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Traditional Irish Music every night

Waterloo Street | Derry | BT48 6HD | 02871 267295 | Find us on


Peadar O’Donnell’s, the home of live traditional music in Derry. Peadar’s is known throughout the world and is a must visit location for the many tourists that flock to Derry in ever increasing numbers. We are famous for, among other things, our live music which is largely organised but has regular impromptu sessions from either local musicians or visiting performers. You are always guaranteed a warm welcome, a good time and the best pint of Guinness in Derry!

Waterloo Street | Derry | BT48 6HD | 02871 267295 | Find us on


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CONTENTS

Eating out

Derry-Londonderry is fast becoming a culinary destination… Page 26

Shopping

This county is making waves in the fashion world... Page 36

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CONTENTS Welcome...................................................................................... 09 Derry-Londonderry is a county like no other!

History all around.......................................................................10 A rich cultural history is evident throughout Derry-Londonderry.

©VITALY TIAGUNOV/ADOBE STOCK; CHARLES KOH/UNSPLASH; GARDINER MITCHELL/ TOURISM IRELAND/IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL; MID-ULSTER DISTRICT COUNCIL/ NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD; ROLF G WACKENBERG/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Let’s go there............................................................................... 14 Whatever the time of year, and whatever the weather, there’s always plenty to do here.

Ten things you must do........................................................... 24 There are loads of things to do here – make sure you don’t miss these.

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A taste of Northern Ireland – and the world....................... 26 Top-end fine dining, adventurous independents and a great range of ethnic cuisine means you’ll never go hungry here.

If you’re only here for 48 hours.............................................. 34 You can pack a lot into a couple of days – try this itinerary to make the most of it.

Like to shop? You’ll love it here............................................. 36 High street chains, one-off independents and quirky specialists – they’re all waiting for the shopaholic.

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


CONTENTS

Arts & culture

This was the inaugural UK City of Culture in 2013… Page 46

Sport

There’s plenty of golfing opportunities here… Page 58

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44 Ten reasons to love this region.............................................. 44 There are dozens of reasons to love it here – check out a few of our favourites.

A region at the heart of art....................................................... 46 Immerse yourself in a region that is crammed with arts and culture.

Welcome to the night............................................................... 50 From bustling bars to country pubs, you won’t be bored in Derry-Londonderry.

CATHERINE KEENAN/FÁILTE IRELAND/TOURISM IRELAND/IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL; LORCAN DOHERTY/THE CITY OF DERRY JAZZ FESTIVAL; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; TYRONE AND SPERRINS DESTINATION/NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

Our sporting life......................................................................... 58 Whether you want to watch or take part, there’s plenty on offer here.

Getting here and getting around............................................ 60 Getting to and around Derry-Londonderry couldn’t be easier.

Let’s explore................................................................................ 64

60 50

Although you’ll never run out of things to do here, there’s also plenty to do and see further afield.

We’re open for business........................................................... 66 With a skilled workforce employed in diverse sectors, this region’s economy is performing well.

If you’re planning to stay longer............................................ 68 People come to Derry-Londonderry for many reasons – and stay for a lot more!

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


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Bus Stops

Bus Stops Tour 7Tickets & Timetable5

Languages Languages

Adult Concession Child Tour Tickets & Timetable 24 Hours £12.50 £10.00 £6.00

Family £31.00 48 Hours £15.00 £12.00 £8.00 £38.00 Adult Concession Child Family Tours Everyday First Tour 10:00 Last Tour 16:00 24 Hours £12.50 £10.00 £6.00 £31.00

Tour Tickets & Timetable 48 Hours

£15.00

£12.00

£8.00

£38.00

Tour departs from: Tourist Information Centre, Foyle Street Tours Everyday First Tour 10:00 Last Tour 16:00 Adult Concession Child Family Contact: or call 028£31.00 7137 0067 24 Hours info@citysightseeingderry.com £12.50 £10.00 £6.00 Tour departs from: Tourist Information Centre, Foyle Street 48 Hours £15.00 £12.00 £8.00 £38.00 info@citysightseeingderry.com or call 028 old. 7137 0067 Family isContact: up to 2 adults & 3 children. A child is 5-15 years Tours Everyday First Tour 10:00 A concession is a student or senior citizen 60+.Last Tour 16:00 Family is up to 2 adults & 3 children. A child is 5-15 years old. A concession is a student or senior citizen 60+.

Tour departs from: Tourist Information Centre, Foyle Street Explore Derry Londonderry Contact: info@citysightseeingderry.com 028 7137 0067discounts Explore Derry Londonderry or callExclusive

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Exclusive discounts with our Ticket Ticket Partners Partners

with our an open busA child touris 5-15 years Family iswith up to 2 adults & 3 top children. old. A concession is a student or senior citizen 60+.

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Explore Derry Londonderry Exclusive discounts BUYtop TOUR TICKETS ONLINE with our TODAY! Ticket Partners with an open busTICKETS tour BUY TOUR ONLINE TODAY! CAUSEWAY DIRECT TOUR ALSO AVAILABLE

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WELCOME

WELCOME

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hether it’s a weekend break to visit some of the best nightlife in Northern Ireland, days out with the children or a taste sensation at an outstanding restaurant, Derry-Londonderry has got it all. You can get a taste for fine dining at the end of a hard day’s shopping. Browse the local produce at the picturesque towns and villages offering all the temptation presented by independent retailers. Derry-Londonderry is also a staple in the cultural hub that makes up Northern Ireland. The city was celebrated in 2013 as very first City of Culture. Its landscape is magnificent too. Recognised as a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the mountainous valleys of the Sperrins are threaded with rivers, streams, forest lakes and shady glens. Derry-Londonderry is also packed with historical interest but, as you’ll see, it’s also a thriving region. Whether you’re visiting for business or pleasure, you can always be assured of finding something exciting to do, tasty to eat or interesting to explore. So whatever you do during your visit to the region, please enjoy – and come back soon! l

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“YOU CAN ALWAYS BE ASSURED OF FINDING SOMETHING EXCITING TO DO, TASTY TO EAT OR INTERESTING TO EXPLORE IN DERRYLONDONDERRY”

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


HISTORY & HERITAGE

HISTORY ALL AROUND! A rich cultural history is evident throughout Derry-Londonderry

ROLF G WACKENBERG/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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– including, in 1688-89, a siege by a small army loyal to the Catholic King James II. Tradition has it that the city’s apprentice boys closed the gates. William III’s defeat of James at the Battle of the Boyne the following July secured Protestant ascendancy over the region, sparking huge emigration. In the late 18th century the city became a major shirt-manufacturer, but the partition of 1922 left Derry under unionist control, separated from Donegal, isolated from international markets and in decline. In the late 1960s, in a bid to end widespread antiCatholic discrimination, the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association was formed, but met violent opposition from the Protestant police force. The Troubles were starting. In January 1969, after police attacked Catholic homes in the Bogside, residents erected barricades, declaring a self-policed ‘Free Derry’ area. That July saw the first victim of The Troubles – Samuel Devenney, a victim of the January police attacks. August 1969 saw British troops on the street, in the Battle of the Bogside. Internment without trial was introduced, and Free Derry began to be p12

n AD 546 the Donegal monk Colmcille (also called St Columb) built his first monastery on a hill on the western bank of the Foyle. This hill was curious, in that it was wooded, but surrounded by river and bog. The native Irish word for this is Doire. At the time, it was known as Doire Calgaigh, the oakwood of Calgach, a local hero. In time it became known as Doire Columcille, after the founder of the first Christian settlement. For centuries, Gaelic lords like the O’Dohertys held sway. In 1600, medieval Doire, now anglicised as Derry, was fortified against these native Irish clans by the English Sir Henry Docwra. Eight years later, after the Irish general Sir Cahir O’Doherty burned it to the ground, London responded with the “Plantation” of English and Scottish Protestant settlers. A new city was built, with huge stone and earth fortifications funded by the City of London. Renamed Londonderry in 1623, it remained a Protestant Parliamentary garrison in the Irish Confederate Wars of the 1640s – the bloodiest in Irish history. There were sieges from Protestant and Catholic armies alike

“IN 1600, MEDIEVAL DOIRE, NOW ANGLICISED AS DERRY, WAS FORTIFIED AGAINST THE NATIVE IRISH CLANS BY THE ENGLISH SIR HENRY DOCWRA”

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HISTORY & HERITAGE

JOAQUIN OSSORIO CASTILLO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

“WITH SUPPORT FOR THE IRA RISING, THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT IMPOSED DIRECT RULE AND SENT 22,000 BRITISH ARMY TROOPS INTO NATIONALIST AREAS LIKE FREE DERRY”

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defended by armed IRA units, who began to bomb commercial targets. A turning point came on 30 January 1972 with the Bloody Sunday massacre, when the British Army responded to a civil rights march by sending in elite troops. The Parachute Regiment shot and killed 13 unarmed civilians, wounding 14. In Dublin, the British Embassy was burned to the ground. With support for the IRA rising, the British government imposed Direct Rule and sent 22,000 British Army troops into nationalist areas like Free Derry, ending Northern Ireland’s last no-go areas at the price of the highest British troop concentration in the history of counterinsurgency. Council boundaries were redrawn, ending unionist political control over the mainly nationalist city. Violence continued until the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998. Sectarianism is less prevalent today. Across Northern Ireland, 29 per cent of Protestants define themselves as Irish. Some Catholics, meanwhile, would vote to stay in the UK. l

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DAYS OUT

LET’S GO THERE! Whatever the time of year, and whatever the weather, there’s always plenty to do here


BRIAN MORRISON/CHRIS HILL/TONY PLEAVIN/ TOURISM IRELAND/IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL

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and Guilds of London, although the initial name for the new Guildhall was actually Victoria Hall. Whatever its moniker, the building is one of the city’s architectural jewels, and provides a sumptuous backdrop to the recently renovated, and awardwinning Guildhall Square. It also provides the perfect entree to the Walled City. Derry has the only complete circuit of city walls in Ireland, and they are among the finest in Europe. Built between 1613 and 1618 as defences for English and Scottish settlers, the walls are up to 35 feet in width, and as high as a two-storey building in places. The walls include such attractions as the Artillery Bastion, and contain seven gates and 24 cannons – one of the biggest collections in Europe – including the famous Roaring Meg. To understand the particular place the walls hold in the city’s history, visit the Tower Museum, which documents Derry’s journey from its ancient earlyChristian beginnings, to the O’Dohertys and the Confederate Wars, to the 109-day Siege of Derry and beyond. It houses two permanent exhibitions – one centering on the story of Derry – and the second on La Trinidad Valencera, a shipwreck from the Spanish p16

hey don’t call it ‘LegenDerry’ for nothing. Six years on from its UK Capital of Culture year, Derry-Londonderry is in great shape, and full of surprises. The first surprise comes on the Waterside near the railway terminus, where the former army parade ground at Ebrington Square has been transformed into a modern city plaza, tastefully remodelled to breathe new life into the city’s eastern bank. It has some great eateries, including Brown’s Restaurant and the famous Walled City Brewery, and a park nearby. But this is just the start. To experience the heart of the Walled City, cross the Foyle on the new Peace Bridge walkway, which swerves invitingly across to the Peace Flame and has connected the Maiden City’s communities like never before. Now you’re ready to explore the historic riches of the city centre. Here, the city’s Guildhall is worth a visit. It has stood proud here since its foundation in 1890 (the 17th-century Guildhall was located in the Diamond), giving a certain elegance to the Derry-Londonderry waterfront. The name reflects the construction of ‘Londonderry’ (as it was renamed in 1623) by the City

“TO EXPERIENCE THE HEART OF THE WALLED CITY, CROSS THE FOYLE ON THE NEW PEACE BRIDGE WALKWAY, WHICH SWERVES INVITINGLY ACROSS TO THE PEACE FLAME AND HAS CONNECTED THE MAIDEN CITY’S COMMUNITIES LIKE NEVER BEFORE”

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


DAYS OUT

ING IMAGE; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

“IF YOU ONLY DO ONE OTHER THING IN DERRY-LONDONDERRY APART FROM EXPLORING THE CITY WALLS, VISIT THE HISTORIC FREE DERRY CORNER IN THE CITY’S BOGSIDE”

excellent, inexpensive guided tours from outside the Guildhall, starting at £5 per person. They are also tours available at the Museum of Free Derry, a short walk from the city centre. This little museum is real gem, and has great archival material from the early Troubles era, when the city was the cockpit for the struggle for Catholic Civil Rights and, ultimately, clashes between the local Catholic population and British forces. Many of the tour guides of the Bogside will be related to some of the 13 innocent civilians shot dead in January 1972 by the Parachute Regiment, and offer a moving account of the events of that day. This area also has People’s Gallery, huge murals painted on Rossville St by the Bogside Artists. It was here, in July 1969, that the Troubles saw its first victim: Samuel Devenney, a victim of RUC (the former Northern Irish police) attacks on p18

Armada, which sank off the Donegal coast in 1588 but was recovered in 1971. The four original gates were Bishop’s Gate, Ferryquay Gate, Butcher Gate and Shipquay Gate, and each are decorated with tasteful, informative displays. The Tower Museum’s fifth floor offers an open-air viewing point across the city, perfect for a clear day. The walls are open until sundown, and well worth a gentle stroll along their 1.5km circumference, with a panoramic view over many of the city’s sights – including two areas harbouring very different historical and political views: the tiny, but staunchly Loyalist, Fountain, and the densely packed nationalist Bogside and Creggan areas. If you only do one other thing in DerryLondonderry apart from exploring the city walls, visit the historic Free Derry Corner in the city’s Bogside. This is best experienced on one of the many

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Seamus Heaney HomePlace is centred in the Nobel Prize winning poet’s heartland. Experience our interactive exhibition where you will discover the people that inspired him and explore the places of his childhood.

Book Online

Just 45 minutes from Derry City To book or for more information: 45 Main Street, Bellaghy, Co Derry BT45 8HT Tel: 028 7938 7444 | w w w . S e a m u s H e a n e y H o m e . c o m


GARDINER MITCHELL/TOURISM IRELAND/ IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

DAYS OUT

Catholic homes earlier that year. Those attacks sparked the self-policed area of Free Derry, which at one point had a perimeter patrolled by the first British troops on the streets of Northern Ireland. The various incarnations of Free Derry ended in 1972. The nearby Brandywell area, meanwhile, is home to the sporting heart of Derry-Londonderry on Lone Moore Road. Try and grab a Gaelic football match at Celtic Park, or visit the Brandywell, home to the city’s two football (soccer) teams. If you’re a fan of historic churches and cathedrals, meanwhile, it’s bonanza time: few cities of this size offer such a wealth of religious architecture, although confusingly many are named after various spellings of St Colmcille (Columba in Latin), who founded a monastic settlement here in the 6th century. A good place to explore these riches – and the story of the city’s founding saint – is St Columba’s Long Tower Church, built in 1784 as the city’s first Catholic post-Reformation church. It was built on the site of the medieval Great Church (Tempeall Mór) built in 1164, but plundered in the 1600s. Long Tower has a heritage centre offering an

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

exhibition on the extraordinary, controversial life of the city’s founding father, along with artefacts and manuscripts including a copy of the Book of Kells, which is also known as the Book of Columba. For true aficionados, head down the Lecky Road and visit the nearby St Columb’s Well, the site of the saint’s feast day in June 9. In medieval times three wells here were dedicated to Colmcille and his successors; today there is a decorative pump, erected in 1897. Just around the corner, meanwhile, lies the magnificent Protestant St Columb’s Cathedral, the first post-Reformation church erected in these islands and the city’s oldest surviving building. Continue on with a visit to St Eugene’s Cathedral, built in the wake of the Great Famine. On the site of Colmcille’s monastery, meanwhile, you’ll find the Anglican St Augustine’s Church, formerly known as the Black Church. Continue on to visit the First Derry Presbyterian Church, and St Brecan’s at St Columb’s Park – the only surviving medieval church in the city today. I think you’ll agree that Colmcille left his mark on the city – even Derry’s most famous school, St p20

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“JUST AROUND THE CORNER FROM ST COLUMB’S WELL, THE MAGNIFICENT PROTESTANT ST COLUMB’S CATHEDRAL IS DERRY’S OLDEST SURVIVING BUILDING”

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©SERGII MOSTOVYI/ADOBE STOCK; GARDINER MITCHELL/TOURISM IRELAND/ IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL; MID-ULSTER DISTRICT COUNCIL/TYRONE AND SPERRINS DESTINATION/NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

DAYS OUT

Columb’s College, was named after him. It was here that one of Ireland’s most famous poets, Seamus Heaney, was educated. He was born in 1939, near Bellagh in the countryside of southeastern county Derry, near Lough Neagh, and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995. Today his birthplace is home to a newly-opened interpretive centre called Heaney HomePlace, giving an introduction to the region’s most famous literary figure, who was buried here in 2013. The centre includes a 191-seat performance space, a library, education spaces, a community annex, cafe and shop. It’s well worth a visit, and is a splendid book-end to any journey into the region’s countryside. It’s here that you’ll find Derry-Londonderry’s unrivalled coastal and mountain scenery. Between Derry-Londonderry and Lough Neagh – Ireland’s largest lake – lies the Sperrin Mountains Area of Outstanding National Beauty. Follow the northern walking route from the thriving little town

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

“BETWEEN DERRYLONDONDERRY AND LOUGH NEAGH – IRELAND’S LARGEST LAKE – LIES THE SPERRIN MOUNTAINS AREA OF OUTSTANDING NATIONAL BEAUTY”

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of Garvagh, and prepare for a treasure trove of natural wonders. Legavannon Pot (the “hollow of the soul”) is a glacial meltwater feature between Garvagh and Dungiven, while the route also brings you to the impressive ruined 11th-century Banagher Old Church (burial place of St Muiredach O’Heney) and the hiking paradise of the steep, wooded Banagher Glen. For an easier stroll, walk along the Derrynoid Wood Trail. There is also a succession of ancient structures in this part of the county, testament to the area’s antiquity. There is the Tirnoney Dolmen, a tomb up to 6,000 years old – and, most enticingly, the Tirkane Sweathouse – the Gaelic forerunner of today’s Turkish bath. In Germany, they are known as Irish baths, suggesting their introduction by Irish missionaries during the medieval period. Visit the Aghascrebagh Ogham Stone, upon which the ancient pre-gaelic ogham alphabet is carved; and the wedge tombs galore. For the coasts, the epic railway tunnels at p23

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When you want to get out, our refreshing activities put you right… in nature!

Action-packed activities for all ages!

Try a novel longboard lesson after breakfast, a lunchtime foodie bike ride, a soothing Stand Up Paddle Board (SUP) Yoga afternoon, or a moonlight kayak tour at twilight!

farandwild.org farandwild farandwildadventure

Opening Times: Monday-Sunday 10am-6pm 71 Carrowclare Road, Limavady, Derry-Londonderry BT49 9EB T: 028 777 22235 E: info@foylehov.com

www.foylehov.com

+447775911198

Fresh and tasty It’s not just children that can enjoy our facilities. Adults can relax and drink award-winning coffee and enjoy freshly-prepared, unprocessed, locallysourced food that’s all made in our own kitchen.

Playing freely is important for young children to help keep them active, develop social skills, help with physical development and to have fun. The Playshed offers a fun, colourful, safe and clean environment for them to do this in, with playframes designed around fundamental movement skills.

Two separate playframes, baby changing, ample toilet facilities, separate party room and free WiFi

sheduk

theplay

We’re open 6 days a week

02871 343 094

Tuesday-Saturday: 10am-6pm Sunday: 1pm-5.15pm

Find us at Unit 2b, Altnagelvin Industrial Estate

Open Bank Holiday Mondays and during school holidays 11am-5pm

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Trench Road, Waterside, Derry-Londonderry

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


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DAYS OUT

“GAME OF THRONES FANS MIGHT RECOGNISE DOWNHILL STRAND AND DOWNHILL DEMENSE WHERE YOU CAN MARVEL AT MUSSENDEN TEMPLE”

©ADOBE STOCK; ART WARD/TOURISM IRELAND/IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

Portvantage; and the nearby cliffs are a good place to start. If you’re a Game of Thrones fan you might recognise Benone Strand, the scene of the Burning of the Seven, while on nearby Downhill Strand and Downhill Demense you can marvel at Mussenden Temple, built in 1785 and offering great vistas of the Donegal coast. From here you can visit the seaside town of Portstewart, popular among students and families alike, and with its golden sandy beach, and excellent surfing. It’s also a model for seeing how freely the two main communities mix in most parts of Northern Ireland. Portstewart is also where the Bann – the longest river in Northern Ireland by some distance – empties into the sea, via the Barmouth of the Bann. City, coast, river, mountain and lake – you’re spoiled for choice when it comes to DerryLondonderry. l

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


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THINGS YOU MUST DO!

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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10 THINGS

[01] HEANEY HOMEPLACE

Newly opened in Bellaghy, the HomePlace gives an introduction to Derry’s most famous literary figure. The eldest of nine children, Seamus Heaney was born at Mossbawn in 1939 near Bellaghy and attended St Columb’s College in Derry before proceeding – like many at the time – to Queen’s University in Belfast. Heaney was buried in Bellaghy in 2013. The centre includes a 191-seat performance space, a library, education spaces, a community annex, cafe and shop.

[02] AMBLE ALONG THE CITY WALLS Few cities do history like Derry-Londonderry, and a walk along the Walled City’s 17thcentury fortification is the best way to explore the area’s tumultuous past and slow walk to peace. If you do nothing else here, do this.

BRIAN MORRISON/MID-ULSTER DISTRICT COUNCIL/NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD; ING IMAGE; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

[03] HALLOWEEN Experience the world’s best Halloween Carnival (according to USA Today), attracting tens of thousands of visitors each year. The successor to the ancient Celtic feast of Samhain, these days Halloween involves light shows, animations and a terrifying woodland trail Fright Night. [04] SEISIÚN CEOIL Derry has long been an incubator for outstanding talent in Irish traditional music, and since the Fleadh Cheoil and City of Culture year of 2013, it has come into its own. You can’t move in the city after 10pm without hearing trad being played. Sunday afternoon sessions are particularly entrancing. Check out Bennigans and Sandinos among others for jazz, rock and acoustic music for today’s successors to Phil Coulter or The Undertones. [05] MARVEL AT MUSSENDEN TEMPLE Now perched precariously on cliffs high above the North Atlantic on the eastern edge of the

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county, the Mussenden Temple was built in 1785, modelled on the Vesta Temple in Rome. It forms an architectural hook for Downhill Demense, offering great views towards Magilligan Strand towards Donegal. It’s popular for civil ceremonies, while Downhill Beach has been used for filming of Game of Thrones. [06] GUILDHALL The most striking building in the city, the neo-gothic Guildhall in the city’s civic centre, overlooking the Peace Bridge, is home to one of Ireland’s largest collections of stained glass.

“STRETCH YOUR LEGS IN THE SCENIC HILLS OF THE FAUGHAN VALLEY AND BEYOND. THE TOURIST OFFICE HAS A LIST OF SCENIC DRIVING, CYCLING AND HIKING ROUTES”

[09] THE PEOPLE’S GALLERY AND FREE DERRY CORNER For many, Derry-Londonderry is synonymous with the Bloody Sunday massacre, here tastefully documented in the People’s Gallery. Combined a Bogside History walking tour with a visit to the Museum of Free Derry. [10] THE TOWER MUSEUM AND THE SIEGE MUSEUM This museum traces the history of the city’s unionist community from the Plantation of Ulster in the early 1600s to the present day. l

[07] THE HERITAGE TRAIL Explore the historic churches – and the story of Columcille, also known as St Columba – by visiting St Columb’s Cathedral, St Columb’s Well, St Augustine’s Church, and the Long Tower Church. Continue on to visit the First Derry Presbyterian Church, and St Brecan’s at St Columb’s Park – the only surviving medieval church in the city today. [08] HIKE THE SPERRIN MOUNTAINS Stretch your legs in the scenic hills of the Faughan Valley and beyond. The DerryLondonderry tourist office has a list of scenic driving, cycling and hiking routes.

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


EATING OUT

A TASTE OF NORTHERN IRELAND – AND THE WORLD! Top-end fine dining, adventurous independents and a great range of ethnic cuisine means you’ll never go hungry here

EILIV SONAS ACERON/UNSPLASH

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but is well worth making the effort for. Food on offer ver the past few years the Maiden City focuses on the meat and fish dishes which are a has come into its own as a culinary staple of the region, with the wide selection on its destination. Demand has soared since lunch and dinner menus making it an ideal pick for its turn as the UK’s City of Culture in larger groups. 2013 resulted in a huge profile boost – the city Back in the city centre, classic bistro-style diner featured in Lonely Planet’s global list of cities to visit Fitzroy’s offers up similar value, with patrons that year – and Derry has delivered. assured of at least a 30 per cent discount at any time, Still relatively off the beaten path, there are with further discounts and unmined dinner-table riches special offers coming on at waiting for you in every corner off-peak times (at the time of of the city – and upmarket “STILL RELATIVELY writing, patrons could even options come in well below avail of £2 pints with their meals what they are priced elsewhere. OFF THE BEATEN on Mondays and Tuesdays). Menu prices throughout the day PATH, THERE ARE Nestled on the corner and into the evening at many UNMINED DINNERbetween Carlisle Road and establishments from Monday to Bridge Street, comfortable TABLE RICHES WAITING Thursday are often half-price, seating and selection of classic with some extending that to the FOR YOU IN EVERY rock on the sound system make weekend at times. Restaurants CORNER OF THE CITY” it a great pick for anyone bunched around the Strand looking for all of the quality Road and city centre vie against without any of the fuss. each other for the midweek Price alone though is never enough, and it is the market, so it is well worth phoning ahead to see popularity of the dishes which keeps the restaurant what’s on offer. packed. A couple of menu highlights include the Start at Quaywest. Housed in a restored 19thsirloin steak and the grilled salmon. Walk-ins may century boathouse, it is a rock-solid choice for face a wait to get a table. anyone looking for a bargain. The wine and cocktail It is a testament to the excellence of the food in bar popular with the city’s locals might be missed by The Spaghetti Junction that, despite its location p29 visitors, sitting a short drive down the Strand Road,

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


THE DIAMOND SPENCER ROAD LISNAGELVIN COLERAINE LETTERKENNY OMAGH @ROCO

visit theSandwich.co

The Sandwich Co is now open at the very popular ROCO Hair & Beauty Salon. Enjoy beautiful views of the River Foyle, whilst you sip on our specialist coffee and indulge in the wide variety of freshly made sandwiches, pastries and cakes on offer.

www.thesandwich.co

NOW OPEN @ on the quay

Follow us on Facebook

Siam Thai is a small, friendly restaurant serving authentic Thai dishes to create the ultimate dining experience.

RESTAURANT & TAKEAWAY Booking is recommended 12A Shipquay St, Londonderry BT48 6DN 02871 281111

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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Our expert chefs prepare creative and innovative dishes using fresh herbs and spices which are sure to delight your taste buds. Our menu includes a fine selection of popular Thai dishes along with some unique options.

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©RACHAEL SANTILLAN/ADOBE STOCK; BRIAN MORRISON/ NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

EATING OUT

on the fringe of the city centre, in an unprepossessing location, it is jammed most nights of the week. Stepping through the door feels like tripping into another world, with the decor brilliantly capturing the feel of an Italian trattoria. You may even notice Italian spoken around the tables, something which comes as a result of a partnership with local language schools. With quality across its pizza and pasta dishes, standouts also include its meatballs and any of the Italian chicken. Housed in a space which previously housed an art gallery, its commitment to locally-sourced ingredients and authentic Italian cuisine puts it a cut above. On the corner of Castle Street and Magazine Street just inside the city walls, meanwhile, lies the gloriously stylish, unpretentious Brickwork. Logic would dictate that any business situated here would be thriving – but that has not proven to be the case, until now. Brickwork has changed that by offering up an unfussy, but eclectic menu which mixes local meat and seafood staples with influences from Japan, Korea, the United States, and Italy. Making a selection can feel like an almost bewildering experience, but there is quality across the board. With its vibrant interior and eye-catching gin and cocktail menu, Brickwork is an ideal choice for a

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“RESTAURANTS BUNCHED AROUND THE STRAND ROAD AND CITY CENTRE VIE AGAINST EACH OTHER FOR THE MIDWEEK MARKET, SO IT IS WELL WORTH PHONING AHEAD TO SEE WHAT’S ON OFFER”

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group looking for the first stop on a night out in the Walled City. It is also a 30-second walk from the Waterloo Street, the centre of the city’s nightlife. A Derry spot marked out for authentic dining is The Cedar Tree, a Lebanese restaurant situated on Carlisle Road, halfway between the Walled City’s Ferryquay Gate, and the Craigavon Bridge – one of the few double-decker road bridges in Europe. The restaurant’s success is a testament to the city’s increasingly sophisticated palate. The family-run business is helmed by Lebanese head chef Simon Matta and wife Bernadette, and their care and attention to everything, from the food to the decor, is evident as soon as you walk through the door. The rich assortment of hot and cold mezzas are a great choice for anyone looking for something different. There are plenty of options around the city for visitors out on a day trip, and perhaps not looking for a full sit-down meal. The Hidden City Cafe is a good place to start. Situated on London Street within the city walls, it’s really easy to find. Although not exclusively meat-free – its fish and chicken dishes have drawn high praise – the cafe offers up brilliant options for vegans and vegetarians. p31

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


ING IMAGE; LAUREN LESTER/UNSPLASH; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

EATING OUT

In a city which may traditionally have been slow to embrace changing tastes, the range of idiosyncratic flavours crafted from seitan and buckwheat (as well as many other things) make for a welcome surprise. The prices on the menu are almost as healthy as the food, with most sandwiches coming in at less than a fiver, and set prices to sample the range of salads available. Another quality pick for a plant-based meal is the recently-opened Cow Bog cafe at the top of Waterloo Street, taking up a space just outside the city walls overlooking the Bogside. The building used to house a bike shop, and the renovated building has kept that down-at-heel vibe. The vegan and vegetarian cafe has proven an instant hit, with a modern, New Nordic interior and a menu that changes on a daily basis to reflect produce coming in from local suppliers. Another gem operating slightly under the radar is Pyke ‘n’ Pommes, which started life as an adapted van in a disused car park and in recent years has taken up permanent residence in a converted shipping container on the city’s waterfront. The idiosyncratic surrounds lends an interesting atmosphere to Pyke ‘N’ Pommes, which has

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“THE IDIOSYNCRATIC SURROUNDS LENDS AN INTERESTING ATMOSPHERE TO PYKE ‘N’ POMMES, WHICH HAS POSITIONED ITSELF IN THE VANGUARD OF IRISH STREET FOOD, WITH HIGH-QUALITY LOCAL PRODUCE”

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positioned itself in the vanguard of Irish street food, with high-quality local produce prepared by chefs Kevin Pyke and Paul Barrett. With the food prepared in front of you, choosing shouldn’t be too tricky – but the tacos are particularly good. Pyke ‘N’ Pommes is an especially good choice if the sun is out, with outdoor seating looking out on the Foyle. Another family-owned establishment which has carved out a reputation for quality in its short existence is the vegan-friendly Coffee Tree. Having opened its doors just over three years ago, the business takes up a narrow shop front on the city’s Strand Road, next to the city’s main hostel, and a stone’s throw away from the main footfall of the city. The Coffee Tree is thriving, quality food and rustic interior making it a go-to for locals in the area. It has gained especial acclaim for its trademark ‘doorstop’ sandwiches – distinctively being served up on large slices of lightly-toasted brown bread and stuffed to the brim. The soup is also excellent. Quality is maximised by keeping options on the menu limited, something which is also the case for the simple but perfectly-executed desserts on offer. The scones are particularly good. Just off of the city’s Guildhall Square is the Warehouse Café, sitting on the ground level of a complex which holds an art gallery in its upper floors. Laid out inside with comfortable leather sofas and varnished wood, it is known for its top-quality coffee and is a popular choice for visitors looking for a pitstop as they make their way around the city centre. The space undergoes a transformation in the evening, and after 6.30pm from Thursday to Sunday serves up a full bistro menu. The Warehouse Café has a licence and diners are able to enjoy a glass of wine or local craft beer with their meals. For a decade, Brown’s Restaurant has been synonymous with high-quality dining in Derry. With the original restaurant opening on the eastern bank of the Foyle in 2009, its popularity has since seen Brown’s in Town open in a more central p32

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


EATING OUT

location on the Strand Road, as well as a location in Donegal. Under head chef Ian Orr, Brown’s is regularly featured on lists of the best restaurants in Ireland, the UK, and Northern Ireland, and in 2016 was named the best restaurant in Ulster. Diners have an expansive range of food and wine to choose from, with specialist menus catering to all tastes, including vegan and vegetarian diners. An appealing option for groups is the tasting menu, which offers up the best of seasonally available produce and can be ordered with or without a matched wine. Brown’s has an unrivalled selection. If you’re looking to splash out a little bit extra to taste the best Derry has to offer, then

“DINERS HAVE AN EXPANSIVE RANGE OF FOOD AND WINE TO CHOOSE FROM, WITH SPECIALIST MENUS CATERING TO ALL TASTES”

/saffronNI

a modern indian kitchen At Saffron we use time honoured family recipes, mainly from the Punjab district in the North West of India. We have been in Derry/Londonderry for over three decades. Saffron Restaurant is a modern Indian kitchen that allows you to taste a range of authentic Indian dishes from our varied menu such as homemade samosas and onion bhajis, tandoori mix, Karahi chicken and Makhan tikka. 4.30pm-10.00pm Sunday-Thursday 4.30pm-11.00pm Friday & Saturday Closed Mondays

2 Clarendon Street, Derry/Londonderry BT48 7ES 028 7126 0532 www.saffronderry.co.uk

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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©SUTSAIY/ADOBE STOCK; ING IMAGE; JANKO FERLIC/ UNSPLASH; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

Brown’s – at either of its locations in the city – is certainly worth it. And even for those on a budget, planning means you can take advantage of early-bird and lunch offers. The Sooty Olive is another dining option on the city’s east bank, made much more accessible in recent years by the construction of the ‘Peace Bridge’. Despite being named after a trout-fishing tied fly, the restaurant’s menu is not seafood-specific and serves up local favourites, with enough quirks to keep it interesting. Situated in an area with a high number of offices and work spaces, the Sooty Olive is a popular lunch destination, as well as catering to the evening market. Cooked and prepared by owner and head chef Sean Harrigan, some of the favourites on the lunch menu include the beer-battered fish and the steak sandwich. A stalwart of Derry’s eating out scene for two decades, La Sosta on Carlisle Road holds pride of place as the city’s original Italian restaurant. With an entrance hidden down an alleyway on Carlisle Road, once inside diners are treated to a sweeping panorama of the River Foyle. The decor inside the restaurant makes it feel like the kitchen of an Italian farmhouse, complete with wooden timber beams running across the ceiling and an oak sideboard for wine storage. All of the Italian options served up in La Sosta are great, and the steak is a particular favourite. The craft beer boom of a few years ago hit Derry in a big way, with drinks menus at most of the city’s

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bars and restaurants now greatly expanded and a number of establishments making it their main selling point. The Guildhall Taphouse is located just around the corner from the Guildhall, which houses the city’s council. Known for its ever-rotating menu of craft beers marked up on a chalkboard above the bar, its sophisticated cocktails and hearty food also make it worth a visit. Live music is played in the bar most nights of the week, making it a great starting point for a night out. However, anyone afraid of the prospect of having to shout over their meal should rest assured – it is set up so performers are stationed at the end of the bar and the wood-panelled and leather interior keep volume levels quiet. A treat for anyone lucky enough to be in the city on the first Saturday of the month from March to December is the Walled City Market. The event pulls in a whole range of artisan traders to the city from across the UK and Ireland, and turns the Guildhall Square into a European market for the day, with great artisan food treats not on the menus anywhere else. If you have a few spare hours, why not try and track down Derry specialities like a gravy ring, a sausage-roll bap, or a ‘fifteens’ sweet treat – all of which are available in bakeries like Eleanor’s Home Bakery, with branches on Strand Road and Spencer Road, the Baker’s Oven on Shipquay Street, Funky Cakes on Castle Street around the road, or the cosy Scullery Café on Waterloo Street. l

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“KNOWN FOR ITS EVER-ROTATING MENU OF CRAFT BEERS MARKED UP ON A CHALKBOARD ABOVE THE BAR, THE SOPHISTICATED COCKTAILS AND HEARTY FOOD MAKE THE GUILDHALL TAPHOUSE WORTH A VISIT”

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


48 HOURS

IF YOU’RE ONLY HERE FOR 48 HOURS… You can pack a lot into a couple of days – try this itinerary to make the most of it

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

ON ARRIVAL: EVENING Pass the Guildhall and the Peace Flame, and grab dinner at funky Brickwork on Magazine Street. Go up the stairway at Castle Gate to the stupendous City Walls, built in 1619 to defend Protestant settlers from the native Irish and now the most complete circuit of walls in Ireland. Pop in for a drink at Peadar O’Donnell’s – maybe staying on for a lively trad session from 10pm.

“TAKE A SHORT WALK TO THE TOWER MUSEUM, AND EXPLORE THE CITY’S HISTORY, FROM COLUMCILLE’S MONASTERY IN THE 6TH CENTURY TO THE SIEGE OF DERRY AND THE BATTLE OF THE BOGSIDE”

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DAY ONE After breakfasting leisurely at Warehouse Number 1, it’s time to get to know some of the city’s history. Take a guided tour of the Bogside, for an insight into the Civil Rights movement, the Bloody Sunday massacre and the beginnings of The Troubles, when it seemed the city was at the centre of world attention. There are guided tours from outside the Guildhall, and also from the excellent Free Derry Museum, which has excellent archive material from the era. Get a closer look at the People’s Gallery – the huge murals painted on Rossville St by the Bogside Artists, marking key events in the Troubles. Grab a sandwich and tea up the hill at Bog Café on Waterloo Street or, if you need to stretch the legs, Coffee Tree on Strand Road. After lunch, if you want to see the historic sights outside the city, take a taxi to the Grianán of Aileach, just 10 minutes away – or take a bus to one of many seaside villages and towns along the Inishowen Peninsula. On returning, grab some dinner at Pyke ‘N’ Pommes on the Foyle estuary, and take a casual,

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20-minute stroll back into town along the riverside to Bennigans, a local secret. Catch a few tunes there before moving on to Sandinos cafe bar, and then proceed on your merry way to Blackbird or any of the many pubs around Waterloo Street or Shipquay Street. DAY TWO Breakfast at Primrose, which boasts superb views across the Foyle to the Waterside woods. It also does a superb full Ulster Fry in a great location. Take a short walk to the Tower Museum, and explore the city’s history, from Columcille’s monastery in the 6th century to the Siege of Derry, the Battle of the Bogside and The Troubles. There is also the wreck of a ship from the Spanish Armada on display. From there, walk the City Walls themselves, which at times rise as high as a two-storey house. Walk towards the Church Bastion, passing the loyalist murals of The Fountain estate and St Columb’s Cathedral, the city’s oldest surviving building. Either take in other churches via the Columba Heritage Trail or complete the wall circuit and alighting at Magazine Gate. Time for food. Pop three minutes down the road to Spaghetti Junction – a superb Italian restaurant on William Street. Then, cross the Foyle via the Peace Bridge, a languid pedestrian walkway built in 2011, to the Waterside and the renovated Ebrington Square. Grab dessert at Brown’s Restaurant or a tipple at the famous Walled City Brewery before finding an excuse to stay another night, and another music session! l

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


SHOPPING

LIKE TO SHOP? YOU’LL LOVE IT HERE! High street chains, one-off independents and quirky specialists – they’re all waiting for the shopaholic

©TATIANA/ADOBE STOCK

D

recognised as the ‘shirt-making capital of the world’. And it packs a lot of shopping into its historic centre, but before taking in the excellent high street fashion offered by the city’s huge city centre malls, take some time to appreciate the craftsmanship and home-made produce of the city’s jewellers, designers and woolworkers. For cutting-edge homeware and quirky design, you’re in the right spot, with a mixture of the best of contemporary Irish, British and European design on show. A great place to start is the Craft Village on Shipquay Street, Derry’s delightfully Dickensian cultural centre. Here you’ll find Sass & Halo, creating bespoke hand-made crowns. Yes, crowns. At Blue Moon you’ll find a range of fairtrade clothes and goods from a range of world cultures and spiritual traditions, while City of Derry Crystal lends a touch of timeless elegance. If you’re into wool, pop into Knitfield, brought in conjunction with p38

erry-Londonderry is the fashion mecca of the North West, with plenty of retail therapy on offer amid the city’s trademark relaxed atmosphere, a nice variety to allow you browse the city’s independent retailers and the high-street names you’d expect in Ireland’s fourth-largest city. Indeed, Derry is starting to make waves in the fashion world, with 10 local designers – the Derry Design Collective – showcasing their collections during London Fashion Week in autumn 2018. The collections included bespoke leotards to Irish tweed menswear, traditional jewellery, print designs, luxury knitwear and fabrics, printed casualwear and children’s lifestyle clothing. But you don’t need to go to London to get your own samples – just pop into one of the many independent shops in the Walled City. The city was built upon the fashion and textile trade – and in its heyday from the 1850s until partition in the early 1920s was

“DERRY IS STARTING TO MAKE WAVES IN THE FASHION WORLD, WITH 10 LOCAL DESIGNERS SHOWCASING THEIR COLLECTIONS DURING LONDON FASHION WEEK IN AUTUMN 2018”

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


SHOPPING

rural Ulster at large, not least from its near neighbour Donegal. The Donegal Shop, also on Shipquay Street, sells the finest knitted sweaters, tweed caps, kilts, Aran knitwear, sweaters and accessories plus lots of interesting Irish artisan wool products – almost anything, in other words, that can be made from natural fabrics, and enough to keep you warm in the Irish winters. On Guildhall Street, in the shadow of The Guildhall and Peace Bridge is Warehouse No1, selling quality unique local crafts, plus specially selected products from further afield from a beautiful listed building. It’s a visually mouth-watering vibrant new space selling local crafts, unique gifts and locally produced artisan foods – and an exclusive art gallery. It’s also very family-friendly, with plenty of room for prams, buggies and wheelchairs. On the first floor is Above And Beyond (as in ‘Above and Beyond the Warehouse’), a aesthetic treat for visitors and locals alike. The building itself is a work of art. On the first floor are concrete figures, representing the five trading continents, a reminder of Derry-Londonderry’s historic trading role. There are surprises everywhere. Up the hill past the Diamond, on London Street, you’ll find Smart Swag, a crafty and design shop featuring the latest in upcycling, hand-painted, hand-made giftware and homeware. Further up the street is Whatnot, an Antique Shop containing everything from classic jewellery to a glistening Brass Pompiers helmet. p41

©IULIAN VALENTIN/ADOBE STOCK; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

“WITH A VARIETY ON OFFER, THERE IS SOMETHING FOR EVERY TASTE, PARTICULARLY FOR NON-CHAIN STORE SHOPPERS”

Edel MacBride wool in Donegal, providing knits and patterns for the yarn and wool-lover in you. Also in the Craft Village is Number 19 Craft and Design, showcasing an eclectic mix of contemporary and traditional home-made crafts. Unlike with the long manufacturing chains of today’s consumer society, everything you see in Number 19 has been designed and made locally, with every penny going directly to the producers. The shop formed as a pop-up during the 2012 Clipper Festival, before transforming into the Craft Village Collective, an umbrella co-operative for small craft-makers. It now comprises 20 members. Number 19 offers workshops, both in-store and also in the Craft Village’s Thatch Cottage, which aim to extend the knowledge and use of traditional craft skills in contemporary craft practice. With a variety on offer, there is something for every taste, particularly for non-chain store shoppers. Try the handiwork of Derry Design Makers, or the Walled City Crafts – two other artisan stores in the Craft Village on Shipquay Street – or the Irish Shop, also known as An Siopa Gaelach. Founded by the late Mary McLaughlin in 1968 on the top of Waterloo Street, it was officially opened in 1990 in the Craft Village by President of Ireland Mary Robinson, from where it continues to offer friendly advice on Irish jewellery, ceramic pottery, linen and souvenirs. As well as producing superb goods in its own right, Derry-Londonderry is the shop window for

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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JEWELLERY & ACCESSORIES

25-27 Ferryquay Street Derry/Londonderry, BT48 6JB Tel: 028 7136 6838

Shop online at bellamiaboutique.co.uk bellamiaboutiqueuk

bellamiaboutiqueuk

bellamiaonline

bellamiani


LOVE

knitwear?

Designer Edel MacBride has created an oasis of colour and warmth at her showcase shop in the picturesque setting of Derry Craft Village. Here, the Designer’s latest handmade creations are available. All handknits are 100% knit locally with wool spun in Donegal. Aran stitching features strongly. Besides this, Edel and her daughter Emma sell you the wools and tools to make your own.

20 The Craft Village, Shipquay Street, Derry BT48 6AR knitfield1@gmail.com WWW.EDELMACBRIDE.COM

Checkpoint Charlie is a locally-owned business We stock Derry gifts and souvenirs with a contemporary design. A visit to the store will give you a real feel for the social and political history of the City. Ask our staff about our Free Derry passport stamp. We look forward to helping you choose all your holiday gifts.

35 WATERLOO STREET, DERRY BT48 6HB • 07540 431721 WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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/CHECKPOINTCHARLIEDERRY

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©DIMJ/ADOBE STOCK

SHOPPING

“THIS NORTHERN IRISH LOCAL INSTITUTION HAS A LUXURIOUS PORTFOLIO OF DIAMONDS, RETRO PIECES AND SPECIAL ITEMS BY CARTIER AND OTHER UPMARKET BRANDS”

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On nearby Pump Street, meanwhile, is Thomas the Goldsmith, one of the city’s many jewellers. Around the corner is Lunn’s, a family-owned chain based in Belfast but with a branch in Derry for 15 years now. A Northern Irish local institution, they have a luxurious portfolio of diamonds, sumptuous retro pieces and special items by Cartier and the rest. Down that very street – Shipquay Street – is D Cooley Jewellers, the favoured spot for Friends star Courteney Cox, and her Derry fiancé Johnny McDaid, of the band Snow Patrol. On Strand Road, across from the stylish eaterie Brown’s In Town, you’ll find Faller’s the Jeweller, specialising in Ogham Sticks, miniature High Crosses of Inishowen, and unique jewellery based on the Grianán of Aileach, the historic fortress just across the border in Donegal. For fantastic artwork – making excellent momentos of your stay on Foyleside – visit Derry Nice Things – an online store which also runs a stall at the Walled City Market in Guildhall Square on the first Saturday of every month. For other artwork, visit We Do Art on Queen Street off Great James St.

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The Walled City Market involves some of the tastiest home-made treats, plus a some exquisite crafts from Willow Studios; Daisy Dots; The One World Shop; Granny Knitter; and Green Purl, along with Simmering Salts; Celtic Leather Art and The Morelli Pod. At Christine Doorish’s Doorish Arts and Crafts, meanwhile, gives you the chance to grab a hold of unique oil paintings, or hand-made wooden plaques with personalised messages, whether humorous or touching. The bespoke wooden works of No9 Creations, in particular, are a touch of elegance, made from Irish trees like oak, beech and birch. They create kitchenware, giftware, keyrings, to mini wooden beer or gin boxes. For a great way of supporting local, family-run businesses, get the Independent Derry app, where you’ll discover independent shops like Yellowmoon Clothing on Shipquay Street, Room 7 boutique on Pump Street among others. As for high-street names, you’re spoiled for choice, with two large shopping centres fitting neatly either side of the city walls in the city centre. The largest shopping centre in the north west of Ireland, Foyleside Shopping Centre has the best of shopping from both Ireland and Britain, including: M&S, H&M, Debenhams, Next, and Dunne’s – a sort of Irish M&S. Pop into Topshop, River Island, Smiggle, and, as of 2018, a new Disney store to keep the kids (and big kids) entertained. It also has Monsoon, DV8, Oasis, Ugg, Edinburgh Woollen Mills, and many more, incorporating top brands including stunning jewellery and accessories from, and a fantastic range of health, beauty products and fragrances including The Body Shop and Mac Cosmetics. They also have an Apple store for your latest gadgets, plus a huge array of all sorts of fashion, including Vans, Converse, Warehouse, Jacques Vert, G Star, and Superdry. After getting around such largesse, you deserve a drink or a bite to eat, and there’s plenty of choice, with the Bentley Bar and The Gate Bistro providing your cocktails of choice, backed up by Fitzroy’s and Badgers Bar, the latter directly across from the main shopping centre entrance. For bookshops, you’ve got the independent Foyle Books on Magazine Street, Eason in the Foyleside Shopping Centre, or – in the Richmond Shopping Centre – The Works. Or are you a charity shop addict? Oxfam, the Red Cross, Cancer Research UK, and the children’s charity Barnardo’s all have stores right next to the central Diamond; while there’s also a cluster on William Street and Waterloo Place, with Action Cancer, St Vincent de Paul, Foyle Hospice and the Animal Refuge providing the best in pre-loved clothes and goods. On Ferryquay Street – lies Mermaid Cove, p43

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


Amazing ladies boutique in the heart of Derry/L.Derry providing a range of smart casual, occasion and formal wear to make customers feel and look fabulous.

Stand out from the crowd

In the heart of the Cathedral Quarter. Thomas Goldsmiths – designers, makers and stockists of beautiful fine contemporary jewellery.

Getting married? For a truly unique and unforgettable experience, we offer you the opportunity to make your own wedding rings under the guidance of a master goldsmith in our city centre workshops.

Thomas Goldsmiths • 7 Pump Street • L’Derry

13 Pump Street, Derry~Londonderry BT48 6JG

WWW.THOMASGOLDSMITHS.COM

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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(028)71 414 545 info@room7boutique.com www.room7boutique.com

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selling hand-made natural bath bombs sure to set your senses tingling. On the Strand Road lies a smaller shopping arcade, the Quayside Centre, bookended by a huge Tesco, and including a host of discount and interior stores. Across the river, on the city’s eastern bank, lies Waterside, with TK Maxx, a huge Tesco superstore and the smaller Lisnagelvin Shopping Centre. On Newmarket Street, on the site of the old Rialto Theatre, lies Primark, for all your stylish budget needs. It’s a challenge leaving the store without spending something. Opposite, across Bank Place, lies the Millennium Forum, and Richmond Shopping Centre which has been providing shopping in the North West since 1984, and has over 100,000 sq ft of retail units over three floors bang in the middle of town. For clothing, it’s got BonMarche, Fosters, New Look, Quiz Clothing, Mango, YOURS Clothing, Jack and Jones, Officer’s Club, Peacocks among others. For a bit of exercise while in the city – or in preparation for getting out and about in the Sperrins, Donegal or on Downhill Strand – you’ve got Trespass, JD Sports and Lifestyle Sports. You’ve got jewellery and giftware covered with Argento jewellers, Gifted, and Warren James Jewellers, and a host of phone shops, plus Bubble Buyer, a new commerce website and retail store specialising in electronics and technology. The mall also has a great pick of high-street shops, including Argos, Game, and health food specialists Holland and Barrett, plus a series of fun bag and accessories shops. Everything is within walking distance. One of the newer additions to the city’s souvenir shops is Checkpoint Charlie, where Stephanie English from Cable Street in the Bogside give tourists an insight into The Troubles. Although the Peace Bridge has seen much more mixing between the two communities of

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©BOGGY/ADOBESTOCK; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

SHOPPING

Derry-Londonderry, some residents of the city’s Waterside continue to travel to shop in Coleraine, a small town with a strong unionist tradition on the county’s eastern border, near the seaside town of Portstewart. The main shopping district in Coleraine runs from Railway Road and on to Kingsgate Street. There you’ll find a host of independent clothes shops, including Moore S&T, Ken Young Menswear, and Burns Outfitters. The town specialises in wedding attire, with Marie Therese Bridal, Star Tiara, Dream Weddings Bridal Boutique, and the womenswear specialist Couples. There’s also the Hope and Gloria Emporium, Constance Fabrice and Design on Mill Street, Buchanan the jeweller and Stephen Boyd Jewellers. Check out the Causeway Speciality Market on the second Saturday of every month, with dozens of stalls selling local food and crafts from across Derry and the north coast. On the banks of the Bann – which in Coleraine is a

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quarter of a mile wide – lies the Diamond Shopping Centre. Despite being half the size of Coleraine (and about a 10th the size of Derry-Londonderry), Magherafelt has a particularly vibrant shopping scene catering to the south of the county, and the towns and villages around the shores of Lough Neagh. It has a mixture of Irish and UK brand high street names including River Island, Sara, Dunnes, Vogue and M&Co at its large shopping centre on Moneymore Road – plus a variety of boutiques, including Sarah-Jane Boutique for ladies, Verona Bridal Shop on the trendy Quiz Clothing and several sportswear shops. One of Ulster’s fastest-growing towns, Limavady lies south east of Derry-Londonderry and has the vibe of an old market town. Stroll down Market Street and Main Street and pop into the many small boutiques before settling down for a coffee at Hunter’s Bakery. And then come back to the city and do it all again… l

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


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REASONS TO LOVE THIS REGION!

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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10 REASONS

[01] THE LANDSCAPE

Enclosed by two great rivers, the Bann and the Foyle, you are entering a region steeped in natural variety, from the beaches of Portstewart to the sweeping cliffs overlooking Downhill Strand, and from the old-growth forests of the Sperrin Mountains to the literary village of Belaghy and the shores of Lough Neagh.

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[02] THE HISTORY From the ancient early-Christian beginnings at the time of Colmcille, to the Siege of Derry, the Battle of Bogside and Bloody Sunday, surely no small city has witnessed such seismic events that have affected so many across these islands. Allow the people of Derry help you explore it with their customary candour, sensitivity and wit. [03] THE CULTURE With a innumerable pubs playing traditional music seven nights a week, to the rock, jazz and DJ scene, and the plethora of artistic venues, organisations and events, few cities have as much going on after 10pm on a weeknight. [04] THE PEOPLE A place apart due to its close associations with Donegal, and its large nationalist population, the city has a huge proportion of the population under 25. Yet life proceeds at an unhurried pace here. It’s a city with the atmosphere of a particularly fun and exciting village. [05] THE ARCHITECTURE A newly-developed waterfront and Guildhall area, the pedestrian Peace Bridge, the Foyle Bridge and the tasteful remodelling of Ebrington Square means the city has never looked so good. Add in the uniquely well-

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preserved walls, cathedrals, and the Millennium Forum, and you’re aesthetically spoilt. [06] THE BORDER-TOWN FEEL Derry-Londonderry is sitting on what is soon to be a border between the United Kingdom and the European Union. It also sits at the confluence of Ireland’s two great coastal routes: the Causeway Coastline, and the Wild Atlantic Way. The influences that come from the surrounding counties are palpable. [07] THE STREET ART The Bogside Murals, the Waterside Murals and the Fountain are visually striking street art, testament to how the communities of the city have channelled their historic identities in a visual way.

“WITH PUBS PLAYING TRADITIONAL MUSIC EVERY NIGHT, TO THE ROCK, JAZZ AND DJ SCENE, AND THE PLETHORA OF ARTISTIC VENUES, ORGANISATIONS AND EVENTS, FEW CITIES HAVE AS MUCH GOING ON AFTER 10PM ON A WEEKNIGHT”

Before The Troubles, most locals used Derry in everyday speech, while many unionists continue to do so. Today, the local government district containing the city is called Derry and Strabane, while city politicians use the inclusive Derry-Londonderry. [10] THE SPORT The city is unique in having its football (soccer) team playing in the Republic of Ireland’s premier division. Yet it is nonsectarian, with Derry City FC due to groundshare with Institute FC, drawn from the unionist east of the city. l

[08] THE FOOD With gastropubs, street food and contemporary cuisine using local produce at every turn, Derry is the culinary capital of the North West. [09] THE NAMES So nice they named it twice, DerryLondonderry has had more alter egos than David Bowie, from Doire Calgaigh to Doire Colmcille, from Derry to Londonderry, from Maiden City and the Walled City to Foyleside.

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


ARTS & CULTURE

A REGION AT THE HEART OF ART! Immerse yourself in a region that is crammed with arts and culture


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s you might guess from the murals festooned across the city’s suburbs – or by visiting any of the music venues like Sandinos or Bennigans – the city takes its arts and culture very seriously. In 2013 was the inaugural UK City of Culture, and was until recently in the running to become European Capital of Culture. Given the proliferation of theatres and arthouses in the city, you can see why. It’s a city that packs a cultural punch. On Great James Street lies Cultúrlann Uí Chanáin, a purposebuilt 200-seater Irish-language cultural hub, welcoming speakers of Irish, English and other languages with its programme of theatre, dance, language classes – a particular favourite is the provision of tai chi and pilates classes taught through Irish. A significant addition to the skyline of the Walled City upon its opening in 2009, An Chultúrlann has won several architectural awards and galvanised a renaissance in the city’s growing Irish-speaking community, galvanising a greater appreciation of traditional music, which has resulted in a trad boom in the city’s pubs and arts spaces, and ambitious plans for a Gaelic Quarter in the city, reflecting the growth of Irish-speaking schools (gaeilscoileanna) in the county and seeking to do for the North West what Galway City’s bilingual offerings have done for the West of Ireland. Over in the Cathedral Quarter, the Centre for Contemporary Art offers a wide-ranging programme of exhibitions on and off site, public programmes and residencies, with the aim of connecting the region with the rest of the world by drawing Irish and international artists, hosting six exhibitions a year, catering for those with a special interest in arts and also the general public. There is a wide range of art galleries, from the established to the innovative. Visit the Craft Village on Shipquay Street, containing a Green Canopy designed to allow the free flow of ideas between artists and craftspeople and the public, through demonstrations, performances and workshops. The Playhouse on Artillery Street – in the shadow of the Artillery Bastion of the historic City Walls – is a one-stop shop, commissioning, producing and touring theatre events with a 175-seat threatre, a dance studio, a gallery, and a large menagerie of artist groups. Quite an achievement when you consider it was established with a grant of just £300 back in 1992. The grassroots organisation has charitable status, and has a special love among the people of Derry from all backgrounds. On any given week you might

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encounter expressionist paintings; theatre from the LGBTI community; touring plays from Dublin; and performances from the Royal Shakespeare Company; celebrations of Irish culture; visiting plays from Brighton; and explorations about identity during The Troubles. Just down the road, also within the city walls, lies The Millennium Forum, the city’s only purpose-built theatre and conference centre on Newmarket Street, with the largest theatre stage in Ireland. The Forum offers drama to dance, comedy to musicals and light entertainment to children’s shows, and has been called the leading entertainment venue in the North West, with additional capacity for conferences of up to 100 delegates, as well as seminars, fairs, exhibitions, banquets, lectures, business meetings, press launches and executive interviews. Next to the Guildhall is a contemporary Irish art gallery, the Warehouse, presenting leading Irish art from each side of the border and further afield from a listed old trading building. Since 2005, the city has been home to Void, a contemporary art space of established international and Irish artists established by the group DADA p48

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“IN 2013 THIS WAS THE INAUGURAL UK CITY OF CULTURE, AND GIVEN THE PROLIFERATION OF THEATRES AND ARTHOUSES IN THE CITY, IT’S EASY TO SEE WHY”

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


(Derry’s Artists for Derry’s Art), now located in the Old City Shirt Factory on Patrick Street. It offers talks, workshops, film screenings and up to five exhibitions a year, seeking to engage the public in contemporary art with its mainly free offerings. The city is a perfect location for a visiting artist. North of the city centre, Studio 2 in Shantallow doubles as an exhibition and performing arts school, provides professional mentors in traditional and digital arts, dance, drama and music carnival in its capacious 200-seat theatre. It also provides two dance studios, a gallery, and conference rooms. For a sense of quiet in the heart of the city, the Garden of Reflection – partly funded by the EU – provides a sense of lightness just off Bishop Street. It is also behind a project to light the gates of the city walls, and lunchtime events programme involving visiting speakers. How to sum up Derry’s contribution to culture? Look no further than one school, which alone has produced playwright Brian Friel, Seamus Heaney, composers Phil Coulter and Paul Brady, as well as peacemaker (and Nobel Laureate) John Hume, political journalist Eamonn McCann and poet Seamus Deane. St Columb’s College, is now a specialist school in maths and sports on the Buncrana Road, but for years was based on Bishop Street at the heart of the city. For many, Heaney is the most notable cultural figure to have emerged from Ireland since the Second World War – the “greatest poet of our age” according to John Sutherland, among others. At one point, his books comprised two thirds of the sales by all living poets in the UK. Some of his most famous poems – including Mid-Term Break – are based at St Columb’s College in Derry, to which he won a scholarship at the age of 12. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995. Raised in Bellaghy Bawn in the east of the county, he

“FOR MANY, HEANEY IS THE MOST NOTABLE CULTURAL FIGURE TO HAVE EMERGED FROM IRELAND SINCE THE SECOND WORLD WAR. AT ONE POINT, HIS BOOKS COMPRISED TWO THIRDS OF THE SALES BY ALL LIVING POETS IN THE UK”

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

drew heavily on his rural upbringing as his work developed, and developed the Bog Aesthetic, obliquely alluding to the sectarian violence then prevalent through Northern Ireland, and refusing to lend rhetorical support for any political creed in his work, although he refused offers to be the Poet Laureate, and considered himself Irish, spending much of his life in Dublin. His Derry fellow alumni also lent richness to the experience of life in Northern Ireland during The Troubles through their work. Phil Coulter is today probably most famous for penning Ireland’s Call, a new anthem for the Ireland rugby team, which includes players from unionist backgrounds in Northern Ireland, and although more a songwriter than poet, he eloquently summed the emigrant’s experience of The Troubles in Derry with his famous song The Town I Loved So Well: “But when I returned how my eyes have burned to see how a town

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could be brought to its knees. By the armoured cars and the bombed out bars and, the gas that hangs on to every tree. Now the army’s installed, by that old gasyard wall – and the damned barbed wire gets higher and higher! With their tanks and their guns, oh my God, what have they done… to the town I loved so well?” Coulter is also famous for writing Scorn Not His Simplicity, about his son’s experience of Down’s Syndrome. The song was given its definitive airing by the Irish singing maestro Luke Kelly, who insisted on only playing it at certain occasions, due to the song’s emotional resonance. Today, the work of Heaney, Coulter and co stands as a testament to the cultural mood music in Derry. The city and county is alive with culture. Each August (in Irish: Lughnasa), Arts Over Borders presents a festival in Derry-Londonderry and Donegal honouring the cross-border talents of Brian Friel, whose most famous play was Dancing At Lughnasa,

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ARTS & CULTURE

later a Hollywood film starring Meryl Streep. Lughnasa Frielfest is now in its third year and held during the month of August. Also in August is the Foyle Pride Festival, with a parade crossing the city from the Waterside Train Station. The year 2018 marked the 25th such festival, celebrating diversity in the North West by following the route of the 1968 Civil Rights march. For electronic music lovers, the inaugural Jika Jika! Festival also kicked off in August 2018, which also sees Maiden City Ink, a celebration of tattoo culture and artists. Each May, meanwhile, comes the City of Derry Jazz Festival, drawing tens of thousands to Foyleside, with artists of the calibre of Van Morrison headlining a roster of artists from all over the world drawn to the biggest jazz festival in Northern Ireland. A Derry Walls Day takes place each year in September. In 2018 it coincided with the European Heritage Open Days weekend, while in 2019 they will mark quadricentennial of the completion of the walls of Derry – the longest, most complete circuit of ramparts of any of

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the 30 remaining walled towns in Ireland. A whole series of events are already in gestation. Also each September is the Carnival of Colours, the North West’s greatest circus arts and music festival, with two big-tops in St Columb’s Park, on a turn in the River Foyle. The City of Derry International Choir Festival brings its dulcet tones to the city in October, centred on St Columb’s Hall and running Wednesday-Sunday. Yet by far the most famous of Derry’s many festivals comes at the very end of October: Halloween, marking the end, or death, of the old Gaelic year, and – on November 1 – the beginning of the new year, or Samhain. This festival, which was popularised in America by Irish and Scottish emigrants in the 18th and 19th centuries, now runs for a week in Derry-Londonderry. The city has become world-famous for this celebration of the supernatural, with USA Today calling it the greatest Halloween festival in the world. Highlights include Samhain Sessions, Awakening the Walls, a Monster Fun Fair, and superb fireworks displays. l

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“DON’T MISS THE CARNIVAL OF COLOURS, THE NORTH WEST’S GREATEST CIRCUS ARTS AND MUSIC FESTIVAL, WITH TWO BIG-TOPS IN ST COLUMB’S PARK”

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


NIGHTLIFE

WELCOME TO THE NIGHT! From bustling bars to country pubs, you won’t be bored in Derry-Londonderry

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performed from Friday to Sunday. It’s a quiet hey don’t call it LegenDerry for nothing. pub for the music connoisseur, with a beer For a small city in European terms, garden bedecked with art. You could be anywhere Derry’s nightlife packs a punch. from Berlin to New Orleans. Check it out. Beautifully framed by the ever-present Directly down Foyle Street from Bennigans city walls, you have come to a city with a thriving lies Sandinos. Named after a Nicaraguan music and arts scene; a string of unique Irish pubs revolutionary and sporting Che Guevara that transport you into the atmosphere of an old pictures, Palestinian flags Irish shebeen; a huge array and a weird and wonderful of classy and alternative variety of headliners, nights out, and a growing Sandinos is a mixture of selection of cafes, arts spaces “EVEN ON A Irish shebeen, American bar and other venues offering an WEEKNIGHT, THE TIDY (as opposed to pub), and a alternative to the justifiably STREETS AND BYWAYS Latin American bolthole. popular Derry pub. Sandinos draws students, For music, you’re spoiled OF THE MAIDEN CITY artists, musicians and for choice. Even on a ARE BUSTLING WITH visiting DJs – not to weeknight, the tidy streets THE NOTES OF mention some talented and byways of the Maiden A THOUSAND chess players – to its City are bustling with the down-at-heel bar, with notes of a thousand MELODIES” larger events on upstairs. If melodies. The holy trinity is this was in London or Sandinos cafe-bar, Peadar Dublin (or Belfast) it would O’Donnell’s and – a cult be very serious indeed. But locals tend not to get favourite, this – Bennigans. too worked up about being cool for the sake of Situated, unusually, next to the Foyleside cool, and Sandinos keeps its laidback bohemian roundabout, Bennigans Bar is a cultural centre in vibe. It has traditional music sessions on Sunday. its own right, hosting open mics on Mondays, a For trad music throughout the week, try piano bar on Tuesdays, a film night on Peadar O’Donnell’s, the raucous, romantic heart Wednesdays, a Thursday triptych of comedy, of the city’s Irish music district, circled p52 gaming and blues, with jazz and other styles

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


©MARA ZEMGALIETE/ADOBE STOCK; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

NIGHTLIFE

around Waterloo Place and extending up through the pedestrianised Waterloo Street. Partly by dint of the craft of the two-part pour (first to the top of the harp, then the rest once settled), and partly due to the proximity to the Dublin brewery, Guinness tastes best in Ireland, and the pint in O’Donnell’s won’t be beaten anywhere. Decorated like an old-fashioned Irish grocer from the 1950s, O’Donnell’s features live music seven nights a week from 10.30pm (7pm-1am on Saturday, and 5pm-1am on Sunday), and is probably the finest Irish pub outside of the Republic, with a definite buzz about the place no matter what time of day. Next door, on the corner is Tracey’s, which does live karaoke. For live rock bands, pop in to the pub on the other side to O’Donnell’s sister pub the Gweedore, which has a nightclub upstairs. Next door to Tracey’s and proceeding uphill you’ll find the Castle and the Dungloe Bar, a family-friendly gastropub serving food – and, again, lashings of music, often played to its spacious beer garden. For drinks before or after the theatre, head to Badgers Bar, a fine Victorian gastropub conveniently located mid-way between the Playhouse Theatre and the Millennium Forum, with a great welcome just next to the City Walls.

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The Brickwork Lounge on Magazine Street, meanwhile, is popular with the stylish younger set. It features comedy in its Loft, and live music most nights from 10pm. For post-shopping classy drinks, try the Gate Bistro and Cocktail Bar which closes at 10pm. It’s strategically located between Foyleside and Richmond Shopping Centre – as is The Bentley, a contemporary wine bar and steakhouse. For other late dining (food until 10pm), and a fine pint of Guinness, try Fitzroy’s, just the other side of the city walls from the Gate Bistro. Fitzroy’s offer simple and uncomplicated pub dining, all carried out to the backing of an excellent playlist, with classic sounds from the 1960s and 1970s. With menus half-price during the week, the steaks are a steal. For nightclubs, you have the choice of Metro Bar on Bank Place, which closes at 2am, or, around the corner on Shipquay Street, Sugar – probably the best in the city – with two floors and a rooftop terrace just above the Quays Bar. Across the road lies the River Inn (now rebranded Silver Street). Established in 1648, it’s Derry’s oldest sited bar, and was, in 1798, the scene of the incarceration of Theobold Wolfe Tone, the leader of the United Irishmen rebellion captured in p54

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Traditional Irish Music every night

Peadar O’Donnell’s, the home of live traditional music in Derry. Peadar’s is known throughout the world and is a must visit location for the many tourists that flock to Derry in ever increasing numbers. We are famous for, among other things, our live music which is largely organised but has regular impromptu sessions from either local musicians or visiting performers. You are always guaranteed a warm welcome, a good time and the best pint of Guinness in Derry!

Waterloo Street | Derry | BT48 6HD 02871 267295 | Find us on


NIGHTLIFE

“FOR TRAD MUSIC THROUGHOUT THE WEEK, THIS IS THE RAUCOUS, ROMANTIC HEART OF THE CITY’S IRISH MUSIC DISTRICT”

with beautiful décor, and walls festooned with old clocks, dressers and lamps. They also have a kitchen and bar in Limavady. Further along Bishop Street lies the Wig champagne bar at the Bishop’s Gate Hotel. It has a lively cocktail and champagne menu, and frequently hosts live musics, which they have dubbed “Gigs at the Wig”. At the top of Waterloo Street is Rocking Chair at the top of Waterloo Street, which has two-piece bands in the shadow of the Butcher’s Gate just outside the city walls. Across the road, on the former Bog Road, a new cafe and arts space called Cow Bog is launching jazz nights, men’s circle, yoga, poetry, organic events, winter flea markets, craft night, women’s lunar events, and a host of other workshops. On the outskirts of the city centre – and next to the city’s main hostel – the Diplomat on Strand Road combines a pub with a nightclub that features Wednesday night karaoke. Next door is Tinneys, a cosy pub with a friendly feel. Just down the street is Grand Central Bar, while around the corner is the atmospheric Jack’s Bar. Grand Central Bar on Strand Road, established in 1922, meanwhile, is as old as Northern Ireland itself, and a great place to hear live music. Nearby is Quay West, situated in a 19th-century building on the banks of the Foyle, with a cocktail bar open until 10pm. For a visit to Derry-Londonderry’s gay scene, Envy Bar and Nightclub lies at the further end of Strand Road, and opens at 10pm. The former p57

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Donegal and executed in Dublin. Today, his prison has become the Cellar Bar which, along with the Snug and Silver Street Café bar, forms today’s pub complex. Next to the River Inn is the Gainsborough Bar, an archetype of the Irish “old man’s bar”, beloved of those, young and old, who like their company relaxed and their pubs quiet. Derry is full of pubs with historical interest. On Ebrington Square on the city’s eastern bank lies the Walled City Brewery, housed in a former army barracks on Ebrington Parade Grounds. Back on the western side of the peace bridge, Guidhall Taphouse, meanwhile, serves an ever-changing range of craft beers in the shadow of city hall. The Exchange wine bar is just two doors down. Blackbird on Foyle Street is a classy bar on Foyle Street serving great cocktails. It has a range of food – including veggie-friendly – options and some stupendously comfortable sofas, and stays open until 1.30am. Another fixture on the Waterloo Street pub lineup is Electric Annie’s, with live music seven nights a week catering to a younger crowd, with a raft of drinks promotions. Its sister pub, Granny Annie’s, is open on the corner of ‘Bishop Street Within’, the other side The Diamond, the centre of the original walled city, halfway between the Bogside and the Fountain. It’s an experience of visiting your grandmother’s house,

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OPEN FROM 4.30PM DAILY

Widely known as Northern Ireland’s premier jazz club, Bennigans Bar is a young and vibrant musician-owned venue bar with a broad range of world-class entertainment on every night. See our popular Saturday afternoon jazz session with local music legend Gay McIntyre and the John Leighton Trio every week at 5.30pm (admission £5). Often described as a cultural gem of the city, the site has a fantastic history and played its part in the mass emigration of the Irish to America in the late 1800s. Pay us a visit and enjoy a great selection of fine beverages in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere.

Mondays

Open mic (10pm)

Tuesdays

Live original acts, local & international (10pm)

Wednesdays

Film Club (9pm in yard)

Thursdays

Chicken Box Comedy open mic (8.30pm in lounge) Gaming Night on 100” screen (10pm in yard) Jack McHale Trio – blues & roots (11pm)

Fridays

Joseph Leighton solo jazz guitar (7pm) Live original acts, local & international (10.30pm)

Saturdays

Gay McIntyre & John Leighton Trio (5.30pm/£5) Live original acts, cover bands or DJs (10pm)

Sundays

John Leighton Trio + guests (5.30pm/£5) Film Club (9pm in yard)

Bennigans Bar 13 John street BT48 6JY

Need more info? Call us on 02871 269127


GR8 BEERS

FOOD SERVED

d e h s i l b sta

WE BREW OUR OWN

BEER

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1 9 2 2

A LISTED BUILDING THE BEST IN LIVE MUSIC TRADITIONAL PUB

GREAT PINTS, GREAT CRAIC, GREAT ENTERTAINMENT

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THE GUILDHALL

TAPHOUSE

Craft

Beer Music venue Cocktail Bar 4 Custom House Street. Derry

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MARTIN MCKEOWN/THE CITY OF DERRY JAZZ FESTIVAL

“IN THE EAST OF THE COUNTY, IN MAGHERAFELT, MARY’S BAR WAS RECENTLY NAMED THE BEST PUB IN THE COUNTY FOR ITS SOPHISTICATED DRINKS MENU AND DECADENT FOOD OFFERINGS”

Clarendon Bar on Strand Road is closed at present, but is due to reopen as a branch of the Belfast cocktail chain the Tipsy Bird. The Glen Bar and Upstairs Downstairs, on the Dungiven Road in the city’s eastern side. There is also the Icon Wine Bar on the same road, a buzzy bar with live music and a DJ. Also on the Waterside is the Riz bar and Bistro. Housed in a building built in the 1840s and formerly Waterside National School, it’s now the most popular haunt on Spencer Road, serving up a mean strawberry daiquiri amid the relaxing old-world charm of its high ceilings, exposed wooden beams and open fire. On the more nationalist western city of the city centre, The Bogside Inn offers an excellent pint and a welcome in the Republican heartland of the Bogside, while another good place to meet the locals is the small, unshowy George’s on Bishop Street – or The Oak, O’Sullivans on the same street, or the sports bar the Abercorn Bar around the corner. But don’t forget the county. North of the city lies Pitcher’s Wine Bar and Restaurant, overlooking a famous golfcourse – the “Earhart” Par 71 course, named after the 1932 solo transatlantic flight by Amelia Earhart, the first women to do so. Shantallow House lies to the north of the city, too, with recent renovations to the former Daly’s Bar and bistro leaving it a favourite for families and visitors to the area. Further east in Magherafelt, meanwhile, Mary’s Bar was recently named the best pub in the county for its sophisticated drinks menu and decadent food offerings. l

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


SPORT

OUR SPORTING LIFE! Whether you want to watch or take part, there’s always plenty on offer here


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he two biggest sports in DerryLondonderry are both football. In this part of the world, ‘football’ can refer to gaelic football, the Irish sport, or ‘soccer’. Soccer is the most popular sport in the city, and Derry has produced several high-profile players, including double European Cup-winner Martin O’Neill, and current Irish star James McClean. The city’s biggest club, Derry City FC, play at the newly renovated Brandywell Stadium, near the city’s historic Bogside. Uniquely, Derry City play in the Republic’s League of Ireland, rather than the Northern Ireland Football League (NIFL). The Candystripes, as they are known, have a storied history. Northern Irish champions in 1965, they competed in the European Cup later that year. In 1972 however, at the height of the Troubles, they resigned from the NIFL, after being forced to play home matches in unionist Coleraine instead of the Brandywell. After 13 years of non-league football, they joined the League of Ireland in 1985 and quickly made history, winning a domestic treble in 1989, plus the League title in 1997, three FAI Cups, and six League Cups. The city’s other main football club, Institute FC, have been recently promoted to the Premiership of the Northern Football Irish league (NIFL), where they join county side Coleraine FC. Since 1980, Institute FC were based at Drumahoe – a mainly unionist town to the south east of the city – but severe flood damage to the ground means they have applied for, and been accepted, to groundshare with Derry City at the Brandywell, on Lone Moor Road – the beating heart of sport in the city. Lone Moor Road is also where you’ll find Celtic Park, the 18,000-capacity home of Derry GAA, which governs hurling, football and camogie. The stadium is visible from the Butcher’s Gate in the city walls. All told, there are 40 GAA clubs in the city and county of Derry, the vast majority concentrating on gaelic football, which sees 15 players on each team using their hands and feet to score goals and points. The Derry Football Championship is renowned for the fierce rivalry between local clubs. At inter-county level, Derry footballers play in arguably the most competitive provincial championship in Ireland – the Ulster Football Championship, against behemoths like Tyrone, Donegal, and Armagh. Derry have won the Ulster championship seven times, the latest in 2007 and in 1993 were crowned All-Ireland

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champions. The Derry minor footballers (a sort of youth team) have won Ulster at minor twice in recent seasons, raising hopes for future senior success at Celtic Park. The ancient Irish sport of hurling is also widely played in Derry, regarded as one of the stronger Ulster hurling sides. After winning the Nicky Rackard Cup in 2017, Derry hurlers now field a competitive senior hurling team in the Christy Ring Cup, the third-tier of All-Ireland hurling counties. In rugby union, the county is represented in the all-Ireland league by Magherafelt, as well as rugby clubs: City of Derry, Limavady, and Coleraine. Cricket and rowing are also increasingly popular. If you like your golf, you are in for a treat. Situated on Northern Ireland’s magnificent Causeway Coast, Portstewart Golf Club was founded in 1894. Strand Course is indisputably the jewel in Portstewart’s crown for both quality of game and scenery. The course is set in classic links country amid towering sand

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dunes with views at every turn of the Donegal hills, the Atlantic and the River Bann. For something a little less challenging, the Riverside Course stretches from the clubhouse down to the River Bann. And if you like a little heritage in your game, the original Old Course situated at the eastern end of Portstewart along the rocky shore, has tested players since 1889. Without doubt championship pedigree, Portstewart has hosted the Irish Amateur Championship in 1960 and 1992 and held qualifying rounds of The Open in 1951 and the British Seniors in 2004. Strand Course was the host for the 2017 Dubai Duty Free Irish Open. And last but not least if you are into motorbikes and visiting between May 16 and 18 this year, the exhilarating North West 200 motorcycle race should not be missed. It is held on a road course between the towns of Portstewart, Coleraine and Portrush in Causeway Coast and Glens. The course, known as the Triangle, is one of the fastest in the world, with average speeds of 120mph and top speeds in excess of 200mph. The 2019 staging marks the 90th anniversary of the international races on Northern Ireland’s north coast. l

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TRAVEL

GETTING HERE AND GETTING AROUND! Getting to and getting around Derry-Londonderry couldn’t be easier…

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GETTING HERE

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BY AIR City of Derry Airport is seven miles from the city, with flights to and from Stansted, Glasgow and Liverpool. Belfast International Airport is a 90-minute drive, while Dublin Airport is three hours away (four by public transport). BY SEA There are sailings from Liverpool and Cairnryan in Scotland to Larne and Belfast. Including the ferry, it typically takes four hours to drive from Cairnryan (Stranraer) to Derry – or six hours from Glasgow. There is also a ferry – the Lough Foyle Ferry – between Magilligan Point in County Derry and Greencastle in County Donegal.

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BY BUS Translink operates bus and rail services through Northern Ireland, and across the border. A 212 bus departs Belfast for Derry-Londonderry every 15 minutes, taking anything from 1 hour and 45 minutes to 2 hours 30 minutes. There also a 273 bus running between Belfast and Derry-Londonderry travelling south of Lough Neagh, via Strabane, Omagh, Dungannon and Lurgan. From Coleraine, take the 234 bus. If you plan on going straight from the Giant’s Causeway to Derry, meanwhile, there is a 243 direct bus running on Sunday evenings back to the city. From Dublin or Dublin Airport, you have the choice of the X4 (operated by Translink/Goldline) via Magherafelt and the scenic Faughen Valley, or the X3 via Omagh and Strabane. Bus Éireann runs nine buses a day from Dublin to Strabane and Lifford (but no longer Derry directly, sadly). p63

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


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TRAVEL

“AS A COMPACT CITY OF JUST OVER 100,000 PEOPLE, DERRY IS BEST EXPLORED BY FOOT OR BICYCLE”

BY TRAIN The rail line between Belfast and Derry is one to behold, particularly from Coleraine on. It sweeps along the northern coast past Mussenden Temple, Downhill Strand and Magilligan Point. It’s an option if you’re using Derry as the start or end of an exploration of the northern coast. BY ROAD Northern Ireland’s motorway network is not as extensive as south of the border, but the A-roads are of good standard, and a dual carriageway from Belfast is in the pipeline. At present, Derry is a 90-minute drive from either Belfast or Larne. Expect to spend twice that time driving from Dublin (via either Monaghan and the N2, or Newry/Armagh and the Republic’s M1). For tourists starting or finishing a drive along the north coast, a particular joy is driving over the Foyle Bridge dual carriageway – Ireland’s longest cantilevered bridge.

GETTING AROUND

GEMMA EVANS/UNSPLASH; GARDINER MITCHELL/MATTHEW WOODHOUSE/TOURISM IRELAND/IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL

As a compact city of just over 100,000 people, Derry is best explored by foot – or bicycles, available from Claudy Cycles at the Visit Derry Information Centre, among others. As well as providing an architectural setting unique in Ireland, the city walls of DerryLondonderry are also a superb elevated way to circuit the city centre. Walking tours of the walled city and Bogside are recommended, with as low as £5 per person. For the inevitable rainy day or two, there are several taxi companies, including Derry Taxis and Foyle Taxis. Ulsterbus run services across the metropolitan area from its office on Foyle Street. A day’s travel card is just £2.20, while £10 will get you a week’s bus travel. l

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WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


FURTHER AFIELD

LET’S EXPLORE! Although you’ll never run out of things to do here, there’s also plenty to do and see further afield


“BELFAST DRAWS PARTY-GOERS AND HIPSTERS FROM ACROSS EUROPE TO ENJOY ITS EXPANDING CULINARY DELIGHTS, MUSIC-FILLED PUBS AND THE SPECTACULAR TITANIC QUARTER”

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BRIAN MORRISON/CHRIS HILL/TOURISM IRELAND/IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL; TONY PLEAVIN/NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD

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t the intersection of the Causeway Coastal route and the Wild Atlantic Way, Derry-Londonderry is the perfect base to explore this half of Ireland – starting with the world-famous Giant’s Causeway (Clochán na bhFomhórach), about an hour’s drive away. Today a UNESCO World Heritage site, the Giant’s Causeway comprises around 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, some as high as 40 feet, formed from intense volcanic activity and acting as stepping stones into the North Channel separating Ireland from Scotland. The Giant’s Causeway has inspired awe since its creation 50 million years ago and today it is universally loved geological wonder – and free, if you avoid the visitor centre. From Giant’s Causeway, the Bushmills Distillery – the world’s oldest licensed distillery – is but a short drive away. Whiskey has been distilled in this area since time out of mind, and the distillery’s tours are again around an hour’s drive from the city. From Derry-Londonderry , you can also head due north or west and sample the riches of Donegal. Named the coolest place on the planet for 2017, Donegal is home to many people who still speak Irish language daily. It’s also a great location for viewing the Northern Lights. And its riches start just five miles from the Walled City: the Grianan of Aileach, a spectacular National Monument, and seat of the ancient Kingdom of Aileach. Continue on into Donegal and visit the savage wild coast of the Inishowen Peninsula, and the spectacular Malin Head, carved out of rock by the North Atlantic. The most northerly point of the whole island, it has hosted filming for the Star Wars move franchise. Fanad Head is another point

jutting out into the sea. Pass through the exquisite town of Ramelton to Ards Forest Park, a 1,200-acre mixture of forest and shoreline. For a visit to one of the last of Ireland’s mature oak forests, visit Rathmullan Wood in Glenveagh National Park, 170 square kilometres of blanket bog and wooded hillside on the shores of Lough Veagh, with deer and golden eagles. You can also visit Sliabh Liag, the highest cliffs in Ireland. South of Derry-Londonderry, meanwhile, lies the lakelands of Fermanagh, and the Sanctuary of St Patrick on Lough Derg, where you can follow the path of pilgrims from the last thousand years . There’s also always time to visit Northern Ireland’s other main city, Belfast, which has reinvented itself in recent years, drawing

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party-goers and hipsters from across Europe to its expanding culinary delights, musicfilled pubs, Titanic Quarter – and a thriving gay scene. A three-hour drive, meanwhile, Dublin makes an ideal overnight stay en route to Derry-Londonderry or back. The city has unrivalled shopping, a burgeoning tech scene – and Ireland’s most established coffee culture. It’s also a great place to explore the many strands of history on the island of Ireland, with Norman, medieval, Georgian and Victorian architecture. For a look at prehistoric Ireland, meanwhile, visit Newgrange. A two-hour drive from DerryLondonderry, it features a 5,000-year-old Neolithic monument, plus lots more. l

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


BUSINESS

WE’RE OPEN FOR BUSINESS! With a skilled workforce employed in diverse sectors, this region’s economy is performing well

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ith the peace dividend kicking in, one of the youngest populations in Europe, and big infrastructure projects underway, it’s a great time to invest in Derry-Londonderry. The city has long been economically significant, earning a mention in Karl Marx’s seminal book Das Kapital as a centre for the linen and textile industries in the 19th and early 20th centuries. And the region is again poised to fulfil its potential. Derry/Strabane Council, which covers the city, is also in advanced discussions for a UK CityDeal, following an invitation from the British Chancellor of the Exchequer. The proposed deal, which would give the city greater access to State finance for investment, was mentioned in the 2019 Budget statement. Even without that, a £27 million North West Multi-Nodal transport hub, partly funded by the EU and Dublin, was recently approved for the city’s railway station. In the meantime, rail frequency from Belfast has increased to hourly trains. Construction has also begun to upgrade the A6 to Belfast to dual carriageway standard, opening Derry-Londonderry to Northern Ireland’s motorway and dual carriageway network. Work is finally under way on two key sections of this route – Randalstown to Castledawson, and Dungiven to Drumahoe – and is ahead of schedule. When all sections are open, it will take just over an hour to drive to or from Belfast. As well as improving connectivity to the east, construction of a separate A5 motorway, which would link Derry-Londonderry by motorway to mid-Ulster and Dublin, is expected to begin in 2019. It will be the biggest road project ever undertaken in Northern Ireland, and transform

“THOUGH HISTORICALLY KNOWN FOR ITS TEXTILES, THE COUNTY HAS A GROWING IT SECTOR AND IS NOW HOME TO A CLUSTER OF HIGH TECH BUSINESSES”

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©PRESSMASTER/MICHAEL BURRELL/ADOBE STOCK; BRIAN MORRISON/ NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD; GARDINER MITCHELL/TOURISM IRELAND/IRELAND’S CONTENT POOL; IGOR OVSYANNYKOV/UNSPLASH

the city’s connection to counties like Tyrone, Fermanagh and south of the border. As a whole, the Northern Ireland economy is going from strength to strength, growing in the third quarter of 2018, mainly down to manufacturing and construction. In terms of manufacturing, textiles, IT and chemicals are the principal sectors for the industry. Northern Ireland’s economic annual growth year on year was 2.1 per cent compared with 1.5 per cent across the UK in 2018. Unemployment in Derry/Strabane, meanwhile, fell by 9 per cent annually. And with around half the population are aged 35 and younger, there is huge untapped potential in the Derry-Londonderry region. The food sector in the region is also very strong, characterised by family-owned businesses, mostly in the bakery sector.

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Specialist agricultural engineering is an established sector in the south of the county. Despite fears over Brexit, big construction projects around the city continue to get approval, including the old Thornhill College site, and a new £10.7 million project for a landmark building on Ebrington Square, bringing 80,000 square foot of office space, 120 jobs during construction and up to 640 jobs once completed. Though it was historically known for its textiles, the county has a growing IT sector. Derry-Londonderry is now home to a cluster of high tech businesses, and is the hub of a technology corridor from Coleraine to

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Letterkenny in County Donegal. Last year 628 digital jobs were created in the city, and there is an increasing entrepreneurship culture, with new business stars including Youtube star Adam Beales, cyber security developer Robert O’Brien, and Grainne Kelly, CEO of Bubblegum. It is a great business destination, with unrivalled conferencing facilities, with capacity for 1,000 delegates at the Millennium Forum. The 2,000-capacity Foyle Arena, on leafy St Columb’s Park, is also a draw, while there are also bespoke meeting facilities at the imposing Guildhall, St Columb’s Hall and theatres across the city. l

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY


PROPERTY

IF YOU’RE PLANNING TO STAY LONGER… People come to Derry-Londonderry for many reasons – and stay for a lot more!

WELCOME TO DERRY-LONDONDERRY

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PETER BOCCIA/UNSPLASH; NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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county lies in Derry-Strabane District Council. The rest of the county, including Limavady and Coleraine, is included in Causeway Coast and Glens). In the second Derry-Strabane saw a rise of 12.5 per cent in the second quarter of 2018. The average house price across this region is now £154,676, up from £137,000 in 2017. The rise included the increasing popularity of detached houses, which has an average price of £210,000. Yet the average price of a terraced house or townhouse in Derry/Strabane is £83,000 – an annual decline of 10 per cent. Overall across the North, property prices across the North increased 6.2 per cent in the second quarter of 2018 compared to 2017. The average price of a house in Northern Ireland is now £162,215 (€181,225), according to the University of Ulster – compared to the average UK house price of £226,351. It means the property market in Derry-Londonderry, and the region at large, is much more attractive than across the UK. Yet despite property being cheap, the City of Derry has the UK’s lowest home ownership at 46 per cent, versus an NI average of 62 per cent. Some 19 per cent of the housing stock comprises social housing, meanwhile, compared to 16.5 per cent across Northern Ireland. Elsewhere in the county, Coleraine, Limavady and the North Coast have seen fluctuations in house prices over the last two years. Today, the average house price is £165,624 as of the second quarter of 2018, having dropped from £147,108 to £136,270 between early 2016 and late 2017. l

t’s a good time to invest in property in DerryLondonderry. The overheating of property markets in Dublin and London, means investors are increasingly looking to Northern Ireland, where house price increases running around three percentage points above UK inflation. The property market across Northern Ireland has been rising for the last two years. It wasn’t always thus. The peace dividend which followed the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998 precipitated exponential growth in the early and mid-2000s, before the credit crunch saw Northern Ireland undergo the largest fall of property prices in any global market. Since 2013, the market has stabilised, investor confidence has returned, and the level of transactions remains at a stable rate compared to the Republic. Commercial property opportunities are on the rise, with a £15 million hotel recently approved for the historic Ebrington Square site on the east bank of the Foyle. The 30,000 square foot Da Vinci complex on the Culmore Road is currently on sale for £3.3 million, meanwhile. Yet Brexit threatens commercial property market, not least with the Northern Irish economy edging close to recession in the first quarter of 2018. At present, Derry remains the second cheapest of the UK’s 54 cities for residential property, with its average price of £117,989 a quarter below the Northern Ireland average. And confidence in Northern Ireland’s housing market is higher than in other parts of the UK. (Although most Northern Ireland has six counties, for administrative purposes it was recently divided up into 11 local authority districts. Derry city and most of the

“THE PROPERTY MARKET IN DERRY-LONDONDERRY, AND THE REGION AT LARGE, IS MUCH MORE ATTRACTIVE THAN ACROSS THE UK”

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Traditional Irish Music every night

Waterloo Street | Derry | BT48 6HD | 02871 267295 | Find us on


Peadar O’Donnell’s, the home of live traditional music in Derry. Peadar’s is known throughout the world and is a must visit location for the many tourists that flock to Derry in ever increasing numbers. We are famous for, among other things, our live music which is largely organised but has regular impromptu sessions from either local musicians or visiting performers. You are always guaranteed a warm welcome, a good time and the best pint of Guinness in Derry!

Waterloo Street | Derry | BT48 6HD | 02871 267295 | Find us on


Step into HomePlace

Immerse yourself in the extraordinary world of Seamus Heaney, and explore through his words and imagination the people and place that so inspired him.

Admission: Adults ÂŁ7 | Concession ÂŁ4.50 | Children (under 7) free | Family tickets available 45 Main Street, Bellaghy, Co. Derry BT4T 8HT T: 028 7938 7444 | www.SeamusHeaneyHome.com

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