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CONTENTS

Our top fives

Check out our top things to do, see, experience and more... Page 66

Eating out

Edinburgh’s restaurant scene offers an array of flavours... Page 68

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94 93

CONTENTS Welcome.......................................09 Edinburgh is a city like no other!

History all around....................... 10

©RUTH ARMSTRONG/THE ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA; ©VISITBRITAIN/SIMON WINNALL/ VISITSCOTLAND; ADOBESTOCK; ING IMAGE; RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO/KATIE PATON

Edinburgh is steeped in history – it’s in the very fabric of the city.

Eyes of the world on Edinburgh............................... 18 From stunning skylines to sandy beaches, festivals to fireworks, this city has something for everyone, day and night.

Like to shop? You’ll love it here........................20

High street chains, one-off independents and quirky specialists – they’re all waiting for the shopaholic.

Our top fives................................66 There are dozens of reasons to love it here – check out a few of our favourites.

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A taste of Scotland – and the world...............................68

Top-end fine dining, adventurous independents and a great range of ethnic cuisine means you’ll never go hungry here.

Double-quick Edinburgh..........90

If you only have a few days on your hands to enjoy Edinburgh, check out our guide to getting the best out of 48 or 72 hours here.

Did you know?.............................93 Know all about Edinburgh? Think again!

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A city at the heart of art.............94 Edinburgh’s rich cultural history continues to grow and thrive in a city which has played host to all of the greats.

Written in the stars...................102 Our amazing heritage continues to be well-documented by a host of great writers.

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CONTENTS

Nightlife

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Uncover the gems hidden within Edinburgh’s nightlife scene... Page 126

124 Let’s go there.............................108 Whatever the time of year, and whatever the weather, there’s always plenty to do.

Welcome to festival city.......... 124 If it’s worth celebrating, there’s a festival in Edinburgh dedicated to it.

Welcome to the night..............126 From a quiet pint or a wee dram in a traditional bar to the latest sounds from top DJs, there’s no shortage of things to do after dark in Edinburgh.

Let’s explore...............................134 There’s always plenty to do here – but it’s also a great base for striking out further afield.

Sport

The sporting oportunities in this city are endless… Page 144

139 108

Getting here and getting around...........................139 Edinburgh is a leading world city – but it’s small enough for visitors to get around with ease.

Our sporting life........................144 Whether you want to watch or play, there’s always plenty to do in Edinburgh.

Historic past, exciting future...........................150 Once a thriving commercial centre, Leith has been transformed into a stylish, must-visit part of Edinburgh.

We’re open for business..........154 As befits Scotland’s economic powerhouse, Edinburgh is very much open for business.

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WELCOME

MARKETING EDINBURGH; THE ROYAL EDINBURGH MILITARY TATTOO/©MARTIN SCOTT POWELL

WELCOME T

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his is Edinburgh: Scotland’s proud capital where centuries of rich history meet a modern metropolis. Voted one of the most beautiful cities in the world by Rough Guides, and repeatedly named the UK’s top city by the Daily Telegraph, the sheer beauty and buzz of Edinburgh is like nothing you have experienced before. Take a close look and discover world-class attractions and a myriad of hidden gems. Pandas and penguins at Edinburgh Zoo. Pop art and portraits in our galleries and museums. An extinct volcano. The one o’clock gun, fired every day from our very own castle. Stunning parks and hidden lanes. Roam our streets and you’ll uncover a labyrinth of culture and heritage. Edinburgh also hosts some of the finest independent shops in Scotland, as well as the very best designer and high-street names. Stroll along Multrees Walk to indulge in a spot of luxury, step through the revolving doors of Jenners, the oldest department store in Scotland, or browse off the beaten track on Thistle Street, Rose Street, Grassmarket and the West End. Once you’ve enjoyed the above, you’ll realise that you’re in the perfect place to satisfy the hungriest of appetites. From street food to Michelin stars, all tastes are catered for in our restaurants and cafes. And we’ve plenty of places to visit afterwards for the perfect nightcap. You can also benefit from local knowledge as residents recommend some of their favourite bars, restaurants and must-sees, in the city centre and further afield. So, welcome and enjoy. With attractions and activities to suit visitors of every age, interest and cultural palate all year round, we hope your stay will be just as unique as our setting. l

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“VOTED ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CITIES IN THE WORLD, THE SHEER BEAUTY AND BUZZ OF EDINBURGH IS LIKE NOTHING YOU HAVE EXPERIENCED BEFORE”

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HISTORY & HERITAGE

HISTORY ALL AROUND! Edinburgh is steeped in history – it’s in the very fabric of the city

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the key to more than 5,000 years of Scottish history and culture. These attractions offer great days out for both young and old, with lots to see and do. This area is home to 26 Historic Scotland properties including the famous Edinburgh Castle and the historical landscape of Holyrood Park. Edinburgh Castle is a proud and majestic symbol of Scotland, famous the world over. Perched on an extinct volcano, this instantly recognisable fortress is a powerful national symbol and part of Old and New Towns of Edinburgh World Heritage Site. Its story is Scotland’s story. From the One O’Clock Gun and Mons Meg to the Honours of Scotland and the Stone of Destiny, there is a lot to see at this magnificent property. Visitors can also follow in royalty’s footsteps in the chamber where Mary Queen of Scots gave birth and the Great Hall, where monarchs feasted. Edinburgh Castle has a wealth of history. The Castle rock has been a stronghold for over 3000 years. It has some wonderful and fascinating p12

he buzz of Scotland’s capital city sits in perfect contrast to the peaceful tranquillity of the surrounding Lothians region. With Scotland’s most famous castle dominating the city skyline, there is plenty to see and do with the perfect balance between all things traditional and contemporary. Its magnificent architecture shifts from the lofty tenements and narrow closes of its medieval Old Town as they tumble down the spine of the Royal Mile, to the grace and geometric precision of the Georgian New Town. Above it all, in its towering splendour, stands the Castle. Close to Edinburgh, yet a million miles away from the bustle of city life, the Lothians are the perfect place to relax and unwind. The area consists of three distinct regions – East Lothian, Midlothian and West Lothian, which together make up Edinburgh’s surrounding coast and countryside. Historic Scotland cares for the largest number of historic visitor attractions in the country, holding

“WITH SCOTLAND’S MOST FAMOUS CASTLE DOMINATING THE CITY SKYLINE, THERE IS PLENTY TO SEE AND DO WITH THE PERFECT BALANCE BETWEEN ALL THINGS TRADITIONAL AND CONTEMPORARY”

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THIS IS EDINBURGH


©VISITBRITAIN/BRITAIN ON VIEW/VISITSCOTLAND

HISTORY & HERITAGE

“SINCE THAT TIME, THE ANCIENT FORTRESS HAS CONTINUED TO SERVE AS AN ACTIVE ARMY BASE”

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history. Archaeologists have found evidence for human occupation of the Castle Rock reaching back to 900 BC, the late Bronze Age. During the Roman occupation of Scotland in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD, it was a thriving settlement. In the Middle Ages Edinburgh became Scotland’s chief royal castle – seat of royalty, headquarters of the sheriff of Edinburgh, military garrison and storehouse of the royal gun train, and repository of the nation’s crown jewels and state records. The Jacobite siege of 1745, during which Bonnie Prince Charlie held court at Holyrood Palace but could not wrest the castle from the Hanoverian King George II, proved to be the last. Since that time, the ancient fortress has continued to serve as an active army base, but has since found new roles – as a major visitor attraction, as home of the Scottish National War Memorial and two proud Scottish regiments (the Royal Scots and the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards), and as host of the worldfamous Edinburgh Military Tattoo. Not far from the Castle is the scheduled ancient monument of Holyrood Park. This unique historic landscape in the heart of the city has dramatic crags and archaeology spanning thousands of years. Featured within the park is Arthur’s Seat, consisting of

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four hill forts dating from around 2,000 years ago. There is also the St Anthony’s Well, a stone bowl and massive boulder, which lies on a path up to the gaunt ruin of St Anthony’s Chapel, which stands on a spur overlooking the Forth. Downhill is St Margaret’s Well, one of seven holy wells in the park. Holyrood Park was enclosed by a stone-built boundary wall in 1541. As well as its rich cultural heritage, the park offers walks, solace, wildlife, volcanic geology and unparalleled vistas of the city from many vantage points. Out of the city centre stands the well-preserved medieval Craigmillar Castle. This property is especially unique as it has a tower house, courtyard and gardens. Craigmillar’s story is linked with that of Mary Queen of Scots and is one of Scotland’s most perfectly-preserved castles. The property began as a simple tower-house residence. Gradually, over time, it developed into a complex of structures and spaces, as subsequent owners attempted to improve its comfort and amenity. As a result, there are many nooks and crannies to explore. Of equal importance is the parkland, and the present-day Craigmillar Castle Park has fascinating reminders of the castle’s days as a rural retreat on the edge of Scotland’s capital city. At the core lies the original, late-14th-century p14

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THE GEORGIAN HOUSE EH2 4DR | Tel: 0131 225 2160 n GRAND GEORGIAN TOWN HOUSE n ART COLLECTION n SHOP

The National Trust for Scotland is a Scottish charity, SC007410


©CROWN COPYRIGHT REPRODUCED COURTESY OF HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT SCOTLAND; ©VISITSCOTLAND/PAUL TOMKINS; ING IMAGE

HISTORY & HERITAGE

tower house, among the first of this new form of castle built in Scotland. It stands 17m high to the battlements, has walls almost 3m thick, and holds a warren of rooms, including a fine great hall on the first floor, and the so-called ‘Queen Mary’s Room’ beside it, where Mary is said to have slept when staying there as a guest of the Prestons. In all probability, Mary resided in a multi-roomed apartment elsewhere in the courtyard, probably in the east range. Further afield in West Lothian is Linlithgow Palace. The magnificent ruins of this palace are set in a park beside a loch. Most of the Stuart kings lived here, and numerous renovations to the palace’s grand facades and chambers were carried out as each sought to create the ideal modern palace. The beautiful courtyard fountain has been carefully restored and is now on full view to visitors. A well surfaced walkway around the loch also gives visitors good views of the abundant water birds including swans, ducks and great crested and little grebes. In East Lothian, Dirleton Castle and Gardens is one of the oldest surviving castles in Scotland. For

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“FOR 400 YEARS, THE CASTLE STOOD AS A MAGNIFICENT FORTRESS-RESIDENCE FOR THREE SUCCESSIVE NOBLE FAMILIES”

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400 years, the castle stood as a magnificent fortress-residence for three successive noble families. The castle has boasted a garden probably since its earliest days as a medieval fortified residence. Today there is a colourful blend of traditional formal gardens and more contemporary plantings, including – as the Guinness Book of Records testifies – the world’s longest herbaceous border. Crichton Castle is one of Midlothian’s finest properties. The castle stands tucked away out of sight, on a terrace overlooking the River Tyne in Midlothian. Built as the lordly residence of the Crichtons and later home to the earls of Bothwell, this property is an eye-catching 16th-century courtyard façade. Crichton Glen is rich in woodland and meadow, with abundant wildflowers and birdlife. The castle is also an important bat roost and a footpath between Crichton and Borthwick castles makes this a great place for a beautiful afternoon stroll. These are just a few of the sites in the care of Historic Scotland in the Edinburgh and Lothians area. The rich built heritage of the area is really p17

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HISTORY & HERITAGE

“THE GEORGIAN HOUSE IS A TYPICAL EXAMPLE OF SUCH A HOUSE AND TODAY OFFERS VISITORS A VIVID RECREATION OF LIFE IN THE LATE 18TH-CENTURY CITY”

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outstanding and with so much to see and explore you are guaranteed never to have a dull moment. Nowhere is Edinburgh’s Jekyll & Hyde-style split personality more on display than in the gap between the chaotic, medieval Old Town and the refinement and order of the New Town. In these areas recognised as a World Heritage Site, the National Trust for Scotland cares for two properties which give a unique glimpse into a fascinating ‘tale of two towns’. For centuries, life in Edinburgh was dominated by work, kirk and king. Gladstone’s Land stood on the doorstep of it all. This high-rise tenement spans nearly 500 years of history, and the six rooms across two floors recreate the life of those who called it home, including a wealthy laird in the 1600s, a merchant shopkeeper, and the servants who did the dirty work. Gladstone’s Land was one of the “world’s first skyscrapers” and showcases the turbulent life of a capital city bursting at the seams. Inside its walls await treasures such as an iconic painted interior and countless stories of daily life, death, and drama. Sweep aside the Edinburgh you know and discover the often gritty yet sometimes glamorous life of the many thousands packed in amongst the

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claustrophobic closes of the Royal Mile. As living conditions in the Old Town grew worse, plans for the New Town emerged. Broader streets were designed with bigger, lighter houses, where the wealthier people quickly relocated. Designed by Robert Adam, The Georgian House is a typical example of such a house and today offers visitors a vivid recreation of life in the late 18thcentury city. Dating from 1796, the house was first occupied by John Lamont, 18th Chief of the Clan Lamont, who lived here with his family until 1815. The house’s collections of china, silver, paintings and furniture all reflect the domestic life and social conditions of the time. Contrast this with the life of the household ‘below stairs’ who made this elegant lifestyle possible.
The National Trust for Scotland, which looks after these houses, is a registered charity, and exploring these historic houses is a great way to contribute to the organisations’ vital conservation work and ensure that these magnificent places are in safe hands for future generations to enjoy.
Visit both of these places and more for free with a National Trust for Scotland membership, from only £7.00 per month for a family. For more details visit www.nts.org.uk. l

THIS IS EDINBURGH


WORLDCLASS CITY

EYES OF THE WORLD ON EDINBURGH! From stunning skylines to sandy beaches, festivals to fireworks, this city has something for everyone, day and night


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dinburgh’s setting is magical! Edinburgh Castle, the city’s top attraction, sits majestically upon the dormant volcanic rock overlooking Princes Street. The castle is based in the Old Town, a beguiling maze of ancient buildings and steep, cobbled streets. The New Town is over 200 years old and is made up of Georgian architecture and wide avenues. It is the grandiose mix of medieval and Georgian architecture that led to UNESCO granting the old and new towns World Heritage status in 1995. One of the best places to take in stunning views of the city is from the summit of Arthur’s Seat. This unique geological feat sits regally in the centre of the city and offers an oasis of tranquillity from the buzz of city life for residents and visitors alike. The city region is a thriving financial centre and home to some of the world’s most innovative biotechnology companies. Studies have rated Edinburgh as offering the highest quality of life in the UK. First-class urban amenities, a thriving business sector and world renowned universities attract people from all around the world to live, invest, study and visit Edinburgh. Edinburgh has a rich and diverse array of galleries, museums, theatres and festivals to cater to all cultural tastes. It is little wonder that Guardian/Observer readers have regularly voted Edinburgh as their Favourite UK City in their Travel Awards. The Scottish National Gallery on Edinburgh’s Mound displays art from the prestigious national collection including artists such as Monet and Van Gogh. A free bus service takes you to the Gallery of Modern Art and Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art where you can see works by eminent artists such as Andy Warhol and Damien Hirst. Children and adults love Edinburgh Zoo where they can see 131 different kinds of animals and can take in the delight of the daily penguin parade. Edinburgh is a unique city and if you’re in the mood for something a little different why not visit Our Dynamic Earth where our environmental past, present and future is vividly brought to life? Opportunities for surfing, climbing and mountain biking are all readily accessible from Edinburgh within 45 minutes. Less strenuous pursuits can be followed, too, as there are numerous golf courses in and around the city

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region. Edinburgh has one of the most picturesque high streets in the world. With a vibrant mix of bijou boutiques, speciality shops and designer labels there is something to suit every taste and budget. Multrees Walk is the focal point for luxury shopping in Edinburgh. Designer brands abound in this part of the city, Harvey Nichols is located in this area and is the only Scottish store. George Street is full of designer brands and chic and unique shops. At the top of George Street, St Andrews Square offers a well-earned respite after a hard day’s shopping. A one minute walk from the Square will take you to Princes Street where you will find a multitude of high street brands. Edinburgh also has the largest number of restaurants per head of population of anywhere in the UK! The city is packed full of restaurants serving Italian, Spanish, French, Japanese or traditional Scottish food to suit your mood. Edinburgh serves the best in international cuisine and with no less than four Michelin star restaurants you will delight at the food on offer. Edinburgh’s vibrant city night life is a hit with both residents and tourists. If you’re in a particularly indulgent mood, improvise a George Street cocktail trail: start off at Harvey Nichols’ Fourth Floor Bar and work your way through

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“EDINBURGH SERVES THE BEST IN INTERNATIONAL CUISINE AND WITH NO LESS THAN FOUR MICHELIN STAR RESTAURANTS YOU WILL DELIGHT AT THE FOOD ON OFFER”

the variety of opulent cocktail bars on offer. Edinburgh is THE Festival city and has a range of festivals all year round. The summer festivals combine the Fringe, International, Book, Art, Jazz and Mela festivals in a vibrant mix of comedy, music, dance, theatre and fun. The streets are alive with performers all vying for the attention of passers by. Enjoy a wander down the bustling Royal Mile to catch a free show and soak up the unique and magical atmosphere. In winter, with Edinburgh’s bright crisp days and long haunting nights, the city comes alive. Edinburgh’s Christmas and Hogmanay celebrations truly sparkle and are world famous. Edinburgh’s Winter Wonderland hosts an ice rink, Christmas Market and a 33m Big Wheel with 360 degree views of the city. l

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SHOPPING

LIKE TO SHOP? YOU’LL LOVE IT HERE! High street chains, one-off independents and quirky specialists – they’re all waiting for the shopaholic

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dinburgh boasts a mixed retail experience unlike any other in Scotland. While it has all the big brands you’d expect in a major city, there’s also a rich variety of independent stores you won’t find anywhere else and it’s well worth spending the extra time to hunt them out. The majority of the city’s shops can be found in the New Town, in and around the main thoroughfare, Princes Street. If you love shopping, you simply won’t encounter a more beautiful setting to indulge your passion. Shops line the north side of the street, overlooking Princes Street Gardens to the south, with the castle perched high atop the volcanic outcrop that rises steeply behind. Situated so close to the shops, the gardens also provide the perfect haven if all the hustle and bustle gets too much for you. Princes Street itself is home to a number of well-known high street names and department stores, including Topshop, River Island, M&S, House of Fraser, Urban Outfitters, Zara, Gap, Levis and H&M all to be found on the mile-long stretch. Tech-savvy shoppers will probably enjoy a stop at the Apple Store, located at the east end of Princes Street, opposite the iconic Balmoral Hotel. Of course, no trip to Edinburgh would be complete without a visit to the world-famous Jenners, either. An Edinburgh institution, there are over 100 different departments within the store which has occupied the same magnificent building since moving in almost 180 years ago. It’s often described as ‘the Harrods of the north’, and even if you’ve already blown the budget, it’s worth looking in p24

“IF YOU LOVE SHOPPING, YOU SIMPLY WON’T ENCOUNTER A MORE BEAUTIFUL SETTING TO INDULGE YOUR PASSION”

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Designer

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Matching rings, interlocking ring sets and beautiful individual rings are a speciality of well-known Scottish jewellery designer, Sheila Fleet OBE Sheila’s distinctive rings are made in silver, white, rose and yellow gold palladium and platinum. Many designs feature handset diamonds, gemstones and vibrant enamel colours. Why not have your finger sized and a ring made to measure specially for you... A warm welcome awaits you in Jenners and in our boutique Edinburgh shop in Stockbridge at 18 St Stephen St

Ogham script reads ‘A Blessing‘


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SHOPPING

simply just to admire the Grand Hall that lies at its heart. At the east end of Princes Street, there are two shopping centres. Waverley Mall, which forms part of the Waverley Station development, counts Oasis, New Look and Superdry amongst its tenants. Having served shoppers for four decades, the nearby St James Centre is undergoing an ambitious £850 million redevelopment – one of the largest projects in the UK – that will see the area completely transformed. Due for completion in 2020, it will offer over 100 shops and restaurants, a multi-screen cinema complex and a luxury hotel. When the New Town was laid out, it was George Street, not Princes Street, that was earmarked as the main commercial strip, p28

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“HAVING SERVED SHOPPERS FOR FOUR DECADES, ST JAMES CENTRE IS UNDERGOING AN AMBITIOUS £850 MILLION REDEVELOPMENT”

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THE ULTIMATE SCOTTISH EXPERIENCE!

“Scotland’s best”

WHISKI SHOP Located in the multi award winning WHISKI ROOMS – a fabulous range of Scotland’s best. • Over 500 whiskies, rare and vintage collections • Great range of Scottish spirits, beers and gifts • Gift hampers available • Worldwide delivery • Daily whisky tastings in our private tasting room • Corporate enquiries & groups welcome

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4-7 North Bank Street, Edinburgh EH1 2LP Tel: +44 (0)131 225 1532 shop@whiskirooms.com

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SHOPPING

but lacking the spectacular views of its neighbour, it instead became the city’s financial district. However, as times have changed, George Street has come to more closely match the planner’s original intentions as the banks and insurers moved out, and traders moved in. Some of the city’s best independents can be found here, and there’s a glamorous, upmarket feel to it all, home as it is to the likes of Whistles, Cath Kidston and All Saints. It’s also where you’ll find White Stuff, Joules and Anthropologie, while the younger generation is well-catered for too with favourites such as Jack Wills, Hollister and Fatface. For those who love to pursue a healthy lifestyle – or at least look like they do – activewear specialists Sweaty Betty and Lululemon both have outlets here. Hanover Street, Frederick Street and Castle Street, which each bisect both Princes Street and George Street, are packed to the gunnels with stores too, including well-known brands such as Barbour, North Face, Schuh and Loake, showcasing the company’s classic hand-made brogues, boots, Oxfords and moccasins. There’s plenty in the way of luxury beauty products as well, with established names such as Molton Brown, Jo Malone, Kiehl’s and Space NK vying for your attention alongside Scottish success

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story Arran, which has grown from humble beginnings in a kitchen cottage to become the producer of some of the UK’s most sought-after aromatics. You can accessorise any outfits you’ve purchased with shoes, bags and extras from Church’s, Jones Bootmaker and Aspinal of London, and if you’re searching for something special, try a signature piece from one the district’s many marvellous jewellers; Laings, Hamilton and Inches, Joseph Bonnar and Rox and MacIntyres are all in the vicinity, as are Fraser Hart and Chisolm Hunter, while Goodwins, Alastair Wood Hart and Robert Anthony also offer antique and harder-to-find styles. The George Street area is also home to some of the city’s most interesting men’s fashion retailers, including formal outfitters such as Hawe & Curtis, Ede & Ravenscroft and Slaters, plus a host of casualwear specialists. Cruise and Xile for instance, both of which started out in the city over 30 years ago and offer luxury denim, designer fashions and limited edition sportswear collectables, have become two of the UK’s leading independents. Nearby, quirky menswear store Quarters stocks everything from clothing to accessories and gifts, and you can also find Oasis frontman Liam Gallagher’s label, Pretty Green. p33

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“HANOVER STREET, FREDERICK STREET AND CASTLE STREET ARE PACKED TO THE GUNNELS WITH STORES TOO, INCLUDING BARBOUR, NORTH FACE, SCHUH AND LOAKE”

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LUXURY FASHION BRANDS MULTREES WALK THE DEFINITION OF LUXURY SHOPPING Harvey Nichols · Louis Vuitton · Burberry · Michael Kors · Mulberry BOSS · Nespresso · Links of London · Tommy Hilfiger · Castle Fine Art Kurt Geiger · Pandora · North America Travel Service · Swarovski Bravissimo · Sassoon Salon · Coach · JoJo Maman Bébé · The Pen Shop Reiss · Caffè Nero · Boots · Valvona & Crolla VinCaffè · Tesla

ST ANDREW SQUARE EDINBURGH EH1 3DQ WWW.MULTREESWALK.CO.UK


Foremost Experts in Tartan and Highland Dress Since 1868 Kinloch Anderson is a family owned and managed Company renowned as makers and retailers of finest clothing and Highland Dress over 6 generations. Our shop in Leith has a distinctive choice of luxury Scottish clothing and accessories in superb cashmere, silk and pure wool fabrics. Ladies can have a skirt made in the tartan, tweed or silk of their choice. We have the finest KILT HIRE in Edinburgh and if you purchase a made to measure kilt in the tartan of your choice we will provide the rest of your hire outfit free of charge. Our Heritage Room Exhibition has now been transformed and visually tells the amazing story of Kinloch Anderson from simple beginnings through to our present day developments both at home and overseas. We are design specialists for your exclusive family or Corporate tartan. Our Shop is spacious, offers and relaxed shopping experience and we have a large private car park. We will be delighted to help you with our personal and professional service.


Fascinating Facts about Kinloch Anderson We were originally called William Anderson & Sons Limited and we first started trading as bespoke tailors in George Street, Edinburgh where the George Hotel is located today. We have a selection of over 2,000 tartans from which you can choose for your Kinloch Anderson kilt. Our reputation as makers of the finest kilts is worldwide; there are 8 yards of pure wool worsted tartan cloth in one kilt and it can take up to 17 hours to make. We won the Queen’s Award for Export in 1979 at which time we were making over 100,00 ladies’ skirts a year, exporting primarily to Europe and the USA. We first supplied the Royal Family in 1903 to Edward VII and remain to this day Royal Warrant Holders as Tailors and KIltmakers to Her Majesty The Queen, His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales. The Kinloch Anderson, Scotland Brand is achieving increasing recognition in Asian markets through our 300+ shops in Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China. Record your visit on Instagram

Buses from City Centre

No.22 No.16 No.35 No.36

4 Dock Street, Leith, Edinburgh, EH6 6EY Tel (0131) 555 1390 Email theshop@kinlochanderson.com www.kinlochanderson.com


Pam Jenkins 41 Thistle Street | Edinburgh | EH2 1DY T. 44(0) 131 225 3242 | E. pam@pamjenkins.co.uk | @pamjenkinsshoes

WWW.PAMJENKINS.CO.UK


©VISITSCOTLAND/JAKUB IWANICKI; NICK MAILER PHOTOGRAPHY/MULTREES WALK

SHOPPING

At the east end of the New Town is St Andrew Square, where you’ll hit upon Edinburgh’s swankiest shopping address, Multrees Walk. Burberry, Boss and Louis Vuitton are amongst the high-end brands with outlets here, and there’s upmarket accessory specialists such as Mulberry, Coach and Michael Kors. The development’s flagship store is Harvey Nichols, the only one in Scotland. Spanning five floors and more than 100,000 square feet, the prestigious shop stocks everything from chic fashion to jewellery, make-up to lavish foodstuffs and, like Jenners, is a must for both casual and serious shoppers alike. The West End Village, just a few hundred yards from Princes Street, is a shopper’s dream. Centred around William Street, there are one-off boutiques and independents just waiting to be discovered, specialising in everything from elegant lingerie to quality accessories. Colourful shop fronts abound in this tiny, picturesque shopping area where you could easily lose yourself for an afternoon. With two stores, one for men, and a larger one for women round the corner, the trendy Frontiers is home to an

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eclectic variety of hard-to-find prints and designers. Close neighbour Hogarth specialises in cashmere, merino and silk scarves, throws and accessories, Serap Couture provides individual-tailored pieces and there’s more cool menswear from Solo. The West End is also something of a haven for those seeking some pampering, with hair stylists including Charlie Miller and Freddy Antabi, plus salons and spas such as Glam Candy, Sleeping Beauty Salon, Chamomile Sanctuary and Odyssey Boutique, which also stocks swimwear and lingerie. Supplying designer cards, stationery and small gifts, Paper Tiger is a godsend for the forgetful, and is the perfect place to pick up last-minute presents and cards. Liam Ross and Lily Luna both offer boutique and bespoke jewellery, and if you’re looking for something to hang rather than wear, you’ll want to pay a visit to both Gallery Ten and UNIONgallery. In fact, if you’re more interested in dressing the walls than dressing yourself, there are a heap of excellent galleries across the city where you can pick up some art and crafts for your home. For funky prints and homeware, the Red Door Gallery is just the p36

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“SPANNING FIVE FLOORS AND MORE THAN 100,000 SQUARE FEET, HARVEY NICHOLS STOCKS EVERYTHING FROM CHIC FASHION TO JEWELLERY AND MAKE-UP TO LAVISH FOODSTUFFS”

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bar à vin, Queensferry Street

Frontiers Woman, Stafford Street

William Street

Sound Walks

Wander, Explore, Shop, Taste – Edinburgh’s West End edinburgh-westend.co.uk

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thriving business district since the 1800s, Edinburgh’s West End should definitely be on your list of places to visit when staying in the city. Among the atmospheric streets you’ll find specialist boutiques, delightful delicatessens, art galleries, cocktail bars and unique dining experiences. An oasis of charm, Edinburgh’s West End is the ideal place to while away the hours, exploring a neighbourhood rich in character. “Consider yourself lucky if you've visited the prestigious West End of Edinburgh. You've just unlocked one of the best shopping destinations in town for fashion and arts”- Di Wu, 5 *, Facebook 2017. Some of the attractions include the glamorous Waldorf Astoria Hotel. Fondly known as “The

Edinburgh’s West End should definitely be on your list of places to visit while in the city

Caley”, visitors can enjoy afternoon tea in Peacock Alley, or fine dining in The Pompadour by Galvin restaurant. Foodies should also check out Forage & Chatter, Otro and La P’tite Folie for delicious dining experiences. If paying it forward is more up your street then stop in for a bite to eat at Home. This stylish restaurant serves up Scottish/French cuisine with a social mission; giving its profits to the homeless. Leonardo DiCaprio visited Home in 2017 while in Edinburgh attending the Scottish Business Awards. When it comes to shopping, Edinburgh’s West End really does have something for everyone. With chic boutiques (Frontiers Woman, Odyssey, Solo Menswear), specialist services (Rogue Flowers, Serap Couture, Run and


Patisserie Maxime, Queensferry Street

Paper Tiger, Stafford Street

Ruffians, Queensferry Street

The Voyage of Buck, William Street

Just a few minutes’ walk from Princes Street you’ll find the cobbled Georgian streets of Edinburgh’s West End. With charming architecture, colourful shop fronts and a laid-back vibe, this area truly is one of Edinburgh’s hidden gems.

Become, Mr James Tailors & Outfitters) and gifting inspiration (Paper Tiger, Jewellery by Liam Ross), those in need of a little retail therapy will find exactly what they are looking for. If in need of a little ‘me time’ then the West End has you covered from head to toe. Sleeping Beauty Salon, Claire’s Beauty and Breathworks are just some of destinations offering a delightful array of treatments and classes; helping you relax, unwind and feel rejuvenated. The West End also hosts an elite selection of hair salons and barbers, including multi award winners Charlie Miller, Ruffians and Cheynes. Intrigued by Interior Design? Then head to Craighead & Woolf, Bagnodesign and The AGA Store for expert advice on how to create the perfect look in your home.

Those who enjoy a bit of a tipple will not be disappointed with the abundance of establishments for all palates. Wine lovers should try out bar à vin, whisky lovers check into Teuchters and cocktail connoisseurs should stop in at The Voyage of Buck, to sample award winning cocktails made by Head Bartender Mike McGinty who won the title of 2017 Patron Perfectionist. Just around the corner you’ll find the Edinburgh Gin Distillery, where you can take a tour and meet Head Distiller David Wilkinson. Edinburgh’s West End really is a great place to sit back and watch the world go by. Head to Cairngorm Coffee, Strumpets or The Huxley to enjoy a light bite and fantastic views. Those with a sweet tooth should try out the

mouth-watering selection of ice cream at Affogato, or indulge with a framboise tartlet at Patisserie Maxime. Download the West End Sound Walks to be taken on a journey of discovery through this wonderful area: www.edinburghwestend.co.uk/west-endsound-walks. Edinburgh’s West End is fast becoming Edinburgh’s go-to destination of choice for visitors and locals alike. We invite you to come and take a closer look. l


SHOPPING

©VISITBRITAIN/SIMON WINNALL; ING IMAGE

ticket, while over at the Laurel Gallery you can get your hands on paintings, ceramics and sculpture by some of Scotland’s most promising contemporary artists. Like it’s counterpart in the west, Thistle Street over towards the east stakes a claim for being a true destination shopping experience. The narrow cobbled street is the domicile of some of the city’s most fashionable boutiques, and with stacks of hip cocktail bars nearby you won’t struggle for refreshments either should you need some mid-expedition fortitude. For clothing with a Scandinavian twist, a stop at Kakao by K is a must, while Covet is splendid for accessories – this diminutive store is big on style and it’s full of handbags, purses, jewellery and belts. p40

“WITH STACKS OF HIP COCKTAIL BARS NEARBY, YOU WON’T STRUGGLE FOR REFRESHMENTS SHOULD YOU NEED SOME MID-EXPEDITION FORTITUDE”

Aberdeen

Edinburgh

Glasgow

Broughty Ferry

Elgin

Tillicoultry

21-22a Haddington Place, Leith Walk, Edinburgh

0131 557 3979 THIS IS EDINBURGH

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35 Dundas Street Edinburgh EH3 6QQ Telephone: 0131 556 5554 epitomeofedinburgh.com Exclusive cashmere lounge with


Frontiers Clothing

For Edinburgh’s sartorially savvy shoppers, Frontiers has long been associated with women’s fashion of the highest quality and style, having been founded over 25 years ago by designer Jane Forbes. Last year, a new chapter opened for this iconic Edinburgh West End store when Jane’s partner Nigel Pashley decided to join the family business. The result is Frontiers Man, an entirely new shop located next door to Frontiers Woman on William Street, which brings the Frontiers ethos into menswear, with a carefully selected range of top labels, including many that are otherwise tricky to find in Scotland.

WOMAN Tucked away just off Princes Street in the West End Village, the glass fronted boutique feels big and spacious with high ceilings and statement pieces, giving the shop a museum-like quality. Owner Jane Forbes has an eye for texture and pattern which allows the clothes to speak for themselves. Similar to the mens store, the boutique stocks wellknown names as well as labels that are about to blow up, with shoe and accessories collections selected just as carefully as the clothing brands. The store also runs to a lower ground area with a dedicated shoe room housing the likes of Ash, GH Bass, Penelope Chilvers and Arkk, alongside a jean room with brands such as Reiko and Hod.

MAN The mens store instantly has more of a guy feel about it. Although stylish in itself, the no nonsense steel rails and big chunky butcher table display a packed to the rafters store of well selected designs and high-quality products. Sitting proudly next to its bigger sister, the menswear store is also split over two levels and again this area features shoes and jeans with Fracap and Red Wing in the shoe area and jeans from Nudie and Lee 101.


Mention ‘This is Edinburgh’ to receive 10% off

Frontiers Man 4 William Street West End Village Edinburgh, EH3 7NH frontiers-man.com

BRAND MIX

Across the two stores their collections include iconic British brands such as Paul Smith and Barbour which sit alongside contemporary labels, Folk, Oliver Spencer, Universal Works and YMC. A Scandinavian influence also features heavily with the likes of Wood Wood, Sandqvist, Norse Projects and Mads Norgaard. In addition, they have a handful of great brands from across the pond such as Rails shirts, Corridor NYC, Gitman Vintage and Alex Mill.

Frontiers Woman 16b Stafford Street West End Village Edinburgh, EH3 7AU frontiersboutique.com


SHOPPING

Next door, Biscuit, is equally small in stature but still manages to offer a terrific range of fashion, homewares and more. If you want to be sure you’re on-trend this season, look no further than Jane Davidson and Pam Jenkins; both of which have featured in style bible Vogue’s top 50 UK Retailers. The family–run Jane Davidson has been keeping Edinburgh’s female half well-dressed for more than 40 years, and the converted Georgian townhouse has four floors of designer womanswear including Dries van Noten, Diane Von Furstenberg and Helmut Land. On the other side of the street, Pam Jenkins is all about footwear. Stocking labels like Christian Louboutin and Jimmy Choo, they’re sure to help you find that pair of killer heels p45

REUBEN PARIS/MARKETING EDINBURGH

“STOCKING LABELS LIKE CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN AND JIMMY CHOO, PAM JENKINS ARE SURE TO HELP YOU FIND THAT PAIR OF KILLER HEELS”

Bringing The Past To The Present The Knights Vault holds Scotland’s largest collection of medieval weaponry and a range of heraldic products unrivalled in the UK. With over 1 million European family name histories and Coats of Arms you will almost certainly find yours here. What’s more in minutes you can take away an 1800 word history of your family name on its own parchment and many more personalised gifts. The Armoury section is probably the biggest in the UK with everything from handmade Scottish swords to Viking swords. You will receive the warmest welcome on your visit. Come in and meet Colin and the team.

102 West Bow, Grassmarket Edinburgh EH1 2HH info@theknightsvault.com

www.theknightsvault.com

THIS IS EDINBURGH

0131 281 4147

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The World’s Finest Shortbread PURE BUTTER SHORTBREAD |OATCAKES | SCOTTISH SPECIALITIES

Harvey Nichols 30-34 St Andrew Square Edinburgh EH2 2AD

Walkers Shortbread Ltd, Aberlour House, Aberlour-on-Spey, Scotland, AB38 9LD Tel: +44 (0) 1340 871555 Fax: +44 (0) 1340 871355 Email: enquiries@walkers-shortbread.co.uk www.walkersshortbread.com

Book online or call us on 0131 557 3007

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DANIEL HENDERSON JEWELLERS 188 ROSE STREET | EDINBURGH | EH2 4BA TEL: 0131 466 1745


WWW.DHJEWELLERY.COM DANIEL HENDERSON JEWELLERY


SHOPPING

necessary to complete the look. Further along the street, the award-winning ALC stocks different denim brands and styles, and owner Adele Crombie takes real pride in ensuring you find the perfect fit. Away from the city centre, Ocean Terminal at Leith Docks has a huge selection of stores under the one – giant – roof. Designed by Sir Terence Conran, the interior evokes the great age of the luxury steamliner and features almost 50 shops including French Connection, Debenhams and Trespass. There’s even enough to keep even the most devout non-shoppers entertained, with a cinema complex, state-of-the-art gym and luxurious spa. The three-floored food terrace looks out to sea and on a clear day the views over to Fife are fantastic. The Royal Yacht Britannia is also moored at Ocean Terminal and is open to visitors, should you want to see what life on the seven seas (in ultimate luxury) would be like. Lovers of vintage clothing and accessories are in for a real treat, because they are certainly wellcatered for in Edinburgh. The real bargains are to be had in the plethora of second-hand stores, charity shops and emporiums of curios you’ll tend to be seen grouped together in small pockets throughout the city – Stockbridge, Morningside, Dalry and Gorgie are all home to a good selection of these. You’ll probably have to wade through some dross to locate the gems, but they are there to be unearthed if you’re willing to look hard enough. If you’d prefer someone else to sort the wheat from the chaff for you, then there are a profusion of stores that cater to almost every vintage whim and desire. You’ll pay a premium for that service, but on the whole, the price tags aren’t exorbitant and still offer fantastic value for money. Style guru Mary Portas has teamed p51

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ADOBESTOCK; SHANNA CAMILLERI/UNSPLASH

“IF YOU’D PREFER SOMEONE ELSE TO SORT THE WHEAT FROM THE CHAFF FOR YOU, THEN THERE ARE A PROFUSION OF STORES THAT CATER TO ALMOST EVERY VINTAGE WHIM AND DESIRE”

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laingedinburgh.com


F O R D I A M O N D S , F O R WAT C H E S , F O R YO U


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Whether you’re looking to immerse yourself in living history, browse in unique independent shops, or dine at our award winning restaurants, cafes and bistros, the Greater Grassmarket area is a must visit destination.

“Wonderful place to stroll” TripAdvisor 2017

Regular Weekend Events!

Overlooked by Edinburgh’s magnificent castle, the Greater Grassmarket area is only a minute’s walk from the world famous Royal Mile and the amazing National Museum of Scotland.

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W W W. G R E A T E R G R A S S M A R K E T. C O . U K

With unique specialist shopping delivered by dedicated craftsmen, artisans and experts, the Greater Grassmarket is Edinburgh’s leading independent shopping destination. independent shops, we are Edinburgh's independent shopping destination. GREATERGRASSMARKET

GRASSMARKETEDIN


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TripAdvisor 2017 Check out Grain Store for Scottish produce served in a vaulted and alcoved former storeroom or visit Ondine, arguably the city’s best seafood restaurant. At our weekly Saturday market you will find superb street food, quality souvenirs and everything from artisan bread, fruit and home bakes to crafts and original artwork.

Soak up the medieval atmosphere of the Greater Grassmarket, shop, dine and enjoy its splendid views of Edinburgh castle. . There’s.never a dull moment in this refreshing alternative to the high street.

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Images: 1. Walker Slater (20 Victoria St) 2. The Knight’s Vault (102 West Bow) 3. The Cambridge Satchel Company (96 West Bow) 4. Divino Enoteca (5 Merchant St) 5. Victoria St and Victoria Terrace 6. Maison Bleue (36-38 Victoria St) 7. Greyfriars Bobby (Candlemaker Row) G


Looking for something you wouldn’t find on the high street?

Only a few minutes walk from Princes Street, The Cat’s Miaou is definitely worth a visit! Our aim is to provide an excellent, friendly service and to have something for everyone. We have an eclectic mix of Fairtrade and ethically-sourced gifts, and fantastic creations from local designers and craftspeople. These include contemporary silvery jewellery, Harris tweed accessories, funky baby clothes, Padraig slippers, Scottish soaps, mugs and coasters.

The Cat’s Miaou

Opening times Mon to Sat: 10.30 – 7pm Sun: 11.30 – 5.30pm

The Cat’s Miaou, 36 Elm Row (opposite Central Youth Hostel) Edinburgh EH7 4AH Find us on Facebook and Google maps

Tel: 0131 557 1277

www.thecatsmiaou.co.uk


SHOPPING

up with Save the Children to open Mary’s Living and Giving Shop in Raeburn Place, but the daddy of them all is undoubtedly W. Armstrong & Son. With three tardis-like shops (including The Rusty Zip) to browse through until you fall in love with something, it’s a Mecca for vintage enthusiasts, and claims to be Britain’s largest vintage emporium. If you can’t find it here, chances are it probably doesn’t exist. Rammed full of little record stores, quirky gift outlets and clothing stores, the twisting, winding Cockburn Street which feeds up from Waverley Station and Princes Street Gardens towards the High Street also p55

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CLEM ONOJEGHUO/UNSPLASH

“RAMMED FULL OF LITTLE RECORD STORES, QUIRKY GIFT OUTLETS AND CLOTHING STORES, COCKBURN STREET ALSO APPEALS”

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Enjoy up to 60% off your favourite brands Book a group visit to our Designer Outlet and receive more savings on your shopping. Contact us up to 48 hours in advance and we’ll send you a group pack with all information to plan your trip. In addition, we also offer a great selection of coach driver incentives – expect a free meal from one of the participating brands as well as a free round of golf at Paradise Island Adventure Golf.

To top it off, drivers with 35+ passengers also receive a £10 gift card to spend while waiting. And of course, parking is free for coaches and we’d be happy to organise a meet and greet service if you wish. Book through: livingstoncoaches@realm.ltd.uk or 01506423617

For more infomation: livingston-designer-outlet.co.uk Almondale Avenue, Livingston EH54 6QX. M8 junction 3.

#loveitforless


SHOPPING

©VISITSCOTLAND/PAUL TOMKINS

appeals, although it’s more niche than vintage. If it’s old books you’re seeking, then try any one of the half a dozen or so second-hand bookstores in the locale of West Port. And proving that small can sometimes be best, the picturesque St Stephen Street in Stockbridge offers a surprisingly diverse array of shops, from vinyl at Vox Box Records to beautiful books at Golden Hare Books, plus some more vintage looks in Those Were the Days. There are some hip independent clothing stores too, including Kestin Hare and Dick’s ( just around the corner), while Bon Tot ensures the wee ones are kitted out every bit as stylishly. There’s also some super-cool interiors ideas from Catalog. For more cool furniture and homewares elsewhere, Bra Bohag in Leith specialises in mid-century chic, while Bo Concept on Rose Street is similarly influenced by Scandinavian design, but with a contemporary focus. Continuing the Scandi theme is Life Story at the bottom of Broughton Street, while a few doors down Moleta Munro will leave you wanting to refurbish your living spaces over and over again. Anta on George Street stocks classy, Scottishthemed furnishings and stoneware. p59

Edinburgh’s famous fossil shop. An excellent range of fossils, minerals, crystals, meteorites and jewellery from all around the world. Great present ideas, beautiful display pieces, and huge, heavy lumps of rock – something for everyone. Our knowledgeable staff will be happy to answer questions and help you find what you are looking for. Established in 1987 by the noted fossil hunter Stan Wood, this award winning shop has gone on to forge an international reputation for quality and value.

Browsers are welcome, so take your time! 5 Cowgatehead | Grassmarket | Edinburgh | EH1 1JY | 10am-5.30pm 0131 220 1344 | shop@mrwoodsfossils.co.uk | www.mrwoodsfossils.co.uk

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JANE DAVIDSON

FISHERS

ALC

BISCUIT CLOTHING

THISTLE STREET JANE DAVIDSON

Award-winning family-run independent boutique showcasing a host of International brands including Dries van Noten, Sonia Rykiel, Osman, Roland Mouret and alongside wearable day wear from Helmut Lang, DVF, Rixo London and J Brand. Also stockists of Scottish cashmere brand Queene & Belle and Begg & Co scarves. Established in 1969 and now owned by Jane’s daughter Sarah. Open 7 days and online. 52 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1EN Tel: 0131 225 3280 shop@janedavidson.co.uk www.janedavidson.co.uk

ALC

ALC is Edinburgh’s go-to destination for women’s denim. Dedicated to finding the perfect pair of jeans, ALC offers fit advice and features a collection of must-have brands including Paige, Frame, Joe’s, Dr Denim, Rains, Samsoe & Samsoe and Maison

Labiche, alongside local British designers. Build your capsule wardrobe here with premium denim sourced across the globe and an exclusive selection of clothing and accessories. Owned by Edinburgh girl Adele, expect friendly service and a cute little shop that still retains some original period features.

every day from 12pm until 6pm, a la carte and specials available all day, every day. At Fishers we believe it’s our professional and friendly service, great food and continual attention to detail which draws our guests back time and time again. Open all day, every day!

61 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1DY Tel: 0131 226 2317 info@alceshop.com www.alceshop.com

58 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1EA Tel: 0131 225 5109 city@fishersrestaurantgroup.co.uk www.fishersrestaurantgroup.co.uk

FISHERS

BISCUIT CLOTHING

At Fishers in the City our ethos is simple; honest food, great service in a relaxed dining atmosphere. Set in an old converted warehouse on Thistle Street in the city centre of Edinburgh the contemporary surroundings offer the perfect venue for any occasion. Our guests have extensive choice from our selection of menus and comprehensive wine list. Our set lunch/pre-theatre is available

If someone came up to me and asked “so what is Biscuit?” I would reply , “somewhere to come and buy a pretty top to wear for a Saturday night at a friend’s dinner party and while you are there why not pick up the perfect present for the hostess?!” Voted Best New Independent Business in 2016 within the fashion industry, Biscuit provides a beautiful and welcoming environment in which you


21ST CENTURY KILTS

COVET

ALCHEMIA GALLERY

HENDERSONS

Thistle Street is one of Edinburgh’s hidden gems, tucked behind George Street and nestled between Frederick Street and Hanover Street, this charming cobbled street boasts some of Edinburgh’s top destination shops, restaurants, bars and beauty salons. This entirely independent street offers you a world of delights like nowhere else in Edinburgh with fashion boutiques, culinary hot-spots, traditional bars and places to be pampered.

can always pick up something that inspires you. It could be something to wear, something to give or something that you now need. The perfect eclectic mix of clothing and living, under one roof. 22 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1EN Tel: 0131 225 2308 www.biscuit.clothing

21st CENTURY KILTS

ALCHEMIA GALLERY

We are makers of fine art jewellery, specialising in precious metals, platinum, gold, and silver with our own trademark enamel rings set with precious and semi-precious stones. We offer a portfolio of our own designs, alongside a selection of new contemporary designers, predominately Scottish. Our bespoke service provides personal design and making with attention to style, technique, and expert advice. Alchemia are experienced and expert wedding jewellers.

Howie Nicholsby’s 21st Century Kilts offer a unique take, and are a fitting homage, to a traditional Scottish- style. Kilts for men and women. Appointments recommended, available Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays.

37 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1DY Tel: 0131 220 4795 www.alchemia.co.uk

48 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1EN Tel: 0131 220 945 howie@21stcenturykilts.com www.21stcenturykilts.com

Voted best Independent Accessories Shop in the UK by Drapers and recommended by Grazia, a trip to Covet is a must for handbag and accessory lovers. Specialising in quality brands from all over Europe

COVET

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and showcasing Covet’s own label of luxury leather handbags, designer scarves and costume jewellery. 20 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1EN Tel: 0131 220 0026 www.thoushaltcovet.com

HENDERSONS

You can enjoy dishes created by our talented team of chefs in a light and colourful, table service environment. The food we serve is 100% vegan including all our wines, beers, cakes and fair trade coffees. Our food is made with many organic ingredients and packs a tasty punch. 25c Thistle Street, EH2 1DX Tel: 0131 225 2605 vegan@hendersonsofedinburgh.co.uk Shop & Deli 94 Hanover Street Tel: 0131 225 2131 www.hendersonsofedinburgh.co.uk


ADAM WILSON/UNSPLASH; ING IMAGE; MARKETING EDINBURGH

SHOPPING

“BOASTING EVERYTHING FROM RARE VINTAGE WHISKIES TO PARAPHERNALIA, IT’S A VERITABLE TREASURE TROVE FOR LOVERS OF THE AMBER NECTAR”

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Foodies are spoiled for choice in Edinburgh, thanks to the city’s flourishing deli scene. Over the last decade or so, there’s been a flurry of specialist stores spring up to complement those more established premises. Many are so well-thought of that most of the city’s best restaurants regularly use their produce. Some of the most notable examples include ‘liquid deli’ Demijohn which stocks all sorts of oils, vinegars and infusions, while, for all things spicy, Lupe Pintos is an Aladdin’s cave of hard-tofind, authentic goodies from Mexico and beyond. Falko Konditormeister in Bruntsfield is an excellent German bakery which makes delicious cakes, breads and pastries, while George Mewes and Mellis the Cheesemonger both have terrific selections of cheeses (and all the necessary accompaniments). Bower’s is known for supplying the finest game, while fellow butcher Crombie’s is particularly famed for it’s sausages. Scotland’s oldest delicatessen, Valvona & Crolla, offers the finest imported Italian ingredients, foods and wines, and is an aggregation of riches. And for those seeking something distinctly Scottish, the Canongate’s Cranachan & Crowdie (named for a traditional Scots dessert and a crumbly cream cheese) offers a wide-ranging selection of local treats and delicacies. In recent years, Scotland has seen a boom in brewing and distilling, particularly beers and gins, and off-licences such as The Trumpet Shop, Bon Vivant’s Companion and

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Drinkmonger all stock a fabulous array of weird and wonderful drinks for almost every occasion. And of course, a visit to Scotland wouldn’t be complete without paying due reverence to one of it’s biggest exports – whisky. A stop at Royal Mile Whiskies, on the High Street, is probably a good place to start: Boasting everything from rare vintage whiskies to paraphernalia such as books, accessories and glassware, it’s a veritable treasure trove for lovers of the amber nectar. There are a number of other excellent whisky stockists in the capital too, particularly in the Old Town, so it pays to shop around for the perfect dram. Dotted around the city as they are, it can be time-consuming to try and visit all the best food and drink emporiums, so if you are pressed for time, probably the most convenient option is to make your way along to the award-winning Farmer’s Market on Castle Terrace. It runs every Saturday, from 9am until 2pm, and many of Edinburgh’s finest stores and food producers have stalls there. If you can’t make that, then the Stockbridge Market, which runs from 10am until 5pm on Sundays, is an equally enjoyable alternative. In Scotland, the kilt is traditionally worn from everything from weddings to funerals, black tie dinners and balls, and is perfect for almost any formal occasion. If you’re inspired to get one, then avoid the shops that offer complete outfits for little more than it would cost for lunch for two p64

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Visit the Canongate The lower portion of the Royal Mile, known as the Canongate, has its own distinctive character and charm

MIMI’S LITTLE BAKEHOUSE

CRANACHAN & CROWDIE

We are a family-owned cafe and takeaway bakery positioned on the Royal Mile, in Edinburgh’s historic Old Town. Voted Scottish Craft Baker of the Year 2015, 2016 and 2017, Mimi’s brings together a mixture of traditional classics and creative inventions and offers a few cosy tables nestled in the window.

Highly rated on TripAdvisor and by Rick Steves as one of the most personal shopping experiences in Edinburgh, this boutique Canongate gem is your destination for the widest range of Scottish-made food, drink, souvenirs and unique gifts. Shipping is available.

Mimi’s Little Bakehouse, 250 Canongate, Edinburgh EH8 8AA Tel: 0131 555 5908 www.mimisbakehouse.com

Royal Mile, 263 Canongate, Edinburgh EH8 8BQ Tel: 0131 556 7194 Email: info@cranachanandcrowdie.com www.cranachanandcrowdie.com

Look for our stag logo and you’ll know you’re in the Canongate!


Once the home of Edinburgh’s aristocrats, the Canongate today houses lovely independent shops that showcase gifts, clothes, art, antiques, home interiors, jewellery, food, whisky and much more. Getting to the Canongate is easy: Walk down the Royal Mile from the Castle

ROBERT GRAHAM 1874

towards Holyrood Palace and you reach the cross roads of Jeffery and St Mary’s streets. That’s where the Canongate begins. Take a leisurely stroll and explore both of these streets before continuing to the shops further down the Canongate. It’s the perfect way to satisfy all your retail therapy needs.

AQUILA

Founded in 1874 Robert Graham is one of the oldest whisky and tobacco merchants in the UK. We serve the finest scotch whisky, hand rolled cigars and pipe tobacco whilst organising bespoke tastings.We offer unparalleled service and specialist knowledge from our expert staff allowing you to peruse and taste our diverse collection of fine Scottish produce.

Aquila is a gift shop bursting with colour and full of quirky affordable gifts made by UK-based designers and artists. With the emphasis on both quality and price it is the perfect destination for your holiday shopping. From luxurious 100% cashmere wraps to hand made Scottish soaps there is something to suit every taste and budget.

254 Canongate, Edinburgh EH8 8AA Tel: 0131 556 2791 Email: info@robertgraham1874.com www.robertgraham1874.com

4 Jeffrey St, Edinburgh EH1 1DT Tel: 0131 556 4952 Email: info@aquila-edinburgh.co.uk www.aquila-edinburgh.com

Scan the QR code to find the Canongate!


Breguet, the innovator. Classique 7147

The finely fluted gold case of the Classique 7147 houses an ultra-thin movement, the complexity is matched only by the timeless elegance of the watch. Expressing a subtle blend of finesse and precision, this timepiece is distinguished by an off-centred oscillating weight, a variable-inertia balance beating at the rate of 3 Hz, and a silicon balance-spring and escapement. History is still being written...

97-98 Princes Street | Edinburgh | EH2 2ER


REUBEN PARIS/MARKETING EDINBURGH

SHOPPING

– if you’re going to buy one, do it properly; a kilt should be like a Savile Row suit, individually-tailored and fitted, and of a quality that should last a lifetime. A suitable place to instigate proceedings would be at Kinloch Anderson. Highlandwear outfitters for the Royal Family, you can be confident that you’re in safe hands. For something more modern, head for the 21st Century Kilts. Owner Howie Nicolsby has created pieces for the likes of Robbie Williams, Alan Cumming and Vin Diesel and they are a stylish alternative to the traditional kilt outfit. Like any city that welcomes as many visitors as Edinburgh does, there are mounds of shops that specialise in tourist-friendly gifts, especially in and around the Royal Mile. However, there are plenty of more discerning outlets too, so for a more memorable souvenir of your stay, opt for quality; handmade Scottish crafts make for an appropriate keepsake, as can hand-woven Scottish knitwear. Down at the Shore, Flux is a good place to start when perusing crafts and unusual gifts, while you can choose from more traditional Scottish gifts, including wool and cashmere knits galore on the Royal Mile, Canongate and down in the Grassmarket. l

At Ecco, we are proud of our Scandinavian heritage, combining style and comfort in our extensive range of footwear and accessories. Our Edinburgh store stocks a wide range of ladies and mens shoes as well as leather handbags and small leather goods. ECCO EDINBURGH 112/124 Rose Street, EH2 3JF Tel. 0131 220 5756

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OUR TOP

FIVES!

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TOP FIVES

TOP FIVE CITY AREAS [01] NEW TOWN The elegant Georgian architecture of the New Town provides the backdrop to a number of equally stylish shops, bars and restaurants. [02] OLD TOWN With a fascinating history that’s impossible to ignore, every one of the tightly-packed buildings in the Old Town has earned its place in history. [03] LEITH Edinburgh’s city quarter by the sea is a great place for eating, drinking and shopping. [04] WEST END Perfect for boutique shopping and plenty of eating and drinking options, the cobbled streets of the West End are moments from Princes Street. [05] GRASSMARKET Once a medieval market place and site for public executions, the area is now known for eating, drinking and independent shops, all in the shadow of Edinburgh Castle.

TOP FIVE CITY EXPERIENCES [01] LEITH The area of Leith provides a unique blend of old and new. A great place for eating, drinking and shopping, Leith is also home to The Royal Yacht Britannia.

©VISITSCOTLAND/KENNY LAM; ADOBESTOCK; CHRIS JENNER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

[02] CITY TOUR Let the professionals guide you around the city, choose from an open-topped bus, a walking or cycling tour or even an atmospheric ghost tour of the Old Town. [03] TAKE IN THE VIEW Find your favourite view of the city, take the short walk up Calton Hill for a great view of the city below or a slightly more strenuous walk up Arthur’s Seat for views of the city and beyond. [04] PICK A CASTLE Edinburgh’s castle, high on Castle Rock is Scotland’s top heritage attraction. Time your visit for the One O’Clock Gun. However, the beautiful Castle of Craigmillar is also worth a visit. [05] A BREATH OF FRESH AIR Edinburgh is a surprisingly green city, with some beautiful spots to relax and enjoy the outdoors. Choose from Princes Street Gardens

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in the city centre, or the Royal Botanic Gardens for starters.

TOP FIVE OPEN SPACES

TOP FIVE CITY VIEWS [01] CALTON HILL Climb the steps from Waterloo Place to the monument-covered Calton Hill for panoramic views of the city.

[01] ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN A short journey north of the city offering acres to stroll through, a collection of glasshouses, sculptures, café and shop to pass a few hours.

[02] ARTHUR’S SEAT The city’s highest climb (280m) is in fact an extinct volcano – follow the path to take you to the top in around 30 minutes.

[02] PRINCES STREET GARDENS Built in the hollow of a drained loch, these gardens sit opposite Edinburgh’s main shopping street.

[03] GEORGE STREET AND HANOVER STREET Take some time out from shopping at this crossroads and enjoy views over the Firth of Forth to Fife.

[03] THE MEADOWS A popular spot on the south side of the city for locals to jog, frisbee, fly a kite or just hang out.

[04] THE SHORE, LEITH For a different perspective, take a stroll along the Shore in Leith, a unique blend of old and new in Edinburgh’s city quarter by the sea.

[04] HOLYROOD PARK In the shadow of Arthur’s Seat this amazing variety of landscapes offers crags, moorland, glens, lochs and fields. [05] WATER OF LEITH This gentle riverside walk has a number of manageable sections within its full 12-mile route from Leith to Balerno.

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[05] DEAN BRIDGE In the west end of the city, the 100 ft tall Dean Bridge provides great views across the Water of Leith and Dean Village below. l

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A TASTE OF SCOTLAND – AND THE WORLD! Top-end fine dining, adventurous independents and a great range of ethnic cuisine means you’ll never go hungry here

SCOTT NEAR/CAMERASHY PHOTOGRAPHY/ DINE SCOTLAND LTD; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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best eateries in Britain. One of Scotland’s most acclaimed chefs, Martin Wishart, could be considered one of the chief proponents of Leith’s emergence as a food-lover’s paradise, and a contributing factor to the neighbourhood’s continued regeneration. The area is now home to many great bistros, bars and restaurants, including two Michelinstarred eating places located within two minutes stroll of each other, with Martin Wishart Edinburgh sitting slap-bang in the middle of it all. The restaurant earned Edinburgh its first Michelin star back in 2001, and hasn’t looked back since, picking up virtually every other award going, too. Modern and refined, the food is out of this world, and a must for any gastronome. ‘From nature to plate’ boasts the menu, and seasonality is the driving force at p71

he Scottish culinary scene has undergone a renaissance in recent years, and nowhere has that transformation been more evident than in Edinburgh. Gone are the days of only being able to find bland, stodgy, over-priced fare on the streets of Scotland’s capital (although you’ll find plenty of places that serve up fantastic versions of traditional Scottish dishes, such as haggis, stovies and Cullen skink). Instead, the cuisine now reflects the city’s increasingly cosmopolitan nature, drawing on influences, ingredients and techniques from all four corners of the globe, and has firmly established it in Scotland’s gastronomic vanguard. With a number of Michelin-starred restaurants to its name, the city has earned a reputation for playing host to some of the

“WITH A NUMBER OF MICHELIN-STARRED RESTAURANTS TO ITS NAME, THE CITY HAS EARNED A REPUTATION FOR PLAYING HOST TO SOME OF THE BEST EATERIES IN BRITAIN”

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ASTELLO C IL

Sample menu Antipasti (starters) Insalata caprese

(buffalo mozzarella & fresh tomato) (v)(h) £6.20

Avocado di gamberetti

(avocado pear with prawns & marie rose sauce) (v)(h) £6.90

Ristorante & Pizzeria

Specializing in Seafood

Asparagi al Gorgonzola

(baked asparagus, gorgonzola cheese and cream) £7.20

Pasta e risotti (pasta & rice) Risotto Mare

(rice cooked in a selection of shell fish, garlic, white wine) (v)(h) £11.20

Penne Calabrese

(spicy salami sausage, cream with a touch of tomato sauce) £8.50

Rigatoni Papalina

(rigatoni, onions, bacon, mushrooms, peas, blue cheese & cream) £10.80

Pizza Pizza Prosciutto Cotto

(pizza topped with tomato sauce, mozzarella, garlic, herbs & ham) £11.50

Il Castello restaurant was established in 1989 by Nicky Polcino and Jackie Waller, who were the brains behind Edinburgh's very first Italian restaurant, The Sorrento, which they opened in 1959. Following The Sorrento, Nicky went on to open several restaurants throughout Edinburgh including the 5-star, Vito’s Restaurant who garnered a reputation for being one of the UK’s best Italian restaurants. From Il Castello’s opening until his passing in 2015, the restaurant was run by Giuseppe Votta, who was well-known and respected in the Edinburgh community.

Pizza Castello

(tomato sauce, mozzarella, garlic, herbs, artichokes, sliced potatoes & mushrooms) (v)(h) £9.90

Pizza Mare

(tomato sauce, mozzarella, garlic & selection of seafood) (v)(h) £12.50

Main courses Halal sirloin steak

(Aberdeen Angus 9oz ai ferri) £19.10

Nowadays the restaurant has come full circle, and is now operated by Nicky and Jackie’s son, Cosimo, who has great plans for Il Castello. Working alongside Cosimo is head chef, Elaina Fernandez and her talented team of chefs. Elaina will soon be undertaking the Master Chef Certificate, meaning a Michelin star will be possible for the restaurant. Cosimo has brought a wealth of experience to Il Castello, particularly from Kenya Malindi, where he ran the largest holiday resort on the coast of the Indian Ocean. He also also brought with him, a great deal of knowledge and expertise regarding Italian seafood, which is now featured heavily on Il Castello’s menu. Cosimo welcomes all to come and join him for an Italian feast in Il Castello restaurant.

Scaloppina Romana

(veal topped with Parma ham & cooked in white wine & sage) £18.20

Pollo Fantasia

(breast of chicken cooked in white wine, mushrooms & sage) £15.50

Opening Times Monday to Saturday Lunch: 12-2pm, dinner: 5pm-10pm Data: 23 MARZO 2012

Prodotto: KIMBO ESPRESSO ITALIANO FLAG

Formato:

Supporto: Colori:

Stampa:

Lavorazioni speciali:

RED KIMBO

CYAN

MAGENTA

YELLOW

BLACK

Copia al: 100%

Gli esecutivi prima di procedere alla stampa, sono da elaborare da parte del fotolitista a seconda dell'esigenza dello stampatore, verificandone le fustelle, gli abbondaggi, le sovvrastampe e i relativi codici. Per i colori attenersi alla copia colore allegata

CORRESPONDS TO THE PANTONE 485 C 2X (2X STANDS FOR DOUBLE IMPRESSION). THIS TO OBTAIN A RICH AND FULL RED COLOUR (IF YOU DO NOT FOLLOW THIS ADVICE, YOU WILL NOT OBTAIN THE RIGHT KIMBO RED COLOUR).

ESPRESSO ITALIANO Font: Shannon Book

Sunday: closed* VERSIONE PER STAMPA SU METALLIZZATO

Tel: 0131 229 2730 Il Castello, 36 Castle Terrace, Edinburgh EH1 2EL

RED KIMBO

*Months of December, July, August open Sunday 5pm-10pm

CYAN: 10 MAGENTA: 100 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

PANTONE 4975 C

CYAN: 37 MAGENTA: 85 YELLOW: 60 BLACK: 90

PANTONE 347 C

CYAN: 0 MAGENTA: 100 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

PANTONE 1355 C TRASPARENTE

CYAN: 0 MAGENTA: 20 YELLOW: 56 BLACK: 0

BIANCO

BIANCO

SOLO SU METALLIZZATO “ESPRESSO ITALIANO” VA PANT_1355 C SENZA BIANCO SOTTO

RED KIMBO

www.ilcastellorestaurant.co.uk

PANTONE 4975 C

CYAN: 0 MAGENTA: 100 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

PANTONE 347 C

CYAN: 32 MAGENTA: 40 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

PANTONE 872 C

E S P R E S S O I TA L I A N O

CYAN: 10 MAGENTA: 100 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

CYAN: 37 MAGENTA: 85 YELLOW: 60 BLACK: 90

RED KIMBO

CYAN: 10 MAGENTA: 100 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

PANTONE 347 C

CYAN: 0 MAGENTA: 100 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

PANTONE 872 C

CYAN: 32 MAGENTA: 40 YELLOW: 100 BLACK: 0

BLACK

CYAN: 0 MAGENTA: 0 YELLOW: 0 BLACK: 100


CAROLINE ATTWOOD/UNSPLASH; ING IMAGE

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The Kitchin, Leith’s other starred restaurant. Tom Kitchin and his team aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty – from butchering their own meat in-house to foraging for berries and mushrooms by hand; everything is carefully-crafted and considered before it makes it to the table and a recent upgrade, which saw the venue almost double in size, only adds to the ambience. Under the guidance of executive chef Jeff Bland, Number One at the iconic Balmoral Hotel is known for its quality and service and has held it’s Michelin star for more than a decade. The dining room, finished with red lacquered walls imported from Hong Kong, is comfortable and elegant, and the team has proved more than adept at combining Scottish and French know-how to create something truly memorable. After making his name with Juniper in Greater Manchester, chef Paul Kitching decided to relocate and establish 21212; a £4.5 million ‘restaurant with rooms’ in a magnificent Georgian townhouse on Royal Terrace. The restaurant originally earned the accolade just eight months after opening its doors in May 2009, claiming a clutch of other prestigious titles

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along the way, too, including Best New Restaurant in the UK at the National Restaurant Awards. Combining modern British cuisine with traditional French techniques, Castle Terrace makes the most of Scotland’s freshest, choicest produce. After initially being awarded a ‘Rising Star’ recommendation by Michelin in 2011, this sister restaurant to The Kitchin soon joined the ranks of the big boys thanks to the hard work of chef patron Dominic Jack and his team. Although they subsequently lost their star in 2016, they will be confident of reclaiming their star status in the near future, helped along in no small part by a stunning interior refurbishment. Two of those feted chefs have also branched out, adding more relaxed, but no less good, venues to their stables. Martin Wishart’s second city eatery, The Honours, is a more informal affair than his fine-dining establishment, but the more affordablypriced New Town brasserie still maintains the same high standard of dishes served by its compatriot down in Leith. Likewise, Tom Kitchin’s top-notch gastropub, the Scran and Scallie has proved to p73

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“EVERYTHING IS CAREFULLY-CRAFTED AND CONSIDERED BEFORE IT MAKES IT TO THE TABLE”

THIS IS EDINBURGH


Traditional, artisan Neapolitan pizza in Edinburgh Honest. Sincere. Simple Locanda de Gusti offers you genuine Italian hospitality at their warm and welcoming restaurant, reminiscent of the trattorias of Naples.

Our pizza menu changes, but keeps the favourites! We pride ourselves on our original toppings. All the ingredients used at Pizzeria 1926 are fresh and simple. The very best varieties of tomatoes, burrata, mozzarella, sausage, flour and olive oil are imported from Italy, whilst meat, seafood and vegetables are sourced as locally as possible. Every day, everything is made from scratch, including our own gluten-free pasta, using imported artisan products from Italy and the freshest meat, fish and seafood from Scotland.

WWW.PIZZERIA1926.COM

Locanda is a place to eat well and relax. locandadegusti@gmail.com

85 Dalry Road • Edinburgh • EH11 2AA • 0131 337 5757

0131 346 8800 | 102 Dalry Road, Edinburgh EH11 2DW

www.locandadegusti.com

Located in the heart of Edinburgh, overlooking St Andrew Square, The Refinery offers an all-day drinking and dining experience in beautiful surroundings. From craft coffee and business breakfasts in the morning to dinner dates and cocktails late into the evening, The Refinery is your everyday escape. Opt for our gorgeous crispy duck flatbread to share over drinks or join us for long, lazy weekend brunches and roasts. The options are endless, with space for up to 400 people, we can cater to all kinds of private hire and events from intimate mixology classes to wedding receptions and corporate parties.

Contact T. 0333 210 0017 E. info@refinerystandrew.co.uk 5 St Andrew Square | Edinburgh | EH2 2BD

www.drakeandmorgan.co.uk/the-ref inery-st-andrew-square

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research facility all at the same time. Cafe St Honore makes excellent use of local, seasonal ingredients, celebrated chef Mark Greenaway’s food is full of fun, foams and fancy flourishes, while Rhubarb at Prestonfield is worth a visit, particularly for Sunday lunch. For a bit of celebrity-spotting, especially during the Festival, The Witchery is the place to go, if you can get a table. Jack Nicholson and Michael Douglas are just a couple of the many stars that have dined out in its opulent and imposing surroundings immediately beneath the Castle, which is often described as Scotland’s answer to The Ivy. That claim might be harder to justify now, however, given that the famous London Theatreland venue has recently opened a sister establishment, The Ivy on the Square, in Edinburgh. For more relaxed dining, the Shore in Leith is home to some excellent foodie pubs, including the acclaimed King’s Wark. In the centre of town, Urban Angel is to be admired for its long-running eco-conscious attitude and commitment to sourcing ingredients locally, without recourse to skimping on originality or taste. In the West End, the fresh and funky WestRoom boasts an p77

be a popular addition to Stockbridge’s dining scene. Elsewhere, there’s plenty more in the fine dining vein worth investigating, including The Wee Restaurant, The Printing Press and The Pompadour by Galvin. Alongside the Michelin stars and attendant aspirants, Edinburgh has also seen a boom in fabulous, chic and affordable restaurants influenced in part by the philosophies of new nordic cuisine and focused on ultra-local, ultra seasonal eating. Two excellent proponents of this are the Gardener’s Cottage and Timberyard, both of which, alongside the superb food and drink, lay considerable claim to the title of ‘coolest space in Edinburgh’. Those two are just some of the new breed of exciting, informal restaurants, alongside other standouts such as Norn, Field and the superb Aizle. Should you find yourself in Stockbridge, Taisteal and Purslane are every bit their equal. Le Roi Fou delivers delicious and delicately cooked treats at a fraction of the cost of many of its London counterparts, while newcomers Forage & Chatter and Ostara are also worth a visit. The impressive Edinburgh Food Studio manages to be a restaurant, quirky pop-up and experimental cookery lab-cum teaching and

JAPANESE STREET FOOD & SUSHI

DINE IN OR GRAB A YO! TO GO Find us at : Princes Street Harvey Nichols or Edinburgh Airport YOSUSHI.COM

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THE ULTIMATE SCO Choose from either of our award-winning venues…

WHISKI ROOMS “ a truly magical place” • Unique venue with all day dining restaurant, bar & whisky shop • Over 300 whiskies in bar and 500 whiskies in shop • Daily whisky tastings – book online • A stylish blend of classic & modern dishes using the best local produce • Fantastic cocktail List • Private dining, groups & families catered for • Only on-trade Ardbeg embassy in UK • Multi award-winning venue WHISKI ROOMS BAR & BISTRO RESTAURANT 4-7 North Bank Street, Edinburgh EH1 2LP Tel: +44 (0)131 225 7224 bar@whiskirooms.com

www.whiskirooms.com @ whiskirooms


OTTISH EXPERIENCE! WHISKI BAR & RESTAURANT “the ultimate Scottish experience” • Multi award-winning whisky bar • Fresh Scottish food served all day • Over 300 whiskies • Great selection of craft beers, wines & cocktails • Free live Scottish music every night • Great atmosphere • Whisky flights and tastings • Groups & families welcome • Amazing experience guaranteed! WHISKI BAR & RESTAURANT 119 High Street, Edinburgh EH1 1SG Tel: +44 (0)131 556 3095 bar@whiskibar.com

www.whiskibar.com @ whiskibar


B O O K O N L I N E AT C H O P H O U S E S T E A K . CO.U K FOLLOW US

102 Constitution St 0131 629 1919 Arch 15, East Market St 0131 629 1551

“ THE FILLET

S T E A K WA S I N S A N E LY GOOD ” THE SCOTSMAN


©VISITSCOTLAND/KENNY LAM/PAUL TOMKINS; ADOBESTOCK; MIKE MARQUEZ/UNSPLASH

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impressive bar menu and enviable cocktail list to wash it down. For great value, the New York Steam Packet on Rose Street North Lane can’t be beaten. This tiny corner of Americana offers a mixture of set menu options that’s sure to sate your appetite, and then some. One of the biggest changes to the city’s dining scene in the past few years is the huge growth in top-notch coffee shops. One of the pioneers of this was perennial favourite Wellington Coffee who, despite opening almost ten years ago, continue to maintain their high standards; they do a mean cheese and bacon scone, too. Over the past decade, they’ve also seen their share of worthy competitors spring up. In fact, there are so many it almost feels unfair to name check some and not others, but a few of the best proponents include Cairngorm Coffee, Lowdown, Artisan Roast, Castello Coffee, Machina Espresso, Brew Lab, Cult, Filament and The Milkman, all of which ensure that wherever you are in the city, you’re never far away from a quality caffeine hit. If tea is more your thing, then seek out one of Eteaket’s two city centre cafes, or pop into

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Cup Tea Lounge, situated just off the west end of Princes Street. While most of these establishments offer above-decent snacks to accompany their hot drinks, if you’re after something a bit more substantial or adventurous, there’s no shortage of great little cafes too, most of whom do decent coffee to boot. Lovecrumbs will tempt you with some of the most incredible cakes in town, Milk serves some of the most interesting, fresh and healthy sandwiches (and hot options) in town, while if it’s a nourishing dose of soup you’re after, then Union of Genius almost certainly has the answer. As you’d expect from a port, seafood plays a large part in Edinburgh’s culinary life. Catches are landed at the village of Newhaven on the northern edge of the town and the fishmarket there is a hive of activity, with buyers from all over the region vying for the choicest picks. You’ll find freshly-caught fish on the menu in many establishments in Edinburgh, but there are some excellent places which specialise in seafood which are well worth seeking out. With premises in both Leith and the city p81

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“THERE ARE SOME EXCELLENT PLACES SPECIALISING IN SEAFOOD WHICH ARE WELL WORTH SEEKING OUT”

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13 Clifton Terrace, Haymarket, Edinburgh EH12 5DR T: 0131 467 7464 | E: enquiry@labruschetta.co.uk | W: www.labruschetta.co.uk An intimate dining experience of classical Italian cuisine, La Bruschetta is situated in the heart of Edinburgh’s Haymarket. Fillet of Beef Carpaccio and Rosettes of Lamb are amongst dishes created by Chef/Owner Giovanni Cariello, which proudly feature Scottish produce. Fresh fish and seafood is a specialty with a daily delivery reflected in the popular signature dish Linguine ai Fruitti di Mare. The only restaurant in Scotland to receive the “Eccellenze Italiane” 2017 accolade, an extensive list of exclusively Italian wines at the restaurant showcases some of the best from the Nero D’avola of Sicily to the prestigious Sassicaia of Tuscany, the perfect accompaniment to your meal!

Open Tuesday to Saturday | Lunch 12:00 – 2:00pm | Dinner 6:00 – 10:30pm

INDIAN LOUNGE Indian & Punjabi Restaurant

For over 30 years Indian Lounge has been doing what it does best, and that is serve great Indian and Punjabi street food. Established in 1983, this family business has been regarded as one of the best Indian restaurants in Edinburgh by many food critics. The Head Chef carefully sources ingredients from local suppliers personally to make sure everything is first-class quality.

Quote E1 to receive 10% off your bill when ordering

Our menu is award-winning, with specialty dishes such as tandoori salmon, lamb chop karai, vegetarian haggis pakora and a local favourite on a Friday lunchtime with office crowds is Indian spiced fish and chips. We have a good selection of meat, seafood and vegetarian dishes, together with our famous grill menu, which is very popular. We can also cater for people with food allergies such as gluten-free and dairy-free. Only olive oil used in our cooking Only free-range chicken Grass-fed Scottish lamb Ship-to-plate seafood in 24 hours or less Fresh vegetables daily 70-seat capacity

A very warm welcome awaits you!

THIS IS EDINBURGH

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 12:00-15:00 & 17:00-23:45 Sun 15:00-23:45 129A Rose Street, Edinburgh EH3 2DT Tel. 0131 226 2862

www.indianloungeedinburgh.co.uk

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Mussel Inn on much more than just mussels Don’t make the mistake of thinking that there’s only seafood on offer at Mussel Inn. In fact, with its rump burger and surf and turf menu options, there’s much more to this award-winning restaurant than just seafood.

Passionate about Seafood

Fans of fresh food, sourced locally, will love Mussel Inn’s new menu offering an extensive selection of dishes to suit every palate.

W

ith starters including seafood chowder, whitebait, fish cakes, grilled queenies, crab salad, Piri Piri prawns, hot smoked salmon, oysters and queen scallops, new main dishes include: a hot seafood platter of king and queen scallops, tiger prawns and mussels poached in seafood sauce topped with grilled sea bass fillet and cream fraiche; pan fried or char-grilled king scallops, spiced fish stew and shellfish pasta with mussels, prawns, queen scallops and fettuccini in a shellfish bisque. Other dishes include: crab pasta; tiger prawns; sea bass and a surf and turf option comprising a 6oz Orkney rump steak, three

tiger prawns and three half shell queenies served with a seafood sauce, new potato, rocket and cherry tomato salad. Meanwhile, the restaurant’s mussels, grown on ropes in sea lochs on the West of Scotland and the Shetland Isles, remain available in kilo and half kilo pots with a selection of popular sauces, including shallot, roasted peppers, Moroccan and blue cheese. The Mussel Inn offers special two and threecourse pre-theatre menus, while its ‘lunchtime quickies’ offer diners a selection of healthy, nutritious, freshly prepared dishes. There’s a varied daily specials board too, featuring dishes carefully prepared by the team of chefs and chosen daily from selected suppliers. Located at 61-65 Rose street, in the heart of the city centre and just 10 min walk from Waverley station, Mussel Inn is renowned for its passion for its offering of delicious locally sourced fresh seafood, providing excellent value for money and a quick and friendly service.

To book a table at Mussel Inn call 0131 225 5979 or log onto www.mussel-inn.com for more information.


Opened in January 2017, Taisteal is the latest venture by Chef Gordon Craig. Meaning journey or travel, Taisteal presents dishes using the best local Scottish produce combined with elements from around the world. Taisteal takes elements of fine dining and presents them in a relaxed environment.

WWW.TAISTEAL.CO.UK Taisteal have been recommended in the Michelin Guide 2018, the Good Food Guide and have been awarded one AA Rosette.

Opening Hours Tuesday-Saturday Lunch served 12pm-2.30pm Dinner served 6pm-9.30pm

1-3 Raeburn Place, Stockbridge, Edinburgh EH4 1HU taistealstockbridge@gmail.com Reservations: 0131 332 9977

Elegant and sumptuously-decorated, 21212 restaurant’s stand-out feature is the fantastic open kitchen where guests can see Michelin chef, Paul Kitching, and his team at work.

21212 restaurant sits in a regal, listed Georgian townhouse in Edinburgh’s Royal Terrace.

The unique 3-1-3-1-3 menu approach offers contemporary French-inspired dishes with flavour combinations sure to delight even the most frequent Michelin diner. The menu offers diners 3, 4 and 5 course options for both lunch and dinner. Whilst the weekday 2-course lunches, from just £28, make it accessible to all.

Set over 5 floors, it hosts a 38-seater restaurant.

Get in touch with us: 0345 22 21212

The restaurant is open Tuesday-Saturday

3 Royal Terrace Edinburgh EH7 5AB

www.21212restaurant.co.uk

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centre, Fishers is a popular haunt for seafood fans, having previously held the award for ‘Best Seafood in Scotland’. Menus change daily depending on what the boats have just brought back from the North Sea, and to capitalise on the pick of seasonal ingredients to complement the fresh catch. Cadiz combines the best in Scottish seafood with Spanish and Mediterranean influences, served up in an elegant first floor dining room on George Street. If you’re looking for something extra special, a trip to Ondine is highly recommended. Having worked with the likes of Rick Stein and Mark Hix, multi-awardwinning executive chef Roy Brett returned to his native Edinburgh in 2009 to tackle this personal project and indulge his passion for seafood, and it’s been a roaring success ever since. You can chose to sit in the restaurant, but the best seat in the house is at the horseshoe-shaped crustacean bar, where you can watch the chefs prepare the piscine treats right in front of you. Stac Polly, now in its 29th year in Scotland’s capital, is the city flagbearer for traditional Scottish cuisine, plus modern interpretations and an extensive wine list and choice of whiskies.

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But if it’s simply some traditional fish ‘n’ chips you’re yearning for then you’re in luck, as Edinburgh is stuffed full of superior outlets. Notable examples include Auld Reekie institution L’Alba D’oro, and modern upstart The Tailend. Owned by two stalwarts of the fishing industry, the Tailend on Leith Walk has quickly established itself on the scene, while L’Alba D’oro became the first ever takeaway in the world to achieve a four-star rating from a national tourism body, and continues to delight. Wherever you decide to head for, you simply must try a ‘delicacy’ unique to the fish bars of Edinburgh; namely chippy sauce. A mixture of vinegar and brown sauce, it’s a staple throughout the city. So much so, in fact, that your server will ask if you would like “salt and sauce” with your takeaway rather than the usual question “salt and vinegar?” As well as it’s seafood, Scotland is also worldrenowned for the quality of its beef, and accordingly Edinburgh is home to some fantastic steakhouses and burger bars. Kyloe pays due homage to the art of the steak, while the sleek and sexy Chop House Leith, and it’s equally hip sibling on Market Street, both serve up cuts of meat that will linger long in the p83

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“SCOTLAND IS ALSO WORLD-RENOWNED FOR THE QUALITY OF ITS BEEF, AND ACCORDINGLY EDINBURGH IS HOME TO SOME FANTASTIC STEAKHOUSES”

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Come to Stac Polly for modern Scottish cuisine and a warm Scottish welcome. Stac Polly in Dublin Street is one of Edinburgh’s original Scottish fine dining restaurants. It is complemented by the Brasserie, Gin and Wine Bar on the ground floor.

Open 7 days Private rooms available

29-33 Dublin Street Edinburgh EH3 6NL T. 0131 556 2231

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memory. The beef in Belted’s burgers boast full traceability and equally full flavour while Reekie’s Smokehouse add more than a touch of southern barbeque goodness to proceedings. It’s not just carnivores that can eat well in Edinburgh, though; vegetarians are well catered for too. While most of the city’s restaurants offer some mouth-watering meat-free choices on their menus, in David Bann and Henderson’s (which has been championing vegetarian and vegan alternatives for half a century), they have two of Edinburgh’s best restaurants dedicated solely to their needs. For something on the go, Holy Cow’s vegan burgers are worth checking out. Almost half of the Edinburgh’s residents weren’t actually born here, and there are people from every corner of the globe who now call the city home. This is particularly relevant to food lovers, because it’s a fact that is reflected in the diversity of cuisine on offer. In fact, you could make a very agreeable attempt at eating your way round the entire world without ever having to leave Edinburgh. There’s everything from Venezuelan to Nepalese, Brazilian to Sudanese – you name it, you’ll probably be able to find it. Whether it’s takeaway tex-mex style burritos or more authentic regional cuisine, Mexican food is a firm favourite in Edinburgh. Both Bodega and El Cartel Casera Mexicana serve up amazing street-food style dishes, including a range of delicious soft tacos, p85

Kasturi was used in exotic perfumes for the Mughal Emperors long ago. The combination of the fragrance in the room and a menu of spicy dishes, creates an atmosphere of complete relaxation and satisfaction in the best tradition of an Indian gourmet restaurant. Located in the heart of Edinburgh’s vibrant West End, Kasturi Indian restaurant offers a haven for the connoisseur of gourmet Indian food. Ideal for special evening occasions, for pre-theatre or for sports celebrations. Elegant decor and friendly service will make your visit to Kasturi a culinary experience to remember. Tourists particularly welcome. Open 12-2pm & 5-11.30pm every day. All food is Halal.

4 course business lunch – £7.95

35-37 Shandwick Place Edinburgh EH2 4RG T: 0131 228 2441 E: bookings@kasturi-ed.co.uk

www.kasturi-ed.co.uk “YOU COULD MAKE A VERY AGREEABLE ATTEMPT AT EATING YOUR WAY ROUND THE ENTIRE WORLD WITHOUT EVER HAVING TO LEAVE EDINBURGH”

Highly rated on Trip Advisor

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CALL 0131 629 5300 ~ SHUCKS@WHITEHORSEOYSTERBAR.CO.UK ~ 266 CANONGATE, EDINBURGH. EH8 8AA WWW.WHITEHORSEOYSTERBAR.CO.UK


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“THE FIRST WRITTEN RECIPE FOR CURRY IN THE UK WAS CRAFTED IN EDINBURGH IN THE LATE 1700S, AND IT’S A TRADITION THAT HAS CONTINUED THROUGH TO THE MODERN DAY”

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while Miros Cantina on Rose Street is a real treat for those seeking some hearty, feelgood flavours. If Italian is your thing, then Nonna’s Kitchen in Morningside serves up exactly what it sounds like it should – hearty Italian food just like mamma used to make, while Contini George Street has an eye for the contemporary. For truly authentic regional dishes, Locanda de Gusti is a surefire winner. Pizza aficionados are well catered for too, whether it’s graband-go NYC-style slices from Dough or Civernos, or sit-down affairs like Pizzeria 1926 and Wildman. If it’s Gallic flair you’re seeking, then sister restaurants L’Escargot Blanc and L’Escargot Bleu are a safe bet. Owned and operated by Frenchman Fred Berkmiller, he’s made a name for himself by cooking the classics of his homeland, but embracing Scottish produce in order to do so. One experience not to be missed is a trip to Chop Chop, winner of numerous awards and accolades for its simple, but amazingly tasty, dishes. Rather than serving up anglicised versions of Chinese cuisine,

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they specialise in traditional dishes like stuffed dumplings – steamed or fried – and a variety of noodle, meat and vegetable dishes, too. It all makes for great sharing food too ideal if you’re catching up with friends. Curry plays an important part in the city’s eating habits, too. The first written recipe for curry in the UK was crafted in Edinburgh in the late 1700s, and it’s a tradition that has continued through to the modern day. Some of the finest examples are ones that offer a slightly different take on the typical curry-house encounter, while still providing excellent value for money. Mother India’s tapas-style approach means that it’s a great place to try something new without having to go the whole hog, and the variety ensures it’s never boring. The Original Mosque Kitchen might hardly be the most luxurious setting, sitting outside under a plastic roof cafeteria-style eating off paper plates, but it all adds to the fun, and once you see the size of the portions (and the relative prices) and start tucking into p89

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For more than 15 years Jean-Michel Gauffre has taken his nostalgic passion for his rural childhood in the Languedoc region of southern France and applied it to the rustic, hearty cooking that has earned La Garrigue two AA rosettes, The Good Food Guide’s Restaurant of the Year award and the praise of being Gordon Ramsay’s favourite French bistro.

Loosely translated, ‘garrigue’ refers to the hills along the Mediterranean coastline where luxuriant and fragrant plants such as juniper, thyme, rosemary and lavender grow wild. At La Garrigue, ideas for dishes are as bountiful as the herbs that season them. The menu boasts traditional specialities of the Languedoc region, which have been updated with a contemporary twist, featuring ingredients sourced personally by Jean-Michel.

With panoramic views of Calton Hill and its Scottish location, La Garrigue remains authentically French at heart.

www.lagarrigue.co.uk reservations@lagarrigue.co.uk • 0844 502 2525 31 Jeffery Street • Edinburgh • EH1 1DH

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Authentic Spanish Tapas Bar & Restaurant

Tapa, 19 Shore Place, Leith, Edinburgh EH6 6SW +44 131 4766776

www.tapaedinburgh.co.uk

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Dine is Edinburgh’s multi-award winning luxury brasserie and cocktail bar. Menus are designed by Michelin chef Stuart Muir using fresh, local and sustainable produce with fine wines, champagnes and seasonal cocktails available.

LUNCHTIME / PRE-THEATRE MENU* Monday-Friday 12-3pm 2 courses £14.50 / 3 courses £19.50 / inc tea or coffee Monday – Saturday from 5pm** 2 courses £14.50 / 3 courses £19.50 *Our Market Menu is still available from 7pm on a Monday to Thursday evening at 2 courses £16.50 3 courses £21.50 **6.30pm is the last sitting for our Market Menu on a Friday or Saturday evening.

Dine, Saltire Court, 10 (1F) Cambridge Street, Edinburgh, EH1 2ED

RESERVATIONS -

0131 218 1818

DINEEDINBURGH.CO.UK

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1 LEVEN STREET

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the range of delicious, slow-cooked concoctions, you’ll hardly even notice. If you still want something more comfortable, then you’re in luck – its founders upped sticks and moved to more amenable premises in the nearby Nicholson Square, setting up a competitor named the Mosque Kitchen. Confusing perhaps, but tasty nonetheless. For more innovative Indian cuisine, Navadhanya is ideal, while Ronaq delivers an excellent traditional neighbourhood curry-house experience. Ting Thai Caravan do some of the tastiest Thai street-food style dishes around, bursting with zing. If you’re after similar flavours in more sophisticated surroundings, then try Passorn Brasserie in the New Town. If it’s sushi that you’re craving, then Hakataya, Harajuku Kitchen and Kanpai are all superb Japanese restaurants. It’s been suggested that Edinburgh has more places to eat out per head of population than

“IF YOU TAKE A STROLL THROUGH THE TOWN YOU’LL BE FACED WITH PLENTY OF TOUGH DECISIONS – IT SEEMS THAT ROUND EVERY CORNER IS ANOTHER GREAT PLACE TO GRAB A BITE TO EAT”

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anywhere else in Europe and, while it may or may not be true, if you take a stroll through the town you’ll be faced with plenty of tough decisions – it seems that round every corner is another great place to grab a bite to eat. Looking slightly further afield however, The Bridge Inn at Ratho is wonderful for a lazy lunch. Set on the banks of the picturesque Union Canal, it’s a glorious spot, particularly on a fine day. In the charming coastal town of North Berwick, a short train-ride away, the Herringbone is a popular spot for cracking pub lunches (so much so it now has a sister venue in suburban Edinburgh), while Osteria is a sensational Italian restaurant serving mouth-watering combinations. With Angelo Coccia at the helm, this little gem lays claim to possessing the most genial host imaginable, and it’s a true family affair with daughter Daniela and her husband Daniele heading up the kitchen. l

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ITINERARIES

DOUBLE-QUICK

EDINBURGH!

If you only have a few days on your hands to enjoy Scotland’s capital, check out our guide to getting the best out of 48 or 72 hours here

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ITINERARIES

48 HOURS

“ANOTHER SCOTTISH FLAVOUR IS HONOURED AT THE SCOTCH WHISKY EXPERIENCE WITH A DRAM AT THE END OF THE TOUR”

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DAY ONE An open-top bus tour of the city is a great way to orientate yourself and work out exactly what is where. Tours follow a circuit through the medieval Old Town and the 18th-century Georgian New Town so you can always get back to where you started. The top of the Royal Mile is a great starting place to explore on foot. Edinburgh Castle is Scotland’s number one attraction and definitely worth a visit. As well as the obvious visits to see Scotland’s Crown Jewels and the Stone of Destiny, it’s worth trying to locate the Dogs’ Cemetery in memory of man’s and soldier’s best friends. Arguably the best view of Edinburgh is from the Castle ramparts as nothing in the city can be built higher. Crossing the Castle Esplanade, scene of the annual Edinburgh Military Tattoo, you will find The Spirit of the Tattoo, a new and free visitor centre which gives some of the history and flavour of the magic of the Tattoo. Another Scottish flavour is honoured at the Scotch Whisky Experience with a dram at the end of the tour and Scottish restaurant, Amber, in its basement for a spot of lunch. With batteries recharged you can either continue down the Royal Mile with its museums and visitor centres on everything from weaving to

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childhood toys or jump back on board a tour bus to take you down to the Palace of Holyroodhouse and the Scottish Parliament or over to Princes Street with its shops and galleries. In the evening, combine a tour of pubs with a love of literature on the Scottish Literary Pub Tour before dinner in one of the intimate restaurants and bistros of the Old Town. DAY TWO Edinburgh is surrounded by hills which give great outlooks as well as good exercise. If an extinct volcano in Holyrood Park is too much for you, try the more manageable Calton Hill off Princes Street. This is the site of what should have been Scotland’s National Monument but the city ran out of money so the columns are all that was completed, earning them the title “Edinburgh’s Disgrace”. Nelson’s Monument, in the shape of a telescope, is worth the climb to the top. A ball at the top of its mast drops simultaneously with the firing of the One O’Clock Gun from the castle. Keep the natural theme for the afternoon with a tour of the Royal Botanic Garden with its recently renovated Glass Houses, exhibitions and world of colourful plants and shrubs. It’s where Edinburgh people go for moments of quiet reflection and a reviving cup of tea. In the evening, try one of the traditional pubs in Leith with their menu of freshly-caught fish dishes as you look over the Water of Leith. p92

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ITINERARIES

72 HOURS

DAY THREE If Edinburgh marks your first visit to Scotland, you may like to get out of the city today to see the Highlands or other parts. There are day trips year-round which whisk you in little more than half an hour to the majestic splendour of the Highlands and the still expanses of lochs and glens. Tours take in forest walks amongst spectacular waterfalls, standing stone circles and the tallest trees in the country. The scenery may change as you travel but the sheer beauty of the land remains constant. Whether by luxury coach or intimate minicoach, your driver will have you back to Edinburgh in time for dinner or even a traditional fish supper! Round off your trip with a night of live music in a pub. Just remember you have to get home tomorrow! l

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“IF EDINBURGH MARKS YOUR FIRST VISIT TO SCOTLAND, YOU MAY LIKE TO GET OUT OF THE CITY TODAY TO SEE THE HIGHLANDS OR OTHER PARTS”

DAY ONE It’s a good idea to start your day at Edinburgh Castle when it opens at 9.30am to get ahead of the crowds. You can then either follow the Royal Mile down on foot to explore its narrow ‘closes’ and boxful of attractions or, if you want to get some idea of what you are seeing as you go, jump aboard one of the open-top tour buses. Choose a multilingual tour or get a more personal view from an on board guide. The buses follow the same route all day so you can jump off and on as you please to visit other attractions like the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the Scottish Parliament building or the National Galleries of Scotland. There are plenty of cafés and eating places scattered around the city centre for a quick lunch. Most pubs offer hearty food at reasonable prices and many have strong historical connections themselves. If you’ve spent the morning in the Old Town area (and you could easily spend several days there and not visit everything), cross the North Bridge to Edinburgh’s other World Heritage site, the Georgian New Town. The elegant street layout and neo-classical architecture is among the best of its kind anywhere. Head back to the Royal Mile for a walking ghost tour either before or after dinner, depending on how brave you feel, followed by dinner in the romantic and historic setting of a candlelit restaurant like The Witchery by the Castle or the Vintners Rooms in Leith.

DAY TWO From Princes Street it’s a short No.22 bus ride to another regally-named attraction. The Royal Yacht Britannia is now permanently docked at Ocean Terminal in Leith. After the tour, stay on to explore the port of Leith, now one of the most fashionable areas to live in Edinburgh. It’s easy to forget when in the city centre just how close you are to the sea. If you’re feeling energetic, join the Edinburgh tradition of climbing Arthur’s Seat in Holyrood Park. It’s an extinct volcano (last active over 300 million years ago) and is one of the best vantage points over the city to the countryside beyond. If you dined ‘Old Town’ last night, go for something different around George Street tonight. There’s something of everything in one of the city’s main eating areas.

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FACT FILE

DID YOU KNOW? Think you know all about Edinburgh? Think again!

Edinburgh was designated a World Heritage Site in 1995.

The first international rugby union game was played in Edinburgh in 1871 and saw Scotland beat England.

Edinburgh was named the world’s first UNESCO City of Literature in 2004.

St Margaret’s Chapel, in Edinburgh Castle is the oldest building in the city, built in 1090.

East Lothian boasts the highest number of links golf courses in proximity than anywhere else in the world.

The West End, Stockbridge and Leith have some great independent shops and boutiques.

Jenners, Edinburgh’s original department store, has been trading since 1838.

A free gallery bus operates between The Mound and the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art every 45 minutes.

The clock on the Balmoral Hotel, situated above Waverley railway station, is set two minutes fast so travellers running to the station have time to spare. The only time the clock runs to the correct time is on Hogmanay when Princes Street is the scene of a huge party, and the clock counts down the minutes to midnight.

Many of Edinburgh’s museums and galleries offer free entry. The One O’Clock Gun which is fired from Edinburgh Castle’s ramparts each day (except Sunday) was once used as a time signal for sailing ships in the Firth of Forth.

Edinburgh is the only city to have a dog on the list of citizens who have been given the prestigious Freedom of the City award. That dog was ‘Greyfriars Bobby’.

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The Grassmarket, now popular for its pubs and restaurants, was once a medieval market place and prime location for public hangings. l

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ARTS & CULTURE

A CITY AT THE HEART OF ART! Edinburgh’s rich cultural history continues to grow and thrive in a city which has played host to all of the greats

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ulturally, Edinburgh has played a significant role not only in shaping Scottish society, but in fact much of the western world. Since it was founded in 1582, the University of Edinburgh has been a driving force in cultural and social development, with alumni including Charles Darwin, Adam Smith, David Hume and William Wordsworth. It’s been joined in recent times by noteworthy contributions in each of their own specialities from the city’s other universities, Edinburgh Napier, Heriot-Watt and Queen Margaret University. During the enlightenment especially, the city and its people were responsible for advancements in the fields of politics, economics, sociology, engineering, agriculture, medicine, law, archaeology, geology, philosophy and architecture. Indeed, it was a combination of the latter two that

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“EDINBURGH IS A LIVING, BREATHING, WORKING MUSEUM, WHERE THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT SERVES AS A CONTINUAL, UNPARALLELED BACKDROP TO DAYTO-DAY LIFE, AND IT IS THERE THAT THE CITY DERIVES ITS INIMITABLE CHARACTER”

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earned Edinburgh the nickname ‘the Athens of the North’. As well as being the base for many of the pre-eminent philosophers and social thinkers of the day, it was also the location for scores of neo-classical buildings and structures like the National Gallery, Register House, the City Observatory and the National Monument. The architecture of Edinburgh is one of the reasons that the city is so unique and so admired. It’s the juxtaposition between its two distinct areas – the chaotic sprawl of the medieval Old Town and the pomp and splendour of the New Town, with its mix of neoclassical, Victorian and Georgian designs – that sets it apart. Edinburgh is a living, breathing, working museum, where the built environment serves as a continual, unparalleled backdrop to day-to-day life, and it is there that the city derives its inimitable p96

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ARTS & CULTURE

“EDINBURGH IS LITTERED WITH HISTORICALLYSIGNIFICANT STRUCTURES, AND EVEN AN AIMLESS STROLL AROUND THE TOWN WILL UNCOVER SOME DELIGHTFUL FEATURES”

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character. Here you can appreciate architecture and urban-planning on a peerless scale – it’s the only place in the world where it’s possible to walk for a mile in either direction and only ever see listed buildings. There are numerous walks and trails, guided or otherwise, that you can follow or take part in which reveal the wonders and hidden secrets of the city’s buildings and monuments. Edinburgh is littered with historically-significant structures, and even an aimless stroll around the town will uncover some delightful features. Two monuments – out of many – stand out. Described by Bill Bryson as a ‘Gothic rocket ship’, the Scott Monument which dominates Princes Street is the largest in the world commemorating a writer, while the Nelson Monument on Calton Hill contains a time ball which is still dropped daily at 1pm. Even today, Edinburgh is the cultural seat of the nation. Scotland is home to four internationallyimportant National Collections, the National Galleries (NGS); the National Library (NLS); the National Museums (NMS) and the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) and the buildings which comprise each are based almost

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exclusively in Edinburgh. Five galleries, on three sites across Edinburgh, encompass the NGS and together they house one of the finest art collections in the world. Open daily from 10am-6pm (and 7pm on Thursdays), admission to each is free, although there is sometimes a charge for special exhibitions. Individually or collectively, they shouldn’t be missed. If you’re a keen enthusiast, the archive and study facilities at the galleries are second-to-none, with almost 150,000 pieces, dating back to 1300, available for reference. The National Gallery itself is situated on The Mound, adjacent to the Royal Scottish Academy and the two galleries are linked by an underground tunnel, The Weston Link, which also houses a stunning glass-fronted restaurant overlooking Princes Street Gardens. Both buildings – huge neoclassical structures designed by William Henry Playfair – can be considered impressive works of art in their own right. Here you’ll find works by greats like Rembrandt, Cezanne, Gaugin, El Greco, Van Gogh, Constable, Vermeer, Monet, Raphael, Degas, Botticelli, Raeburn and many more. This is also where a number of paintings by the Italian master Titian hang, including the glorious Diana and p99

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Like what you see…

Our superb visitor guides are packed with useful articles and information.

Dates from before the Fourteenth Century and houses the celebrated Hamilton Palace collection of portraits, furniture and porcelain, as well as Mary, Queen of Scots’ Death Mask and Casket.

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Guided Tours at 12:30, 13:30, 14:30, 15:30 on Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays from Easter to October. Groups and catering on request. Call 01620 823 720.

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THE SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT IS

OP E N T O E V E RYO N E

Open Monday to Saturday

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Actaeon (which rotates both here and in London), which made headlines when it was saved for the nation for the princely sum of £50 million. At its picturesque setting in the West End, the National Gallery of Modern Art, split between two neighbouring buildings, displays works by many luminaries of the modern art world. Pablo Picasso, Francis Bacon, Andy Warhol, Piet Mondrian, Henry Moore and Tracey Emin are some of the highlights in Modern One, while Modern Two is the permanent home of the Paolozzi Gift, a collection of works gifted by the Edinburgh-born artist

“ENJOY A WALK ALONG THE DELIGHTFUL WATER OF LEITH AND FOLLOW A SERIES OF INSTALLATIONS BY TURNER PRIZE WINNER, ANTHONY GORMLEY, WHICH YOU CAN FOLLOW RIGHT DOWN TO THE SEA”

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Eduardo Paolozzi. From here, you can also enjoy a walk along the delightful Water of Leith and follow a series of installations by Turner Prize winner, Anthony Gormley, which you can follow right down to the sea. The Scottish National Portrait Gallery on Queen Street houses depictions of some of Scotland’s most notable citizens such as Robert Burns, Bonnie Prince Charlie and Mary, Queen of Scots. First opened to the public in 1889, it recently underwent a three-year long, £17 million refurbishment, and is one of the country’s most stunning gallery spaces. In addition to the NGS there are a multitude of other public, private and commercial art galleries in Edinburgh which are open to the public, too, many without charge. The City Art Centre, operated by the city council, has a real focus on national and local artists, as well as a fantastic collection of Scottish pieces right through to the modern day. Directly across the street, the not-for-profit Fruitmarket Gallery specialises in contemporary art, staging exhibitions by celebrated artists from Britain and beyond. The Queen’s Gallery, part of the Palace p100

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of Holyroodhouse, displays works drawn from the Royal Collection on rotation, while the Ingleby Gallery is one of most-respected private galleries operating in the UK. Created by amalgamating the 19th-century Royal Museum building with a new custom-built structure in the 1990s, the jewel in the crown of the NMS is the National Museum on Chamber Street. Its collections include everything from prehistoric fossils to significant cultural artefacts from all four corners of the globe. Most notably, though, it traces Scotland’s history right back to the dawn of time, interweaving various threads to tell the complete story of the land, its people, and the nation they created. There are exhibitions, interactive displays and live action recreations, and you could easily spend the whole day here. The city is also the setting for The Museum of War, located in the grounds of Edinburgh Castle, which presents the history of Scotland’s military experience, examining great battles, glorious victories and crushing defeats, and the impact these had on shaping our society over hundreds of years. No matter where you’re from, with over 20 million items in almost 500 languages, you should be able to find something to read at the National

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“WITH HALF A DOZEN MAJOR VENUES, AND SCORES OF SMALLER ONES, THEATRICAL ARTS THRIVE IN EDINBURGH YEARROUND, NOT JUST IN AUGUST DURING THE FESTIVAL”

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Library. With ancient maps, musical masterpieces and manuscripts from some of Scotland’s greatest authors, it’s a terrific way to explore the history of the nation’s culture through first-hand evidence. The city was also a huge inspiration in the domain of literature, influencing great writers like Sir Walter Scott and Robert Burns, and continues to do so to the present day, with celebrated authors such as J.K. Rowling, Ian Rankin, Alexander McCall Smith and Irvine Welsh all drawing inspiration from the capital and it’s people. The RCAHMS looks after all the information about Scotland’s built environment – everything from buildings, sites and ancient monuments, whether they are of architectural, archaeological or historical interest, so for those that want to delve deeper into these areas, you needn’t look any further. If you’re here tracing your Scottish ancestry, it’s a superb tool for adding some flavour to your research; what was your family’s home like, or the area that they lived in? Edinburgh is also the home of the National Archives of Scotland, undoubtedly the best starting point for any amateur genealogists. Other notable attractions include the Writer’s Museum, the Museum of Childhood, and the Museum of Edinburgh where you can learn about every detail of the city’s past. With half a dozen major venues, and scores of smaller ones, theatrical arts thrive in Edinburgh year-round, not just

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in August during the festival. The marvellous Usher Hall, for instance, stages everything from classical music to rock concerts, the Festival Theatre presents a broad range including ballet, opera, dance and drama, whereas the King’s specialises in comedy, drama and musicals. The Playhouse (the UK’s largest theatre, with a capacity of over 3000) hosts large touring companies and hit shows, while the Traverse and the Lyceum tend to showcase new writing and produce contemporary shows of their own respectively. The Bedlam is the oldest student-run theatre in the UK, staging around 40 performances a year, and the Brunton Theatre, Pleasance and the Church Hill Theatre all frequently put on an assortment of pieces too. Amateur theatre flourishes as well, although the standard does, of course, tend to fluctuate. Edinburgh has a strong creative industry which continues to influence, and be influenced by, contemporary art and culture. Many of the city’s arts venues, especially the smaller ones, collaborate with all kinds of artists to continue to develop ideas and challenge conceptions. In the last few years, there have been some interesting collectives emerging that seek to combine different media in new ways and tend to spring up around multi-purpose venues. If you like your culture to be cutting-edge, scratch the surface a little – you’ll find an abundance of innovative, challenging and provocative art lurking beneath Edinburgh’s grandiose veneer. l

THIS IS EDINBURGH


CITY OF LITERATURE

WRITTEN IN THE STARS! Our amazing heritage continues to be well-documented by a host of great writers

©VISITSCOTLAND/PAUL TOMKINS

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Holmes? Which other city has named its railway station after a novel? Or one of its football teams? Edinburgh was the first UNESCO City of Literature in the world, receiving the designation in 2004. The idea of a formal ‘City of Literature’ designation came about because four book lovers thought that Edinburgh, and indeed Scotland, should take on responsibility for the future development of a literary culture that has distinguished and enlightened our country’s past. They wanted to share the literary culture of this capital city with the world, to celebrate the literary greats of the past and to embrace and encourage future literary developments. Edinburgh was proposed not as the city of literature but as part of a growing network of cities. The idea was not about competition but about aspiration and partnership. This marked the beginnings of a global enterprise, a network of cities of literature celebrating, sharing and developing their literary culture and Melbourne has recently joined Edinburgh to become the second UNESCO City of Literature with other cities expected to follow shortly. The Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust is the driving force behind the city’s efforts to share and expand its literary culture and as well as co-ordinating a wide range of literary activities and events, the Trust runs a city-wide reading campaign every year. Each February, Edinburgh’s residents are encouraged to all read the same book at the same time. Thousands of free books are given away p104

dinburgh is world-renowned for its magnificent architecture – from the grandeur of the Georgian New Town to the closes and wynds of the historic Old Town, the monuments of Calton Hill to Edinburgh Castle at the top and the Palace of Holyroodhouse at the bottom of the Royal Mile. Rich in history, the city has known battles and plague, poverty and great riches, religious persecution, grave robbers, The Enlightenment, The Union and eventual devolution and its history has shaped its streets and buildings. Complementing the built environment, and often inspired by it, is the literary heritage of the city. Authors, writers, poets and thinkers have lived and worked in Edinburgh through the ages, from James Hogg, Walter Scott, Robert Burns and Robert Louis Stevenson to modern day authors Ian Rankin, JK Rowling, Iain Banks, Irvine Welsh and Alexander McCall Smith. The stories are in the stones, streets and monuments, and visitors and residents alike can wander through Edinburgh’s streets soaking up the atmosphere that has inspired so many. Where else can you follow in the footsteps of Rankin’s Inspector Rebus or explore the locations found in McCall Smith’s 44 Scotland Street series? Where else can you learn about Deacon Brodie, respected cabinet maker by day, thief by night and the inspiration for Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde, or find out more about Joseph Bell, the surgeon whose diagnostic approach to cases inspired the character of Sherlock

“COMPLEMENTING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT, AND OFTEN INSPIRED BY IT, IS THE LITERARY HERITAGE OF THE CITY. AUTHORS, WRITERS, POETS AND THINKERS HAVE LIVED AND WORKED IN EDINBURGH THROUGH THE AGES”

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“THE BOOK FESTIVAL HAS DEVELOPED A SERIES OF HIGH PROFILE DEBATES AND DISCUSSIONS WHICH HAVE BECOME ONE OF THE HALLMARKS OF THIS WONDERFUL OCCASION”

THIS IS EDINBURGH

through libraries, schools, community centres, shops, cafes and restaurants and there is a full programme of events, including performances, films, readings, debates, discussions and tours. The author is usually Scottish, often from Edinburgh or with strong Edinburgh connections, and the book is chosen to appeal to the widest possible audience. In previous years titles have included Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic Scottish adventure story, Kidnapped, and the darker and gothic Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde, which, although set in London is clearly inspired by some of Edinburgh’s most notorious characters as well as the duality of the city itself. In 2009, Edinburgh collaborated with other cities around the UK including Bristol and Glasgow in a country-wide reading campaign featuring Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Lost World, celebrating not only the 150th Anniversary of Conan Doyle’s birth (in Edinburgh) but also the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Darwin, whose theories of evolution are explored in the book. Edinburgh is also host to the largest public celebration of words in the world – the Edinburgh International Book Festival, which takes place in the heart of the historic city each August. Started in 1983, it regularly brings over 800 writers to the city from 45 different countries. The Book Festival takes place in an ever-expanding tented village in the tranquil oasis of Charlotte Square Gardens in the heart of the New Town. The first choice of venue in 1983 was Princes Street Gardens. However an ancient by-law (now repealed) prohibiting the sale of books and printed materials in the Gardens meant that Charlotte

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Square became the home of this, the largest public book festival in the world. Over 200,000 visitors enjoy discussions, readings and Meet the Author sessions with authors, poets, journalists, commentators, politicians, photographers and illustrators from all over the world. The Book Festival has developed a series of high profile debates and discussions which have become one of the hallmarks of this wonderful occasion. Each year internationally-renowned authors join newly-published writers to become part of this unique forum in which audience and author meet to exchange thoughts and opinions on some of the world’s most pressing issues. Running alongside the general programme is the highly-regarded Children’s Programme which has grown to become a leading showcase for children’s writers and illustrators. Incorporating workshops, storytelling, panel discussions, author events and book signings, the Children’s Programme is popular with both the public and schools alike, and now ranks as the world’s premier books and reading event for young people. Edinburgh is full of great literary organisations where people in the city can get involved with words. The National Library of Scotland on George IV Bridge is Scotland’s largest library, and holds over 14 million printed items. The library also houses the John Murray Archive. Edinburgh-born John McMurray established the publishing house of John Murray in 1768. Over seven generations the firm grew to become one of the world’s greatest publishers. The firm’s historical archive (to 1920) consists of over 150,000 items representing the lives and works of many great writers in the fields of

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ALAN MCCREDIE/EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL; THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SCOTLAND; TROTALO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

literature, science, politics, travel and exploration. Among the circle of authors and correspondents (well over 16,000 in all) represented in the Archive are writers as diverse as Lord Byron, Jane Austen, Charles Darwin and David Livingstone. An exhibition of some of the contents of the Archive is open to the public. The Writers’ Museum showcases three of the country’s finest writers: Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Burns and Walter Scott. Other prominent Scottish writers, including contemporary authors, are featured in the museum’s programme of temporary exhibitions. The courtyard immediately outside The Writers’ Museum has been designated as Makers’ Court and celebrates the lives and works of Scottish writers. Each of the writers is commemorated by a quotation inscribed in stone and set in the paving of the courtyard. The Scots word Makar stresses the role of the poet or author as a skilled and versatile worker in the craft of writing. Edinburgh has adopted its own version of the Poet Laureate: the Edinburgh Makar. In the growing Literature Quarter on the Royal Mile nestles the Scottish Storytelling Centre, home to a brand new theatre and bright cafe as well as creative exhibitions and events, and the Scottish Poetry Library, the light and welcoming home to a vast selection of poetry books and pamphlets, which regularly brings in poets for evening events. In addition to the Museums and Libraries, Edinburgh celebrates its literary roots in a wide variety of ways. A number of literary walking tours have developed where visitors can wander through the streets, on a Book Lovers Tour, or a Literary Pub Crawl. If you have a favourite author or book, you may enjoy the Trainspotting tour, or the Rebus Tour. The Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust has developed a series of free walking tours – the first of which takes in a number of the locations featured in Alexander McCall Smith’s 44 Scotland Street series. Around every corner, you can find reminders of Edinburgh’s writers, past and present – poet Robert Fergusson is striding down The Royal Mile outside the Canongate Kirk, Sherlock Holmes himself stands on Picardy Place, the birthplace of his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle. Alan Breck and David Balfour, the two heroes of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped, stand proud on the Corstorphine Road, and a small memorial to Stevenson himself stands in a grove of silver birches in Princes Street Gardens. The most prominent is the monument to Sir Walter Scott, towering over Princes Street and Princes Street Gardens. It’s well worth the trip up the narrow and twisting stair to the top for the views across the city. The Scott Monument is one of Edinburgh’s architectural treasures featured in a series of podcasts on the City. The City of Literature Trust has collaborated with the Edinburgh World Heritage Trust to create ten short podcasts exploring p106

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©VISITSCOTLAND/KENNY LAM; FOTOLIA

LITERATURE

some of Edinburgh’s most famous landmarks, their architectural history and curiosities and their literary links –from Calton Hill to Princes Street Gardens, The Netherbow to The Canongate, from Robert Louis Stevenson to Daniel Defoe, Ian Rankin to Quintin Jardine. Using quotes from writers, poets and some of the classic stories inspired by the built environment of the city, the podcasts are designed to provide a guided tour of Edinburgh, revealing some of the hidden gems and history of the city for visitors walking around the streets, or at home planning their trip. Or even for the city’s residents, wanting to know a little more about the landmarks they pass every day. A recent addition to Edinburgh’s literary scene is the Poetry Garden in the recently re-developed St Andrew Square, in the heart of the Georgian New Town. St Andrew Square, which is now open to the public for the first time in over 230 years, is being developed as a new space for celebrating poetry in the City of Literature. Scotland’s publishing industry is thriving, and Publishing Scotland, based in Edinburgh,

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has information, courses and advice for publishers and writers as well as housing BooksfromScotland.com, Scotland’s online bookshop and literary resource. Edinburgh has a long history as an international centre of learning. Today, the city’s universities and colleges play host to creative writing courses, renowned academics, theatre work and many more specialised projects. The city’s libraries run book groups and competitions, with knowledgeable librarians and specialised courses ranging from Scots language to more general discussion groups. If you are in Edinburgh, you can borrow books at any one of the 26 lending libraries, part of a network of 140 library and information services that are housed in the city. The designation UNESCO City of Literature is a permanent one, and one of which the city of Edinburgh is justifiably proud. From the writers of the past, celebrated in statuary, in the National Library and the

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Writers Museum, to contemporary authors found in the Scottish Poetry Library, The Scottish Book Trust or the Scottish Storytelling Centre, and showcased at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, a thriving publishing industry, and a strong academic element, there is much to be proud of. The City of Literature Trust is a portal for all literary events and activities taking place throughout the city, and their website can direct you to anything you need to know. For information on book signings and author appearances, literary events and activities, literary tours, the Stories in Stone podcasts and the free walking trails visit cityofliterature.com. Residents and visitors alike cannot help but brush up against the city’s literary heritage whenever they walk through the streets. And Edinburgh is a city for walking. Whether following one of the free literary trails, or just wandering where the mood takes you, come and be inspired by the stories in the stones. l

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DAYS OUT

LET’S GO THERE! Whatever the time of year, and whatever the weather, there’s always plenty to do here

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ecause of Edinburgh’s compact nature, it’s easy to get around and between the different areas of the city on foot, making it possible to see many of the sights in a reasonably short time frame. That’s particularly handy given that there is so much to see and do here. If you only do one thing during your stay in Edinburgh, it has to be a trip to Edinburgh Castle. Wherever you are in the city, you can’t escape it’s looming presence. Built on the rocky outcrop of a long-dormant volcano, it dominates the skyline, peering down on the city and its people below. Communities are believed to have lived on the site since the ninth century, and there has been a Royal castle here since the time of David I in the 11th century. It has been the subject of many battles, sieges and sackings, despite the fact that its unique position afforded unparalleled protection. Most of the medieval fortifications are long gone, but structures from the 15th century still stand today, and the castle is not one but a conglomeration of buildings pieced together from the various incarnations. Nowadays, the spectacular Edinburgh Tattoo takes place there every August, and tourists can visit at any time of the year. It draws in well over one million visitors annually, making it is Scotland’s most popular paid-for visitor attraction. There are a whole host of things to see and do at the castle, and you could easily spend most of the day there. However, do try to time your visit to coincide with the firing of the One O’ Clock Gun, Edinburgh’s famed time signal. p110

“BUILT ON THE ROCKY OUTCROP OF A LONG-DORMANT VOLCANO, THE CASTLE DOMINATES THE SKYLINE, PEERING DOWN ON THE CITY AND ITS PEOPLE BELOW”

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For kids – and big kids – alike, a trip to Our Dynamic Earth, in the immediate vicinity of the Royal Mile, is highly recommended. Our Dynamic Earth offers the chance to take an immersive journey through the planet’s past, present and future, through a series of amazing interactive exhibitions, including a 360 degree full dome cinema. Explorers can come face-to-face with weird and wonderful beasts, witness an erupting volcano one minute only to find themselves in the hot, humid rainforests or a polar tundra the next. Holyrood, at the foot of the Royal Mile, is the site of the controversial Scottish Parliament building. Designed by famous Catalan architect, the late Enric Miralles, it was three years late (eventually opening p115

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Join the animals for elevenses, lunch and dinner every day at 11am, 2pm & 4pm.

Animal Handling Sessions

Join us if you dare...every day at 12 noon and 3pm for your chance to handle tarantulas, snakes and giant millipedes.

Located just off the Edinburgh City Bypass at the Gilmerton exit or at the Sheriffhall roundabout Lothian Buses 3 or 29

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at Dobbies Garden World, Lasswade, Edinburgh, Midlothian EH18 1AZ Tel: 0131 663 4932 Fax: 0131 654 2774 Spring and Summer Only

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k r a P t s e r o F h t Queen Elizabe Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

! t o l a o d . . . e l t t i l Do a

Watch out for wildlife From the majestic red deer to the busy red squirrel. Š Danny Green - 2020 Imag

es

Go Ape! Enjoy a bird’s eye view of the forest with this high wire adventure.

The best views in Scotland Relax and enjoy a cuppa at The Lodge Forest Visitor Centre above Aberfoyle.

Less than 1 hour from Edinburgh!

Follow us on

Call us on 0300 067 6600 www.forestry.gov.uk/qefp


Dark sky at night,

Dumfries & Galloway

Stargazer ’s delight !

See the wonders of the universe at the UK’s first dark sky park.

Home to some of the darkest skies in Europe, the Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park is the perfect destination for an exceptional view of our celestial neighbours. With astronomer friendly accommodation, regular stargazing events, welcoming astronomy groups and the Scottish Dark Sky Observatory; you can enjoy spectacular views of the Milky Way, meteor showers and planetary bodies over the next few months.

Photographs © NA

With big skies, beautiful settings, quiet roads, miles and miles of walking and biking trails and fantastic access to wildlife; the Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park delights both night and day.

SA & ESA. Backgroun

d © istock photo

Call us on 0300 067 6800 www.forestry.gov.uk/darkskygalloway

© Forestry Commission Picture Library


DAYS OUT

current Norwegian King. At the Scottish Seabird Centre at North Berwick, you can see more than 300,000 seabirds in their natural habitat, including puffins, guillemots and gannets, via live camera feeds or by taking a guided boat trip. Back along the coast is Deep Sea World at North Queensferry, where you can stare enthralled at red-bellied piranhas, or dive in and come face-to-face with sharks and stingrays. There’s an underwater tunnel – the longest in the UK – where you can get up close and personal with all manner of sea life, while rescued seals have outdoor pools to sun themselves as they recover from injury. Here, you’ll also find one of Edinburgh’s two World Heritage Sites; the magnificent Forth Bridge. Designated by UNESCO in 2015, the iconic 125-year-old rail bridge is a marvel of modern engineering and was the first large-scale steel structure of its kind. With the Forth Road Bridge, and it’s eventual replacement – the newly-completed Queensferry Crossing also situated just a few hundred metres further up river, the three bridges make for a breathtaking view, and a perfect photo opportunity, back along the Firth of Forth. Edinburgh is notorious for its unsavoury past and there are plenty of ways to uncover more of the p116

“THE ZOO ALSO FEATURES EVERYTHING FROM LIONS AND TIGERS TO HIPPOS AND BEARS, PLUS A WHOLE HOST OF SPECIES OF PRIMATE”

©VISITSCOTLAND/PAUL TOMKINS; ADOBESTOCK; RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO; THE EDINBURGH DUNGEON

in 2004), going massively over budget along the way. The end result, however, was a striking structure unlike anything else in the country, acclaimed by many and the recipient of numerous awards. Although open to the public all year round, non-sitting days are probably the best time to explore the full extent of the edifice and attempt to gain an insight into the nation it serves. Just a few hundred metres away, and in direct contrast to the high-tech Arts and Crafts-style of the Parliament building, sits the grand Palace of Holyroodhouse. The official Scottish home of the British Monarch, it has often played a part in Scotland’s turbulent history, from hosting the wedding of Mary Queen of Scots to acting as the headquarters of the 1745 Jacobite rebellion. The palace, gardens and ruined abbey are open to visitors, except when the Queen is in residence (usually at the end of June). Home to Tian Tian and Yang Guang, the only giant pandas in UK, Edinburgh Zoo, in the west of the city at Corstorphine, is a huge draw for visitors. Established more than a century ago, the zoo also features everything from lions and tigers to hippos and bears, plus a whole host of species of primate. There’s even a penguin, Sir Nils Olav, which was knighted by the

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DAYS OUT

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; THE REAL MARY KING’S CLOSE

city’s dark secrets. Meet grave robbers Burke and Hare at the Edinburgh Dungeon and scare yourself silly in the labyrinth of lost souls or on one of their terrifying rides. A warren of underground closes where plague victims breathed their last (and who might or might not have been walled up and left to die), Mary King’s Close is about as authentic as it gets. But beware – it’s not for the faint-hearted. And if all that’s doesn’t raise enough goosepimples, there are numerous late-night guided tours that delve into the city’s spookiest graveyards, medieval cellars and forgotten nooks and crannies. Down at the waterfront in Leith, the Royal Yacht Britannia, aboard which the Prince and Princess of Wales honeymooned in 1981, is permanently docked at Ocean Terminal. The ultimate p119

“NUMEROUS LATE-NIGHT GUIDED TOURS DELVE INTO THE CITY’S SPOOKIEST GRAVEYARDS, MEDIEVAL CELLARS AND FORGOTTEN NOOKS AND CRANNIES”

Ask us where to find

Wildlife wonders

Edinburgh & The Lothians’ BEST KEPT SECRETS.

Zoom in with our interactive live cameras. Edinburgh city and Holyrood Park

www.seabird.org 01620 890202

If you’re looking for the true spirit of Edinburgh & The Lothians, start your search at one of our VisitScotland iCentres. We’ll point you in the direction of the best the region has to offer, whether you need advice on where to go and what to do, or even if you’re looking to book accommodation or tickets for all kinds of events, activities and transport. Come and talk to our knowledgeable and friendly staff. You never know, we might just let you in on a few local secrets.

The Harbour North Berwick EH39 4SS

3 Princes Street, Edinburgh EH2 2QP

Image © Rob McDougall / Scottish Charity no SC025837

Edinburgh International Airport, Edinburgh EH12 9DN

DISCOVERY CENTRE · BOAT TRIPS · CAFÉ · GIFT SHOP

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TM

SHUTTLE BUS FROM EDINBURGH Glenkinchie distillery will be running daily minibus services from Edinburgh city centre to the distillery. TRANSPORT AND TOUR FROM £22

Glenkinchie Distillery, Pencaitland, Tranent, East Lothian EH34 5ET Telephone: 01875 342 012 • Email: glenkinchie.distillery@diageo.com Twitter: @12distilleries • Facebook: friendsoftheclassicmalts www.discovering-distilleries.com/glenkinchie


©VISITSCOTLAND/GRANT PATERSON/KENNY LAM; GETTY IMAGES/JUPITER IMAGES

DAYS OUT

in ocean-bound luxury, the vessel was used for almost a thousand official engagements from its commission in 1954 until it was retired from service in 1997. Visitors can tour five decks, and take a look into the lavish state apartments and dining room, the engine room and the crew’s quarters, and you can even take a peek inside the Queen’s bedroom, something you can’t do at any of her other residences. If this is your first stopover in Edinburgh, then jumping on one of the open top bus tours that leave from outside Waverley station is a great way to get your bearings and gain a feel for your new surroundings. Alternatively, if you’re pressed for time, it’s also the ideal way to see the city quickly and easily. Just a few miles outside the city lays the hauntingly beautiful Rosslyn Chapel. Thrust into the limelight after starring as one of the major locations in film of the best-selling Dan Brown book, The Da Vinci Code, crowds from all around the world flock to investigate the myths and legends that surround the 15th century church for themselves. Whether true or not, for the elaborate carved stonework alone it should rank high on your list of sightseeing priorities. There are many fabulous beaches along the East

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Lothian coast, ideal for summer picnics and paddling, or bracing walks in the colder months. North Berwick has two such stretches of sand, but if you’re looking for something quieter, head for one of the mass of hidden coves out that way; Seacliff is perhaps the finest. It also makes for a base to explore some local ruins in the area. Auldhame Castle and Tantallon Castle are nearby, as is Seacliff House, complete with one of the smallest and most remarkable harbours you’ll ever witness. Linlithgow Palace, held by the English for years until the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, whereupon it served as a residence for Scottish kings for hundreds of years, is hugely significant in historical terms; Oliver Cromwell also stayed there from 1650-51, and it was last used during the time of the second Jacobite uprising in the mid-18th century. It may now be largely just a shell, but what a magnificent shell it is – easily one of the best medieval buildings still standing in Scotland. For those keen to tackle wide open spaces, the views from Arthur’s Seat – the volcanic plug that looms over Edinburgh, eclipsing even the Castle Rock – certainly merit the effort it takes to p123

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“CROWDS FROM ALL AROUND THE WORLD FLOCK TO INVESTIGATE THE MYTHS AND LEGENDS THAT SURROUND ROSSLYN CHAPEL”

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VISI TOR AT TRACTION

1 Hou Guide r d Tour

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PALACE OF HOLYROODHOUSE

HOME OF

SCOTTISH ROYAL HISTORY

At the end of the Royal Mile www.royalcollection.org.uk 0303 123 7306

Enjoy free re-admission for a Enjoy free re-admission for a year by asking us to treat year by asking usyour to treat your ticket purchase as a donation. ticket purchase as a donation.


©VISITSCOTLAND/KENNY LAM

DAYS OUT

get to the top, as does the scene that greets you after ascending the tougher Pentland Hills to the south of the city. For something a little more sedate, try the Royal Botanical Gardens in Inverleith, home to some exotic species of plants and fauna. On a lovely day, it’s also a super place to relax and soak up the tranquillity and calm. In fact, for such a condensed urban area, Edinburgh’s lucky that it has so many green spaces. Although some are private gardens, like those at Queen Street or Charlotte Square, there are plenty that are open to the public, such as St Andrew Square or the unrivalled Princes Street Gardens. But despite all the activities available to you, one of the best days out you can have in Edinburgh is also one of the simplest – just explore the city for yourself, without recourse to a plan. Thanks to the myriad of bridges, winding staircases and cobbled closes, everywhere you go you’ll stumble on an amazing view that’s sure to set your heart racing. These accidental discoveries will drive you to keep going long after your weary feet have given up. As the author Alexander McCall Smith so eloquently put it: “This is a city of shifting light, of changing skies, of sudden vistas. A city so beautiful it breaks the heart again and again”. Who could ask for anything else? l

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FESTIVALS

WELCOME TO FESTIVAL CITY! If it’s worth celebrating, there’s a festival in Edinburgh dedicated to it

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he Edinburgh Festival is a generic term used to describe the cultural explosion which takes place in the city every summer. With not one but nine festivals to choose from between late July and early September, Edinburgh offers an extravaganza of world-class entertainment. With the International Festival, Festival Fringe, Book Festival, International Film Festival, Military Tattoo, Jazz Festival, Art Festival, Edinburgh Mela and Festival of Politics, the city streets buzz with music and performers from around the world. Springtime sees Ceilidh Culture and the International Science Festival provide the entertainment, while the Beltane Fire Festival sets the city skyline alight with an exuberant mix of fire, costume, drums and pagan ritual. During the summer festivals the city’s population doubles in size. Performers mill the streets in their stage costumes, street entertainers delight the bustling crowds on the Royal Mile and visitors from around the world arrive to enjoy this unique atmosphere with the non-stop café culture and nightlife adding to the buzz of the city. Enjoy music performances from jazz to classical; contemporary dance and ballet; cutting edge and traditional theatre, as well as sparkling wit and alternative comedy. And don’t miss the chance to view some of the finest films that the industry offers, and to hear internationally-renowned authors read from and discuss their latest work with a live audience. Later in the year, the city comes alive during the Winter Festivals. With bright, crisp days and long, haunting nights, Edinburgh takes on a magical quality at this time of year. The month-long Edinburgh’s Christmas sees the city’s streets sparkle with the glow from half a million Christmas lights, creating a truly magical experience. The climax of Edinburgh’s winter festivals is the celebrated Hogmanay street party in Princes Street, when thousands gather to enjoy music and fireworks and join in arguably the world’s best New Year celebrations. As home to the most vibrant calendar of international festivals and events, you can be sure that there’s something to tempt you during your stay in Edinburgh. l

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WELCOME TO THE NIGHT! From a quiet pint or a wee dram in a traditional bar to the latest sounds from top DJs, there’s no shortage of things to do after dark in Edinburgh

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hen it comes to enjoying a night out in Scotland’s capital, one of Edinburgh’s greatest assets is its size, or rather, the lack of it. That’s not to say that there isn’t much to see and do, however, it simply means that getting about from one place to another is pretty easy, so it’s terrific if you’re trying to catch up with different groups of friends on a flying visit. The ability to flit from one bar to the next, or to try a particular club out before deciding to move elsewhere instead, means that you can sample many

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different places too; perfect if you’re planning to return to the city regularly and want to get a feel for the nightlife. Whatever you look for in a night out, Edinburgh will be able to meet your expectations, and much more besides. For the discerning drinker who likes to indulge with cocktails in luxurious surroundings, you don’t really have to look much further than the area around George Street, littered as it is with a surfeit of trendy style bars that wouldn’t be out of place in New York, London or Hong Kong. These are the places to see and be seen. Many blur the

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boundaries between bar and club as the night draws on, and they tend to play a mixture of house, RnB, hip-hop and funky soul. Candy Bar is a haunt for all the pretty young things, while Le Monde offers something similar at the other end of the same street. Neighbours Grand Cru and 99 Hanover Street are laid-back bars, also in the same vein and their resident and guest DJs are always excellent. The attractively-furnished Tigerlily, a dazzling oasis of mirrors and glistening chandeliers, is a real highlight, and it even p128

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vaults, the subterranean lair plays host to all sorts including cutting edge electronic and dance. Wannabe rock stars, indie kids and metalheads all strut their stuff up at Smash (formerly Citrus Club) just off Lothian Road, which offers a range of alternative gigs and club nights, while the always-diverse Bongo Club also holds interesting one-off nights. Ultimately, if you’re after something a little more alternative, it’s best to do a little research in advance or, alternatively, ask around for what’s happening that evening – there’s nothing better than stumbling across great night at the last-minute simply by word of mouth, and you’ll find no shortage of opinions from the locals. Come the weekend, the multitude of pubs around the Grassmarket and Rose Street become the domain of the hen/stag party, but on weeknights are a lot more convivial and worth exploring. If you fancy staying up until the wee small hours but aren’t worried about what everyone around is wearing, make your way to one of the pubs and clubs with more of a party atmosphere – Whistlebinkies, Stramash and Dropkick Murphy’s are merry, lively, and often have live bands playing classic hits. And to soak up some of that famous Scottish hospitality, Ghillie Dhu hosts late-night ceilidhs at weekends. To showcase your dance moves, there are recurring Salsa and Latin evenings that take place across p131

ADAM JAIME/UNSPLASH; EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL; FOTOLIA; SUZANNE R LIVINGSTONE/VOODOO ROOMS

“CONSISTING OF TWO STONE VAULTS, THE SUBTERRANEAN LAIR PLAYS HOST TO ALL SORTS INCLUDING CUTTING EDGE ELECTRONIC AND DANCE”

has its own club, Lulu, downstairs should you wish to prolong the evening’s festivities. Just a few blocks down is Opal, which also prides itself on being a luxury venue. The labyrinthine club is great for mingling, but if you really want to splash out and impress, you can always book the use of one of their exclusive dens instead. If you find yourself up in the Old Town, you’ll definitely want to make a beeline for the bar in the five-star G&V hotel (formerly the Missoni). Just off the High Street, it’s a real triumph of design, achingly cool and effortlessly stylish. But pretty much wherever you go in the city, you’ll be able to find a classy bar with individually-tailored cocktails and select drinks lists. For weird, wonderful and truly memorable cocktails, try Bramble on Queen Street – which regularly features in industry World’s Best Bar lists – or its sister bars, Lucky Liquor and the Last Word Saloon. For wine lovers, Stockbridge’s Smith & Gertrude and Good Brothers are both first-rate examples of the modern enotecas you might find in Perugia or Melbourne, while Bar à Vin, a few minutes walk from Princes Street, offers a more traditional – but equally appealing – dose of Gallic charm. If a little less glamour and a little more grunge is more your scene, then you’d do worse than to check out Cabaret Voltaire, one of Edinburgh’s most popular and eclectic clubs. Consisting of two stone

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ROB ERTS ON S 3 7 BA R An old-fashioned, old school bar famed for its whiskies and an abundance of real character.

For more than one hundred years Robertsons has stood vigil between the busy shopping avenues of Princes St and George St ensuring the thirst of both loyal regular and passing patron alike does not go unslaked.

SlĂ inte mhath! 0131 226 5402 37 Rose Street | Edinburgh | EH2 2NH

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the city. Boteco Do Brasil, El Paso and the Wash Bar are just some of the places that host classes so you can join in and be your own entertainment. But if you just fancy making your own music, Supercube has private karaoke booths of varying sizes and styles and makes for an enjoyable soiree with friends. A very gay-friendly city, Edinburgh has a thriving LGBT scene, with the pink quarter centred around Picardy Place and Broughton Street including Cafe Habana, Planet and The Street, while the nearby Regent offers a host of real ales. If cheesy and cheerful is more your thing, head for CC Blooms, which has been successfully entertaining the gay community for years. In terms of evening entertainment, Edinburgh is

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a customary fixture on the comedy circuit, thanks in part to the Fringe, but also to the efforts of comedy club The Stand. Since it was established in 1995, it’s become one of the UK’s leading clubs, developing new talent and playing host to the biggest and the best too. There are plenty of pubs which host regular comedy nights, too, and although the standard at these can vary wildly, that’s half the fun. Although it’s perhaps not always attracted touring acts with the same frequency as Glasgow, Edinburgh’s pretty well-served in terms of live music and the local band scene is vibrant, encompassing virtually every sort of genre in some form if you dig deep enough. The Edinburgh Corn Exchange is the city’s biggest live music venue, while the Liquid Room has proved enduringly popular with musicians and fans alike. Nearby, Sneaky Pete’s, a tiny club-cum-venue on the Cowgate, is the place to catch the next big thing and cult favourites from almost any niche or genre. As well as being one of the city’s most attractive bars, the Voodoo Rooms stages gigs frequently throughout the year, and other popular venues like Bannermans and Henry’s Cellar Bar also get in on the act too, while Sandy Bell’s and The Royal Oak cater for those who like a bit of folk and traditional music. Jazz aficionados are well served at The Jazz Bar in the heart of the city’s Old Town, where an p133

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“EDINBURGH IS A CUSTOMARY FIXTURE ON THE COMEDY CIRCUIT, THANKS IN PART TO THE FRINGE, BUT ALSO TO THE EFFORTS OF COMEDY CLUB, THE STAND”

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’ TE is h s rg hi u ‘T inb Ed

O n u U ca o n Q nd m ie a fr d r a d me an o u e lc yo w d a an oy j en

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The new Kaleidoscope Whisky Bar & Shop at 28 Queen Street is completely unique with a constantly changing menu of whisky flavours to taste and explore.

As part of The Scotch Malt Whisky Society, Kaleidoscope offers a wide range of single cask whiskies and spirits, cocktails, a curated whisky collection by Charlie Maclean and a range of draught and bottled craft beers and wines. Exquisite bar food is served is daily until 10pm OPEN IN G HOU R S

Mon to Wed – 11am to 11pm; Thurs to Sat – 11am to Midnight; Sunday – 11am to 10pm FACEBO O K @SMWSKaleidoscope TE L 0131 220 2044

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TWITTER @SMWSQueenStreet

2 8 Q U E E N S TR E E T, E D I N B U R G H , E H 2 1J X

E M AI L kaleidoscope@smws.com

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eclectic mix of live jazz, plus other genres, are on offer every night. If you’d prefer a few quieter drinks, you’re spoiled for choice. With a fine selection of malt whiskies to try, Teuchters on William Street is a welcoming cosy retreat, although it livens up post-work on Fridays and when the rugby is in town. On balmy summer evenings, an outside table at the Pear Tree is delightful, but you might have to stand in the courtyard until one becomes available. The Roseleaf, in Leith, is a quirky little hideout, brimming with exotic spirits and beers. It’s also home to the friendliest bar staff in the city, who like nothing more than to chat about food and drink, so don’t expect to leave after just one tipple. Specialising in craft beers created by their own team and master brewers from around the world, Brewdog are doing their bit to elevate beer to the status of fine wines and spirits. There’s a lot of other great brew bars too, with the Hanging Bat and local brewer Innis & Gunn’s own establishment, the Beer Kitchen – both just a hundred metres or so apart on Lothian Road – a couple of good examples, while fellow Scottish brewers Six Degrees North offer an excellent selection of their own concoctions, collaborations and curated pours from around the world. Other top craft beer bars include Salt Horse Beer Shop & Bar, OX184, Brauhaus and Jeremiah’s Taproom. The bar scene is really burgeoning in the

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capital, with a number of interesting and unusual new venues. Squirrelled away below street level, through an almost unmarked door, Panda & Sons is a hidden speakeasystyle cocktail bar with a barbershop theme, with a sister bar, Hoot The Redeemer that is equally as wacky. In the Old Town Devil’s Advocate makes stunning use of a centuriesold space just off the Royal Mile. In the West End, First Fleet boasts that it stocks the largest selection of rum in the country. Fans of more traditional-style public houses should start at Bennets Bar. Situated next door to the King’s Theatre, the charming mahogany interior is listed, and there are some interesting features inside. Cloisters and Blue Blazer are other excellent examples of this style of pub, and both serve a wide range of real ales. If you like to make sure your conversation is heard, Bow Bar just off the Grassmarket has a ‘no music’ policy, although you may find that the array of malts on offer curb your ability for speech somewhat. Finally, no outing in Edinburgh would be complete without setting foot in the Oxford Bar. The epitome of the ‘no frills approach’ to pub decor, it’s the preferred watering hole of author Ian Rankin (and his most famous character, Inspector Rebus), you can either choose to join in the banter between the regulars and the staff in the tiny bar area, or move up the stairs to the back room for a seat. l

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“SPECIALISING IN CRAFT BEERS CREATED BY THEIR OWN TEAM AND MASTER BREWERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD, BREWDOG ARE DOING THEIR BIT TO ELEVATE BEER TO THE STATUS OF FINE WINES AND SPIRITS”

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FURTHER AFIELD

LET’S EXPLORE! There’s always plenty to do here – but it’s also a great base for striking out further afield

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s well as playing host to some wonderful things to do, Edinburgh’s a great base from which to explore some more of Scotland, too. Stirling, Dunfermline, St Andrews and Perth are all under an hour’s drive from the capital, and these smaller towns and cities are well worth exploring, especially given that each of them is home to some of the country’s most interesting visitor attractions, many of which are of huge cultural and historical significance to the Scottish nation. Like Edinburgh, Scotland’s smallest city, Stirling, is a medieval Royal Burgh. It, too, boasts a castle atop a volcanic crag and, rising high above the town below, its similarity to the one in the capital is instantly noticeable. It’s the oldest building in the city, ahead of The Church of the Holy Rude which is, aside from Westminster Abbey, the only remaining church in which a royal coronation took place. As well as a trip to both, it’s worth stopping at the nearby National Wallace Monument, which commemorates the actions of William Wallace (immortalised in the film Braveheart) during the Wars of Independence. If you have enough energy to climb the 246 steps to the top, you’ll be rewarded with fabulous views of the Ochils. p137

“IT’S WORTH VISITING THE NATIONAL WALLACE MONUMENT, WHICH COMMEMORATES THE ACTIONS OF WILLIAM WALLACE DURING THE WARS OF INDEPENDENCE”

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Included in Admission Price Wild Animal Reserves, Boat Trip around Chimp Island, Sea Lion Presentations, Bird of Prey Centre & Displays, Elephant habitat with public viewing gallery, Bug Land, Lemur Land, Pets Farm, Adventure Playground, Giant Astraglide, Pedal Boats, Flying Fox, Picnic & Barbecue areas Open daily, mid-March to end of October By Stirling FK9 4UR Tel: 01786 841456 M9, Junction 10, 4 miles along A84 towards Doune signposted on M9 & A84. On-site parking

www.blairdrummond.com

ONLY ONE HOUR FROM EDINBURGH

Abbotsford is the extraordinary home of Sir Walter Scott, the 19th century novelist and ‘Great Scott’ who popularised tartan and rediscovered Scotland’s Crown Jewels.

Abbotsford remains one of the most famous houses in the world. Scott’s “conundrum castle” pioneered Scots Baronial architecture and was the place from where his writing transformed how the world saw Scotland and Scotland saw itself. Scott’s home during his rise to worldwide success and his debt-ridden but noble final years. Explore Scott’s home and gardens, riverside and woodland walks, cafe, shop and play trail.

Edinburgh

Abbotsford Melrose TD6 9BQ t. 01896 752043 e. enquiries@scottsabbotsford.co.uk www.scottsabbotsford.com

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Trains every 30 minutes Edinburgh Waverley to Tweedbank

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FURTHER AFIELD

Midway between Stirling and Edinburgh lies the marvellous feat of engineering that is the Falkirk Wheel. A rotating boat lift, this remarkable structure is the only one of its type in the world and cuts a dramatic figure amongst the surrounding landscape. Built in 2002 to connect the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal, you can take a one-hour round trip by boat from the visitor centre and experience the wheel working for yourself, taking in the local scenery en route. Here you’ll also find the World Heritage Site of the Antonine Wall, one of two ‘great walls’ (the other is Hadrian’s Wall) constructed by the Romans. Just across the Forth Road Bridge into Fife lies Dunfermline. As well as being home to the Dunfermline Palace and Abbey, scene of countless Royal births and burials, this old town is also the birthplace of industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, and you can spend a diverting couple of hours touring the museum dedicated to his life’s work. Situated on the coast of Fife is St Andrews.

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Affectionately known as ‘the Home of Golf ’, this charming little university town lives and breathes the game and a visit is considered a pilgrimage for golfing fanatics. Home to the famous Old Course (the oldest in the world) as well as the superb British Golf Museum, even the non-golfer will be caught up in the magic of the place. Another ancient seat of royal and religious power, the ruins of a cathedral and castle are located on a headland which juts out dramatically into the sea. Add in long, sweeping beaches and some gorgeous buildings, and it’s easy to see why St Andrews is so popular with tourists and locals alike. Perth, too, has some fascinating buildings, but it is the surrounding countryside, some of the most beautiful in the country, which is perhaps most appealing, with some terrific hill-walking on offer. Here you’ll also find the magnificent Scone Palace, which was also the original resting place of the Stone of Destiny, used to coronate monarchs for almost a thousand years. l

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“AFFECTIONATELY KNOWN AS ‘THE HOME OF GOLF’, THIS CHARMING LITTLE UNIVERSITY TOWN LIVES AND BREATHES THE GAME”

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Keeping Edinburgh Moving The Lothian family is made up of Lothian Buses, East Coast Buses, Edinburgh Bus Tours, Lothian Country, Airlink, Skylink and NightBus. Hundreds of thousands of customers rely on our services every day including residents and visitors to the city. Servicing Edinburgh Airport, we have

capital, explore the sights with

three routes which will get you to and

Edinburgh Bus Tours. Hop on at any tour

from our amazing city – Airlink 100,

bus stop and see the sights from the

Skylink 200 and Skylink 300.

open-top deck of one of our modern, clean tour buses. Our five-star tours

Unlimited travel

show you the best of Edinburgh, and our hop on – hop off tickets are a flexible

Enjoy unlimited travel on board Lothian

option to help you discover our city.

services in the city fare zone with a DAYticket. If you’re a family of 2 adults and up to 3 children then the Family DAYticket is a great value option. Ask about the DAY&NIGHT ticket if you are travelling after 1800hrs.

note: bus drivers can’t give change– please have the exact fare ready.

Ticketing app

Choose from a multi-lingual commentary available in up to 10 different languages or listen to a specially-trained guide. Visit edinburghtour.com for more information.

Take advantage of our FREE mobile

From all the team at Lothian – we hope

ticketing app to get around the capital.

you have a wonderful visit. Come and

The app lets you plan journeys and

see us at one of our Travelshops or visit

find out when the next bus is due. Our

lothianbuses.co.uk for more information.

m-ticketing service means you can buy tickets with the app so you don’t need to have change in your pocket to travel. Download our free multi-lingual mobile travel app at TfEapp.com. Tickets are available from our drivers, at any of our Travelshops and as m-tickets

Tour the city

with our free mobile travel app. Please

While visiting Scotland’s stunning


TRAVEL

GETTING HERE AND GETTING AROUND!

©VISITSCOTLAND/KENNY LAM

Edinburgh is a leading world city – but it’s small enough for visitors to get around with ease

BY RAIL All trains to Edinburgh go to Waverley Station, off Waverley Bridge at the east end of Princes Street – this is where the main ticket booking office is located. Taxis collect passengers from the station concourse, but there is also a taxi rank on Waverley Bridge. All trains to the north and to the west coast, including Glasgow, also stop at Haymarket station.

BY AIR Edinburgh International Airport is eight miles west of the city centre on the A8 Edinburgh-Glasgow road. The airport has all the usual facilities, including a tourist information desk near International Arrivals, bureau de change, ATMs, bars and restaurants (on the first floor) and shops (ground floor and first floor). The tourist information desk, in the international arrivals area, will book accommodation and car hire. Two bus services, Airlink 100 and Guide Friday run between the airport and the main train station at Waverley Bridge.

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BY CAR There is a wide selection of self-drive hire firms operating in Edinburgh. p143

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BY BUS The city’s bus station is in St Andrews Square, only a few minutes’ walk from Waverley station. This is the terminal for all coaches from England, from other towns and cities around Scotland and also for local services to outlying towns and villages. There are left luggage lockers at the Terminus. First Group operate around 300 services throughout the Edinburgh area, including within Musselburgh, Dalkeith, Peebles, Galashiels, Livingston, South Queensferry, Falkirk, Balfron and Stirling.

©VISITBRITAIN/SIMON WINNALL

BY TRAM The tram service is now operative, running for 14km from Edinburgh Airport to York Place in the city centre. For full details, go to edinburghtrams.com. BY TRIKE See Edinburgh in one of the coolest ways possible with a chauffeur-driven trike tour taking in the historic Grassmarket and Arthur’s Seat. l

Car, Van & Volkswagen Camper Van rental from £19. Both daily & long term rental available across our range of cars & vans. Collection and drop off from Edinburgh Airport and Edinburgh Railway Stations. To find out more, visit our website or contact us on 0131 341 5877 today. Clark Commercials Edinburgh Moorfoot View, Bilston, Edinburgh, EH25 9SL. Telephone: 0131 341 5876 www.clarkcommercials.co.uk Half day hire is available 08.30-13.00 or 13.00-17.00. Calls may be recorded.

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SPORT

OUR SPORTING LIFE! Whether you want to watch or play, there’s always plenty to do in Edinburgh

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the beautiful game dates back much further than the inception of either of these clubs. The world’s first ever documented ‘Foot Ball Club’ was referred to in papers covering the period 1824-41, which belonged to a local man named John Hope. He described the game as involving “such kicking of shins and such tumbling” so perhaps not that much has changed over the years! It’s not just the city’s football teams that divide the loyalties of its populace either; other sports do too. Glasgow may well be regarded as Scotland’s ‘football city’, but it’s Edinburgh that flies the flag for Scotland’s other national pastime – rugby. In the midst of the West End lies Murrayfield Stadium, the largest sports stadium in Scotland, with a capacity of over 67,000. Home of the Scottish national team, it’s been the scene of some famous victories, none more so than the thrilling 13-7 victory over England in 1990 in the deciding game of the Five Nations Championship which secured the title for the Scots, as well as the Calcutta Cup and Grand Slam in the process. Since then, though, Scotland’s record against the ‘Auld Enemy’ has been chequered, with only three victories against their rivals in the intervening period. Edinburgh might play host to a number of festivals and high-profile events throughout the year, but when the Six Nations is in p147

t’s often said that the story of Edinburgh, split between the Old Town and the New Town, could be described as a tale of two cities, but when it comes to sport, it’s most definitely a city of two halves. The fault line splits the citizens of Edinburgh into two opposing camps; either the maroon of Hearts or the green and white of Hibs (or Heart of Midlothian FC and Hibernian FC to give them their official sobriquets). Both were, amazingly, relegated from Scotland’s top division in 2014, although Hearts bounced back with promotion to the top flight in 2015. It’s one of the longest-running rivalries in world football, dating back to Christmas Day, 1875, when the two originally faced each other in The Meadows in the very first Edinburgh derby. Hearts claimed bragging rights that day, and the competition between them has been fierce ever since. While it may not have the profile of the Old Firm derby over on the west coast, it also lacks the caginess that tend to stifle those games, which in turn makes for a much more appealing spectacle for the neutral. The two adversaries usually face each other four times during the course of the season (assuming they’re in the same division!), which means there’s a good chance you’ll be able to catch one of the fixtures. However, Edinburgh’s relationship with

“THE WORLD’S FIRST EVER DOCUMENTED ‘FOOT BALL CLUB’ WAS REFERRED TO IN PAPERS COVERING THE PERIOD 1824-41, WHICH BELONGED TO A LOCAL MAN NAMED JOHN HOPE”

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STADIUM TOURS

£10 Adults ts £7 Studen U18s £5

BEHIND THE SCENES at the Home of Scottish Rugby Take a tour of BT Murrayfield in Edinburgh with our knowledgeable and professional Scottish Rugby tour guides.

Our new and improved tour includes: •

Bill McLaren Press Gallery

TV Studio

Hospitality Boxes

Tunnel and Pitchside

Virtual Team Talk with Former Captain Al Kellock Scotland Changing Room

Book now at scottishrugby.org/tours stadium.tours@sru.org.uk | 0131 346 5160 (Mon-Fri 10am - 5pm)

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SPORT

town, the atmosphere is unlike anything else; it’s one big party as opposition fans flock to the city to experience some of the celebrated Scottish hospitality. Edinburgh Rugby, one of Scotland’s two professional teams, also play at the stadium, participating in the RaboDirect Pro12 and Europe’s premier rugby tournament, the Heineken Cup. With more than 20 courses dotted immediately in and around the city, golfers are spoiled for choice, and some offer more than just a great round of golf, too. Duddingston, a rolling parkland course, offers stunning views of Arthur’s Seat, especially if you play in the early evening as the sun sets, while Braid Hills provides a panoramic outlook over the entire city, meaning that no matter how bad your golf is, you can be sure your walk won’t be completely spoiled. If you’re willing to travel a little, you’ll be well rewarded; the East Lothian coast is home to some of the finest links courses in the world, all within easy reach of central Edinburgh. In fact, there are more championship layouts to be found in this area than anywhere else in the UK, so a stern test of your ability is assured. The nine-hole Musselburgh Links is the world’s oldest playing course – Mary Queen of Scots is

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reputed to have tried her hand at the game here back in 1567 – while a little further afield lie a plethora of challenging, picturesque courses, including Dunbar, Gullane, North Berwick and the 2013 Open Championship venue, Muirfield. Slightly further afield – in the opposite direction – is the equally famous Gleneagles golf resort, the setting for the 2014 Ryder Cup. For those that prefer their sports to feature four legs rather than two, Musselburgh Racecourse stages a variety of races year-round, with a mixture of flat and National Hunt races taking place at the 2km-long floodlit track. Those looking for something a little more adventurous have plenty of options, too. For instance, the Edinburgh International Climbing Arena, located in the former Ratho quarry, is the world’s largest indoor climbing facility, attracting top competitors who revel in the challenge of tackling some of the hardest man-made climbs in the sport. Open to the public all year round, whether you’re an experienced climber or just a beginner, it’s a great place to push yourself farther, and there’s a variety of other related activities including abseiling and bouldering on offer as well. p149

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“THIS CLIMBING FACILITY ATTRACTS TOP COMPETITORS WHO REVEL IN THE CHALLENGE OF TACKLING SOME OF THE HARDEST MAN-MADE CLIMBS IN THE SPORT”

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THIS IS EDINBURGH!

If you’re planning your next visit, or you want some reminders of this one, visit:

KINGFISHERVISITORGUIDES.COM/EDINBURGH To view our full portfolio of visitor guides to the UK and Ireland, visit kingfishervisitorguides.com

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SPORT

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Keen snowboarders and skiers don’t need to wait until winter to get some practice in, thanks to the Midlothian Snowsports Centre at Hillend. It’s the longest dry ski slope in Europe, and you might even see some Olympic hopefuls sharpening their skills in the off-season. Hardier souls can brave the North Sea and ride the waves at a number of spots just right for surfing. With the imposing Bass Rock serving as a backdrop, Belhaven Bay in Dunbar is ideal for beginners, with long shallow waves at high tide, while the more proficient should head along the coast and try the trickier White Sands or Pease Bay. For a more civilised way of taking to the water, the marina at Port Edgar offers plenty of opportunity for all sorts of sailing, with the added bonus of doing so in the shadow of the two iconic Forth Bridges, the Rail and Road. And come 2016 it’ll be even more spectacular, with the completion of the new Queensferry Crossing adding to the mix. And keen swimmers are well catered for at the refurbished ‘Commie Pool’, Edinburgh’s only 50-metre pool, in the shadow of Arthur’s Seat on Dalkeith Road. l

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ON THE WATERFRONT

HISTORIC PAST, EXCITING FUTURE! Once a thriving commercial centre, Leith has been transformed into a stylish, must-visit part of Edinburgh

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Close to Edinburgh city centre, Leith is more than just a gateway to the capital. For almost 900 years Leith played a central role in Scottish history. From its first appearance in written records in 1128, Leith has been an important centre for commerce and trade. Indeed, from the turbulent Middle Ages to early industrialisation some 200 years ago, Leith was Scotland’s principal port for trading with the world. Over the centuries, hard-working Leithers built thousands of ships, ventured into far-flung parts, fished and whaled, milled, made rope, sails and exported enough whisky to give the world a hangover. Leith has a long tradition of innovation and has contributed many firsts to the world including the classic wine bottle p152

he views from Edinburgh’s Waterfront are magnificent – as you look over the water you will see the Kingdom of Fife, the Firth of Forth and the iconic rail and road bridges. Just two miles from Edinburgh’s city centre is this new urban quarter which is home to thousands of residents, award-winning restaurants, Malmaison Hotel, The Royal Yacht Britannia and other visitor attractions. This once industrial periphery of Edinburgh is witnessing huge redevelopment. Reaching from Granton on the west-side to Leith in the east, the area is being transformed. It will mean an additional 29,000 homes for the city, new shops, new office space and new spaces for people to enjoy themselves.

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design, the first steam ship to cross the Atlantic and the original rules for the game of golf. Today Leith is a thriving community with its own strong identity: a blend of old and new, a meeting place for industry, commerce and leisure – a unique city quarter by the sea. The busy port offers a wide choice of restaurants, pubs, hotels and shops. When it comes to eating and drinking you’re spoiled for choice. Leith’s restaurants have a reputation for quality and boast Michelin starred establishments like Restaurant Martin Wishart and The Kitchin. Whether it is traditional seafood on the Shore, a snack in a bistro or the best of Scottish cuisine in an award-winning restaurant, Leith caters for all tastes. As a port the area has always had its fair share of pubs and today there is no shortage of places to have a drink, whether it’s a quiet pint in an ancient tavern

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or the latest cocktail in an ultra-modern bar. Live traditional music is still performed in many pubs but there’s plenty of other entertainment on offer too, from the multi-screen cinema at Ocean Terminal to a flutter at the Casino. Leith also offers a range of satisfying retail therapy from the hustle and bustle of Leith Walk and Great Junction Street to the stylish surroundings of Ocean Terminal. The development of Ocean Terminal, with its range of shopping, entertainment and dining facilities all under one roof, has been a catalyst for attracting visitors to Leith. In August 2008, Forth Ports received approval for its Leith Docks Outline Planning Application, the largest planning application in Edinburgh’s history. The Leith Docks development will accommodate up to 15,000 townhouses and flats and is expected to

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©VISITSCOTLAND/GRANT PATERSON/KENNY LAM/ PAUL TOMKINS; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; WU YI/UNSPLASH

ON THE WATERFRONT

create almost 12,000 jobs in Edinburgh. The regeneration is a phased process, which is expected to take up to 30 years to fully complete. It will feature nine ‘urban villages’ including a mix of commercial, retail, industrial and leisure uses. This encompasses a new office quarter extending to 130,000 sq.m and over 90,000 sq m of enhanced retail, cultural, community and leisure facilities. At the heart of the development will be a new area around the existing Ocean Terminal shopping centre – this will see new shopping, leisure and business clustered around the water’s edge. The area will be very much part of the city – easily accessible, sitting at the heart of a public transport interchange, and incorporating pedestrian and cycle paths, linking the area to the surrounding city region. The proposed Master Plan for Granton Village is

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to create a dynamic ‘village-like’ community with space for cultural activities, retail, commercial and leisure. The development will be eco-friendly with ‘green buildings’. The City of Edinburgh Council has agreed the provisional route and phasing plan for the development of a 17km promenade stretching from Joppa in the east to Cramond in the west. Work on the first phase will see a new plaza in Portobello and improvements to existing sections of walkway. Three further phases will take place over the next 25 years. The construction of a continuous Promenade is one of the key signature projects for the Waterfront and will link communities with each other. A number of ‘destination nodes’ will be developed along the route – these will have recreation and entertainment facilities to attract visitors. l

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“THE BUSY PORT OFFERS A WIDE CHOICE OF RESTAURANTS, PUBS, HOTELS AND SHOPS. WHEN IT COMES TO EATING AND DRINKING YOU’RE SPOILED FOR CHOICE”

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BUSINESS

WE’RE OPEN FOR BUSINESS! As befits Scotland’s economic powerhouse, Edinburgh is very much open for business

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s the capital city of Scotland since 1437, Edinburgh has a rich history as an administrative, political and commercial centre. The way Edinburgh developed tells a story of a city which has quite a different commercial basis from the rest of Scotland. The academic, religious and political development of Scotland has strong roots in Edinburgh and it has shaped the commercial activity of the city. Urban development across Scotland was fairly rapid. Until 1840, under a third of Scots were living in the emerging cities and towns. Edinburgh developed alongside the other main cities in Scotland of Glasgow, Dundee and Aberdeen. By 1911, one in three Scots lived in a city. Where Glasgow developed as an industrial city along the River Clyde, Edinburgh developed a service based city because of the presence of the law courts, a parliament, the banks and the churches. Even though the union of the crowns in 1707 ended the Parliament in Edinburgh for 292 years, the city retained a focus for education, law and law making. Scotland has its own legal system and Edinburgh has always been the centre of it.

FINANCE As well as the legal sector, Edinburgh became an important international centre for banking. The Bank of Scotland was formed in 1695. It is worth noting that the Bank of England had been formed the year before and by a Scotsman, William Paterson. 1727 saw the Royal Bank of Scotland emerge and the two banks battled away for business. These banks developed their services and became places for the new businesses to go to for help. As industrialisation took hold across Scotland in the early 19th century, the Clydesdale Bank opened for business in 1838. The financial sector continued to grow in and around Edinburgh, with Standard Life opening up in 1825. It gradually grew and by 1900 had opened offices as far afield as Shanghai, Calcutta, Brussels and Copenhagen. Today, the banking sector in Scotland has taken the same sort of hit as other financial institutions across the world. Just as at their birth, banks like the Royal Bank of Scotland are looking again at the way forward for the business for the rest of the 21st century. The Bank of Scotland is part of the Lloyds group now and it too is emerging from the p156

“THE ACADEMIC, RELIGIOUS AND POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCOTLAND HAS STRONG ROOTS IN EDINBURGH AND IT HAS SHAPED THE COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY OF THE CITY”

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MATT DAVIS/COURTESY OF HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY; PAUL DODDS/UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH; SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

global financial crisis as a bank determined to renew its commitment to a strong Scottish brand based on fair and equitable services to businesses and individuals. There’s no doubt that the image of Scottish bankers took a hit in the last few years but all concerned are concentrating on learning from the crisis and moving forward. The pain of restructuring and change means jobs losses and new jobs too. It has been a testing time. Edinburgh is still the UK’s second financial centre beyond London. As well as the banking businesses, life assurance, pensions, asset servicing and investment management are widely represented amongst city based companies. The city has a skilled graduate

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workforce ready to move into these sectors and all the financial companies continue to attract a skilled workforce from across the UK and the rest of the world.

biotechnology research has led to a number of successful spin out companies from the city’s universities. Part of this is the development of a bioquarter as a life sciences hub.

INNOVATION When the birth of Dolly the sheep was announced on the 5th of July 1996, Edinburgh’s reputation for innovation and controversy was confirmed once more. Dolly was the first mammal to have been successfully cloned from an adult cell. This ground breaking work took place at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh and Dr Ian Wilmut led the team of scientists behind the arrival of Dolly. He said that it would enable them to study genetic diseases for which there was presently no cure. The news about Dolly attracted criticism from animal rights activists. The Church of Scotland described the research work as ‘fascinating’ although it had some reservations. Dolly had to be put to sleep in 2003 because of a progressive lung disease. She was preserved and put on display at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh. The work at the Roslin Institute is just one example of the scientific innovation taking place here. Informatics, microelectronics,

EDUCATION Historically, Edinburgh has been a centre of education and this continues today. Edinburgh University, Heriot-Watt University and Edinburgh Napier University are at the forefront of providing first-class employees but also act as centres of excellence in research. A hallmark of their success is in the form of many spin out companies from these research centres. For example, Edinburgh University has a research and innovation centre to support new companies. The technology and research centre at Heriot-Watt University specialises in knowledge transfer, research development and commercialisation. A similar department exists at Edinburgh Napier University where research and knowledge transfer goes through one faculty. All three institutions have a strong focus on practical research from which new ideas and new jobs emerge. The universities have a vital role to provide up-to-date research and sustainable programme of commercial activity. They are the life blood of ideas on

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which the Edinburgh and Scottish economy depends for future growth. TOURISM The iconic skyline of Edinburgh, with the castle and the Palace of Holyrood, gives a clue to the other crucial area of economic activity here. Four million tourists visit Edinburgh every year. They see it as an essential trip as part of a holiday in the UK and Edinburgh is seen as the gateway to the rest of Scotland. This contributes about £2 billion to the local economy. Out of the top 20 visitor attractions in the UK, half of them are situated in Edinburgh. In fact, half of Scotland’s top visitor attractions are in Edinburgh city region. But it isn’t just leisure visitors which are attracted to Edinburgh. Business travellers increasingly see this is as a city in which to hold conferences. CREATIVE INDUSTRIES The city is home to the Edinburgh International Festivals each year. Thirteen festivals with something for everyone, from the very young, to the slightly more mature. Locals treat it as an annual friendly invasion which they either take part in fully or ignore! It is no surprise then that the creative industries

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are well represented here. Just under 30,000 people work here in the creative industries. These include film and video, music, broadcasting, advertising, architecture and the performing arts. Computer and video games, crafts and designer fashion also attract well qualified, talented people. THE FUTURE This is a city which doesn’t lie back on the Georgian grandeur of the New Town, the traditions of the legal fraternity or the international recognition of the festivals. Economically, finance, tourism and education will continue to be vital. The emerging industries in science and innovation, along with the creative sector, are leading the way to broadening the appeal of Edinburgh as an economic hub. The Scottish economy is highly based in public sector activity and this is recognised here. There is a need to encourage innovation and retain it in Edinburgh. Both the Scottish Government and those driven to encourage innovation are looking at various way to provide a long term funding for this kind of vital work. The belief that the future is based in innovation is something beginning to take hold here. When the great thinkers of the Scottish

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enlightenment met in quiet lounges and taverns across the city, there was never a feeling of elitest competition between the thoughts of those concerned. The ability to debate, consider and seek a solution still lingers here. This is a capital city and one continuing to capitalise on doing things differently. Scotland is a small country and Edinburgh is a small city, but both are recognised across the world as somewhere to see and be seen in. The continuing success of Edinburgh will depend on innovation and retaining tradition at the same time. So far, there is little sign of fading enthusiasm to achieve that from everyone lucky to call Edinburgh home, either for business or life. l

“EMERGING INDUSTRIES IN SCIENCE AND INNOVATION, ALONG WITH THE CREATIVE SECTOR, ARE LEADING THE WAY TO BROADENING THE APPEAL OF EDINBURGH AS AN ECONOMIC HUB”

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THE HOME OF COUNTRY CLOTHING SCOTLAND’S MOST PRESTIGIOUS INDEPENDENT STORE

We are proud to be one of the leading designers of country clothing in Great Britain, with our Cashmere and Knitwear Hall (the largest in the UK) providing a stunning selection of luxury natural fibre designs in a comprehensive range of colours. We also offer a superb collection of prestigious brands. Our Ladies Country Clothing Halls showcase Gant, Gerry Weber, Gardeur, Masai and Barbour, while our Shoe and Handbag Department includes Dubarry, Brics, Gianni Conti and Gabor. Our 20,000 sq ft Menswear Hall houses a wide range of pure new wool tweeds, knitwear, shirts, shoes and accessories, which, alongside our Technical Department, provide the ultimate choice of country clothing. The Fishing Tackle Shop is a haven for the keen fisherman, while just next door you can browse contemporary rural art from some of Britain’s leading artists in our Gallery.

Innovative ideas for home and garden reside in the Country Living Department. Our Present Shop is the perfect place to find that exclusive gift, and the experienced staff would be delighted to help with your wedding list. Throughout the Food Hall, Delicatessen and Restaurant you’ll find the finest produce Scotland has to offer. Special mention must be made of our award-winning Butchery as well as our brand new Fish and Chip Shop, the first of its kind in Britain, which specialises in lobster with all seafood delivered fresh on a daily basis seven days a week - the ultimate in luxury comfort food!

No trip to Scotland is complete without a visit to The House of Bruar, situated just off the A9 ten miles north of Pitlochry. Shown here is a taste of our new 2017-2018 range. To order a copy of the latest mail order catalogue please call us or visit our website.

The House of Bruar by Blair Atholl, Perthshire, PH18 5TW Telephone: 01796 483 236 Email: office@houseofbruar.com

www.houseofbruar.com


This is Edinburgh  

Unique, beautifully designed, high-quality visitor guide, which is available in leading hotel bedrooms. For those enjoying a break, or stayi...

This is Edinburgh  

Unique, beautifully designed, high-quality visitor guide, which is available in leading hotel bedrooms. For those enjoying a break, or stayi...