Kennedy. The London Symphony Orchestra’s principal cellist Tim Hugh and actor Edward Fox will combine to create a profoundly reflective hour in which the poetry of TS Eliot, Robert Browning and others will be interspersed with movements from Bach’s solo suites for cello (25 May). Lucy herself will perform Strauss’s melodrama based on Tennyson’s Enoch Arden, with Henry Goodman narrating (27 April). She is already planning for the 2014–15 season and can reveal that John Suchet and John Lill will perform a Beethoven event together. Lucy’s series will be interleaved with a series of illuminating Keyboard Conversations® with American pianist Jeffrey Siegel beginning with The Romantic Music of Chopin on 9 February.

COFFEE CONCERTS LUCY PARHAM

December 2013 — March 2014

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NEW-LOOK SUNDAY MORNINGS Word/Play 8 DECEMBER Celebrity Carnival with Alan Rusbridger, Simon Russell Beale, Juliet Stevenson, Lucy Parham and others 26 JANUARY Just William with Martin Jarvis (actor) and Richard Sisson (piano) 16 FEBRUARY The Dark Pastoral with Iain Burnside (piano) and Andrew Kennedy (tenor) 26 MARCH Cabaret with Janie Dee

I'D LIKE THESE SUNDAY MORNING CONCERTS TO HAVE A DISTINCT IDENTITY, AND THE COLLABORATION OF ACTORS GIVES US THAT

27 APRIL Enoch Arden with Henry Goodman (actor) and Lucy Parham (piano) 25 MAY Bach and Poetry with Tim Hugh (cello) and Edward Fox (actor) Keyboard Conversations® 9 FEBRUARY The Romantic Music of Chopin 1 JUNE Mistresses and Masterpieces See Listings pp53, 63, 66 & 69


46 SPOKEN WORD

December 2013 — March 2014

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Drawing Life Sophie Solomon, Artistic Director of the Jewish Music Institute, tells the story behind a new songcycle – to be previewed at Jewish Book Week – which takes its inspiration from poems written at the infamous Terezín concentration camp


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December 2013 — March 2014

SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Terezín, a walled 18th-century garrison town in northwest Czechoslovakia, was used by the Nazis as a vast concentration camp for more than 150,000 Jews, many of whom were then sent on to the death camps of Auschwitz and Treblinka. Also known during the war by its German name Theresienstadt, the camp was the destination for 15,000 deported children between 1941 and 1944. Just 100 of these young people saw the end of the war. But while most did not survive, their poetry and drawings did, stuffed into walls or buried outside. The first line of one of these poems, written by the young Pavel Friedman in 1942, has now become the title of a collection of poetry and drawings.

JOCELYN POOK © HUGO GLENDINNING | DRAWINGS © PHOTO ARCHIVE, JEWISH MUSEUM IN PRAGUE

‘I never saw another butterfly… That butterfly was the last one. Butterflies don’t live here In the ghetto.’

Jocelyn Pook

Soon after writing the poem, Friedman died in Auschwitz. Living conditions in Terezín were appalling. Inmates were crammed together, ravaged by starvation and disease. But the story of the camp demonstrates the enormous resilience of the human spirit even amid the horror of the Holocaust. Those who lived there found ways to play music together and artists stole supplies with which to capture their impressions of life. Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, a Terezín inmate who was an artist and educator before the war, organised art classes for the child inmates, seeing art as a way for the young to process the horror of the experience. Helga Weiss was one such child-inmate who, on her father’s advice to ‘draw what you see’,captured the intimate details of camp life in her drawings. Fifteen-year-old Petr Fischl recorded how they all became accustomed to standing in a long queue ‘with a plate in our hand, into which they ladled a little warmed-up water with a salty or coffee flavour. Or else they gave us a few potatoes. We got used to sleeping without a bed, to saluting every uniform, not to walk on the sidewalks, and then again to walk on the sidewalks. We got used to undeserved slaps, blows and executions.’ Drawing Life is a new cross-disciplinary musical composition and performance inspired by the drawings and poems of the prisioners of Terezín. Commissioned by the Jewish Music Institute, the piece brings together awardwinning composer Jocelyn Pook with a creative team that includes dramaturg Emma Bernard of Streetwise Opera, visual artist Dragan Aleksic and a stellar line-up of performers including Lorin Sklamberg, lead singer of the Grammywinning New York Klezmatics, soprano Melanie Pappenheim and a band of virtuoso klezmer and classical musicians.

(Top) Life in the Ghetto, unknown author (Left) Beyond the Looking Glass, Margit Koretzova (1933–1943) (Bottom Left) Living Quarters, Vilem Eisner (1933–1943)

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SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK

December 2013 — March 2014

Jocelyn Pook’s work often combines contemporary music with symbolic dramatic elements and video to deliver a powerful impact to her audience. The aim of this commission is to enable audiences to experience the act of remembrance in a new way by creating a staged piece that combines Pook’s music with the aural testimonies of survivors and Nazi propaganda films made inside Terezín. Unusually for a prison camp, Terezín had a large number of famous composer and musician inmates, including Viktor Ullman (who composed the opera The Emperor of Atlantis while interned), Gideon Klein and Hans Krása, many of whom continued to compose and perform in captivity. Indeed, Krása’s charming children’s opera Brundibár received its premiere in the camp during a visit from Danish Red Cross Officials. The Nazis used Terezín as a ‘model camp’ to convince those officials that mass genocide of Jews was not occurring across Europe. ‘When asked to make a piece of work inspired by the poems and drawings of the camp’s children, I accepted without hesitation. I had seen some of these works exhibited in the Jewish Museum in Prague when I was recording there several years ago, and it had a profound effect on me,’ reflects Pook. ‘What shines through in these works, and also in many survivors’ testimonies I have read, is the capacity in people to find hope and beauty in the direst and bleakest of circumstances and the inventive, creative ways of doing this. I was also touched to read of countless individual acts of kindness and bravery from all sides.’ As the 70th anniversary of the mass deportation of Terezín inmates to Auschwitz approaches, this piece is a memorial to those who perished. The children’s poems and drawings combine images of harsh camp guards, deportations, cramped barrack conditions, beatings and executions with positive visualisations of birds and butterflies, beautiful gardens and a future life beyond the ghetto. Pook says, ‘This piece will, I hope, be reflective without being devoid of light. It is about the human ability to find ways to nourish the spirit even in the harshest conditions. It is about the positive impact of creativity against all the odds.’ The event at Kings Place will be a doublebill comprising a preview performance and discussion on Saturday 22 February 2014, as part of Jewish Book Week. Jewish Book Week (jewishbookweek.com) 22 February (opening night) – 2 March For details see Listings pp72–74

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The closed town

...Everything leans, like tottering, hunched old women. Every eye shines with fixed waiting And for the word ‘when?’ Here there are few soldiers. Only the shot-down birds tell of war. You believe every bit of news you hear. The buildings now are fuller, Body smelling close to body, And the garrets scream with light for long, long hours... Anonymous

Melanie Pappenheim

MELANIE PAPPENHEIM © STEVEN WILLIAMS

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tickets online £9.50 | kingsplace.co.uk

TriniTy Laban GoLd MedaL ShowcaSe Six elite musicians showcase their musical talents at the Trinity Laban Gold Medal Concert. The Gold Medal Award is the most prestigious prize for musicians at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, awarded for excellence in performance. Performers taking part in the showcase concert are each nominated by Heads of Departments for their high standard of performance and contribution to the musical life of Trinity Laban. Join us for an evening of music, which will see one of them honoured with this prestigious award.

Image: jk-photography

Thu 16 Jan 19.00h KinGS PLace £14.50, £11.50, £9.50 (saver seat £6.50) KinGSPLace.co.uK | 020 7520 1490

TRINITY LABAN CONSERVATOIRE OF MUSIC & DANCE


LISTINGS In the following pages, you will find details of our fantastic Winter 2013–14 Season. From classical, jazz, folk and world music concerts to spoken word and comedy nights, with so many events to choose from and tickets going very quickly, book early to secure your seats!

SAVER SEATS £9.50 ONLINE www.kingsplace.co.uk BOx OffIcE 020 7520 1490

BAFTA award winner Emily Barker and The Red Clay Halo (right) will be performing during the Americana Showcase (13–15 February 2014). See Listings pp67–68 for details. Emily Barker © Supplied Photo

51 57 64 73 77 78

DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH ART LISTINGS CALENDAR


LISTINGS 51

December 2013

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 13

SUNDAY 1 DECEMBER

5 – 7 DECEMBER

SUNDAY RETREAT

DECEMBER

CHAMBERSTUDIO MASTERCLASSES at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

Piano-Yoga® Certificate Courses with GéNIA – 4 Maggini Quartet

Foundation Course (Morning) Course One (Afternoon) INTERACT The last day of Russian virtuoso pianist GéNIA’s new Piano-Yoga® Certificate Courses for pianists from advancedbeginner to advanced level. More details at kingsplace.co.uk/piano-yoga Foundation Course – Day Four (10am)

DAY PLAN: Tension release exercises – Practising according to your body energy – Combating pre-performance nerves – Concert (guests are welcome) & certificate award Course One – Day Four (2pm)

DAY PLAN: Using yoga props in piano playing – Mastering tone-control on the piano – Improving your memory with Piano-Yoga® – Concert (Guests are welcome) & certificate award. Limehouse Rm 10am–1pm (Foundation Course) 2pm–5pm (Course One)

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Maggini Quartet Mozart String Quartet in D, K499 Hoffmeister Stuart MacRae String Quartet (premiere) Mendelssohn String Quartet No. 3 in D, Op. 44 No. 1 CLASSICAL The famous Maggini Quartet perform Mozart’s D major quartet (written in 1786 for his friend FA Hoffmeister), the premiere of a new work by the Scottish composer Stuart MacRae, and Mendelssohn’s 1938 D major Quartet (the first of three dedicated to the Crown Prince of Sweden). Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

Online Rates £50 (morning or afternoon) Multi-buy offers available. Please visit kingsplace.co.uk/piano-yoga for more details.

OUT HEAR DANIEL-BEN PIENAAR © HIROYUKI FURUKAWA | MAGGINI QUARTET © MELANIE STROVER | ANDRI MAGNASON © CHRISTOPHER LUND

Miniaturised Concertos Daniel-Ben Pienaar

DANIEL-BEN PIENAAR PERFORMS BACH'S FAMOUS ‘48’, THE WELL-TEMPERED CLAVIER In the thirteenth week of Bach Unwrapped, two magical nights of Bach Preludes and Fugues, in which South African pianist Daniel-Ben Pienaar will take us through every key in a feast of dazzling counterpoint. Christoph Richter returns to complete his traversal of the Solo Cello Suites with the expressive and darkly coloured suites in D and C minor. See Classical Highlights for complete Bach Unwrapped details

Kate Halsall & Mary Dullea pianos South West Music School Ensemble Maxime Tortelier conductor Philip Cashian, Katharine Norman & Colin Riley composers Peiman Khosravi & James Waterworth electronics CONTEMPORARY Experimental double piano concertos commissioned by Kate Halsall explore the traditional double piano concerto. Working with electroacoustics and film, chamber ensemble, extended techniques and duo, they create large-scale effects from small forces, incorporating notated and improvised music. The project began with a Residency at The Banff Centre (Canada) in 2012 and is supported by Arts Council England, the Britten-Pears Foundation, the RVW Trust and South West Music School.

Andri Magnason

MONDAY 2 DECEMBER WORDS ON MONDAY

Literary Death Match Mark Billingham, Andri Magnason and Stephanie Merritt SPOKEN WORD Four authors read their most electric writing for seven minutes or less before a panel of three all-star judges. After each pair, the judges take turns spouting hilarious, off-the-wall commentary about each story, poem or otherwise, then select their favourite to advance to the finals. The two finalists then compete in the Literary Death Match finale, which trades in the show’s literary sensibility for an absurd and comical climax to determine the winner.

Hall Two 4pm

Hall One 7pm

Online Rates £9.50

Online Rates £9.50

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk | Prices shown are for online booking


LISTINGS

52 LISTINGS

MONday 2 deceMber

THurSday 5 deceMber

WOrdS ON MONday

bacH uNWraPPed

edna O’brien

daniel-ben Pienaar: The Well-Tempered clavier, book I

SPOKeN WOrd Edna O’Brien scandalised audiences with her 1960 novel Country Girls. Last year she published her memoirs to great acclaim. For this event the winner of the prestigious Frank O’Connor Prize looks back on 50 years of writing short stories with The Love Object, a collection of her best pieces. Hall Two 7.30pm Online rates £9.50

TueSday 3 deceMber OFF WITH THeIr HeadS!

Storytellers’ club: crumby christmas Sarah bennetto & Guests cOMedy A night of true tales by excellent comedians of their funniest ever festive experiences. Weird families and Christmas carcrashes. Hosted by stand-up Sarah Bennetto, with a line-up of special guest comedians to be announced soon. Expect to see top standups telling true stories and sometimes revealing more than they planned! Storytellers’ Club: you show, we tell. ‘A magical idea.’ The Metro Hall Two 8pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

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December 2013

JS bach The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, BWV 846–869 daniel-ben Pienaar piano cLaSSIcaL South African pianist Daniel-Ben Pienaar embarks on an epic mission to perform one of Bach’s keyboard masterpieces in two successive nights. Published in two separate volumes, The WellTempered Clavier consists of 48 preludes & fugues, each pair written in a separate key. Opening with the ever popular C major prelude, the first book was finished in 1722 when Bach was ‘Hofkapellmeister’ in Köthen. Abstract and formal concepts meet a mesmerising sense of beauty and sophistication in these pieces whilst providing a vast playing field for the pianist to express sublime musical thoughts. Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

Blair Dunlop

FOLK uNION

blair dunlop FOLK Blair, son of Fairport Convention’s Ashley Hutchings, and winner of the Horizon Award (BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards), is a captivating young vocalist and phenomenal guitarist, fast gaining a reputation as one of the UK’s finest singer-songwriters. This concert features songs from his acclaimed debut album Blight & Blossom, alongside new material from his forthcoming recording. ‘The British folk scene has produced a series of impressive dynasties, and this looks like the start of yet another’ **** The Guardian Hall Two 8pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

FrIday 6 deceMber bacH uNWraPPed

WedNeSday 4 deceMber GuardIaN reVIeW bOOK cLub

JS bach The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II, BWV 870–893

Helen Fielding

daniel-ben Pienaar piano

SaTurday 7 deceMber

cLaSSIcaL

bacH uNWraPPed

Virtuoso pianist Daniel-Ben Pienaar will perform the second book of Bach’s hugely influential masterpiece, which came 20 years after the first, when Bach was ‘Thomaskantor’ in Leipzig. The maturity and complexity of Bach’s writing is unmistakable in this second set, demonstrating how seemingly conservative musical ideas can be treated progressively.

christoph richter: bach cello Suites & Sonatas – 3

‘Weight: nine stone (terrifying slide into obesity – why? why?); alcohol units: six (excellent); cigarettes: 23 (vg).’ It’s almost two decades since Helen Fielding introduced us to the chardonnay-swigging, chain-smoking 30-something singleton – Bridget Jones. Now, in Mad About the Boy, Bridget is back – a 51-year-old mother of two, with a mobile phone and a twitter account. Oh, and she’s a widow. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to join Helen Fielding for a celebration of one of the best-loved heroines of all time. Hall Two 8pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50 Book for both Daniel-Ben Pienaar concerts and save 25%. To take advantage of this offer please call the Box Office on 020 7520 1490.

Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

Nikki Iles

THe baSe

Nikki Iles 50th-birthday celebration with Norma Winstone & The Printmakers JaZZ

Book for both Daniel-Ben Pienaar concerts and save 25%. To take advantage of this offer please call the Box Office on 020 7520 1490.

daniel-ben Pienaar: The Well-Tempered clavier, book II

SPOKeN WOrd

(representing the more personal and tragic side of Bach’s compositions) alongside the uplifting Sonata in G major. For Bach, D minor is a key associated with religion, and at the end of the prelude he paints in sound the sign of the cross – an ‘Amen’. The C minor Suite is the only one to feature a prelude and fugue, and the famous lone-voice sarabande. The Sonata for cello and piano in G major, transcribed by Bach from a trio sonata, presents a lighter contrast to the reflective mood of the solo suites – bright, pastoral and serene.

Christoph Richter

JS bach Suite No. 2 in D minor for solo cello, BWV 1008 Sonata in G for cello and piano, BWV 1027 Suite No. 5 in C minor for solo cello, BWV 1011

A superb band of players from the British jazz scene. British super-pianist Nikki Iles and jazz innovator Norma Winstone are joined by improv guitarist Mike Outram, saxophonist Stan Sulzmann, bass player Steve Watts (a significant member of innovative groups led by Django Bates, Iain Ballamy and others) and the hugely talented young drummer James Maddren (a collaborator with Gwilym Simcock and Kit Downes). The Printmakers cross the boundaries between jazz, folk and contemporary music. Their repertoire has the distinctive air of English song, and includes original pieces by band members alongside explorations of other more uncharted territory (Steve Swallow, Ralph Towner, Joni Mitchell, Fred Hersch). ‘For my money this now has to be the top working band in Britain’ London Jazz News Hall Two 8pm Online rates £14.50 | Savers £9.50

christoph richter cello alasdair beatson piano cLaSSIcaL Completing his cycle of Bach solo cello suites and sonatas, Christoph Richter performs the two minor-key cello suites

Norma Winstone


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LISTINGS

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS CUSTOM-MADE WINTER

LISTINGS 53

December 2013

SUNDAY 8 DECEMBER COFFEE CONCERTS

Celebrity Carnival – Lucy Parham & Friends

CURATED BY ALAN BEARMAN MUSIC

Part of ‘Word/Play’ devised by Lucy Parham

12 – 14 DECEMBER

CLASSICAL SPOKEN WORD

BLAIR DUNLOP © MARIO ROTA | NORMA WATERSON © PETRA KEMPER | BELLA HARDY © LOUISE DECARLO | ALISTAIR MCGOWAN © CLARE PARK | JULIET STEVENSON © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | CHRISTOPH RICHTER & NIKKI ILES | SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Schumann Kinderszenen, Op. 15 Saint-Saëns Carnival of the Animals (1886) Pianists to include: Ed Balls (MP, Shadow Chancellor), Simon Russell Beale (Actor), Humphrey Burton (Writer, Broadcaster) Oliver Condy (Editor, BBC Music Magazine), Niamh Cusack (Actor), Edward Fox (Actor), Richard Godwin (Journalist, Evening Standard), Richard Ingrams (Journalist, Editor, The Oldie), Alistair McGowan (Actor) Alan Rusbridger (Editor, The Guardian), Juliet Stevenson (Actor), Sarah Walker (Presenter, BBC R3), David Whelton (Managing Director, Philharmonia); Conrad Williams (Novelist, Author of The Concert Pianist) Sean Rafferty host Martin Jarvis & Joanna David narrators Join The Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger and other piano-playing celebrities for a morning of fun at the keyboard. 13 pianists each play a movement from Schumann’s enchanting Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood). This piece is followed by a star-studded performance of Saint-Saëns’ Carnival of the Animals. Hosted by R3’s Sean Rafferty. Presented by Lucy Parham. Hall One 11.30am Online Rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee/ tea) | Savers £9.50 (without drink) Bella Hardy

A CUSTOM-MADE WINTER FROM BELLA HARDY, ALBION BAND, NORMA WATERSON, ELIZA CARTHY, THE GIFT BAND AND KAN A winter celebration that mixes echoes of the distant past, traditional favourites and cutting-edge creativity from some of Britain’s most illustrious folk talents. Bella Hardy brings songs from Bright Morning Star while legendary motherand-daughter duo Waterson and Carthy are reunited with The Gift Band and firebrands KAN conjure up a late show. See Folk Highlights p10–11

CHAMBERSTUDIO MASTERCLASSES at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

OUT HEAR

Lazy Modem 2 featuring Howlround CONTEMPORARY The second event in a series considering our day-to-day soundscape as technology continues to evolve. Howlround are a duo who take a literal approach to deconstructing perceived notions of time and location. They create a composition performed on ‘out-moded’ analogue reelto-reel tape machines, using the ‘hidden’ sounds of the Kings Place building as raw material. The result is a spatial exploration at times akin to an aural séance, where memories seep out of the walls and the

Alistair McGowan

Juliet Stevenson

everyday is suddenly viewed in a strange new light. This semi-improvised performance twists the source material into new shapes and projects it back, fundamentally changed, into the space where it was found. Curated by Esther Ainsworth (e_s_t). Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Allegri Quartet with Martin Outram (viola) Pre-Concert Talk with Prof W Drabkin Mozart String Quintet in E flat, K614 Haydn (compl. Drabkin) String Quartet in D minor, Op. 103R (London premiere) Brahms String Quintet No. 2 in G, Op. 111 CLASSICAL The celebrated Allegri Quartet performs the last string chamber works by the three Viennese masters. In 1803, Haydn, aged 71, had completed only the middle two movements of his final quartet. He allowed the fragment to be published as Op. 103, adding the following words to the score: ‘Gone is all my strength, old and weak am I.’ William Drabkin has completed Haydn’s sketches for the first movement and also supplied a clever finale to the work. We are pleased to present the London premiere of his reconstruction. Talk – St Pancras Rm 5.10pm (45 mins) Performance – Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50 The pre-concert talk is FREE, but requires tickets. Please contact the Box Office to reserve your seat.


LISTInGS

54 LISTInGS

SUnday 8 december KInGS PLace arTISTIc HIre

ann Liebeck with Omar Puente’s Tango Quartet Violetta’s Last Tango

book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

December 2013

music, dancing and celebration. This is a special anniversary show, and the band will be playing favourites from the back catalogue. A truly festive treat. Book early! ‘The perfect antidote to the corporate Christmas’ The Guardian

‘Long may the dynasty flourish’ BBC Review

cLaSSIcaL TanGO

Hall One 7.30pm

International opera singer and tango-lover Ann Liebeck, who has sung Violetta, Tosca, Salome and the Queen of the Night, joins forces with contemporary dancer Nuno Silva and Cuban jazz/classical violinist Omar Puente and his Tango Quartet. A journey in song and dance through the melancholic passion of the most beautiful tangos staged in the memories of a Buenos Aires ‘Traviata’. With arrangements of Gardel, Canaro, Bizet, Verdi and Piazzolla by Grammy-Awardwinning Nicolas ‘Colacho’ Brizuela...

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

Hall Two 8pm Online rates £24.50 | Savers 9.50

Save 30 % when you book all three 7.30pm ‘Custom Made Winter’ concerts

Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50 Save 30% when you book all three 7.30pm ‘Custom-made Winter’ concerts

OFF WITH THeIr HeadS!

Impropera’s (not So) bleak midwinter cOmedy Join Impropera for an evening of yuletide glamour and giggles as they improvise a fun festive opera just for you. Do you fancy a coloratura carol? Or a wassail about wellies? The choice is yours. Festive family fun and seasonal cheer, guaranteed to make you merry!

WOrdS On mOnday

‘The perfect operatic pick-me-up’ The Independent ‘Hugely entertaining’ The Telegraph

carlos acosta

Hall Two 8pm

Pig’s Foot

Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

mOnday 9 december

and some surprising gems. Norma and Eliza are two of the country’s finest exponents of traditional song. Between them they have three Mercury Prize nominations, and both have won the BBC Folk Singer of the Year award and many other accolades.

SPOKen WOrd Dazzling dancer Carlos Acosta has already entranced readers with his autobiography. Now he comes to Kings Place to talk about his much-awaited second book. Pig’s Foot is a sweeping literary novel full of dark comedy and magical history – a big tale of revolution, family secrets, love and identity set in the Cuban hinterland, across three generations.

KAN

Online rates £9.50

Carlos Acosta

cUSTOm-made WInTer

The albion Xmas Show 15th anniversary Tour FOLK Take a guided tour of Christmas customs with this seasonal blend of carols, spoken word, humorous readings and dance. The Guvnor himself, Ashley Hutchings (founder of Fairport Convention, Steeleye Span and The Albion Band), is joined on stage by trad folk enthusiasts Kellie While (The Albion Band), Simon Care (Edward II) and Simon Nicol (Fairport Convention) for an evening of traditional English Christmas

bright morning Star FOLK A feast of seasonal treats, from the carols of Bella Hardy’s North Derbyshire home to rather less traditional fare. People flock from far and wide to sing the Peak District’s local carols, and the villages are lit up with song. Join in similar unadulterated seasonal cheer at Kings Place in the company of Bella and special guests guitarist Anna Massie and concertina genius Chris Sherburn. Nominated three times in the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards, and winner of Best Original Track for The Herring Girl in 2012, Bella is famed for entwining her hypnotic voice with fiddle accompaniment to stunning effect. ‘Seductive and original’ The Telegraph ‘Marvellously assured’ Financial Times

Kan

Hall One 7.30pm

FOLK

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

A late show with firebrands KAN, four of the most influential instrumentalists of today’s traditional music world. There’s certain to be an upbeat party atmosphere! Melding the beautiful, bold flute virtuosity of Brian Finnegan (mainstay of Flook) with the daring fiddle innovation of Aidan O’Rourke (of award-winning Lau), intuitive drumming from Jim Goodwin and the playful guitar stylings of Ian Stephenson, KAN are masters of intricate melody.

Hall Two 10pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers 9.50 £6.50 if booked with Friday 7.30pm concert

THUrSday 12 december

cUSTOm-made WInTer

bella Hardy

FOLK UnIOn cUSTOm-made WInTer

‘A live wire of rhythm and melody – a tapestry of textures, there is magic in this’ Songlines

Hall One 7pm

SaTUrday 14 december

Save 30% when you book all three 7.30pm ‘Custom-made Winter’ concerts

Mercury

THe baSe

mercury Tom Thorp saxophones daniel brew guitar Jim molyneux drums Gavin barras bass

FrIday 13 december

JaZZ

cUSTOm made WInTer

After their critically acclaimed appearance at the Manchester Jazz Festival in 2012, Mancunian-based quartet Mercury started 2013 with a run of various jazz festivals throughout the UK and launched their selftitled EP in May. The band’s unashamed rock ’n’ roll aesthetic draws influences from a wide spectrum of musical genres. They are constantly finding new ways to interpret traditional roles in the jazz quartet, bringing together approaches and sound worlds from genres as diverse as classical avantgarde, ECM jazz, dub-step and grunge.

norma Waterson & eliza carthy with The Gift band FOLK Wrap yourself in the warm sound of Norma Waterson & Eliza Carthy with The Gift Band – distinctive earthy voices that tap a rich, authentic vein of traditional song. The velvet richness of this mother/ daughter duo, backed by family and friends (incl. Martin Carthy) is truly sumptuous. Expect traditional classics

Norma Waterson & Eliza Carthy

Hall Two 8pm Online rates £9.50


This Week's Focus chRisTMAs AT kiNGs PLAce BAch uNWRAPPed Week 14 18 – 21 DECEMBER

sUnDay 15 DECEMBER

on another hit show at this year’s Edinburgh Festival: political journalism live on stage.

OUT HEaR

Hall One 7pm

FOUnD

Online Rates £9.50

sarah sarhandi viola, electronica with guest musicians and dancers COnTEMPORaRy Sarhandi created FOUND in 2012 around recorded traffic sounds collected in Karachi. She has always had an awareness of incongruous spaces – actual or imagined – between Islamic and Western cultures. As well as Sarhandi’s viola performance, FOUND includes poetry set to music from America via Ancient Rome, Viola for Isla, (film of a child’s dance), The Dance of Giving Up (dance performance), a piece about surrender that began in Pakistan in 2011 and Us and Them, a video created with pupils at Wendell Park School London. Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50 CHaMBERsTUDIO MasTERCLassEs at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

CARLOS ACOSTA © JOSE GOITIA/DPA/CORBIS | KAN © ALLAN MACDONALD | ROSEMARY JOSHUA© RUTH CRAFER | MERCURY, NORMA WATERSON AND ELIZA CARTHY © SUPPLIED PHOTO

LOnDOn CHaMBER MUsIC sERIEs

sir Roger norrington & Cambridge University Chamber Orchestra Haydn Symphony No. 104 in D, Hob. I:104 London a scarlatti Cantata pastorale Mendelssohn Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 11 Malin Christensson

MALiN chRisTeNssoN siNGs iN BAch's B MiNoR MAss, ALoNG WiTh The choiR oF cLARe coLLeGe ANd AuRoRA oRchesTRA Bach Unwrapped comes to a climactic end with Bach’s B Minor Mass on 21 December, under the baton of Nicholas Collon. We also welcome the peerless Baroque violinist Rachel Podger, who completes the solo Partitas, while the Platinum Consort unwrap the Christmas Oratorio with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. See The Night before Christmas pp38–39

LIsTInGs 55

December 2013

CLassICaL The finest musicians currently at Cambridge University, conducted by Sir Roger Norrington, perform Mendelssohn’s youthful First Symphony, Haydn’s last symphony (composed for his second visit to London), and a beautiful Baroque cantata by Alessandro Scarlatti written for performance on Christmas Eve. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £21.50 | savers £9.50

MOnDay 16 DECEMBER WORDs On MOnDay

Rock’n’Roll Politics 2 steve Richards & Guests sPOKEn WORD Join the columnist and broadcaster Steve Richards for some festive fun and insights in a brand-new ‘Rock’n’Roll Politics’ based

WEDnEsDay 18 DECEMBER BaCH UnWRaPPED

Rachel Podger & Marcin s´wia˛tkiewicz Bach Violin sonatas & Partitas – 3 Js Bach Sonata No. 3 in C for solo violin, BWV 1005 Sonata No. 2 in A for violin and harpsichord, BWV 1015 Partita No. 3 in E for solo violin, BWV 1006 Sonata No. 3 in E for violin and harpsichord, BWV 1016 Rachel Podger violin Marcin s´wia˛tkiewicz harpsichord CLassICaL In this last instalment of her Bach recital series here at Kings Place, Baroque violinist Rachel Podger continues to explore some of Bach’s most brilliant chamber music. The programme includes the particularly demanding C major Sonata for solo violin that features an extensive fugue, and the popular Partita No. 3, widely known for its delightful tune in ‘Gavotte en Rondeau’. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | savers £9.50

THURsDay 19 DECEMBER BaCH UnWRaPPED

Christmas Oratorio Js Bach Christmas Oratorio, BWV 248 (Parts I, III, V & VI) Platinum Consort Orchestra of the age of Enlightenment scott Inglis-Kidger director CLassICaL Bach’s Christmas Oratorio is a complex, almost mathematical, display of compositional genius. On a spiritual level, however, Bach shows us the whole gamut of human emotion, from the ecstatic timpani fanfare of ‘Jauchzet, frohlocket!’, announcing the coming of Christ the King, to the affectionate alto solo ‘Schließe, mein Herze’, expressing the intimacy of his birth. Platinum Consort and director Scott Inglis-Kidger are joined by a stellar cast of soloists from within the choir and by the world-renowned OAE. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £19.50 £29.50 £39.50 £49.50 | savers £9.50

LIsTInGs

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk | Prices shown are for online booking


LISTINGS

56 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January 2014

FRIDAY 20 DECEMBER CHRISTMAS AT KINGS PLACE

A Ceremony of Carols Britten A Ceremony of Carols, Op. 28 Jonathan Rathbone The Oxen; Silent Night Jonathan Dove Three Kings Away in a Manger; In dulce jubilo Sir John Tavener The Lamb Andrew Gant Still, Still, Still + Traditional & contemporary carols Barts Chamber Choir Ivor Setterfield conductor Chris Lee piano CLASSICAL Get into the festive spirit with this wonderful evening of seasonal favourites performed by Barts Chamber Choir and Ivor Setterfield. As well as Britten’s magnificent A Ceremony of Carols, the programme also includes some of the best carols with audience participation and jazz improvisation by pianist Chris Lee. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

THE BASE

The Golden Age of Steam Welcome to Bat Country James Allsopp reeds Kit Downes keyboards Ruth Goller bass guitar Alex Bonney trumpet, electronics Tim Giles drums, electronics

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS NEW YEAR AT KINGS PLACE 31 DECEMBER – 4 JANUARY

JAZZ The Golden Age of Steam’s music is a kaleidoscope of sounds veering between delicate ambient, stomping punk freak-outs and intricately woven counterpoint. For their forthcoming album Welcome to Bat Country they have augmented the original trio ‘to bring in more sounds, taking the music in all sorts of crazy new directions – more colours, heavier grooves, a new-found love of all things ambient and psychedelic!’ ‘There’s no denying the oddly evocative – and evocatively odd – atmosphere that hangs over the whole session: a skewed, David Lynch-style vision of reality gone wrong… Who knew nightmares could be so much fun?’ BBC Music Magazine Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

SUNDAY 22 DECEMBER CHRISTMAS AT KINGS PLACE Nicholas Collon

SATURDAY 21 DECEMBER BACH UNWRAPPED

Bach: Mass in B Minor JS Bach Mass in B Minor, BWV 232 Malin Christensson soprano Jennifer Johnston mezzo-soprano William Towers countertenor Andrew Kennedy tenor Benedict Nelson bass The Choir of Clare College, Cambridge Aurora Orchestra | Nicholas Collon CLASSICAL Acknowledged as one of the greatest achievements not only of sacred choral music but of European culture as a whole, the Mass in B Minor gets its Kings Place debut. The Aurora Orchestra, under the baton of Nicholas Collon, are joined by a world-class line-up of soloists and one of the UK’s finest mixed-voice chamber choirs.

Handel’s Messiah Alice Privett soprano Roderick Morris countertenor Christopher Turner tenor Božidar Smiljanic´ bass OSJ Voices Jeremy Jackman chorus master Orchestra of St John’s John Lubbock conductor

Ruby Hughes

CLASSICAL A firm favourite on the Kings Place calendar – the best-loved oratorio of them all, performed by the Orchestra of St John’s and four talented young soloists. Be sure to book early. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 | Savers £9.50

WELCOME IN THE NEW YEAR WITH RUBY HUGHES IN PURCELL & BACH, WHILE AURORA ORCHESTRA TAKE AN AMERICAN ROAD TRIP The Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment under the direction of dynamic violinist Matthew Truscott toasts 2014 with a sparkling programme on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day featuring music by Biber, Purcell, Telemann and Bach. Also this week, Aurora Orchestra and special guest Dawn Landes with music by Copland, John Adams and Ives.

Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £29.50 £39.50 £49.50 £59.50 | Savers £9.50

Christopher Turner

See Classical Highlights p9


Tuesday 31 december NeW year aT KINGs PLace

aurOra aT KINGs PLace

aurora Orchestra: road Trip

Telemann Ouverture and Air (Allegro) from Ouverture-Suite, TWV 55.D1 Js bach Cantata ‘Weichet nur, betrübte Schatten’ (Wedding Cantata), BWV 202 biber Sonata à 6 in C for trumpet and strings muffat Sonata No. 2 in G minor Armonico tributo (1682) Purcell Dido’s Lament and closing ritornello from Dido and Aeneas Js bach Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F, BWV 1047 Orchestra of the age of enlightenment matthew Truscott director, violin ruby Hughes soprano david blackadder trumpet rachel beckett recorder cLassIcaL As well as featuring two much-loved pieces from the soprano repertoire, Bach’s Wedding Cantata and the lament from Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, this programme explores the diverse roles of the Baroque trumpet, from the splendour of the French overture style, through the relative intimacy of Biber’s Sonata à 6 to the virtuosic peaks of the Second Brandenburg Concerto. This programme is repeated in the afternoon of New Year’s Day. Hall One 6pm

NICHOLAS COLLON © RUTH CRAFER | RUBY HUGHES © ALEJANDRA HERNANDEz | CHRISTOPHER TURNER © SUPPLIED PHOTO

Online rates £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 | savers £9.50

JaNuary WedNesday 1 JaNuary NeW year aT KINGs PLace

Orchestra of the age of enlightenment New year concert brass, bohemia and love’s lament cLassIcaL A second chance to see the New Year Concert, also performed in the evening of New Year’s Eve. See above for the programme details. Hall One 3pm Online rates £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 | savers £9.50

LIsTINGs 57

saTurday 4 JaNuary

Orchestra of the age of enlightenment New year concert brass, bohemia and love’s lament

January 2014

Programme to include: copland Appalachian Spring (1944) Ives Orchestral Set No. 1 Three Places in New England (1903–29) (extract) John adams Chamber Symphony (1992) + new folk and pop arrangements TBA aurora Orchestra | Nicholas collon Special guest dawn Landes cLassIcaL We hit the road with the Kings Place Resident Orchestra for the opening concert in our 2014 series. For this journey-themed programme, Aurora presents an all-American collection of orchestral repertoire – including works by Aaron Copland, Charles Ives and John Adams – alongside folk and pop arrangements from some very special guest artists. A typically inventive and inspiring concert from the UK’s most dynamic ensemble.

Make IT YOUR PLaCe kIngs PLaCe aUdITORIa nOw avaILabLe fOR aRTIsTIC hIRe

‘There seems to be no end to what this young ensemble is willing, hungry and able to do.’ Hilary Finch, The Times Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | savers £9.50

fOR MORe InfORMaTIOn CaLL 020 7520 1461

suNday 5 JaNuary LONdON cHamber musIc serIes

emperor Quartet & sarah beth briggs (piano) britten String Quartet No. 3, Op. 94 Haydn String Quartet in G, Op. 76 No. 1 brahms Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34 cLassIcaL The prize-winning Emperor Quartet perform Britten’s last quartet, composed in 1975, alongside one of Haydn’s most popular quartets from the Op. 76 set. They are joined by the wonderful British pianist Sarah Beth Briggs for Brahms’s epic F minor Piano Quintet.

'COMbIned wITh hIgh qUaLITY LIghTIng and sTagIng, aMPLe baCk sTage aRea and a vIbRanT fROnT Of hOUse, kIngs PLaCe Ranks aMOngsT The MOsT OUTsTandIng COnCeRT exPeRIenCes heRe and abROad.' haRRY ChRIsTOPheRs Cbe, engLIsh COndUCTOR, The sIxTeen

Hall One 6.30pm Online rates £16.50 | savers £9.50

artistic.hires@kingsplace.co.uk cHambersTudIO masTercLasses at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

LIsTINGs

book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk | Prices shown are for online booking


LISTINGS

58 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January 2014

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS GWILYM SIMCOCK & FRIENDS 9 – 10 JANUARY Johannes Berauer

THURSDAY 9 JANUARY GWILYM SIMCOCK & FRIENDS

Johannes Berauer’s Vienna Chamber Diaries feat. Gwilym Simcock Album Launch Johannes Berauer composer Klaus Gesing soprano saxophone, bass clarinet Gwilym Simcock piano Florian Eggner cello Thomas Frey flute, piccolo flute, alto flute Christian Bakanic accordion JAZZ

Jeremy Paxman

Gwilym Simcock

GWILYM SIMCOCK WELCOMES A HOST OF KINDRED SPIRITS FROM THE EUROPEAN JAZZ SCENE TO KINGS PLACE Impossible Gentleman and pianist extraordinaire Gwilym Simcock has invited artists who share his ease in the classical and jazz worlds, such as Austrian Johannes Berauer, with whom he’ll perform The Vienna Chamber Diaries, and Céline Bonacina, who’ll launch new works from her album alongside Simcock’s own, Instrumation. See Impossible Gentleman feature on pp40–42

The UK launch of a new album from Johannes Berauer – one of Austria’s most versatile and prolific young composers. The evening features a remarkable line-up, including jazz greats Gwilym Simcock and Klaus Gesing. Successful as both a classical and jazz musician, Berauer blends subtle chamber music with high-energy improv, groove and intricate polyphony – each piece calling for different instrumentation. He merges two different soundworlds in perfect harmony. The music has been written over the course of a year, and reflects very personal thoughts. Like diary entries, the compositions in The Vienna Chamber Diaries describe experiences that the listener shares.

Céline Bonacina

Gwilym Simcock Quintet Gwilym Simcock piano Thomas Gould violin Gabriella Swallow cello Yuri Goloubev double bass Martin France drums Céline Bonacina Trio Céline Bonacina saxophones Gwilym Simcock piano Michel Benita double bass JAZZ The second and last day of a mini-festival curated by Gwilym Simcock. This concert launchs Gwilym’s new orchestral album Instrumation, featuring a major new work for orchestra alongside quintet pieces. The concert also showcases saxophonist Céline Bonacina, Gwilym’s collaborator on ‘Le Shuttle’, an initiative that brings together British and French players. ‘A formidable musician as well as a formidable pianist, with a feeling for the way harmony can create architecture as well as momentary colours – a rare gift’ The Telegraph Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

SATURDAY 11 JANUARY KINGS PLACE ARTISTIC HIRE

Old Wise Tales

Hall One 7.30pm

MUSICAL THEATRE

Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

The London premiere of a new musical theatre concert work and a journey into the wonderful world of Jewish folk literature. Featuring two West-End performers, a chorus of young singers (aged 8 to 18), a duodectet of future West-End singers and three exceptional musicians, Old Wise Tales combines the power of music and literature to tell ‘old’ stories in ‘new’ ways! With original music by Mendel Ben Yechel, Old Wise Tales is recommended for anyone aged between 9 and 99. Old Wise Tales... not just little fairytales!

FRIDAY 10 JANUARY GWILYM SIMCOCK & FRIENDS

Gwilym Simcock + Céline Bonacina Trio Double Album Launch Céline Bonacina Trio various pieces from her new album Gwilym Simcock pieces from his new album Instrumation, incl. ‘Simple Tales’

Hall One 8pm Online Rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50


THIS WEEK'S FOCUS CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 1

SUNDAY 12 JANUARY OUT HEAR

ANARCHY IN THE ORGANISM curated by Kate Romano

15 – 18 JANUARY

CONTEMPORARY Anarchy in the Organism (2012) (Simeon Nelson lead artist, Rob Godman music, Nick Rothwell video software, electroacoustic sound, live sound & image) Siorram (1992) (James Dillon solo viola) Lexicon (2012) (Andrew Lewis sound and video) Crossing Over (1978) (James Dillon solo clarinet) Halcyon (2011) (Dai Fujikura clarinet and string trio)

GWILYM SIMCOCK © RON BEENEN | JOHANNES BERAUER © MATERIAL RECORDS | CÉLINE BONACINA © THIERRY DOCMAC | BRODSKY QUARTET © ERIC RICHMOND

Goldfield Ensemble (Kate Romano clarinet, Nicola Goldscheider violin, Bridget Carey viola, Toby Turton cello, Rob Godman sound projection) A multi-media performance exploring our relationship with complexity. Using music and light, simple concepts are translated into highly intricate works and multi-faceted issues are articulated with clarity and empathy. Lexicon explores the challenges and creative potential of dyslexia through a poem written by a 12-year-old boy. Andrew Lewis’s Anarchy in the Organism engages patients and public with the science of cancer and its social, cultural and ethical impact through visual and musical algorithms. Dai Fujikura and James Dillon explore deceptively simple ideas in explorative music, combining complexity with an evocative, immediate appeal. The ANARCHY event is a study in live music and light which illuminates these contradictions. Brodsky Quartet

Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50

THE BRODSKY QUARTET LAUNCH CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED, FEATURING THE TOP 50 CHAMBER WORKS AS VOTED BY YOU Our resident quartet, the Brodsky, launch a brand-new Unwrapped series for 2014, in association with BBC Music Magazine, based on the Top 50 chamber works as chosen by you, the audience. Also this week, the Dante Quartet and Nicholas Daniel and the Haffner Wind Ensemble perform more chamber classics for the series. See Chamber Classics Unwrapped feature p36

LISTINGS 59

January 2014

CHAMBERSTUDIO MASTERCLASSES at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Wihan Quartet LCMS International Quartet Series – 4 Mozart String Quartet No. 14 in G, K387 Mendelssohn String Quartet No. 6 in F minor, Op. 80 Schubert String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D810 Death and the Maiden CLASSICAL The celebrated Czech quartet perform the first of the six quartets Mozart dedicated to his friend and master of the medium,

Haydn, published in 1785; Mendelssohn’s passionate final quartet, written in the last year of his life; and Schubert’s late great masterpiece composed in the mid-1820s. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

MONDAY 13 JANUARY WORDS ON MONDAY

The Shelf-Help Sessions: 12 Reasons to Feel Better Jeanette Winterson & Stephen Grosz SPOKEN WORD Award-winning Jeanette Winterson, author of Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit, in conversation with Stephen Grosz, psychoanalyst and author of The Examined Life. Funny, acute, fierce and celebratory, Winterson’s Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal tells how the painful past she thought she had left behind returned to haunt her, and sent her on a journey into madness and out again in search of her real mother. Grosz has spent the last 25 years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behaviour. His Sunday Times bestseller The Examined Life distils over 50,000 hours of consultations into pure psychological insight. Hall Two 7pm Online Rates £9.50

WEDNESDAY 15 JANUARY CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Brodsky Quartet Beethoven: String Quartet No. 15 & Bartók: String Quartet No. 4 Purcell Fantasia Henning Kraggerud Preghiera (2012) Bartók String Quartet No. 4, Sz. 91 (Voted No. 27) Beethoven String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op. 132 (Voted No. 12) Brodsky Quartet Daniel Rowland violin Ian Belton violin Paul Cassidy viola Jacqueline Thomas cello CLASSICAL The newest Unwrapped series opens with a performance by the Brodskys, quartet-inresidence at Kings Place. Their programme pairs one of Beethoven’s mighty ‘late’ quartets with Bartók’s Fourth, admired for its ingenious construction and tight, formal symmetry. Paul Cassidy: ‘To accompany these pieces, we’ve chosen two works

LISTINGS

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LIStInGS

60 LIStInGS

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January 2014

written three centuries apart, yet both reflecting religious, ancient and folk elements. Purcell’s Fantasia is a rare treat for us: quartets truly began with Haydn and the Classical era, so we don’t often get the chance to revel in the pure soundworld of the Baroque. Kraggerud’s Preghiera (‘Prayer’), written for our 40th-anniversary Wheel of 4Tunes series, is a beautifully atmospheric modal hymn peppered with improvisatory flourishes.’

a rising star, and his big band line-up includes many of the UK’s finest jazz and session musicians. Their debut album, Between Shadows, with its enticingly subtle palette, plaintive Kenny Wheeleresque chords and Gil Evans textures, was released to critical acclaim in 2013. Nicholas Daniel & Haffner Wind Ensemble

Saturday 18 January

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

CHaMBEr CLaSSICS unWraPPEd

FrIday 17 January CHaMBEr CLaSSICS unWraPPEd

dante Quartet with Benjamin Frith (piano) Elgar: Piano Quintet turina La oración del torero (‘The Bullfighter’s Prayer’) for string quartet, Op. 34 Falla Suite populaire espagnole for cello and piano (arr. from 7 Canciones populares españolas) Poulenc Sonata for violin & piano, Op. 119 (in memory of Federico García Lorca) Elgar Piano Quintet in A minor, Op. 84 (Voted no. 38) dante Quartet Krysia Osostowicz violin Giles Francis violin rachel roberts viola richard Jenkinson cello with Benjamin Frith piano CLaSSICaL ‘Ghostly stuff’, wrote Elgar of the first movement of his glorious piano quintet. In amongst the generous Elgarian warmth lurks a sinuous, Spanish-sounding melody evoking the twisted shapes of strange trees near Elgar’s house. The legend goes that these were the petrified remains of a group of medieval Spanish monks who had practised satanic rites. The Dante Quartet and Benjamin Frith expand on this Spanish theme, opening with evocative pieces by Andalusian composers Turina and Falla, both close friends of the great poet Federico García Lorca, murdered during the Spanish Civil War. Poulenc’s plangent sonata is dedicated to Lorca’s memory.

Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50 Charles Owen & Katya Apekisheva

LOndOn CHaMBEr MuSIC SErIES

nicholas daniel & Haffner Wind Ensemble

Charles Owen & Katya apekisheva Piano duo

nielsen: Wind Quintet Sir Peter Maxwell davies Sea Eagle for solo horn (1982) thea Musgrave Impromptu No. 1 for flute and oboe (1967) arnold Divertimento for flute, oboe & clarinet, Op. 37 Bridge Divertimenti for wind quintet, H189 John Harbison Quintet for Winds (1979) Martin Butler Down-hollow winds (1993) for wind quintet nielsen Wind Quintet, Op. 43 (Voted no. 50) Haffner Wind Ensemble nicholas daniel oboe Joy Farrall clarinet Emer Mcdonough flute Sarah Burnett bassoon Stephen Bell horn CLaSSICaL This stylish musical conversation was affectionately written for five players known to Nielsen, and their characters are enshrined in the score. Like all his music the Quintet embodies sprung rhythms, clear, cool colours and a heightened, suspended sense of harmony that zings like frost in the air. The pearlescent voices ripple through the spacious scoring – in dialogue, talking all together, or alone. A piece that encapsulates many facets of his art in miniature, it was performed at his funeral in 1931. Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

with Pedro Segundo & George England | percussion

Fitzwilliam Quartet

Sunday 19 January Out HEar

Fitzwilliam Quartet: absolutely! album Launch COntEMPOrary A concert that fuses jazz, classical, folk, and electronic music, featuring original compositions by Uwe Steinmetz, Liz Johnson and John Ramsay. This event is built around three current Fitzwilliam Quartet recording projects, headed by the launch of a new disc of works by Steinmetz himself for string quartet, jazz violin, and soprano saxophone – the main work providing the title of both the event and the CD. The concert starts with the First Quartet by eminent geologist John Ramsay CBE, and is completed by a piece for solo violin and live electronics by Liz Johnson, whose complete works for string quartet will be recorded by the Fitzwilliam next year. Hall Two 4pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

tHE BaSE

reuben Fowler Big Band

Hall One 7.30pm

JaZZ

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

23-year-old jazz trumpeter and composer Reuben Fowler is a recent conservatoire graduate, and the second winner of the Kenny Wheeler Award. Fowler himself is

dante offer: 17 Jan & 16 Oct 2014 20% off if you book both concerts.

‘Obvious potential… razor-sharp young big band’ The Guardian Hall Two 8pm

Hall One 7.30pm

Brodsky offer: 15 Jan, 19 Mar & 11 Dec 2014 20% off if you book any 2 concerts. 30% off if you book all 3 concerts.

CHaMBErStudIO MaStErCLaSSES at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

Reuben Fowler

debussy En blanc et noir for two pianos, L134 rachmaninov Suite No. 2 for two pianos, Op. 17 Bartók Sonata for two pianos and percussion, Sz. 110 CLaSSICaL Composed in 1937, Bartók’s Sonata for two pianos and percussion is one of the dramatic masterpieces of the 20th-century piano repertoire. In this concert it is performed by two of the outstanding pianists of our time and two exceptional percussionists, and contrasted with other remarkable 20th-centuryworks for two pianos: Debussy’s En blanc et noir from 1915, and Rachmaninov’s Second Suite, composed in Italy in 1901. Hall One 6.30pm Online rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

MOnday 20 January WOrdS On MOnday

Grammar with david Marsh SPOKEn WOrd David Marsh, author of the recently published grammar book For Who the Bell Tolls, celebrates language and explains the rules of grammar in a witty and entertaining way. He takes a progressive, creative approach to learning grammar – illustrating key points through pop and rap songs, and believing, unlike to many, that text speak is not in fact ruining the English language. Hall Two 7pm Online rates £9.50


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January 2014

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

CURATED BY SWINGLE SINGERS & IKON ARTS MANAGEMENT

NICHOLAS DANIEL & HAFFNER ENSEMBLE © HARRY RANKIN | FITZWILLIAM QUARTET © BENJAMIN HARTE | REUBEN FOWLER © DAVE STAPLETON | CHARLES OWEN & KATYA APEKISHEVA © JACK LIEBECK THE SWINGLE SINGERS © MAMUN HUMAYUN | THE HOUSE JACKS & THE SONGMEN © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

23 – 25 JANUARY

The House Jacks

THURSDAY 23 JANUARY LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

The House Jacks CONTEMPORARY

Swingle Swingle Singers Singers

An ‘original rock band without instruments’, this is the all-American House Jacks’ London debut. Achieving fame in the blockbuster movie Pitch Perfect, on the NBC hit television show The Sing-Off and on radio stations and stages around the world, The House Jacks’ name is synonymous with spontaneous improvisation, electrifying entertainment and extraordinary vocal antics. They’ve played everywhere from Carnegie Hall to CNN, and performed with the likes of Ray Charles, James Brown, Train, The Temptations and The Four Tops. Catching The House Jacks live in concert is definitely an opportunity not to be missed. ‘I loved it! I loved it! I loved it!’ Ray Charles ‘Man! They can really sing!’ The Temptations Hall Two 7.30pm (60 mins; standing) 9pm (repeat performance)

SWINGLE SINGERS, THE REAL GROUP, THE HOUSE JACKS, BACKSTEP AND THE SONGMEN... IT'S THE LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL!

Online Rates (per performance) £16.50 £18.50 | Savers £9.50

FREE FOYER PERFORMANCES Thursday 23 January – evening Friday 24 January – evening Saturday 25 January – all day Come and hear some of the best beatbox, gospel, barbershop, choral and jazz talent from the UK and beyond.

FRIDAY 24 JANUARY LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

The Songmen CONTEMPORARY Award-winning a cappella ensemble The Songmen bring a fresh approach to all-male a cappella. With an enviable reputation as one of the UK’s finest and most versatile groups in the genre, they add their own special touch to the worlds of classical, sacred and popular music, balancing their love for the old Renaissance masters with a passion for exciting contemporary composers. ‘Crisp, tight, cool arrangements’ John Rutter CBE Hall Two 6.30pm (60 mins) Online Rates £14.50 | Savers £9.50

Celebrating its fifth year, the London A Cappella Festival has become a much-anticipated fixture at Kings Place, a global showcase of vibrant talent and vocal invention. Come and bask in the superbly honed skills of the Swedish Real Group, be entertained by The House Jacks, a rock band with no instruments, and discover cutting-edge Backstep. See Contemporary Highlights pp 14–15

The Songmen


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January 2014

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

Backstep Beatboxer Bellatrix & 8 Voices CONTEMPORARY

World Champion Beatboxer Bellatrix

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

The Real Group with support act Vive

Eight of London’s most exciting vocalists from the worlds of jazz, folk, opera, soul and electronica join World Champion Female Beatboxer Bellatrix in the ground-breaking new project Backstep. Uniting artists from a wide range of musical backgrounds, Backstep creates cutting-edge and exhilarating performance experiences in nightclubs, festivals and concert halls, collaborating with artists and composers of all disciplines, including electronic musicians, DJs and rap artists. Hall Two 10pm (60 mins) Online Rates £14.50 | Savers £9.50

CONTEMPORARY After their sell-out performance at the London A Cappella Festival in 2011, we are thrilled to welcome back The Real Group to help us celebrate the festival’s fifth birthday. Undoubtedly one of the leading forces in the world of vocal music today, The Real Group’s give performances that display an unbeatable combination of vocal artistry and perfection, insatiable humour and a unique personal touch. This Swedish vocal super-group are famed for superlative creativity as they delight audiences with jazz originals and reworkings of popular favourites. ‘At the core of this quintet’s repertoire are the standards on which every jazz artist, foreign or domestic, eventually must prove his mettle.’ Chicago Tribune Hall One 8pm Online Rates £24.50 £29.50 £34.50 £44.50 | Savers £9.50 The Real Group

Workshop II: Pitch Perfect Unpicked with Deke Sharon and Nick Girard Blockbuster hit Pitch Perfect’s Music Director Deke Sharon and fellow House Jack Nick Girard will draw upon two decades of performing, recording, arranging and teaching. Whether you are an amateur singer, an experienced improviser or a shower-singing guru, you will be challenged to see just what you can achieve with your voice. Hall Two 11.30am (60 min)

Workshop IV: Pass me the Jazz with The Real Group Join members of The Real Group as they explain and demonstrate the ingredients of their inimitable trademark sound. This is an unparalleled opportunity to sing with members of this vocal super-group as they explore creativity, intonation, blend, pulse and rhythm. Hall Two 3.45pm (60 min) Online Rates £9.50

Workshop III: The Craft with Bob Chilcott Join internationally acclaimed composer and conductor Bob Chilcott as he delves into two gems from his ever popular collection of choral works with Oxford University Press. Crafting your vocal skills under Chilcott’s expert direction, you’ll be part of the festival’s first ever scratch choir! Scores will be provided. Sponsored by Oxford University Press ‘A contemporary hero of British choral music’ The Observer

Workshop V: Dominic Peckham’s Total Vocal Dominic Peckham is one of the UK’s finest young conductors and an ambassador of choral music. Join him as he ‘lays it bare’ – getting to grips with exactly what it takes to be part of an a cappella group. Explore various technical aspects involved as you put together your a cappella team, the ingredients to enhancing your individual instrument and taking your performance standards to a new level. In association with London A Cappella International Summer School

INTERACT

Hall Two 1pm (60 min)

St Pancras Room 4.45pm (60 min)

Enthusiastic singers and choirs of all ages and abilities are invited to join international industry experts and performers in a series of workshops focusing on various aspects of singing and vocal performance. Early booking is a must to avoid disappointment!

Online Rates £9.50

Online Rates £9.50

Online Rates £9.50

Bob Chilcott

SATURDAY 25 JANUARY LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

All Things Vocal: Workshops

Please note that all workshops are standing events with limited seating. Workshop I: Brazilian Rhythms & Body Percussion with Carlos Bauzys Blow away those winter cobwebs as celebrated musical director and conductor Carlos Bauzys joins us from São Paulo, Brazil, to bring you an invigorating workshop exploring the vibrant rhythms of South America and introducing Brazilian Body Percussion. Hall Two 10am (60 mins) Online Rates £9.50

SLIXS


LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

Time Ensemble

COFFEE CONCERTS

with special guests The Swingle Singers

Just William

WORLD CONTEMPORARY

Martin Jarvis & Richard Sisson

The truly unique Time Ensemble is a ‘world choir’ performing contemporary choral works and re-workings of traditional folk songs. With members originating from across Europe, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, South Africa, the USA, Venezuela and Uruguay, they draw on their combined knowledge of diverse musical styles and languages to create a sublime multinational soundworld. Prepare for goosebumps!

Part of ‘Word/Play’ devised by Lucy Parham CLASSICAL SPOKEN WORD

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

The adventures of Richmal Crompton’s irrepressible and ageless schoolboy William Brown, told here by Martin Jarvis, have been delighting both young and old for decades. Perpetually scruffy, mudstained and mischievous, William is a lovable scamp whose pranks usually end in disaster – for his harassed elders at least. With friends Ginger, Douglas and Henry and the angelic thorn-in-his-side, lisping Violet Elizabeth Bott, William has rightly joined the literary immortals. Jarvis is joined by pianist Richard Sisson (formerly of Kit and the Widow).

SLIXS

Hall One 11.30am

Hall One 2.30pm Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £18.50 £21.50 | Savers £9.50

BELLATRIX © TOM GRIFFITHS | THE REAL GROUP © MATS BAêCKER | BOB CHILCOTT © JOHN BELLARS | MARTIN JARVIS © SVEN ARNSTEIN | GERMAINE GREER © JONATHAN RING | TIME ENSEMBLE, SLIXS & SILJE AKER JOHNSEN © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

SuNDAY 26 JANuARY

with support act PENNY ARCADE CONTEMPORARY

Online Rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee/ tea) | Savers £9.50 (without drink)

Fusing world-class vocals with a powerful concoction of jazz, pop and funk, sixstrong German group SLIXS have rocked audiences at concerts and festivals across the world as they effortlessly imitate an astonishing variety of sounds and noises. Packed concert halls and numerous awards attest to SLIXS’s spirit of innovation and daring forays into new artistic ventures. Martin Jarvis

Hall One 6pm Online Rates £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 | Savers £9.50

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

The Swingle Singers CONTEMPORARY Festival favourites The Swingle Singers need no introduction. This worldrenowned group seamlessly embrace five decades of Swingle history whilst continuing to push the boundaries of the a cappella soundworld. Five decades on from their pioneering Grammy-winning debut album Jazz Sébastien Bach, today’s Swingle Singers are an international a cappella phenomenon, delivering folk ballads, funk jams and fugues with equal precision and passion. ‘A riveting, sometimes comical and most musical of evenings’ London Jazz Review Hall One 8.30pm Online Rates £24.50 £29.50 £34.50 £44.50 | Savers £9.50

Silje Aker Johnsen

OuT HEAR

nu:nord featuring Tre Voci Cello Ensemble & Silje Aker Johnsen Silje Aker Johnsen soprano Tre Voci (Torun Stavseng, Gregor Riddell & Colin Alexander cello) Rob Lewis electronics CONTEMPORARY A collaboration with nu:nord, an artistic cooperation and community-building project between emerging new-music creators from Canada, Norway and the UK. This performance features nu:nord resident

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singer Silje Aker Johnsen and cello ensemble Tre Voci (Norwegian cellist Torun Stavseng and British cellists/composers Gregor Riddell and Colin Alexander). They present contemporary works for cello ensemble and soprano, with electronics. The programme includes two premieres by Jonathan Cole and Taylor Brook.

a forest in her native Australia. Expect Germaine Greer to bring the same passion with which she defended feminist issues to the essential challenge faced by our planet’s biodiversity. Hall One 7pm Online Rates £9.50

Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50 CHAMBERSTuDIO MASTERCLASSES at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

LONDON CHAMBER MuSIC SERIES CHAMBER CLASSICS uNWRAPPED

Tippett Quartet & Stephanie Gonley (violin) Beethoven String Quartet No. 16 in F, Op. 135 (Voted No. 26) A Panufnik String Quartet No. 3 Wycinanki (1990) Herrmann (arr. Birchall) Psycho Suite Mozart String Quintet in G minor, K516 Tippett Quartet John Mills violin Jeremy Isaac violin Lydia Lowndes-Northcott viola Bozidar Vukotic cello with Stephanie Gonley violin CLASSICAL The first of the LCMS concerts in the Chamber Classics Unwrapped series features the excellent Tippett Quartet. In this inspiring programme, they will perform Mozart’s sublime G minor String Quintet, Beethoven’s last quartet, the suite from Bernard Herrman’s famous film score for Hitchcock’s Psycho, and to mark the centenary of the Polish composer Andrzej Panufnik, the last of his three quartets, composed in 1990 and subtitled Messages.

WEDNESDAY 29 JANuARY KINGS PLACE ARTISTIC HIRE

Mark Swartzentruber plays Scarlatti, Beethoven & Chopin In aid of Camden Psychotherapy unit D Scarlatti Sonata in C, K513 Sonata in A minor, K54 Sonata in G minor, K426 Sonata in G, K427 Beethoven Piano Sonata in D minor, Op. 31 No. 2 Tempest Chopin Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23 Ballade No. 2 in F, Op. 38 Ballade No. 3 in A flat, Op. 47 Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52 Mark Swartzentruber piano CLASSICAL Chopin’s four Ballades represent a pinnacle of solo piano writing. Their combination of emotional range, nobility of spirit and dramatic musical narrative remains unsurpassed. The programme opens with four sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti, exemplifying his boundless creative imagination and lively spirit, and continues with the turbulent atmosphere of Beethoven’s Tempest Sonata. Mark Swartzentruber’s recordings on Sony and Solo have all earned excellent reviews in the international music press and confirm his reputation as an artist of the highest calibre. His London appearances have included the Wigmore Hall and QEH. He has also broadcast on BBC R3 and R4. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

MONDAY 27 JANuARY WORDS ON MONDAY

Germaine Greer The Rainforest Years SPOKEN WORD The author of The Female Eunuch tells us how she embraced the fight to bring back

Germaine Greer

LISTINGS

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January 2014

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Jim Causley

Friday 31 January FOLK uniOn

Jim Causley with Lukas drinkwater The Poetry of Charles Causley FOLK Five times BBC Radio 2 Folk Award nominee Jim Causley has recorded an album of the poems of his distant relative Charles Causley to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the death of this celebrated Cornish poet. The Cyprus Well album was recorded live in Causley’s house in Launceston, Cornwall and many of the tracks feature Causley’s own piano. Jim aims to bring wider attention to Causley’s poems and raise awareness of the Charles Causley Trust and their mission to preserve Causley’s house as a writers’ retreat. Jim is renowned for his warm stage presence and his rich singing voice has been likened to the fruitiest of ciders! He is joined on stage by talented guitarist Lukas Drinkwater. Hall Two 8pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

FEBruary SaTurday 1 FEBruary THE BaSE

and absorbing soundscapes. Horns and drums and nothing more makes up the funk/jazz powerhouse that is Dakhla. But actually it is more than that; talent, instinct and creativity add to these basic elements to make this a real force to be reckoned with.’ Sound On Sound Hall Two 8pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Sunday 2 FEBruary CHaMBErSTudiO

ChamberStudio Junior Masterclass inTEraCT An opportunity for pre-formed school-age chamber groups to receive open masterclass sessions with ChamberStudio professors. The day finishes with a concert in Hall Two given by all four of the groups, to which observers are also welcome. The Junior Masterclass Days offer talented young musicians fresh ideas and specialist training and an opportunity to perform in a major concert venue. Masterclass Sessions: Function Rooms 1–2.15pm; 2.15–3.30pm; 4–5.15pm & 5.15–6.30pm Public Performance – Hall Two 7pm Tickets £50 per participating player Customers need to apply to info@ chamberstudio.org with a short biography of the group, and pay ChamberStudio directly. A limited amount of FREE tickets for the concert at 7pm (excl. the masterclass sessions) are available by calling the Box Office.

dakhla Matt Brown drums Charlotte Ostafew baritone saxophone Sophie Stockham alto saxophone Pete Judge trumpet

OuT HEar

We Spoke: Song Juliet Fraser soprano rico Gubler saxophones Kerry yong piano/keyboards Serge Vuille drums/percussion Matthew Shlomowitz, Bernhard Lang & antoine Joly composition COnTEMPOrary We Spoke: Song brings together three instrumentalists and renowned soprano Juliet Fraser to form a new music band that explores the cultural heritage of song. We begin with medley (!) of Swiss song, loving and critical in equal measure. Next, the latest volume of Shlomowitz’s Popular Contexts, also a premiere, which patterns and transforms everyday instructions such as Ikea instructions or fitness directions. And after the break, a work from Lang’s celebrated DW series that explores repetition and its effects on perception in the form of five songs with lyrics by artists such as Bob Dylan and prog-rocker Peter Hammill... Hall Two 4pm Online rates £9.50

LOndOn CHaMBEr MuSiC SEriES

London Soloists Ensemble

London Soloists Ensemble

Their concert features Mozart, Alwyn, Walton’s wonderful youthful piano quartet and Brahms’s passionate and stormy C minor Piano Quartet, completed in 1875. Hall One 6.30pm Online rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

MOnday 3 FEBruary WOrdS On MOnday

Bedsit disco Queen: Tracey Thorn SPOKEn WOrd Tracey Thorn looks back on the defiant, energetic atmosphere of late 1970s suburban post-punk, when she co-founded the Marine Girls, whose two albums became cult classics, and then, at university, met Ben Watt and formed Everything But The Girl. From consciously indie beginnings in the early 1980s, the duo was drawn into the world of international pop had hits and flops, toured venues large and small, sold nine million records worldwide befriended Morrissey and Jeff Buckley, and collaborated with artists and producers as varied as Paul Weller, Tommy LiPuma, Todd Terry and Massive Attack. Hall Two 7pm Online rates £9.50

Mozart Trio in E flat for clarinet, viola & piano, K498 Kegelstatt Walton Piano Quartet in D minor alwyn Conversations for violin, clarinet & piano (1950) Brahms Piano Quartet No. 3 in C minor, Op. 60 CLaSSiCaL

JaZZ ‘Dakhla is a unique horns-and-drums quartet playing original tunes that blend evocative harmonies, intricate rhythms

Juliet Fraser

Dakhla

The wonderful performers of the London Soloists Ensemble – Lorraine McAslan (violin), John Lenehan (piano), Anthony Pike (clarinet), Sarah-Jane Bradley (viola) and Karine Georgian (cello) – make their debut as this ensemble in the LCMS series.

Tracey Thorn


book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk | Prices shown are for online booking

5 – 8 February

Wednesday 5 February CHaMber CLassICs unWraPPed

The schubert ensemble schubert: Trout Quintet Fauré: Piano Quartet no. 1

JULIET FRASER © DAvID JEnSEn | | MEMBERS OF EnDYMIOn © EAMOnn MCCABE | THE SCHUBERT EnSEMBLE © JOHn CLARK | JIM CAUSLEY, DAKHLA, LOnDOn SOLOISTS EnSEMBLE, TRACEY THORn & STEPHEn STIRLInG © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Mozart Piano Quartet no. 1 in G minor, K478 Fauré Piano Quartet no. 1 in C minor, Op. 15 (Voted no. 50) schubert Piano Quintet in A, D667 The Trout (Voted no. 3)

Kyrsia Osostowicz, Mark van de Wiel and Michael Dussek (members of Endymion)

Endymion boasts some of the most versatile and adventurous soloists in the capital, and in the first of three concerts they combine Brahms and Ligeti for the famous horn trios, following this with two delectable programmes featuring flute and clarinet. The Schubert Ensemble start the week with the delightful Trout Quintet. See feature on Chamber Classics p36

Stephen Stirling

THursday 6 February

The schubert ensemble simon blendis violin douglas Paterson viola Jane salmon cello Peter buckoke double bass William Howard piano

endymion

CLassICaL

brahms: Horn Trio

Schubert’s Trout Quintet is one of the bestloved works in the piano and strings repertoire, sparkling from beginning to end and offering a constant flow of wonderful melodies. Although it is not the first work to be written for this unusual quintet with double bass, Schubert employs the five instruments with breath taking originality, using the depth of the bass to release the piano into its highest registers. Mozart’s G minor Piano Quartet was also groundbreaking in its time as the first piece of chamber music for piano quartet in which a real dialogue takes place between all four instruments. The late Romantic passion and shimmering virtuosity of Fauré’s C minor Piano Quartet is in complete contrast to the Classical Mozart and the early Romantic Schubert; it displays Fauré’s extraordinary imagination for instrumental colour.

beethoven violin Sonata no. 10 in G, Op. 96 Ligeti Trio for horn, violin & piano Hommage à Brahms (1982) brahms Trio in E flat for horn, violin & piano, Op. 40 (Voted no. 43)

Hall One 7.30pm

Hall One 7.30pm

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | savers £9.50

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | savers £9.50

schubert ensemble offer: 5 Feb & 15 Oct 2014 20% off if you book both concerts.

chamber classics unwrapped continues with a trio of concerts from endymion in brahms, ligeti, debussy & ravel

LIsTInGs

this week's focus chamber classics unwrapped week 2 + endymion at 35

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CHaMber CLassICs unWraPPed endyMIOn aT 35

Krysia Osostowicz violin stephen stirling horn Michael dussek piano CLassICaL It was only to be expected that Brahms’s Horn Trio would make it into the Top 50 chamber classics, given the heartfelt simplicity of its themes, and the freedom with which (for the first time) Brahms moves away from traditional forms in his chamber music. Ligeti’s Trio is a homage in name only – Brahms couldn’t be further from the Caribbean dance rhythms that put this piece in the initial Top 200.

endymion offer: 6 Feb & 7 Feb 2014 20% off if you book both concerts. The Schubert Ensemble


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Friday 7 February

SaTurday 8 February

CHaMber CLaSSiCS uNWraPPed eNdyMiON aT 35

eNdyMiON aT 35

endymion debussy: Sonata for flute, viola & harp beethoven Serenade in D for flute, violin & viola, Op. 25 debussy Syrinx for solo flute, L129 Saint-Saëns Fantaisie in A for violin & harp, Op. 124 Martinu˚ Three Madrigals for violin & viola, H313 Duo No. 1 ravel (arr. Skaila Kanga) Sonatine for flute, viola & harp debussy Sonata for flute, viola & harp, L137 (Voted N0. 44) CLaSSiCaL The second concert in Endymion’s 35thanniversary celebrations... Debussy’s Sonata for flute, violin and harp ends with a resoluto Finale, but opens with a Pastorale that puts you in mind of the orchestral classic Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune. His Syrinx evokes a similar feeling, and is named after the lost love of the woodland god Pan. Beethoven’s delightful Serenade and Martinu˚ ’s captivating Madrigals show off the violin, viola and flute in a variety of contrasting ways.

endymion plays brahms brahms Clarinet Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 120 No. 1 Clarinet Sonata No.2 in E flat, Op. 120 No. 2 Intermezzo in E flat minor, Op. 118 No. 6 Clarinet Trio in A minor, Op. 114 Mark van de Wiel clarinet Jane Salmon cello Michael dussek piano CLaSSiCaL All of Brahms’s chamber works that include the clarinet were written very late in life. The two clarinet sonatas were the last chamber pieces he composed, and they express the emotion of a lifetime. The passionate F minor Sonata is followed by the joyful exuberance of the Second, in E flat. By contrast, the tension at the beginning of his Clarinet Trio is almost tangible, returning in the finale after two much more relaxed, calming movements. Brahms’s clarinet conveys every mood – from a song of sadness to a dance for life.

endymion offer: 6 Feb & 7 Feb 2014 20% off if you book both concerts.

FOLK uNiON

Chris Wood None The Wiser

Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

SuNday 9 February COFFee CONCerTS

The romantic Music of Chopin Part of ‘Keyboard Conversations® with Jeffrey Siegel (piano)’ Programme to include: Chopin Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp minor, Op. posth. 66 Jeffrey Siegel piano CLaSSiCaL

Hall One 11.30am

THe baSe

Online rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee/ tea) | Savers £9.50 (without drink)

Tim richards’ HeXTeT

JaZZ

Hall Two 4pm Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50 CHaMberSTudiO MaSTerCLaSSeS at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

LONdON CHaMber MuSiC SerieS

Clare Presland, eniko Magyar & Vicky yannoula brahms Two Songs for voice, viola & piano, Op. 91 Strauss 3 Lieder for mezzo-soprano, viola & piano, Op. 31 Vaughan Williams Romance for viola and piano bridge Three Songs for voice, viola & piano, H76 Schumann, debussy & Fauré Songs for voice and piano (selection) Fuchs Fantasie Etude No. 9 for unaccompanied viola Loeffler 4 Poèmes for voice, viola & piano, Op. 5 Clare Presland mezzo soprano eniko Magyar viola Vicky yannoula piano CLaSSiCaL

Tim richards piano dick Pearce trumpet ed Jones tenor sax ralph Wild vibes dominic Howles bass Jeff Lardner drums Tim Richards’ six-piece HEXTET sold out their Kings Place gig in October 2012, so book early for their return match – another set of hard bop and contemporary originals. The line-up includes ex-Ronnie Scott trumpeter Dick Pearce and US3/Incognito saxman Ed Jones, with new face Ralph Wild on vibes. The first set features a special solo piano performance of Duke Ellington

‘GéNIA manages to find a platform for contemporary compositions whilst giving historic pieces a fresh airing’ Financial Times

Hall Two 8pm

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

FOLK

Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

‘A highly distinctive solo voice, blues and gospel tinged, but with a percussive drive betraying his roots in hard bop’ The Independent

Hall One 7.30pm

Two-time BBC R2 Folk Award winner Chris Wood’s love of small things has made him one of England’s most vivid and arresting song writers. With gentle intelligence he weaves tradition in with his own contemporary parables. Joan Armatrading presented him with the 2011 Folk Singer of the Year award before inviting him as special guest onto her 2012 tour. They played 51 cities and Wood found himself collecting the poetry of recession as he eavesdropped on conversations in pound shops, tea rooms, army recruiting centres and hotel saunas. His response is None The Wiser, his fourth solo album. From Alzheimer’s to Blake, Wood lovingly takes the pulse of his homeland in arguably his best album yet. ‘The title track alone is a masterpiece’ 5* The Independent Hall Two 8pm

and Thelonious Monk material, alongside Tim’s own compositions.

A chance to sit back and enjoy some of this much-loved composer’s most famous masterpieces: the Fantaisie-Impromptu (why did Chopin not wish to publish this beautiful composition?), heroic polonaises, vivacious waltzes, and soulful mazurkas.

Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

February 2014

Tim Richards

OuT Hear

GéNia & Max de Wardener

The haunting vocal qualities of the viola lie at the centre of this concert. Brahms’s evocative Op. 91 songs are perhaps the most famous example of this phenomenon, with the viola effectively as second singer, supported and coloured with highly expressive piano writing. They are complemented here with songs for the same forces by Strauss, Bridge and Loeffler, with other Romantic lieder, and with music by Vaughan Williams and the remarkable American composer Lillian Fuchs. Hall One 6.30pm Online rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

CONTeMPOrary

Chris Wood

Described by The Times as ‘an outstanding musician’, Piano-Yoga® founder pianist GéNIA returns to Kings Place with an eclectic mix of contemporary piano music. The programme includes Karen Tanaka’s vibrant Techno Etudes, Sofia Gubaidulina’s Sonata, and the hypnotic minimalism of ECM’s Nik Bärtsch alongside new works by GéNIA and the British composer Max de Wardener.

GéNIA


THIS WEEK'S FOCUS AMERICANA

MONDAY 10 FEBRUARY WORDS ON MONDAY

CURATED BY THE AMERICANA MUSIC ASSOCIATION UK

Dylan Thomas: In My Craft SPOKEN WORD

13 – 15 FEBRUARY

Poet in the City celebrates the centenary of Wales’s greatest poet. A stellar line-up of speakers (former Welsh Laureate Gwyneth Lewis, acclaimed poet and broadcaster Owen Sheers and distinguished Thomas biographer Andrew Lycett) explore the fascinating story of a giant of modern literature. Follow Thomas from Swansea to London and New York in this biographical and poetic introduction. Classics like Do not go gentle into that good night and Under Milk Wood sit alongside fresh revivals of less familiar but equally compelling works as we celebrate the myriad voices of this great modern poet. Hall One 7pm

TIM RICHARDS © PETER MARES | IAN BOSTRIDGE © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | STURGILL SIMPSON © MELISSA MADISON | CHRIS WOOD, GÉNIA & LAURA CANTRELL © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Online Rates £9.50

Ian Bostridge

WEDNESDAY 12 FEBRUARY FRETWORK AT KINGS PLACE Laura Cantrell

‘Lachrimae’: Fretwork with Ian Bostridge & Elizabeth Kenny Dowland’s Lachrimae and other songs

NASHVILLE-BORN COUNTRY STAR LAURA CANTRELL KICKS OFF A THREE-DAY CELEBRATION OF AMERICANA MUSIC Some of the very best Americana comes to Kings Place this winter, courtesy of The Americana Music Association UK, featuring top artists from North America together with a selection of the finest UK-based bands. The stellar line-up includes Emily Barker & The Red Clay Halo, Austin Lucas, Hatful of Rain, Police Dog Hogan and many more... See www.kingsplace.co.uk/Americana

LISTINGS 67

February 2014

Dowland Lachrimae Songs for lute and voice, including: ‘Flow my teares’, ‘Can she excuse my wrongs?’, ‘In darkness let me dwell’, & ‘Shall I strive with words’ Fretwork: Liam Byrne, Asako Morikawa, Reiko Ichise, Richard Tunnicliffe, Richard Boothby viols Ian Bostridge tenor Elizabeth Kenny lute CLASSICAL John Dowland was the finest lutenist of his age and one of England’s greatest composers. He was born 450 years ago in 1563. In 1604, he published the extraordinary collection of music for viols and lute called Lachrimae. Before a series of wonderfully lively galliards, many

drawn from his songs, Dowland presents a transcendental journey based on his most famous song, Flow my teares. The falling fourth emblem is subjected to intense scrutiny and transformation, with a sequence that maps a voyage from despair to hope, from falling to rising, from minor to major. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

THURSDAY 13 FEBRUARY AMERICANA

Laura Cantrell + Sturgill Simpson Presented by The Americana Music Association UK FOLK Laura Cantrell is a Nashville-born country music artist based in New York City with a long appreciation of the UK country audience. Her new release No Way There From Here, her first album of original material in eight years features 11 new original songs. In her 10-year recording career, Cantrell has released the acclaimed albums Not The Tremblin’ Kind, When The Roses Bloom Again, Humming By The Flowered Vine and Kitty Wells Dresses: Songs of the Queen of Country Music. She has toured extensively in the UK, Europe and Ireland, and was a favourite of John Peel, who called her 2000 album Not The Tremblin’ Kind ‘my favourite record of the last 10 years, possibly my life’. Cantrell recorded several Peel sessions for the BBC from 2000 to 2004 and appeared on the first Peel Day programme commemorating the first anniversary of Peel’s death. Support comes from the Kentuckian Sturgill Simpson whose authenticity stands out like an island of hope in a sea of tacky. His album High Top Mountain evokes the sound of timeless country in its many guises and brings back the lyrical forthrightness and depth that permeated the music Simpson absorbed during his Kentucky childhood. Hall One 8pm Online Rates £21.50 | Savers £9.50 Sturgill Simpson

LISTINGS

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68 LiSTiNGS

book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LiSTiNGS

February 2014

Police Dog Hogan

Friday 14 February aMeriCaNa

Police dog Hogan + The Vagaband Presented by The americana Music association uK FOLK Police Dog Hogan are a high-energy and eclectic seven-piece, combining fiddle, banjo, mandolin, drums and guitars with knockout four-part harmonies in an exuberant fusing of country, pop, folk, and rocking urban bluegrass. The Sunday Times has described them as ‘excellent’, The Telegraph named them one of its ‘favourite new bands’ and veteran DJ Johnnie Walker praises their gigs as ‘just a really good, fun time’. Hailing from Norwich, The Vagaband will provide support, playing original song-based roots music – a soulful mix of Americana, blues, jazz and rock. American magazine The Alternate Root have just recognised The Vagaband in the Top 20 roots bands in Europe. A band to watch out for!

Will Kaufman (singer/guitarist, Professor of American Literature and Culture, and author of the book Woody Guthrie, American Radical) brings such hardhitting Guthrie songs as ‘Vigilante Man’, ‘Pretty Boy Floyd’ and ‘I Ain’t Got No Home’ into conversation with other relevant songs – from Joe Hill’s ‘The Preacher and the Slave’ to ‘Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?’. These renditions, buttressed by detailed historical commentary, exemplify the blending of music and radical politics that marks Guthrie’s most powerful and evocative work. ‘No one can understand the American people without listening to Woody Guthrie. Will Kaufman’s doing important work here.’ Tom Paxton St Pancras Room 5.30pm Online rates £9.50

Emily Barker

aMeriCaNa

emily barker & The red Clay Halo

Hall Two 8pm (standing)

+ austin Lucas + Hatful of rain

Online rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Presented by The americana Music association uK FOLK

The Vagaband

SaTurday 15 February aMeriCaNa

Woody Guthrie: Hard Times and Hard Travellin’

A triple bill that promises to be a truly spectacular evening, celebrating Americana music. Born into a folk and bluegrass lineage, Austin Lucas has recently released his fifth solo LP (but first for New West Records) with long-time friends Glossary as his backing band. A record as diverse as his musical background, the critically acclaimed album Stay Reckless fuses elements of alt-country, classic rock, folk, punk, indie rock and bluegrass into a unique brand of Americana.

GoGo Penguin

Hatful of Rain are a British acoustic roots band, steeped in the fiddle tunes and oldtime ballads of the Appalachian mountains. Based around the captivating songs and voice of singer Chloe Overton, this band bring together instrumental virtuosity, soaring harmonies and intense performances. If you like Gillian Welch, Crooked Still and the soundtrack from O Brother, Where Art Thou – this is for you.

deep, soulful modal and spiritual jazz, drawing on the legacy of Alice Coltrane and influenced by Halsall’s love of Eastern music and the more contemporary sounds of The Cinematic Orchestra.

The headliner of the night is Emily Barker – the BAFTA award-winning songwriter and performer of the theme to BBC’s Wallander starring Kenneth Branagh. TV addicts may also recognise Emily and her band, The Red Clay Halo, for their atmospheric theme to another BBC series, The Shadow Line. The band’s new album, Dear River, was recorded by Calum Malcolm and has been released on Linn Records to critical acclaim. Lyrically, the album explores the meaning of home and its related tangents of exile, displacement, and family, blending Emily’s own story into the wider joys and sorrows gleaned from her rigorous researches into others’ experiences of travel and emigration. ‘Heartfelt songwriting... bridging the gap between folk, country and Fleetwood Mac’ The Times ‘Emily Barker has a gift for great melodies’ The Guardian.

GoGo Penguin & Mammal Hands

Hall One 8pm Online rates £17.50 | Savers £9.50

THe baSe

Matthew Halsall & The Gondwana Orchestra Matthew Halsall trumpet Lisa Mallett flute Keiko Kitamura koto rachael Gladwin harp Taz Modi piano Phil France double bass Luke Flowers drums Chris Cruiks percussion

Hall Two 7pm Online rates £14.50 | Savers £9.50

THe baSe

GoGo Penguin Chris illingworth piano Nick blacka bass rob Turner drums Mammal Hands Nick Smart keyboards Jesse barrett drums and percussion Jordan Smart saxophones JaZZ Hotly tipped as the rising stars of UK Jazz by The Times, the brilliant Manchesterbased piano trio GoGo Penguin launch their second album tonight, v.2.0 on Matthew Halsall’s Gondwana record label. They draw on a heady brew of influences from Aphex Twin to Brian Eno, Debussy to Shostakovich and Massive Attack to e.s.t. and their groove-heavy lyricism makes them an exhilarating live act. Support comes from Mammal Hands, a trio of like-minded musicians. Drawing on influences from Steve Reich, Aphex Twin and DJ Krush to elements of North Indian and African music, their debut album will be released on Gondwana in Spring 2014. Hall Two 9.15pm Online rates £14.50 | Savers £9.50

JaZZ

Multi-media show by Will Kaufman MuLTiMedia SHOW A live programme that sets the songs of Woody Guthrie in the context of the American 1930s – the Dust Bowl, the Depression, the New Deal and the state of popular music itself. In the presentation,

Hatful of Rain

Austin Lucas

Manchester-based trumpeter, composer, arranger and band-leader Matthew Halsall’s unique sound was brilliantly described as ‘rain-streaked spiritual jazz from Manchester’ by the Independent On Sunday and tonight’s very special show features the debut of his latest project, The Gondwana Orchestra. They will be playing

Matthew Halsall


THIS WEEK'S FOCUS CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3 19 – 21 February

Sunday 16 February

LOndOn CHaMber MuSIC SerIeS

COFFee COnCerTS

raphael Wallfisch & John york

The dark Pastoral devised by dr Kate Kennedy of Cambridge university alex Jennings actor andrew Kennedy tenor Iain burnside piano

Hall One 11.30am Online rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee/ tea) | Savers £9.50 (without drink)

OuT Hear

Mechanical air: a Hyper~Graphic Score Conceived and graphically composed by Michael Mayhew a Live art collaboration between Michael Mayhew and Gavin Osborn COnTeMPOrary

NAVARRA QuARTET © SuSSIE AHLBuRG | MECHANICAL AIR © MICHAEL MAYHEw | THE VAGABAND © SuPPLIED PHOTO

POLICE DOG HOGAN © RICHARD SHASHAMANE | EMILY BARKER © VIKRAM KuSHwAH | AuSTIN LuCAS © PAuL MOORE | HATFuL OF RAIN © BOB RuSSELL PHOTOGRAPHY | GOGO PENGuIN © ARLEN CONNELLY | MATTHEw HALSALL © SIMON HuNT

CLaSSICaL SPOKen WOrd The Dark Pastoral celebrates the variety of composers’ and poets’ responses to the First world war. we know about wilfred Owen, but what of the women’s poetry, or the private soldiers’? what did composers write to mourn, celebrate or to forget the tragedy of 1914–18? This programme draws on a wealth of words and music, from the well known to the unpublished, including poetry by Charlotte Mew and Edward Thomas, and songs by composers such as Ivor Gurney and william Denis Browne.

Navarra Quartet

AWARD-WINNINg NAVARRA QUARTET jOIN CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED FOR MOZART, BEETHOVEN AND BORODIN Borodin’s mellifluously lyrical quartet is the centrepiece of the Navarra Quartet’s programme for Chamber Classics Unwrapped. Meanwhile, the London Sinfonietta perform Messiaen’s uniquely moving Quartet for the End of Time, and Adrian Brendel and Alexander Madžar play Ravel’s Piano Trio, saturated in the colours of his Basque home. See feature on Navarra Quartet on pp32–34

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February 2014

Knowing our lives have been consumed by mechanical air – an automated soundtrack, the white noise of technology – performance artist Michael Mayhew and avant-garde experimental flautist Gavin Osborn go in search of a sense of awe: air conditioning, escalators, computer fans, cars, jets ripping blue skies with trails of white. By experiencing awe, can we let go of ourselves, transcend separations and experience the interconnectedness of our planet itself? Can we ever get civilisation right? Mayhew and Osborn present a most radical gesture by employing combinations of flute, digital sound, visual art, film, spoken word and movement.

Schumann Three Romances, Op. 94 bridge Sonata in D minor for cello and piano (1917) Clarke Rhapsody brahms Sonata for cello and piano in F, Op. 99 raphael Wallfisch cello John york piano CLaSSICaL A welcome return by this famous cello and piano duo. They perform German Romantic works by Schumann and Brahms, and music by two English composers with strong American associations: Frank Bridge, whose support from the famous American patron Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge made his music international, and Rebecca Clarke, who settled in the uS during the Second world war, and died in New York at the age of 93 in 1979. Hall One 6.30pm Online rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

MOnday 17 February WOrdS On MOnday

Connecting Conversations SPOKen WOrd A psychoanalyst puts a guest from the arts world on the figurative couch. Guests soon to be announced on our website. Hall One 7pm Online rates £9.50

Hall Two 4pm Online rates £9.50 CHaMberSTudIO MaSTerCLaSSeS at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

Mechanical Air by Michael Mayhew

LISTInGS

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LISTINGS

70 LISTINGS

WEDNESDAY 19 FEBRUARY CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Adrian Brendel, Andrej Bielow & Aleksander Madžar Ravel: Piano Trio Haydn Piano Trio in D, Hob. XV:24 Ravel Trio for violin, cello & piano (1914) (Voted No. 33) Sir Harrison Birtwistle Bogenstrich Variationen for cello & piano (2009) Beethoven Piano Trio in E flat, Op. 70 No. 2 Andrej Bielow violin Adrian Brendel cello Aleksander Madžar piano CLASSICAL This programme features three popular piano trios by Haydn, Beethoven and Ravel, the latter of which has made it to our Chamber Classics Unwrapped Top 50 list. Finished in 1914, Ravel’s Piano Trio is hailed as a technical masterpiece, requiring a high level of virtuosity for all instruments. References to Ravel’s Basque heritage are visible, especially in the plaintive first movement based on the zortziko, a Basque dance with an intricate rhythm. Birtwistle’s Bogenstrich Variationen completes the programme as cellist Adrian Brendel, who delivered its first performance back in 2007, revisits the work for its Kings Place premiere. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

THURSDAY 20 FEBRUARY CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Navarra Quartet Borodin: String Quartet No. 2 Mozart String Quartet No. 6 in B flat, K159 Borodin String Quartet No. 2 in D (1881) (Voted No. 21) Beethoven String Quartet No. 10 in E flat, Op. 74 Navarra Quartet Magnus Johnston violin Marije Johnston violin Simone van der Giessen viola Brian O’Kane cello CLASSICAL The dynamic Navarra Quartet, our cover artists for this season’s issue, present a programme that opens with Mozart’s highly original youthful quartet with a fiery Allegro middle movement in G minor.

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

February 2014

Beethoven’s E flat major Quartet was nicknamed Harp by its publishers, referring to the characteristic pizzicato sections in the opening movement. Flanked by these two works is Borodin’s chamber masterpiece, the Second String Quartet, in which the chemist-composer found the ideal balance between fastidious craftsmanship and exultant spontaneity. The work is also known for the voluptuous aria of its third-movement Notturno, which was co-opted for the 1953 Broadway hit Kismet.

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS JEWISH BOOK WEEK 22 FEBRUARY – 2 MARCH

Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

FRIDAY 21 FEBRUARY CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

London Sinfonietta Messiaen: Quartet for the End of Time Messiaen La Colombe, Plainte calme (Nos 1 & 7 from 8 Preludes for piano (1928–29) Theme and variations for violin & piano (1932) Quartet for the End of Time (1940–41) (Voted No. 11) London Sinfonietta CLASSICAL Messiaen was captured by the German army in June 1940 and wrote his apocalyptic vision for the forces available at Stalag 8A in Görlitz: clarinet, violin and a cello missing a string. Eventually, a piano was found. The quartet was premiered at the camp, outdoors and in the rain, on 15 Jan 1941. The musicians had decrepit instruments and an audience of about 400 prisoners and guards. Messiaen later recalled, ‘Never was I listened to with such rapt attention and comprehension’. He explores the Book of Revelation – which inspired the piece – in hypnotic melodies (the clarinet’s longbreathed Abyss of the birds, and the cello and violin’s immense Praises to Christ) and the dynamically rhythmic Dance of fury for the whole ensemble. Freezing and starving, Messiaen dreamed of rainbows – and a violin ascending to celestial heights, where ‘All is love’. London Sinfonietta’s exclusive programme also features youthful works by the composer for piano solo and violin-piano duo. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50 London Sinfonietta offer: 21 Feb, 18 Sep 2014. 20% off if you book both concerts.

Julie Burchill

JULIE BURCHILL AT JEWISH BOOK WEEK TELLS OF FALLING IN LOVE. PLUS JOCELYN POOK'S SONG CYCLE FOR TEREZÍN JBW 2014 is all about life and its choices: how should a person be? With whom do we affiliate? What makes us conform, or rebel? London’s richest annual banquet of writers and ideas blazes into Kings Place once again with questions and answers for the ways we live now. Join us to hear more than 120 speakers in 66 events over nine days. See Drawing Life, feature pp46–48


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February 2014

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Robert Harris on the Dreyfus Affair SPOKEN WORD

Gary Shteyngart

ON SALE 4 DECEMBER

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

The full schedule for Jewish Book Week will be unveiled in just a few weeks, with tickets available for booking from early December. These are the first highlights. Full details will be announced on the Kings Place and JBW websites and in the dedicated JBW brochure available to subscribers. The events and their details presented here are subject to change. To sign up for more news and a print copy of the final programme, please visit

Gary Shteyngart SPOKEN WORD Gary Shteyngart’s uniquely hilarious voice has earned him comparisons with Philip Roth and a place among Granta’s Best Young American novelists. To his work he now adds a memoir, Little Failure, to be launched in the UK at Jewish Book Week. It’s the story of his family’s 1979 escape from the USSR and of his transformation from asthmatic Moscow toddler to 40-something Manhattanite with a receding hairline.

‘HAT AND FIVE ROSES, BARBARA MULLEN, PARIS, 1956’ © WILLIAM KLEIN / COURTESY HACKELBURY FINE ART | OTTO DOV KULKA © ATTA AWISAT | JULIE BRUCHILL, GARY SHTEYNGART & DAVID GROSSMAN © SUPPLIE PHOTO

jewishbookweek.com/signup

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Julie Burchill on her Love Affair with the Jews In conversation with Tanya Gold William Klein Hat & Five Roses, Barbara Mullen, Paris, 1956

22 FEBRUARY – 2 MARCH JEWISH BOOK WEEK

David Grossman In conversation with Ian McEwan SPOKEN WORD The renowned Israeli author is back at Jewish Book Week to discuss his latest work, Falling Out of Time, an exploration of parental bereavement, with Ian McEwan. Employing a new, genre-defying language, Grossman raises questions about the nature of grief and mourning and demonstrates, once again, his rare gift of storytelling, a realm where loss is not merely an absence but a life force of its own.

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Drawing Life JEWISH BOOK WEEK

William Klein In conversation with Alan Yentob SPOKEN WORD

David Grossman

SPOKEN WORD At 14 Julie Burchill fell in love. Not with a boy, but ‘with a whole race of people – the Jews’. The journalist and novelist has been learning Hebrew and even chose Hatikvah, the Israeli national anthem, as her single record choice for Desert Island Discs. Unchosen, which will be published next spring through crowdfunding, is all about this love affair. In a special pre-publication event the inveterate nonconformist shares with Tanya Gold why she’s such a fan.

The influential photographer, painter and filmmaker discusses his career and life with Alan Yentob. Klein (American, born 1928), the subject of a retrospective at Tate Modern in 2012, is known for his evocative street photography, pioneering fashion photography and experimental filmmaking.

Preview performance and discussion

An Officer and a Spy is Robert Harris’s compelling recreation of the Dreyfus Affair, a scandal that became the most famous miscarriage of justice in history. Compelling, too, are the echoes for our modern world: an intelligence agency gone rogue, justice corrupted in the name of national security, a newspaper witch-hunt of a persecuted minority, and the old-age instinct of those in power to cover up their crimes.

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Claudia Roden on the Food of Italy SPOKEN WORD FOOD & DRINK Tuscany has never been closer to King’s Cross. Claudia Roden, a sell-out speaker at the festival with Food of Spain in 2012, returns to talk about an important update of her classic Food of Italy, 25 years after it was first published. The history of Italian-Jewish cooking will be a highlight of Roden’s presentation of this appetising culinary tour of Italy.

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Otto Dov Kulka in conversation with Simon Schama SPOKEN WORD Otto Dov Kulka’s Landscapes of the Metropolis of Death is a memoir of astounding literary and emotional power which explores the indelible marks of a childhood in Auschwitz. A historian by profession, Kulka has studied Nazism with a discipline requiring the greatest dispassion. As an author, he tackled his haunting memories and thoughts, attempting to understand his past – and our history. Kulka comes from Jerusalem to discuss his memoir with historian Simon Schama.

SPOKEN WORD MUSIC Inspired by a collection of poems and drawings by children imprisoned in Terezín, Drawing Life is a powerful new musical work commissioned by the Jewish Music Institute to mark 70 years since the Nazis liquidated the camp. In this preview for Jewish Book Week the work will be performed with live music and video before contemporary classical composer Jocelyn Pook is joined by performers and a camp survivor for a discussion.

Otto Dov Kulka

LISTINGS

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72 LISTINGS

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LISTINGS

February 2014

Ruby Wax

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Ruby Wax on Mindfulness

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Douglas Hurd and Edward Young on Benjamin Disraeli

The Leonard Bernstein Letters

SPOKEN WORD

The American superstar composer and conductor was also an enthusiastic letter writer. Nigel Simeone presents his collection of The Leonard Bernstein Letters, many published for the first time, which attest to the breadth of Bernstein’s musical interests, his love of Israel, a country he first visited in 1948, and his turbulent sexuality. Correspondence with, among others, Aaron Copland, Stephen Sondheim and Jacqueline Kennedy-Onassis reveals much about this complex man and those close to him.

In Disraeli or, The Two Lives former foreign secretary Lord Hurd and Edward Young tell the story of Benjamin Disraeli, a bankrupt Jewish school-dropout and trashy novelist who reached the top of the Victorian Conservative Party. Separating the man from the many myths that followed him, they bring alive the true genius and wit of Disraeli, twice prime minister and arguably the most gifted parliamentarian of the 19th century.

SPOKEN WORD The comedian and ‘poster girl for mental illness’ launches the paperback of Sane New World, a manual for living with less everyday frenzy. In an upfront and compassionate style, Wax uses her experience of depression and study of neuroscience to explore how the mind works. Everyone can rewire their thinking, she says, using mindfulness techniques among others, to find calm in a crazy world.

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Alain de Botton on News

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Unscrolled SPOKEN WORD American cultural activist Roger Bennett asked 54 writers and artists to wrestle with the Torah. The result: 54 mini works of art responding to the cycle of Torah portions traditionally read over the course of a year. Bennett joins us with some of the contributors from the US and Britain to showcase Unscrolled, a re-imagining and eclectic celebration of the Jewish Bible.

SPOKEN WORD The News: A User’s Manual looks at the peculiar place that ‘the news’ occupies in our lives. De Botton notes that we invest it with an authority which used to be the preserve of religion. But what does it do for us? Mixing current affairs with philosophy, de Botton offers a guide to the precautions we should take before venturing anywhere near the news and the ‘noise’ it generates.

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Noreena Hertz and Daniel Finkelstein on Decisions

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Josh Cohen on Privacy SPOKEN WORD Social networking, reality TV and superinjunctions present new fronts in a war over privacy. Literature professor and psychoanalyst Josh Cohen critiques the intrusiveness of contemporary culture which deems everything we do public property. Drawing on characters from John Milton to Katie Price and Snoopy, The Private Life: Why We Remain in the Dark asks, if everything we do can be so public, how come we are so helplessly in the dark?

SPOKEN WORD Economist Noreena Hertz and Daniel Finkelstein of The Times explore how we make decisions. Are emails destroying your ability to think? How do you know which information sources are credible? Whose advice should you trust? In a risky and information-overloaded world Hertz, an academic and broadcaster, offers Eyes Wide Open, a guide to smarter decisions.

Noreena Hertz

JEWISH BOOK WEEK JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Geordie Greig on Lucian Freud Thomas Harding

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Thomas Harding on the Jew who captured Rudolf Höss Chaired by Anne Sebba SPOKEN WORD

Alain de Botton

SPOKEN WORD

Shavit asks difficult questions: Why and how did Israel come to be? Can it survive? This is a portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape.

It was only at his great-uncle’s funeral that Thomas Harding learned of his German relative’s extraordinary past. Hanns Alexander, an officer in the British army, was the man who tracked down and helped bring to justice the Commandant of Auschwitz. Harding tells for the first time the story of the capture of Rudolf Höss at the end of World War II by the German-born Jew. Hanns and Rudolf is an astonishing tale of parallel and intersecting lives.

SPOKEN WORD For 10 years Geordie Greig was among a small group of friends who regularly met Lucian Freud for breakfast at Clarke’s restaurant in Kensington. Over tea, Freud would recount stories of his past and discuss art. Greig presents Breakfast with Lucian, an intimate portrait of the artist, partly based on conversations with Freud and his circle, and also drawing on interviews with those who knew him.

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Ari Shavit on the Triumph and Tragedy of Israel SPOKEN WORD Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel is an authoritative examination of Israel by one of the most influential columnists writing about the Middle East today.

Fiddler on the Roof SPOKEN WORD We celebrate a half-century since the opening of Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway, looking at the life of the musical on stage and screen and Sholem Aleichem’s Yiddish stories that inspired it. What is it about Fiddler’s winning combination of family, tradition and song that has had such a hold on the Jewish cultural imagination ever since?

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JQ Wingate Prize for Jewish Literature SPOKEN WORD Enjoy a glass of wine and a lively discussion about the difficulties – and joys – of judging a completely disparate group of fiction and non-fiction books submitted for the prestigious £4,000 JQ Wingate Prize. Past recipients include Amos Oz, WG Sebald, Howard Jacobson, Zadie Smith and Shalom Auslander. The 2014 winner will be announced at the end of the event.


THIS WEEK'S FOCUS SCHOENBERG: MASTER AND PUPIL

FRIDAY 28 FEBRUARY FOLK UNION

Duncan Chisholm Duncan Chisholm fiddle Matheu Watson guitar Jarlath Henderson Uilleann pipes

4 – 5 MARCH

FOLK

Hall Two 8pm

RUBY WAX © CATHERINE ASHMORE | ALAIN DE BOTTOM © VICENT STARR | WILL DUTTA © HOWARD MELNYCZUK | THOMAS HARDING & NOREENA HERTZ | JANE MANNING © MALCOLM CROWTHERS

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers 9.50

MARCH

MONDAY 3 MARCH WORDS ON MONDAY

Photovision: Nick Danziger SPOKEN WORD An illustrated talk by award-winning photographer Nick Danziger. His book The British (2001) was selected by The Sunday Times as one of its Photography Books of the Year. He has since travelled the world taking photographs and making documentary films, and has become one of the world’s most renowned photo-journalists. Nick has spent much of the last 25 years photographing both heads of state and the world’s most dispossessed and disadvantaged.

Online Rates £9.50

TUESDAY 4 MARCH

OUT HEAR

Will Dutta: Parergon Live

SCHOENBERG: MASTER AND PUPIL

CONTEMPORARY

Pierrot lunaire

The latest high-energy solo show from Will Dutta is a journey through hypercolourful collaborative work with electronic legends Plaid, Max de Wardener and others alongside the original artists in sound Satie, Debussy and Messiaen, uniquely realised in audio-visual format with stunning visuals from Damian Hale, Xavier Perkins, Quayola and Dan Tombs.

Schoenberg’s daughter, Nuria Schoenberg-Nono, is special guest at this centenary celebration, featuring the groundbreaking Pierrot lunaire, sung by the superb Jane Manning, and works by Nono and Zemlinsky. Alberto Portugheis and Charles Owen play the Chamber Symphony, while The Amaya Trio present the intensely romantic Verklärte Nacht. See www.kingsplace.co.uk/schoenberg

Hall Two 4pm

Hall One 7pm

SUNDAY 2 MARCH

JANE MANNING JOINS AN EXPLORATION OF SCHOENBERG'S MUSIC TO MARK THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE COMPOSER’S BIRTH

Revitalising the traditional piano recital format, this show is often shaped without breaks into a single DJ set experience, re-contextualising the piano repertoire within club and remix culture. Parergon Live is indicative of the emerging practice of non-definability.

Online Rates £9.50

Duncan Chisholm is regarded as one of the finest fiddle players of his generation, and his music requires no introduction to carry you on its journey. Conjuring both outer and inner landscapes in their myriad weathers and seasons, Duncan’s unique and inspired trilogy of fiddle music recordings that are his representation of the majestic and stunning glens of Strathglass in the Scottish Highlands have catapulted him into the mainstream folk scene. Nominated for the BBC R2 Folk Musician of the Year in 2013 and with recent works included in Songlines Top 10 Best Albums, he appears here as part of a much anticipated UK tour.

Jane Manning

LISTINGS 73

February 2014

Zemlinsky Three pieces for cello and piano (1891) Dallapiccola Ciaccona, Intermezzo e Adagio for solo cello (1945) Nono ...Sofferte onde serene… (1976) for piano and tape Schoenberg Pierrot lunaire, Op. 21 Jane Manning soprano, reciter Susanne Stanzeleit violin, viola Rohan de Saram cello Susan Milan flute, piccolo David Campbell clarinet Julian Jacobson piano Giora Bernstein conductor Alberto Portugheis piano + special guest Nuria Schoenberg-Nono commentator CLASSICAL

Will Dutta

Schoenberg’s daughter, Nuria, widow of Luigi Nono, makes a rare guest appearance at this special concert in honour of the composer’s centenary. His seminal work, Pierrot lunaire, forms the centre piece of a programme exploring the musical world

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk | Prices shown are for online booking


liStingS

74 liStingS from which Schoenberg emerged – in Zemlinksy’s highly expressive Three Pieces – and his influence on the next generation – in works by Dallapiccola and Nono. A host of distinguished musicians are joined by soprano Jane Manning, whose performance of Pierrot Lunaire (which she sings for the 100th time this evening) has been described more than once as definitive: ‘Her voice encompassing with complete sureness of touch an extraordinary variety of colour and histrionic effect, from the mockportentous to the eerily whimpering...’ Sunday Times Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50 Schoenberg offer: 4 & 5 March 2014. 20% off if you book both concerts.

WedneSday 5 MaRch SchOenbeRg: MaSteR and PuPil

transfigured night Zemlinsky Songs from Op. 22 and Op. 27 collections Schoenberg Verklärte Nacht, Op. 4 (version for piano trio) gerhard Dances from Don Quixote for solo piano (1947) Schoenberg Chamber Symphony No. 1, Op. 9 (arr. for two pianos) Marie Jaermann soprano charles Owen piano alberto Portugheis piano the amaya Piano lea tuuri violin batia Murvitz piano lauri Rantamoijanen cello + special guest nuria Schoenberg-nono commentator claSSical A rare opportunity to hear Schoenberg’s best-loved work, the absorbing and passionate Transfigured Night, in the version for piano trio, together with the two-piano arrangement of his wonderfully concise and cogent Chamber Symphony. The Catalan composer Roberto Gerhard, a disciple of Schoenberg, wrought his own highly individual style and is represented in his delightful Dances from Don Quixote for solo piano, while soprano Marie Jaermann will present a string of Zemlinsky’s sensuous songs, so evocative of turn-of-the-century Vienna. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50 Schoenberg offer: 4 & 5 March 2014. 20% off if you book both concerts.

book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March 2014

of Music and Drama, Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and Trinity Laban Conservatoire. Zoë Martlew and Laura Moody St Pancras Room 10.30am–11.40am Ivan Hussey and Matthew Barley St Pancras Room 12 noon–1pm Ernst Reijseger St Pancras Room 2pm–2.50pm

Ewan McLennan

FRiday 7 MaRch FOlK uniOn

ewan Mclennan FOlK Ewan McLennan burst onto the UK folk scene with his debut album Rags & Robes, which won him the BBC Folk Awards Horizon Award in 2011. Whether singing haunting traditional Scottish ballads or weaving powerful stories into his own songs, Ewan’s unique, moving and earthy voice is always compelling. His guitar playing is outstanding and forms an essential part of his music. He released his much anticipated second album, The Last Bird to Sing, to critical acclaim, and is now established as a prominent artist in the new generation of folk musicians. ‘A gorgeous, lilting voice. So moving.’ MOJO Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Sunday 9 MaRch beyOnd cellO

beyond cello: Workshops ernst Reijseger, Matthew barley, Zoë Martlew, laura Moody & ivan hussey cOnteMPORaRy inteRact ‘Beyond Cello’ is a provocative and radical vision of cello playing celebrating the diverse talents in the world of ‘alternative cello’. This event brings together the compelling artistry of Ernst Reijseger, not often heard on these shores, and the fascinating artistic explorations of our own Matthew Barley and a group of guest cellists. There will be demonstrations of the very latest in cello/electronics technology. As a principal focus of Beyond Cello Week (10–16 March), the senior and junior divisions of the UK music colleges will be invited to take part, including the Royal Academy of Music, Royal College of Music, Royal Northern College of Music, Birmingham Conservatoire, Guildhall School

Online Rates £11.50 combined ticket to attend all three workshops

opened up a world of possibilities for the cello. His renditions capture the moment and tell a story, delighting audiences with the unexpected and the unforeseen. Beyond Cello Q&A – Hall Two 2.50pm Performance – Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50 (without drink) £12.50 (incl. a glass of house wine) combined ticket offer: £19.50 (grants access to 4pm and 7pm concerts + 1 glass of house wine or soft drink) Call Box Office to book tickets with drink

beyOnd cellO

beyOnd cellO

cellophony

cabaret

Free Foyer Performance

Oliver coates, ivan hussey (celloman) Peter gregson, Zoë Martlew, laura Moody, barney Morse-brown & ayanna Witter-Johnson cellos

cOnteMPORaRy London-based cello octet Cellophony have carved a reputation as accomplished exponents of not only the standard cello ensemble repertoire, but also a diverse array of commissioned arrangements and adaptations. Here is a special appearance by this eclectic eight-cello group. Concert Level Foyer 1pm FRee

cOnteMPORaRy A dazzling array of the UK’s most adventurous, innovative and provocative cellists take to the stage for a once-only genre-busting everything-is-possible cabaret. Definitely not to be missed. Please note that drinks will be available throughout the show. Hall Two 7pm

Out heaR beyOnd cellO

Online Rates £9.50 (without drink) £12.50 (incl. a glass of house wine)

Matthew barley (cello) & Julian Joseph (piano) + ernst Reijseger (cello) cOnteMPORaRy Longstanding partnership Matthew Barley and Julian Joseph take to the stage to perform new and old Brazilian classics. Some of the most beautiful and touching tunes ever written by Carlos Antonio Jobim, Milton Nascimento, Chico Buarque and Danilo Caymmi in sumptuous and skilful cello and piano arrangements. Ernst Reijseger is an iconoclast who has forged his personal blend of traditional and improvisatory techniques, world musics and new music, and in so doing has

combined ticket offer: £19.50 (grants access to 4pm and 7pm concerts + 1 glass of house wine or soft drink) Call Box Office to book tickets with drink

chaMbeRStudiO MaSteRclaSSeS at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

lOndOn chaMbeR MuSic SeRieS

tamsin Waley-cohen (violin) & huw Watkins (piano) beethoven Sonata for piano and violin in D, Op. 12 No. 1 elgar Violin Sonata in E minor, Op. 82 debussy Sonata for violin and piano in D Sibelius Five Pieces, Op. 81 claSSical A concert given by the celebrated violinpiano duo, whose recent release An American in Paris has been enthusiastically received by the critics. They couple Beethoven’s First Sonata, written in the late 1790s, with the beautiful Debussy and Elgar Sonatas and Sibelius’s Op. 81 pieces – all completed within a year of each other at the end of WWI

Matthew Barley & Julian Joseph

Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50


clive Stafford Smith: reprieve

Anthony Strong released his debut album in April 2013 (Stepping Out, Naïve). He has since been featured on the front page of France’s biggest daily newspaper, Le Figaro, performed live on nationwide German TV twice and was described by the British press as ‘a major talent hotly tipped to take his place in the retrocontemporary jazz pantheon alongside Jamie Cullum and Michael Bublé.’ ‘First class!’ Die Welt Award-winning rising star Julia Biel will deliver a special, intimate performance with her unique voice that comes over like that of the lovechild of Nina Simone and Thom Yorke – with dashes of Billie Holiday and Björk thrown in. This performance will see Biel accompanying herself on electric guitar/keys, backed by Idris Rahman on bass and Saleem Raman on drums, and armed with a full bag of self-penned songs. ‘Soul-baring songs of great beauty from the best British vocalist to emerge in an age’ The Independent

SPoKEn Word

Hall One 8pm

In 1986, Kris Maharaj, a British businessman living in Miami, was arrested for the brutal murder of his exbusiness associates Derrick and Duane Moo Young. His lawyer did not present a strong alibi; Kris was found guilty and sentenced to death in the electric chair. He immediately began the process of appeal. But it wasn’t until a young lawyer working for nothing, Clive Stafford Smith, took on his case that strong evidence began to emerge that the State of Florida had got the wrong man. So far, so good – except that, as Clive Stafford Smith argues so compellingly in his Orwell Prizenominated book, the American justice system is actually designed to ignore innocence. 27 years later, Maharaj is still in jail. Step by step, from the botched trial to the ludicrous logic of the appeal courts, Stafford Smith untangles the Maharaj case for us and the system that makes disasters like this inevitable.

online rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

THiS WEEk'S FOCUS air SESSiONS CUraTED By air arTiST agENCy 13 –15 March

Clive Stafford Smith

Monday 10 March

EWAN MCLENNAN © LOUIS DE CARLO | MATTHEW BARLEY & JULIAN JOSEPH © NICK WHITE | CLIVE STAFFORD SMITH © IAN ROBINS | MAGNUS ÖSTRÖM, JULAI BIEL & ANTHONY STRONG © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

WordS on Monday

Magnus Öström

air SESSiONS FEaTUrE a STELLar LiNE-UP THaT iNCLUDES magNUS öSTröm, TrOyka, mariUS NESET, JULia BiEL & aNTHONy STrONg Swedish drummer Magnus Öström, long associated with the legendary Esbjörn Svensson Trio, brings his tight-knit new band to Hall One on Friday night to showcase their new album Searching For Jupiter. Saturday brings the superb Marius Neset in a series of duets, performing with Michael Wollny, Daniel Herskedahl, Tamar Halperin and Öström. See Jazz Highlights p21

LISTInGS 75

March 2014

Julia Biel

Hall Two 7pm online rates £9.50

ThurSday 13 March aIr SESSIonS

Voices: Julia Biel + anthony Strong Band JaZZ The first in the AIRsessions features two soulful jazz vocalists. Hailed as ‘England’s new jazz superstar’, singer-pianist

Anthony Strong

LISTInGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk | Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March 2014

LiSTiNGS

76 LiSTiNGS

Magnus Öström Band

FOLK UNiON

Tony McManus FOLK

Friday 14 March air SESSiONS

Visions Magnus Öström + Troyka JaZZ The second of the AIRsessions, subtitled ‘Visions’, will be opened by the explosive jazz-rock trio and multi-textured band Troyka fronted by Mercury Music Prize nominee and BBC Award Winner Kit Downes on organ, Chris Montagues on guitars and loops and Joshua Blackmore on drums. Troyka have been dubbed by Time Out magazine as one of London’s ‘Top 10 Live Acts’ and exhibit a unique style that is progressive, rhythmically surprising, melodically unpredictable and fresh. ‘The virtuosity and power of the jamming makes your hair stand on end!’ The Guardian

The second half welcomes Swedish drummer Magnus Öström, formerly of e.s.t. fame – the legendary Swedish trio of the 90s who performed for nearly two decades until the tragic loss of pianist Esbjörn Svensson. Having taken some decisive steps forward, Öström now has a strong and tight band together with Andreas Hourdakis (guitar), Thobias Gabrielsson (double bass) and Daniel Karlsson (piano). Öström’s programme will include tracks from his second solo album as a bandleader, Searching For Jupiter (ACT), which has been celebrated by audiences and critics alike. ‘The quartet very much pick up where e.s.t.’s now legendary collaboration with Pat Metheny left off with compelling results’ Jazzwise

To find a unique voice on an instrument as ubiquitous as the acoustic guitar is quite an achievement: to do so in a centuries-old idiom where the instrument has no real history is truly remarkable. Scots born and now Canada based, Tony McManus is recognised throughout the world as the leading guitarist in the Celtic tradition. His emotional connection to his music lifts his playing beyond virtuosity and his engaging personality on stage has taken him to five continents. His music was recently recognised with a Gold Medal, voted by the readers of Acoustic Guitar Magazine. The 2009 recording The Maker’s Mark won universal acclaim but his new album Mysterious Boundaries takes a different path altogether, exploring the music of Bach, Couperin, Monteverdi, Satie and Granados.

Tony McManus

‘McManus has shown that traditional Celtic music can form the basis for an original and masterful solo-guitar style that transcends genre’ Acoustic Guitar Hall Two 8pm Online rates £13.50 | Savers £9.50

SaTUrday 15 March air SESSiONS

duets

Marius Neset

Marius Neset saxophones Michael Wollny piano daniel herskedal tuba Tamar halperin piano Magnus Öström drums

Hall One 8pm

JaZZ

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

In the final concert of the AIRsessions Germany´s leading pianist Michael Wollny and harpsichordist Tamar Halperin go on a journey of discovery to new worlds of sound, somewhere between minimal music, electronic music and modal jazz (Wunderkammer XXL, ACT). Norwegian saxophonist Marius Neset and tuba maestro Daniel Herskedal return with a sequel to their highly successful concert at Kings Place from September 2012 (Neck of the Woods, Edition). So far, so predictable! But will Marius Neset duet with Michael Wollny? Tamar Halparin with Daniel Herskedal? And what is Magnus Öström’s role in all of this? This is where and when the true spirit of the AIRsessions will get revealed.

Daniel Herskedal

Hall One 8pm Troyka

Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

Michael Wollny & Tamar Halperin


December 2013 – March 2014

15 NOV – 24 JAN KINGS PLACE GALLERY

Ørnulf Opdahl Paintings and Prints ART Born in 1944, the Norwegian Ørnulf Opdahl is one of the most important painters working in Scandinavia today. Strongly influenced by the sublime sense of place so evident in the magnificent coastal landscape of his native West Norway, his powerfully scaled, lyrically charged work draws upon and develops stimulating currents from both his own Norwegian landscape tradition and the philosophical or spiritual concerns of much post-1945 abstract art.

Ørnulf Opdahl Deer Hunters I

9 JAN – 15 FEB PANGOLIN LONDON

Pangolin London Showcase

MARIUS NESET © TIM ICKESON / EDITION RECORDS | DANIEL HERSKEDAL © KNUT BRY | MICHAEL WOLLNY & TAMAR HALPERIN © JÖRG GROSSE-GELDERMANN | MAGNUS ÖSTRÖM BAND, TROYKA & TONY MCMANUS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS ART LISTINGS © ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF PANGOLIN LONDON & KINGS PLACE GALLERY; PANGOLIN LONON PHOTOS BY STEVE RUSSELL

ART

Briony Marshall, Carbon Pair, Pewter Pangolin Christmas Show

13 DEC – 23 DEC PANGOLIN LONDON

Christmas Show ART This festive exhibition showcases a host of Pangolin London artists with an eclectic and vibrant collection of sculpture and works on paper. Offering modern and contemporary works at affordable prices, this is the perfect opportunity to pick up that extra-special gift in time for Christmas. Price range: £60 – £10,000.

A group exhibition showing the very best of Pangolin London artists. This dramatic show will feature a variety of large-scale pieces including works by the gallery’s staple artists Kenneth Armitage, Ralph Brown, Jon Buck, Ann Christopher, Geoffrey Clarke, Terence Coventry and Merete Rasmussen among others, demonstrating the variety and quality of work produced by the artists the gallery represents.

hard-earned studies she creates while in the landscape, placing a board on the ground to make either a drawing or a watercolour. During these intensive, painfully uncomfortable sessions, throughout which she kneels on the ground, the landscape becomes inscape. ‘I’m so terribly inside the experience that I can’t see what I’ve done until much later on.’ These sketches later become the inspiration for oil paintings made in the studio. In contrast to this her self-portrait works are critical examinations, and reaffirmations of self. Encompassing strength, humanity and wit, they are statements as much about the human condition as about her own. Jones studied at Camberwell School of Art, then at the Royal College of Art, where she won a Rome scholarship in 1982. Born in London, she now lives in Ludlow, and is much inspired by the landscape area bordering Wales, Herefordshire and Shropshire.

William Tucker, Horse V, Bronze Pangolin London Showcase

31 JAN – 21 MAR KINGS PLACE GALLERY

Lucy Jones

JANUARY

Looking Out, Looking In

PANGOLIN LONDON

ART

Sculpture Trail Relaunch

Lucy Jones is renowned for both her imposing, challenging self-portraits, and her expressionistic landscapes. Her landscape paintings evolve from

ART In conjunction with the Pangolin London Showcase exhibition, the gallery will relaunch its renowned Sculpture Trail at Kings Place this January. Fast developing a reputation as London’s best sculpture trail, the relaunch will introduce new large-scale sculptures by a host of Pangolin London artists, both within the building and canalside at Kings Place.

ART LISTINGS 77

OPENING HOURS PANGOLIN LONDON Mon–Sat: 10am–6pm Closed Sundays, Christmas, Bank Holidays and between exhibitions FREE admission | 020 7520 1480 www.pangolinlondon.com

KINGS PLACE GALLERY Gallery Level exhibitions Open daily from 9am to 8pm Enclosed Gallery and Bookshop Tue to Fri: 10am–6pm Sat and Sun 12pm–6pm Closed Mondays, Christmas, Bank Holidays and between exhibitions. FREE admission | 020 7520 1485 www.kingsplacegallery.co.uk

Jon Buck, In Man’s Nature, Bronze Sculpture Trail Relaunch

human anatomy. Pangolin London will host a memorial exhibition to celebrate the life and work of this highly regarded artist, demonstrating the immense talent he possessed for creating figurative works and the legacy he will leave behind as one of the country’s most ground breaking sculptors. The exhibition will feature numerous early works, including a version of Brown’s renowned Meat Porters sculpture which, commissioned for Harlow New Town, Essex, in the late 1950s, propelled him to national prominence.

21 FEB – 29 MAR PANGOLIN LONDON

Ralph Brown Memorial Exhibition ART

Lucy Jones, Serenity, 2010 Oil on canvas, 127 x 168cm

Renowned sculptor and Royal Academician Ralph Brown passed away in April 2013 at the age of 85. In a career that lasted over 60 years, Brown stood out as a master of

Ralph Brown Meat Porters, Bronze

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

December 2013 – March 2014

CALENDAR DECEMBER

CALENDAR

78 CALENDAR

1 DEC 2013 – 15 MAR 2014

BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 13

01 Sun

Limehouse Room

10am & 2pm

Piano-Yoga® Certificate Courses with GéNIA – 4

01 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30pm & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

01 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – Miniaturised Concertos

01 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Maggini Quartet

02 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Literary Death Match

Spoken Word Spoken Word

Interact Interact Classical Contemporary Classical

02 Mon

Hall Two

7.30pm

Words on Monday – Edna O’Brien

03 Tue

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Storytellers’ Club: Crumby Christmas with Sarah Bennetto & Guests

05 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Daniel-Ben Pienaar: The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I

Classical

06 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Daniel-Ben Pienaar: The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II

Classical

06 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Blair Dunlop

07 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Christoph Richter: Bach Cello Suites & Sonatas – 3

07 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Nikki Iles – 50th-Birthday Celebration with Norma Winstone & The Printmakers

08 Sun

Hall One

11.30am

Coffee Concerts – Celebrity Carnival – Lucy Parham & Friends

08 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30pm & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

08 Sun

Hall One

4pm

Out Hear – Lazy Modem 2 featuring Howlround

08 Sun

St Pancras Room

5pm

Pre-Concert Talk – with Professor William Drabkin

08 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Allegri Quartet with Martin Outram (viola)

08 Sun

Hall Two

8pm

Artistic Hire – Ann Liebeck with Omar Puente’s Tango Quartet: Violetta’s Last Tango

09 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Carlos Acosta: Pig’s Foot

12 Thu

Hall One

8pm

Custom-Made Winter – The Albion Xmas Show – 15th-Anniversary Tour

12 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Impropera’s (Not So) Bleak Midwinter

13 Fri

Pangolin London

FIRST DAY

Exhibition – Pangolin London Christmas Show

13 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Custom-Made Winter – Norma Waterson & Eliza Carthy with The Gift Band

Folk

13 Fri

Hall Two

10pm

Folk Union | Custom-Made Winter – KAN

Folk

14 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Custom-Made Winter – Bella Hardy: Bright Morning Star

Folk

14 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Mercury

15 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30pm & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

15 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – FOUND: Sarah Sarhandi & Guests

15 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Sir R Norrington & Cambridge University Chamber Orchestra Classical

16 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Rock’n’Roll Politics 2 with Steve Richards & Guests

18 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Rachel Podger & Marcin S´wia˛tkiewicz: Violin Sonatas and Partitas – 3

Classical

19 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Christmas Oratorio – OAE & Platinum Consort

Classical

20 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Christmas at Kings Place – A Ceremony of Carols: Ivor Setterfield & Barts Chamber Choir

Classical

21 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Bach Unwrapped – Mass in B Minor – The Choir of Clare College, Cambridge & Aurora Orch.

Classical

21 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – The Golden Age of Steam: Welcome to Bat Country

22 Sun

Hall One

7.30pm

Christmas at Kings Place – Handel’s Messiah

23 Mon

Pangolin London

LAST DAY

Exhibition – Pangolin London Christmas Show

Comedy

Folk Classical Jazz

Classical Spoken Word Interact Classical Contemporary Classical Classical Classical Tango

CUSTOM-MADE WINTER Spoken Word Folk Comedy

Art

Jazz Interact Classical Contemporary

CHRISTMAS AT KINGS PLACE – BACH UNWRAPPED WEEK 14 Spoken Word

Jazz Classical

Art

NEW YEAR AT KINGS PLACE 31 Tue

Hall One

6pm

New Year at Kings Place – OAE New Year Concert: Brass, Bohemia and love’s lament

Classical


CALENDAR 79

December 2013 – March 2014

01 Wed

Hall One

3pm

New Year at Kings Place – OAE New Year Concert: Brass, Bohemia and love’s lament

04 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Aurora at Kings Place – Aurora Orchestra | Nicholas Collon: Road Trip

05 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30pm & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

05 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

Classical Classical Interact Classical

London Chamber Music Series – Emperor Quartet & Sarah Beth Briggs (piano)

Classical

GWILYM SIMCOCK & FRIENDS

09 Thu

Pangolin London

FIRST DAY

Exhibition – Pangolin London Showcase

09 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

G Simcock & Friends – J Berauer’s Vienna Chamber Diaries feat. G Simcock – Album Launch

Jazz

Art Jazz

10 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

G Simcock & Friends – Gwilym Simcock + Céline Bonacina Trio – Double Album Launch

11 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Artistic Hire – Old Wise Tales

12 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30pm & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

12 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – Anarchy In the Organism

12 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – LCMS Int’l Quartet Series: Wihan Quartet (Czech Rep.)

Musical Theatre Interact Classical Contemporary Classical

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 1 13 Mon

Hall Two

7pm

Words on Monday – The Shelf-Help Sessions: 12 Reasons to Feel Better

15 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – Brodsky Quartet: Beethoven Qt No. 15 & Bartók Qt No. 4

Classical

17 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – Dante Quartet with Benjamin Frith (piano): Elgar Piano Qnt

Classical

18 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – Nicholas Daniel & Haffner Wind Ensemble: Nielsen Wind Qnt Classical

18 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Reuben Fowler Big Band

19 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – Fitzwilliam Quartet: Absolutely! – Album Launch

Spoken Word

Jazz Contemporary

19 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30 & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

19 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Charles Owen & Katya Apekisheva Piano Duo + Guests

Interact Classical Classical

FEBRUARY

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL 2014 20 Mon

Hall Two

7pm

Words On Monday – Grammar with David Marsh

23 Thu

Hall Two

7.30pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – The House Jacks

Contemporary

23 Thu

Hall Two

9pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – The House Jacks (repeat performance)

Contemporary

24 Sat

Kings Place Gallery LAST DAY

Exhibition – Ørnulf Opdahl: Paintings and Prints

24 Fri

Hall Two

6.30pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – The Songmen

Contemporary

24 Fri

Hall One

8pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – The Real Group + support act: Vive

Contemporary

24 Fri

Hall Two

10pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – Backstep: Beatboxer & 8 Voices

Contemporary

25 Sat

Hall Two

10am

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – All Things Vocal: Workshop I – Brazilian Rhythms

Interact

25 Sat

Hall Two

11.30am

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – All Things Vocal: Workshop II – Pitch Perfect Unpicked

Interact

25 Sat

Hall Two

1pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – All Things Vocal: Workshop III – The Craft with Bob Chilcott

Interact

25 Sat

Hall One

2.30pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – Time Ensemble + sp. guests: Swingle Singers World Contemporary

25 Sat

Hall Two

3.45m

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – All Things Vocal: Workshop IV – Pass me the Jazz

25 Sat

St Pancras Room

4.45pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – All Things Vocal: Workshop V – Dominic Peckham

25 Sat

Hall One

6pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – SLIXS + support act: PENNY ARCADE

25 Sat

Hall One

8.30pm

London A Cappella Festival 2014 – The Swingle Singers

26 Sun

Hall One

11.30am

Coffee Concerts – Just William with Martin Jarvis & Richard Sisson

26 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30 & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

26 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – nu:nord featuring Tre Voci Cello Ensemble & Silje Aker Johnsen

26 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Tippett Quartet & Stephanie Gonley (violin)

27 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words On Monday – Germaine Greer: The Rainforest Years

29 Wed

Hall One

7pm

31 Sat

Kings Place Gallery FIRST DAY

Exhibition – Lucy Jones: Looking Out, Looking In

31 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Jim Causley with Lukas Drinkwater: The Poetry of Charles Causley

Artistic Hire – Mark Swartzentruber plays Scarlatti, Beethoven & Chopin

01 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Dakhla

02 Sun

Function Rooms

1pm–6.30pm

ChamberStudio – Junior Masterclasses

02 Sun

Hall Two

7pm

ChamberStudio – Junior Masterclasses Public Performance

02 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – We Spoke: Song

02 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – London Soloists Ensemble

03 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words On Monday – Bedsit Disco Queen: Tracey Thorn

Spoken Word

Art

Interact Interact Contemporary Contemporary

Classical Spoken Word Interact Classical Contemporary Classical Spoken Word Classical

Art Folk Jazz Interact Interact Contemporary Classical Spoken Word

CALENDAR

JANUARY

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FEBRUARY

CALENDAR

80 CALENDAR

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December 2013 – March 2014

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 2 05 Wed

Hall One

06 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – Endymion: Brahms Horn Trio

Classical

07 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – Endymion: Debussy Sonata for flute, viola & harp

Classical

07 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Chris Wood: None The Wiser

08 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Endymion at 35 – Endymion plays Brahms

08 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Tim Richards’ HEXTET

09 Sun

Hall One

11.30am

Coffee Concerts – Keyboard Conversations® with Jeffrey Siegel: The Romantic Music of Chopin Classical

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – The Schubert Ensemble: Schubert Trout Qnt & Fauré Piano Qt Classical

Folk Classical Jazz

09 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30pm & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

09 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – GéNIA & Max de Wardener

Interact Classical

09 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Clare Presland, Eniko Magyar & Vicky Yannoula

Contemporary Classical

AMERICANA 10 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words On Monday – Dylan Thomas: In My Craft

12 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Fretwork At Kings Place – Ian Bostridge & Fretwork perform Dowland Songs & ‘Lachrimae’

Spoken Word

13 Thu

Hall One

8pm

Americana – Laura Cantrell + support from Sturgill Simpson

Folk

14 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Americana – Police Dog Hogan + support from The Vagaband

Folk

15 Sat

Pangolin London

LAST DAY

Exhibition – Pangolin London Showcase

15 Sat

St Pancras Room

5.30pm

Americana – Woody Guthrie: Hard Times and Hard Travellin’

Classical

Art Multimedia Folk

15 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Americana – Emily Barker & The Red Clay Halo + support from Austin Lucas and Hatful of Rain

15 Sat

Hall Two

7pm

The Base – Matthew Halsall & The Gondwana Orchestra

Jazz

15 Sat

Hall Two

9.15pm

The Base – GoGo Penguin & Mammal Hands

Jazz

16 Sun

Hall One

11.30am

Coffee Concerts – The Dark Pastoral with A Jennings, A Kennedy & I Burnside

16 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – Mechanical Air: A Hyper~Graphic Score

16 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Raphael Wallfisch & John York Cello-Piano Duo

Folk

Classical Spoken Word Contemporary Classical

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3 17 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words On Monday – Connecting Conversations

19 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – A Brendel, A Bielow & A Madžar: Ravel Piano Trio

Classical

20 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – Navarra Quartet: Borodin String Quartet No. 2

Classical

21 Fri

Kings Place Gallery FIRST DAY

Exhibition – Ralph Brown: Memorial Exhibition

21 Fri

Hall One

Chamber Classics Unwrapped – London Sinfonietta: Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time

7.30pm

Spoken Word

Art Classical

JEWISH BOOK WEEK Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – David Grossman in conversation with Ian McEwan

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – William Klein in conversation with Alan Yentob

Spoken Word Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Gary Shteyngart

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Julie Burchill on her Love Affair with the Jews

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Drawing Life – Preview performance and discussion

Spoken Word Music Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Robert Harris on the Dreyfus Affair

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Claudia Roden on the Food of Italy

Food & Drink Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Otto Dov Kulka in conversation with Simon Schama

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Ruby Wax on Mindfulness

Spoken Word Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Alain de Botton on News

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Douglas Hurd and Edward Young on Benjamin Disraeli

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Unscrolled

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Thomas Harding on the Jew who captured Rudolf Höss

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – The Leonard Bernstein Letters

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Noreena Hertz and Daniel Finkelstein on Decisions

Spoken Word Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Geordie Greig on Lucian Freud

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Ari Shavit on the Triumph and Tragedy of Israel

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Josh Cohen on Privacy

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – Fiddler on the Roof

Spoken Word

Sat 22 Feb – Sun 2 Mar (On Sale 4 Dec)

Jewish Book Week – JQ Wingate Prize for Jewish Literature

Spoken Word


December 2013 – March 2014

CALENDAR 81

SCHOENBERG: MASTER AND PUPIL 28 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Duncan Chisholm

02Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear – Will Dutta: Parergon Live

Folk

03 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words On Monday – Photovision: Nick Danziger

Spoken Word

04 Tue

Hall One

7.30pm

Schoenberg: Master and Pupil – Pierrot lunaire

Classical

05 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Schoenberg: Master and Pupil – Transfigured Night

Classical

07 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Ewan McLennan

09 Sun

St Pancras Room

10.30am

Beyond Cello – Zoë Martlew and Laura Moody Workshop

Contemporary

09 Sun

St Pancras Room

12pm

Beyond Cello – Ivan Hussey and Matthew Barley Workshop

Contemporary

09 Sun

Concert Level Foyer 1pm

FREE Beyond Cello – Cellophony

Contemporary

09 Sun

St Pancras Room

2pm

Beyond Cello – Ernst Reijseger Workshop

09 Sun

Function Rooms

2.30pm & 4.30pm

ChamberStudio – ChamberStudio Masterclasses

09 Sun

Hall Two

2.50pm

Beyond Cello – Artists Q&A

Contemporary

09 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

Out Hear | Beyond Cello – Matthew Barley & Julian Joseph + Ernst Reijseger

Contemporary

09 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Tamsin Waley-Cohen & Huw Watkins

09 Sun

Hall Two

7pm

Beyond Cello – Cabaret

10 Mon

Hall Two

7pm

Words on Monday – Clive Stafford Smith: Reprieve

13 Thu

Hall One

8pm

Air Sessions – Voices: Julia Biel + Anthony Strong Band (support)

14 Fri

Hall One

8pm

Air Sessions – Visions: Magnus Öström Band + Troyka (support)

Jazz

14 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Tony McManus

Folk

15 Sat

Hall One

8pm

Air Sessions – Duets: M Neset, M Wollny, D Herskedal, T Halperin & M Öström

Jazz

Contemporary

Folk

Contemporary Interact Classical

Classical Contemporary

AIR SESSIONS

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Spoken Word Jazz

CALENDAR

MARCH

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk


82 CONTEMPORARY

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

December 2013 – March 2014

Q&A GÉNIA Russian virtuoso pianist & composer GéNIA is also the creator of Piano-Yoga®. She performs at Out Hear in February, and teaches a four-week Piano-Yoga® course this autum and winter

What attracted you to the piano as a child? My first teacher was my great-grandmother, the pianist Regina Horowitz, sister of Vladimir Horowitz. She gave me an upright piano when I was just four. I don’t think I’d be a pianist if it wasn’t for her; she made it so fun. Even when I was tiny I’d play the right hand part of Liszt’s Etudes with her… Who were your musical heroes growing up? I listened to a lot of the great recordings of Vladimir Horowitz, and I just thought all grown-ups played like that! My great-grandmother also played so beautifully, with musicians like David Oistrakh. I listened to recordings, too, of Emil Gilels and the operas of Verdi, Bellini and Donizetti as my father, though a mathematician, had a consuming love for Italian opera. When I was

young, though, I didn’t think of becoming a musician. I danced and acted too, and my ambition was to look after animals. How has yoga informed your music-making beyond its physical enabling? Yoga is so much more than a physical discipline, it’s a whole philosophy. The physical side is just one ‘limb’ of eight. The way yoga exercises can help to clarify the mind has helped my music-making profoundly. When I go to the piano after yoga, I would say the quality of my practice is improved by 40%: my whole body is connected. I so often see piano students suffering anxieties which can be quite simply alleviated through yoga exercises. When I have a lot of concerts, yoga focuses and channels my energies.

Max de Wardener is a composer whose music is clearly important to you… Max has been writing for me for a long time, and this will be our third concert at Kings Place. I love the way he works with rhythms and sounds: he thinks about the piano from a very percussive, conceptual point of view, but he also writes lovely melodies, developed in intricate ways. He’s open to feedback, and I learn a lot from performing his music so it’s a very creative exercise. You are also playing Sofia Gubaidulina’s Sonata and works by Karen Tanaka: tell us about them. Gubaidulina’s Piano Sonata was introduced to me by pianist Andrew Ball, when I was asked to design a contemporary programme for a Park Lane Group concert. He was so generous and came along with a huge pile of scores, saying ‘this one is a bit mad’. Instantly, I wanted to play it! It’s an early piece (1965) when Gubaidulina was wild and carefree, using the

inside of the piano – it often doesn’t sound anything like a piano. It’s so dynamic: I recorded it for my album Unveiled (Black Box). Karen Tanaka’s pieces are very different: she’s a wonderful composer and a very quiet person, who I’ve met several times. Her pieces are both minimalist and highly virtuosic. You can hear my performance of her Techno Etude on YouTube. You’ve been working in the studio with Nik Bärtsch this summert… Nik’s motto is ‘ecstasy through asceticism’ and I’ve been very challenged by his music for me. He creates these incredibly complex rhythms which you then have to sustain for a long time. Once you are in the middle of that texture, it’s like waving a magic wand over the audience, putting them into a trance. What would your 12-year-old self think of you now? She would laugh! She’d be happy that I managed to pursue several different things, to retain that childhood sense of play, I think. I’m very privileged to have had the opportunity to live a creative life. For details of GéNIA’s PianoYoga® Certificate Courses (Sundays once-monthly) please visit www. piano-yoga.com or www.kingsplace.co.uk/piano-yoga Out Hear: GéNIA plays Max de Wardener, Karen Tanaka, Sofia Gubaidulina 9 February See Listings p66 for details

GÉNIA © SUPPLIED PHOTO

You’ll be performing your own music in this Out Hear event: when did you realise you wanted to compose? I was working with a lot of composers and improvising. One heard me and suggested I should be writing it down. I feel life in London is very full, so last year I took myself off to Paris to create a studio album. Some of the pieces have already been played in Caffè Nero shops this summer, some I will play at my concert for Out Hear and others will appear when the whole album Thoughts of Today, Dreams of Tomorrow is complete.


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Financial Times

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Wall Street Journal DJANGO BATES | FIDDLES ON FIRE | GOODBYE STALIN!

Contemporary London Sinfonietta with Matthew Bourne / Nils Økland

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World Darbar Songlines Encounters

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AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO ORION QUARTET The Sixteen SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE Imogen Cooper PHILIP DUKES Mozart Unwrapped KATYA APEKISHEVA Jazz CHARLES OWEN Robert Glasper MIKHAIL RUDY Classic Songbooks: Joni Mitchell, IVO VARBANOV Bob Dylan and more

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London Sinfonietta, Orchestra of St John’s, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Oxford Philomusica, Royal Academy of Music

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Baroque Orchestra, Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, New College Choir, La Nuova Musica, Platinum Consort, The Sixteen, Swingle Singers, Apollo’s Fire, Chris Garrick Quartet, Florilegium, Fretwork, Gwilym Simcock Quartet, Keller Quartet, Onyx Brass, Respectable Groove, Wallfisch Band, Sophie Bevan, Robin Blaze, Allan Clayton, Iestyn Davies, Rosemary Joshua, Carolyn Sampson, Andrew Tortise, Elin Manahan Thomas, Sally Bruce-Payne, James Oxley, Jimmy Holliday,

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Katya Apekisheva, Avi Avital, Alasdair Beatson, Bine Katrine Bryndorf, Terence Charlston, Christoph Denoth, Kenneth Hamilton, Pekka Kuusisto, Robert D. Levin, Charles Owen, Daniel-Ben Pienaar, Rachel Podger, Christoph Richter, Maxim Rysanov, Ivor Setterfield, Jeffrey Siegel, Dmitry Sitkovetsky, Miki Skuta, Ashley Solomon, Penelope Spencer, Marcin Swiatkiewicz, Wolfgang Zerer, Family Concerts, Study Days, and more

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Songlines: R.U.T.A. Madagascar All Stars

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Girls in Airports Dave Stapleton

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WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2013

Classical

Fretwork Schubert Ensemble Britten Centenary

Aurora Orchestra Wagner 200

Contemporary

Travel Festival with Michael Palin

Jazz

Jewish Book Week: Amos Oz & Fania Oz-Salzberger Pat Barker

Jazz

Bobby Watson Hans Koller

Aurora Orchestra, Academy of Ancient Music, Academy of St Martin in the Fields, London Sinfonietta, Orchestra of St John’s, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment,

Oxford Philomusica, Royal Academy of Music Baroque Orchestra, Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, New College Choir, La Nuova Musica, The Sixteen, The Swingle Singers, Chris Garrick Quartet, Florilegium, Fretwork, Gwilym Simcock Quartet, Keller Quartet, Onyx Brass, Respectable Groove, Wallfisch Band, Sophie Bevan, Robin Blaze, Allan Clayton, Iestyn Davies, Rosemary Joshua, Carolyn Sampson, Andrew Tortise, Elin Manahan Thomas, Sally Bruce-Payne, James

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Spoken Word

Spoken Word

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WHAT’S ON APRIL – JUNE 2013

Classical

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Oxley, Jimmy Holliday, Katya Apekisheva, Avi Avital, Alasdair Beatson, Bine Katrine Bryndorf, Terence Charlston, Christoph Denoth, Kenneth Hamilton, Pekka Kuusisto, Robert D. Levin, Charles Owen, DanielBen Pienaar, Rachel Podger, Christoph Richter, Maxim Rysanov, Ivor Setterfield, Jeffrey Siegel, Dmitry Sitkovetsky, Miki Skuta, Ashley Solomon, Penelope Spencer, Marcin Swiatkiewicz, Wolfgang Zerer, Family Concerts, Study Days, and more

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| TRAVEL | JOHN| JEWISH | AURORA CAROLYN SAMPSON – BACH UNWRAPPED BOOK WEEK | ORCHESTRA BIRTWISTLES IN RESIDENCE MANU DELAGO FESTIVAL METCALFE

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Classical

CAROLYN SAMPSON – BACH UNWRAPPED | JEWISH BOOK WEEK | BIRTWISTLES IN RESIDENCE

biosphere, deaf Center Cage rattling with the wire

World

The Epstein

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A Cappella Festival Lore Lixenberg Gravenhurst, Teitur

Contemporary

Classical

Brahms Unwrapped Sibelius: Inner Voices Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo Music for a Monarch

Folk

Tim Minchin Lady Garden YOUR FREE COPY

WELCOmE tO LAU-LAND...

notes & letters: Aurora Orchestra, Academy of Ancient amit Chaudhuri Music, Academy of St Martin in the Fields,

AND MANY MORE...

Comedy

APRIL – JUNE 2013 2013 JANUARY–MARCH

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marcus roberts 1982 trio

Jay Phelps, Soweto Kinch and Alex Wilson

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WHAT’S ON SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2012

Francesco Tristano Percussions Claviers de Lyon

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER www.gemmalatimer.com

BRAHMS SILHOUTTE BY OTTO BOEHLER © THE TULLY POTTER COLLECTION

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER www.gemmalatimer.com

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JANUARY–MARCH 2013

SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2012

aurora orchestra, academy of ancient music, academy of St martin in the Fields, london Sinfonietta, orchestra of St John’s, orchestra of the age of enlightenment, oxford Philomusica, royal academy of music baroque orchestra, Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, new College Choir, la nuova musica, Platinum Consort, the Sixteen, Swingle Singers, apollo’s Fire, Chris garrick Quartet, Florilegium, Fretwork, gwilym Simcock Quartet, Keller Quartet, onyx brass, respectable groove, wallfisch band, Sophie bevan, robin blaze, allan Clayton, iestyn davies, rosemary Joshua, Carolyn Sampson, andrew tortise, elin manahan thomas, Sally bruce-Payne, James oxley, Jimmy holliday, Katya apekisheva, avi avital, alasdair beatson, bine Katrine bryndorf, terence Charlston, Christoph denoth, Kenneth hamilton, Pekka Kuusisto, robert d. levin, Charles owen, daniel-ben Pienaar, rachel Podger, Christoph richter, maxim rysanov, ivor Setterfield, Jeffrey Siegel, dmitry Sitkovetsky, miki Skuta, ashley Solomon, Penelope Spencer, marcin Swiatkiewicz, wolfgang Zerer, Family Concerts, Study days, and more

Contemporary

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE PHILIP DUKES Brahms Unwrapped Dante Quartet: Britten KATYA APEKISHEVA New Zealand in London KENNETH HAMILTON CHARLES OWEN Contemporary A Cappella Festival MIKHAIL RUDY Manu Delago JEFFREY SIEGEL Jazz IVO VARBANOV Classical

BRODSKY’S SHOSTAKOVICH | SIBELIUS: INNER VOICES | SONGLINES

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Contemporary

The Labèque sisters LIFEM: Mari Boine

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THE SIXTEEN Spoken Word NATALIE CLEIN

SIMON SCHAMA – JEWISH BOOK WEEK | BRAHMS UNWRAPPED | NEW ZEALAND IN LONDON

CLAUDIA AURORA – LIFEM | NOTES & LETTERS | SONGBOOKS

AND MANY MORE...

THE BRODSKYS ARE BACK!

Jewish Book Week: PIANO TRIO Henry GoodmanGOULD on Ulysses Umberto Eco ORION STRING QUARTET Jonathan Safran Foer SUSAN TOMES WITH

Classical

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WHAT’S ON APRIL–JUNE 2012

STARTING JANUARY 2012

Notes & Letters: Will Self Jonathan Coe Philip Ball Marina Warner

2012

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WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2012

BANQUET OFOF BOOKS ACADEMY ST MARTIN THE FIELDS AT SIMONINSCHAMA ORCHESTRA JEWISHAURORA BOOK WEEK WITH MAXIM RYSANOV

Spoken Word

CONCERTS AT KINGS PLACE DURING

APRIL–JUNE 2012

JANUARY–MARCH 2012

SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2011

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO ORION QUARTET SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE PHILIP DUKES KATYA APEKISHEVA CHARLES OWEN MIKHAIL RUDY IVO VARBANOV

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WHAT’S ON SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2011 JANUARY 2012, SWEETSTARTING SORROW PERFORMERS INCLUDE: CLAUDIA AURORA, ACADEMY ST MARTIN NEW FACE OFOFFADO IN THE FIELDS

STARTING JANUARY 2012, PERFORMERS INCLUDE:

Django Bates Kenny Wheeler

Folk

Larkin Poe

World

Songlines Encounters

Contemporary

John Metcalfe’s Monomedia: Will Gregory, Thomas Dolby

MANU DELAGO THE HANG PLAYER COOKS UP A STORM YOUR FREE COPY

WWW.KINGSPLACE.CO.UK

SAVER SEATS £9.50

COVERx.indd 1

& WIN! A SEASONPASS PASSFOR A SEASON

07/02/2013 17:15

SPRING–SUMMER 2014 FOR WINTER 2013–14

Register by by Friday, Saturday, 1 March 2014 Register 1 November 2013. Customers who have already registered will automatically be eligible to enter the prize draw. The season pass is is applicable to Winter 2013–14 season, comprising the events between 1 Dec 2013 and 16 Mar 2014. Restrictions may apply and are subject to event availability.


C HAMBE R T O P

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C L A S S ICS

C H A M B E R

Academy of St Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble Aurora Orchestra London Sinfonietta Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Royal Academy of Music Aronowitz Ensemble Haffner Wind Ensemble

W O R K S

Endymion New London Chamber Ensemble Schubert Ensemble Brodsky Quartet Carducci Quartet Dante Quartet Escher Quartet Fitzwilliam Quartet Kuss Quartet Maggini Quartet Meta4 Quatuor Mosaïques

A S

UN WR A PPED V O T E D

Navarra Quartet Sacconi Quartet Signum Quartet Tippett Quartet Gould Piano Trio Lendvai Trio Phoenix Piano Trio Sir James Galway Michael Collins Sonia Wieder-Atherton Imogen Cooper Andrej Bielow James Ehnes Stephanie Gonley

B Y

Y O U

Thomas Gould Katharine Gowers Jack Liebeck Priya Mitchell Alfred Brendel Bjørg Lewis Katya Apekisheva Andrew Armstrong Alasdair Beatson Simon Crawford-Phillips Julius Drake Aleksander Madžar Charles Owen

Online Savers £9.50 | www.kingsplace.co.uk/chamber-classics-unwrapped IN ASSOCIATION WITH


Kings Place - What's On December 2013 - March 2014