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Introduction "Learn to draw with robots and light" gives you the complete step-by-step instructions for 11 different drawing projects for geeks. Learn to make your own "doodlebot", draw with lasers and modify your iRobot to draw fun shapes. All projects come from Instructables.com, are written by our creative community, and contain pictures for each step so you can easily make these yourself. Instructables is the most popular project-sharing community on the Internet. We provide easy publishing tools to enable passionate, creative people like you to share their most innovative projects, recipes, skills, and ideas. Instructables has over 40,000 projects covering all subjects, including crafts, art, electronics, kids, home improvement, pets, outdoors, reuse, bikes, cars, robotics, food, decorating, woodworking, costuming, games, and more. Check it out today! Laura Khalil Editor, Instructables.com

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Author and Copyright Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Disclaimer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

Drunken drawing robot ! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

Intro: Drunken drawing robot ! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

Step 1: Materials and mesurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Step 2: Design your plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Step 3: Put it together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Step 4: Let it draw! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Modifying an iRobot Create to Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Intro: Modifying an iRobot Create to Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Step 1: Materials List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Step 2: Modify it to Apply Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Step 3: First Painting: Using the Demos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Step 4: Use Active TCL and LOGO to Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Step 5: Using Sensors to Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Step 6: Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 SADbot: the Seasonally Affected Drawing robot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Intro: SADbot: the Seasonally Affected Drawing robot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Step 1: Shopping List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Step 2: Prepare the motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Step 3: Prepare the EasyDrivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Step 4: Test the motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Step 5: Let there be photocells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Step 6: Motors and photocells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Step 7: Mount the motors and pulleys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Step 8: Go solar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Step 9: Solar charger setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Step 10: Staging and testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Step 11: Make it interesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 DoodleBot360 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Intro: DoodleBot360 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Step 1: Here's what you need... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Step 2: Drill and Glue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Step 3: Add markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 PosterBot: Make a Marker-Writing Robot out of an Old Inket printer and an iRobot Create . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Intro: PosterBot: Make a Marker-Writing Robot out of an Old Inket printer and an iRobot Create . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


Step 1: Get the parts from the printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Step 2: Making the control board and configuring the serial cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Step 3: Make the marker lowerer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Step 4: Adding the carriage to the robot at large . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Step 5: Calibrating your robot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Step 6: Creating and adding your own Bitmaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Step 7: Share what you draw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 How to Make a Better Bristlebot! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Intro: How to Make a Better Bristlebot! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Step 1: Supplies & Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Step 2: The Toothbrush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Step 3: The Guts! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Step 4: Putting It All Together! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Step 5: Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 The High Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Intro: The High Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Step 1: Parts, Materials and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Step 2: Make the head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Step 3: Make the tail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Step 4: How to write high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Write or Draw with Light! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Intro: Write or Draw with Light! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Step 1: Set Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Step 2: Take the picture! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Step 3: Admire! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Laser Photography / Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Intro: Laser Photography / Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Step 1: Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Step 2: Preparation & method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Step 3: Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 miniSADbot - outdoor edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Intro: MiniSADbot - outdoor edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Step 1: Gather materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Step 2: Solder wires to solar cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

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Step 3: Solder wires to motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Step 4: Create the base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Step 5: Final assembly and soldering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Take Awesome Open Shutter Photography With Sparklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Intro: Take Awesome Open Shutter Photography With Sparklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Step 1: Taking The Picture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Step 2: Mistakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Step 3: All the Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

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Author and Copyright Notices Instructable: Drunken drawing robot ! Author: skullbee License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Modifying an iRobot Create to Paint Author: technoplastique License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: SADbot: the Seasonally Affected Drawing robot Author: dustynrobots License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: DoodleBot360 Author: dlcain License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: PosterBot: Make a Marker-Writing Robot out of an Old Inket printer and an iRobot Create Author: W_world License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: How to Make a Better Bristlebot! Author: JetGrindMods License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: The High Writer Author: resistor License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Write or Draw with Light! Author: T3h_Muffinator License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Laser Photography / Drawing Author: Revva License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: MiniSADbot - outdoor edition Author: dustynrobots License: Attribution-ShareAlike (by-sa) Instructable: Take Awesome Open Shutter Photography With Sparklers Author: MonkeyBoy3217 License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa)

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Disclaimer All do-it-yourself activities involve risk, and your safety is your own responsibility, including proper use of equipment and safety gear, and determining whether you have adequate skill and experience. Some of the resources used for these projects are dangerous unless used properly and with adequate precautions, including safety gear. Some illustrative photos do not depict safety precautions or equipment, in order to show the project steps more clearly. The projects are not intended for use by children. Many projects on Instructables are user-submitted, and appearance of a project in this format does not indicate it has been checked for safety or functionality. Use of the instructions and suggestions is at your own risk. Instructables, Inc. disclaims all responsibility for any resulting damage, injury, or expense. It is your responsibility to make sure that your activities comply with all applicable laws.

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Drunken drawing robot ! by skullbee on December 7, 2009

Intro: Drunken drawing robot ! Inspired by the pocket drunken robot , I wanted to give the robot a job to do. I decided to let the drunken robot make some drawings. To make your own you'll need the following: materials: 3 felt-tipped markers a button cell battery some adhesive copper foil a vibrating motor from a cellphone or pager a laser cutter ( run to your local fablab , or order from ponoko ! ) some plexiglass or wood for laser cutting (light wood seems to work best) Here's some in action:

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Step 1: Materials and mesurements Once you have your materials ready you'll need to make a couple quick measurements. We're going to be making a special plate to hold everything, so you'll need to find out the diameter of your pens and your vibrating motor. We'll use these measurements to cut out holes in the plate to hold the pens and the motor.

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Step 2: Design your plate Fire up your favorite vector graphics program and design your plate. I used a triangular shape which is nice and stable, the middle hole is for the motor. I made the hole for the motor a little off-centre so the robot's movements are more eccentric. Then you'll fire up the laser and cut out your plate.

Step 3: Put it together Slide your pens into the holes in the plate. You can slide the motor in to its hole as well, insert it with the leads sticking up so you can easily attach the batter without flipping the robot over. Attach the leads of the motor to the sides of the battery with the adhesive foil. If the motor doesn't fit in its hole you can always use some hot glue to secure it in place. Your robot should start buzzing now!

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Step 4: Let it draw! let your drunken robot go nuts! make some friends for him to bump into and make even cooler drawings.

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Related Instructables

Pocket Drunken Robot by Grathio

Mini Robot Smackdown (video) by Schooniedude

Easy Laser Light Show by thecaden

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wall following virobot by FastLearner

Gillette mini vibrating motor by sixtyfootsteve

DIY Tooth Brush Robot by Captain Molo

Simple bot V1 by lord_kian

Lil' Timmy, my 300lb friend! (Photos) by iminthebathroom


Modifying an iRobot Create to Paint by technoplastique on September 9, 2007

Author:technoplastique Technoplastique Blog I'm making something for every day of 2011. Check out my blog to see what I've been making!

Intro: Modifying an iRobot Create to Paint This is a robotics project that could probably be completed by someone who has no experience with robots at all. I say this because, before I started, I had no experience with robots. Or writing programs. In fact, I knew how to paint and that was pretty much it. I had originally intended to write programs so that the robot could do specific paintings. I quickly realized that doing that is tedious, boring, and really doesn't take advantage of many of the robot's great features. So instead of that, this instructable will teach you how to: - modify the robot so that it can paint with brushes, rollers, and a variety of other apparatuses - take advantage of the basic pre-set programs to do some painting - use Active TCL to design a painting using LOGO - modify the sample programs that came with the module to do some paintings using the sensors on the robot. This project assumes that you can follow the directions that came with your Create to set up the Module, connect it to a computer, etc. I'm pretty sure most people will be able to handle that without (much) difficulty, so I haven't duplicated those directions here. Conceptual Basis (or, why I did what I did from the perspective of an artist) After playing with the robot for a bit I realized that I needed to decide if the robot was an artist or a glorified paintbrush. The logo programing treats it more like a paintbrush, whereas the sensor based programming treats it more as it's own artist. I like it as an artist best. In reality, we quickly became art team-mates. It painted faster and more decisively than I would, but without me to choose paint colors, fill it and push go it was a basically really heavy frisbee. No artist can possibly work without an awareness of the world around them (having senses at all affects your art) so to use the robot without using the sensors seemed ridiculous. I provided it with the things it needed to be aware of, and it's response to these things created the paintings. I also quickly realized that it's important to forget about how a human completes a task and consider how a robot would complete it most easily. With the exception of spray painting, the majority of painting is most effectively done on a horizontal surface, in spite of the cliche of the artist at their easel. The easel is there for the ease of view for the artist - horizontal art has a foreshortened effect. That's why your printer prints horizontally - that's the best way to apply ink without risk of running or bleeding. That's why I decided to work with the naturally horizontal nature of the robot, instead of trying to build on something that could paint on walls as is so common among 'painting robots.' I put a lot of thought to the difference between painting an printing. When I paint I don't worry about working left to right, or top to bottom. I put paint where it should be, working in curves, straight lines or whatever else is appropriate. As I'm not trying to just build a printer, I thought that the robot should paint in lines the way I would, rather than work across the painting like a roving printer. This presented certain challenges, especially with the obvious risk that the robot would roll over wet paint. As it turned out, paint doesn't really seem to accumulate on the wheels much, but they do add a nice mark to the painting. A little builds up between the treads of the tires, but that can easily be peeled off when it's dry. In a way, it's no different than an artist using their fingers to smudge pastels - the robot uses it's 'appendages' to affect the way paint is applied to the surface.

Image Notes 1. First painting ever, using the demo programs.

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Step 1: Materials List This is what you need to complete all steps in this project, but if you're picking and choosing you might not need all of it. - iRobot Create (obviously) - Command and Control Module (attach it now, and set it up. Double check that it's ON when you're setting up the USB connection, that held me up for a few minutes because I didn't realized that the robot and the command each have an on/off switch.) - Battery charger - Serial Cable (included) The create comes with holes all over it to accept 6-32 screws. Don't buy anything that's not threaded 6-32, because it's inconvenient to have keep track of more than one thing. Also, if you can, either get all flat (like mine) or phillips screws. One screwdriver rules because you'll want to keep around to tighten and adjust things as necessary. - 4 - 12 inch pieces of threaded rod - 2 - 2 inch screws - 10 (or more) nuts - 2 - 1/2 inch screws - 9/64 drill bit (this seems to be a good size because it's just a tiny bit snug. The vibration and movement of the robot will tend to loosen connections, so being a little snug is a good thing.) - 2 - 1 to 1 1/2 inch hinges (these are commonly used for wooden boxes and dollhouse type applications) - 2 or more - 2 inch clips (green is nice if you can get it - it coordinates with the module, and they come in handy for securing things) - 1 sheet of white plastic at least 9x9 inches (mine is a board that is sold with cake decorating supplies - it's used to support a cake after it's been decorated. It's corrugated and about 1/8 inch thick, and I was able to cut it with heavy duty scissors.) - 2 feet of 1x2 lumber - funnels (to hold the paint) - 3/8 inch outside diameter clear plastic tubing - 1/2 inch electrical shrink tube - small paintbrushes, rollers, painting pads, makers, pens, or anything else that you can think of that will make a mark - masking tape (to hold down paper and hold things temporarily) - plastic sheeting (because robots are unpredictable and fast, and you probably don't want everything painted) - a diner ketchup style bottle with cap for ever color you plan to use - white paint (for style) - something to cut wood and something to drill holes - a screwdriver - other basic household tools - lots of paint that cleans up with water (I use mis-tints from paint and home improvement stores. You can get a lot of it for $1 to $5, or, if you're super nice/lucky they'll give it to you for free, like the super nice people at Pittsburg Paint, who supplied almost all of mine.) - something to paint on (paper and fabric work well. Butcher paper comes on rolls and is a cheap choice, especially for starting out.)

Image Notes 1. threaded rods with nuts 2. 1/2 inch screws with nuts 3. 2 inch screws 4. clips (green for extra style) 5. 1x2 pieces with hinges 6. funnel platform 7. white spraypaint and screwdriver

Image Notes 1. diner ketchup bottles full of paint 2. mini painting pad

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3. 1 inch brush 4. corner roller

Step 2: Modify it to Apply Paint The robot needs to be able to hold a variety of different paint appliers, as well as pencils, markers, or whatever else you would want to make art with. This presented a variety of challenges, but I think my system resolves most of them quite well. Two wooden arms are attached to the top of the robot, and hinges hold a clip at the end of each. This way the arms can be as far apart or close together as they need to be (they swivel at the point of attachment to the robot, and, once set, that screw can be tightened to keep them more solid, or left a bit looser so the brush can swing at bit as the robot turns.) The hinges allow the clips to always point right at each other or at any other angle necessary to hold the brush, which wouldn't be possible if the clips were screwed directly to the arms. The paint needs to be supplied steadily to the brush, so I added an upper deck to hold a funnel, and paint runs down a tube to drip out right in front the brush. The brush spreads it as the robot moves. You can choose a different size of tubing to supply a different amount of paint, or adjust the speed the robot moves if you don't like the line you're getting. The shrink tubing holds the vinyl tube and funnel together, makes it easy to clean, and allows it to just drop into the top platform. It's a fairly simple assembly, and has held up well through a lot of paintings. Cut the lumber into 2 7" long pieces. Drill a hole (the long way) one inch from the end of each piece. On the other end, drill pilot holes to attach the hinges. Paint these pieces white (if that's what you're into.) Once dry, screw the hinges onto the ends. Then, on the other side of the hinge, attach a clip with a screw and nut. Most clips like those shown come with a hole (even if it's covered with plastic) but you might have to enlarge it a bit. This will work, I promise. Use a 2 inch screw through the hole on the other end into the furthest back pair of holes on the top surface of the robot. Cut the plastic sheet based on the pattern in the images. I used heavy duty (these will cut a penny!) style scissors, but I'm sure most plastics can be cut with a utility knife or, if you feel like splurging, have it laser cut from acrylic. Screw a nut 3/4 inch from one end of each threaded rod. Screw a nut onto the other end about three inches from the end. Screw the short end of the threaded rods into the holes in the cargo bay, up to the nut. Slide the plastic sheet down 3 inches to the top of the other nuts. You may need to add a second nut on top of the plastic if it's not holding firmly on it's own. Set your funnel into the opening on the platform. Measure how much vinyl tube it will take to reach from the bottom of the funnel to just touch the surface below. Use about an inch of the shrink tubing to attach this tube to the funnel. A heat gun will do this well, but my sister's hairdryer was handy and got the job done. You can use masking tape to do this instead if you'd rather, of if you want to test it before committing. Whatever you use to paint with (the brush/roller/etc.) will be held in place with the two clips. The tube should sit between the paint applicator and the robot. You may want to tape the tube to the brush if it doesn't stay in place on it's own. Fill the ketchup bottles with the paint you plan to use. A funnel and ladle (that won't be used with food) come in handy for this. You'll be happy to have such fast paint refill abilities later, and the ketchup action helps fill the tube quickly instead of waiting for paint to run down on it's own.

Image Notes 1. threaded rods screwed into available holes 2. 2 inch screws holding wooden supports 3. hinge pointed to the outside so that it opens to the center

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Image Notes 1. 1/2 inch shrink tubing used to hold the funnel to the tubing

Image Notes 1. 1 inch from end, centered on board 2. they're actually the same length, it's an optical illusion that they're not 3. hinge attached to end, with the pin section off the edge for extra swivel

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Image Notes 1. clip attached to hinge, top view 2. clip attached to hinge, side view. place one on the top hole and the other on the bottom hole.


Image Notes 1. platform slid over threaded rods 2. hole for funnel located further forward than the clips below 3. the clips are the farthest back

Image Notes 1. on lower hinge hole 2. on higher hinge hole 3. solidly touching the surface, it could even be pushed down a bit further

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Image Notes 1. painting pad 2. tube that ends directly in front of painting pad

Step 3: First Painting: Using the Demos Lay out your plastic sheeting. Tape your paper/fabric down with masking tape, on all sides. An area of around 3 by 4 feet seems like a nice amount of surface for it to paint on. Larger works, too, but much smaller than 2 by 3 and you'll paint more on your plastic than your paper. If it can come up around the edges the robot will catch it, pull it around, crumple it up and do whatever other mischievous robot things to it that it can think of, so tape it down well. Turn on your robot. Select a program that sounds appealing - 5 is my favorite, but any that you have the equipment for are good. If you choose a cover type program be sure to put something around the perimeter of the area (like 2x4 lumber or something) because otherwise it will cover and paint your room. You can also have a lot of fun with a pong/4 square kind of deal if you have 3 friends around - have on person on each side and make them responsible for bouncing the robot on their side. You could do this on a table top and count on the cliff sensors, too. Fill some paint into the funnel. Start small the first time, but you can put quite a bit in once you're confident. As soon as the paint it down to the bottom of the tube push the 'start button' and watch it go. Be ready to be fast if it goes off course of something. Also be sure to watch how the brush/roller/etc does, as you may need to do some adjusting there. You'll probably get the hang of it pretty quickly. If you want to take a break or want some extra time a small c-clamp screwed down onto the tubing will stop the paint. The clips used on the arms aren't strong enough to stop the paint in the tube, though. You can pull the funnel and clean it between colors, but I usually just add one color on top of another in the funnel. It's smart to know your color wheel and choose another color to add that doesn't combine red, blue and yellow (because this will make a brown/grey awkward color) but you can get great results with different shades of blues, then adding some purple or red, etc.

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Image Notes 1. action blur 2. waited too long to push start Image Notes 1. taped all the way around 2. plastic sheet for protection

Image Notes 1. fill the tube almost all the way to the bottom, then fill the funnel. let the paint run to the end of the tube, then push start.

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Step 4: Use Active TCL and LOGO to Paint There is a super clever guy that posted some awesome stuff on the create forums. The forums are a great resource, especially if you don't really know what you're doing. His documentation is available here: http://createforums.irobot.com/irobotcreate/board/message?board.id=Create_projects&thread.id=13 He used TCL to set up the robot to run using LOGO commands. You'll need to go to the post and follow his directions for downloading and installing Active TCL, then downloading his program. I didn't feel right posting his code here (for obvious reasons), but it is available at the forum post included above. Once you get it all installed and downloaded you're ready to start using your new iTurtle Create (which is a bad LOGO pun). It's an extremely simple interface where you literally tell it (in millimeters and angle degrees) what to do, connect the serial cable, and do it. This will work much better if you have a laptop, as the serial cable isn't that long and it will have to be connected while it's working. The robot is (apparently) able to carry around 30 pounds, so if you did something to accomodate it I could imagine you could set your laptop right on it and let it go. You can spend hours and hours plotting out paintings, somewhat etch-a-sketch style with this system, and other than installing programs you don't need much computer knowledge at all. Special Note: Pull the Command Module off your robot if you try this. It seems to interfere somehow, and this probably won't work if you have it attached (even if it's turned off.) It's a good idea to set up your painting and either run it without any paint or with a marker before committing to it with paint (at least at first). This is especially useful for choosing your starting point as that will dictate where the imagery appears on the paper. It is important to note that this method seems to disable all of the safety sensors on the robot, so if you set it to go forward 50,000 instead of 500 it will really do that, and you'll be chasing it down to stop it. If it's using real paint you'll have a lot of cleanup to do after you catch it. This method is really effective for creating and rapidly changing what you want to paint, and is much more efficient than writing programs and installing them on the Command Module. The biggest downside is the serial cable.

Step 5: Using Sensors to Paint As I stated in my introduction, after working on this for a while I realized that treating it as a printer really overlooked a lot of features the robot has to offer. So here are a few things you can do with the Create, Command Module, and sample programs to make paintings. Once you get a feel for how the code works and what you can change the options will be endless. The very easiest way to paint with sensors is to the run the sample 'cover' program with objects around the perimeter of the painting area, and even some heavy objects (that are either paint resistant or wrapped in waxed paper) within the painting area. But you probably want a little more control than that, and I added the Command Module to the materials list for a reason. If you would like to keep some of the randomness in what the robot is painting, but still have it work within parameters you set, here are some ways to do it: Open the sample program called 'drive' in programmers notebook (an explanation of this is available in the manual you can download from the iRobot website.) On line 156 you will find: // Set the turn parameters and reset the angle This is what the robot does when a sensor is triggered. This includes bumping into things or almost falling off of things. This section has some fun things to play with. distance = 0; You can change this to any number. The number you choose is how many millimeters the robot will back up after it hits or finds the edge of something. So, for example, changing the "0" to "200", it will back up 200 millimeters. This will give you 200 millimeter long lines at various angles coming from the edges and whatever other objects are on and around the painting surface. angle = 0; This means it backs up straight after it hits something. You man not want this. If you'd like it to back up at different angle set a number here. Changing "0" to "45" will cause it to back up at an arc of 45 degrees. This one takes some tweaking to get just how you want it, but it can cause some cool effects. turn_angle = randomAngle(); This means that the amount the robot turns after hitting something will be somewhere between 53 and 180 degrees. If you'd like to change the range of "random" then head down to line 460 and change that code. If you'd like to set it to a specific angle change "randomAngle()" to "15" or whatever other angle you like. The numbers "1" and "-1" are reserved for right angles, but it seems that any other number, positive or negative is fair game. I just realized that I haven't tried anything over 360, but now I can't wait to try. On lines 143 and 149 you find "turning" followed by a 0. Changing those to anything else makes the robot spin forever. This isn't a very effective or fun change to make, so I wouldn't bother. drive(300, RadStraight); This means move forward at a rate of 300 heading straight. You can change the speed of the robot by changing "300" to another number. Lower is slower, higher is faster (no tricks here). Changing "RadStraight" to a number will result in the robot driving in an arc. This will definitely increase the 'painterly' nature of what the robot does. I really like changing this setting. Changing the speed the robot moves can change the lines it paints. Slower speeds will usually result in a smoother, heavier application of paint. Faster speeds will give you a brushier effect, or it will sometimes even make your brush skip. Once you get involved in the code you'll be able to tweak all kinds of things. If you are having trouble understanding something check the oi file, sometimes there are clues in there. A lot of the time I've had better luck using an angle number instead of "RadCW" or similar commands. I'm assuming this is a fluke, but it's something to check if you have trouble. I'm not an experienced programmer at all. In fact, this is the first I've ever done anything with code, with the exception of making websites. I think it's pretty hard to hurt the robot, and there's always a clean copy of the sample programs on the CD if you irreparably damage the one you're modifying. The code is well noted, and you can pretty much figure out what everything does if you take some time with it. It's worth diving in and changing things to see what you get. I've written quite a few new things to add to the 'drive' program, but they aren't ready to show to the world quite yet.

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Image Notes 1. things for the robot to bump 2. funnel almost empty

Step 6: Conclusion It was important to me that I turn the Create into something I would really, honestly use on a regular basis. A robot that can get a can of soda from the fridge is awesome, but I drink one can a day at most, and I usually grab it on my way to do something else. Even if I had made a robot that would do that I really wouldn't use it. I've been a full time artist/designer for years, and anyone who's done that knows how difficult and lonely it can be. That's why artists hang out at galleries, movie theaters and bars. You need to get out of your own head and think about different things. That's part of what has been so fun about working with the robot - it is fairly unpredictable (and the amount of unpredictability can be changed in it's code) and it generates imagery that I never would have. It does some of the heavy lifting for me, but I still get to make decisions. I've gotten into the habit of working with it, and I really use it a lot. Here are my plans for future experiments with the robot and some ideas I'd love to see other people work on: - LOGO and fractals are practically best friends. There's a lot of potential in fractal paintings if you get more involved with LOGO. Fractals can be similar in structure to trees, coral, and other organic forms, leaving the door open to making a field of unique but related trees, and possibly even adding to the painting yourself to create a landscape. - Collaborating on paintings with the robot in general could be a lot of fun. Let the robot paint, then paint yourself, then let the robot paint again. I did a lot of this with real humans in art school, but it would probably be more fun with a robot. They aren't concerned with preserving your work, and will paint with reckless abandon. - Writing a program that runs on the Command Module that causes the robot to run on a certain path would have some benefits. It could be used to try the same idea in different colors and mediums. It could be used as the basis for a whole series of paintings that would each be handled differently after that. It could even be used for graffiti. - Graffiti in general would be an option with the robot. It could paint on streets or sidewalks. Use this at your own discretion and be responsible. Or just have it hold chalk instead of paint and go to town with it. It could draw arrows directing people to something. It could write messages. In theory, it could even be used to paint the edges of parking spaces. That would be especially useful for temporary markings.

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- Attaching a servo motor to the brush holder would give you the option to stop and start painting wherever you choose. This was outside my experience level to figure out in the time I had, but I'd really like to try it in the future. - The platform was built with the option of adding more colors of paint/brushes at the same time in mind. It would be possible to add a second deck to it, which would support more funnels. Basically, after 2 months or so of working on this I feel like I'm still just starting, and I'm spending as much time with it as possible. This robot and I will be at Maker Faire in Austin if you want to get up close and personal with it! Hopefully by then I'll have made even more progress with it!

Image Notes 1. turn 45 degrees, back up 200mm 2. endless spinning

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iRover: Remotely controlled iRobot Create (or Roomba) by techgeek75

Sparky Jr. - DIY Telepresence Robot by sparkyrust Belvedere - A Butler Robot by wolffan

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SADbot: the Seasonally Affected Drawing robot by dustynrobots on January 1, 2011

Author:dustynrobots

dustynrobots I'm an enginerd, author, and teacher.

Intro: SADbot: the Seasonally Affected Drawing robot SADbot was created in collaboration with Ben Leduc-Mills for the window gallery at the Eyebeam Art + Technology Center. The main idea was to use solar energy to power a drawing machine that could interact with people outside the window through light sensors. You can re-create this project to install in your own window at home. SADbot gets its name from the source of its power: the sun. Since the motors are powered from a battery charged through a solar panel, they will run only if it has been sunny enough to store solar energy in the battery. When the battery runs low and the SADbot motors stop running, SADbot appears sad because it has to wait for the sun to come out before it can keep drawing. Everything you need to know is in this Instructable, but if you've never used an Arduino or worked with photocells and motors, you might want some background material. This the last project in my book, Making Things Move: DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists, so all the background material can be found in there. SADbot has already been listed as one of The 10 Robots That Rocked in 2010 and one of The 10 Coolest Kickstarter Projects of 2010. SADbot also got some love from Adafruit Industries, IEEE Spectrum, True/Slant, Robot Living, and gizmowatch. And when Ben and I showed it at Maker Faire NY in September 2010, our booth won a blue Editor's Choice ribbon! Hopefully you'll make one and comment about it - the world needs more robot art. Also see the Flickr set for higher-res images.

Image Notes 1. solar panel 2. photocell on inside of glass

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Step 1: Shopping List Electronics Multimeter Arduino with USB cable and AC adapter Soldering iron, stand, and solder Three small breadboards (like All Electronics PB-400) Jumper wires (like SparkFun PRT-00124) Hook-up wire: red , black, and white (SparkFun PRT-08023, PRT-08022, and PRT-08026) Two stepper motors (SparkFun ROB-09238) Two EasyDrivers (SparkFun ROB-09402) Male header pins (SparkFun PRT-00116) Four photocells (1K? – 10k?: SparkFun SEN-09088) Four 1K? resistors (SparkFun COM-08980) Photocell (10K? – 100K?, Digi-Key PDV-P9007-ND used here) and resistor (10K?, like SparkFun COM-08374 used here). Note: You can also use a 1K? – 10k? photocell (SparkFun SEN-09088). In that case, you should use a 1K? resistor (SparkFun COM-08980) to get the best response. Benchtop power supply for testing 12V 5Ah SLA battery (PS-1250 F1 from Microbattery.com, www.microbattery.com) Solar charge controller (SKU 06-1024 from Silicon Solar, www.siliconsolar.com) 12V 7W solar battery charger panel (Silicon Solar SKU 9358) Hardware Large plywood or other wooden board to use for canvas (around 3 ft × 2 ft will work well) Eight M3 screws, 20mm length, (McMaster 92095A185) Eight M3 lock washers (McMaster 92148A150) One pack M3 washers (McMaster 91116A120) Drill (either portable or drill press) and drill bits: 3/8 in, 1/8 in Diagonal cutters (like SparkFun TOL-08794) Two pulleys: Download the model file for free from Thingiverse to 3D print them yourself or buy them custom made at from my Shapeways shop. Any pulley that fits on a 5mm motor shaft will also work. Spring clamp (like McMaster 5107A1) that will hold the marker Black (or any color) marker Monofilament fishing line Large white paper

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Image Notes 1. don't worry about these capacitors, we never ended up using them 2. Arduino! 3. Sparkfun EasyDrivers

Step 2: Prepare the motors Prepare the two stepper motors by soldering 4-pin male headers onto the 4 wires of each motor. This will make it easy to plug them into a breadboard in the next step. Yes, the order of the colors does matter: see the note on the image.

Image Notes 1. notice the color order from left to right: red, green, yellow, blue

Step 3: Prepare the EasyDrivers Solder male headers onto the EasyDriver. A set of four lines up with the four motor holes, a set of three lines up with the GND/STEP/DIR holes, and a set of two lines up with the GND/M+ holes. It’s easiest to solder if you stick the long ends of the headers into the breadboard, slide the EasyDriver on the short ends, and then heat up the little solder pads around the holes while you add solder. Be careful not to add so much solder that the pins connect to each other!

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Step 4: Test the motors Create two EasyDriver/breadboard/motor assemblies. Plug the stepper motor header into the breadboard in line with the motor pins on the EasyDriver. The red and green wires should be next to A on theEasyDriver, and the blue and yellow wires next to B. Use a benchtop power supply to get 12V power and ground to the GND and M+ pins on each of the EasyDrivers. Set them up to interface with the Arduino as follows: For the left motor: • Arduino GND to GND on left EasyDriver • Arduino pin 11 goes to DIR • Arduino pin 12 goes to STEP For the right motor: • Arduino GND (one of the two GND pins left) to GND on right EasyDriver • Arduino pin 6 goes to DIR • Arduino pin 7 goes to STEP Make sure the two stepper motors work. Type in the following code, verify it, and upload it to the Arduino. /* Driving two stepper motors with an Arduino through Sparkfun's EasyDriver v4.3 By Ben Leduc-Mills and Dustyn Roberts Created: 2010.06 */ #include //import stepper library #define STEPS 200 // 360/1.8 (step angle) = 200 steps/revolution //declare new stepper objects from stepper library (one per motor) Stepper right_motor(STEPS, 6, 7); //6=DIR, 7=STEP Stepper left_motor(STEPS, 11, 12); //11=DIR, 12=STEP void setup() { //set motor speeds (in RPM) right_motor.setSpeed(200); left_motor.setSpeed(200); } void loop() { //step each motor every time through the loop right_motor.step(10); left_motor.step(10); delay(10); //gives the motor a chance to get to new step } If the code works, your motors should just start spinning slowly. Attach some tape flags to the motor shafts as shown to help indicate what’s going on.

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Image Notes 1. left EasyDriver 2. left motor 3. right EasyDriver 4. right motor 5. benchtop power supply set to 12V 6. notice color order (blue on the right) relative to orientation of EasyDriver - same goes for the right side

Step 5: Let there be photocells Get out the third breadboard and wire up the photocells. Each photocell should have one leg connected to the power column and one leg connected to the ground column through a resistor. The leg going to ground should also go to one of the ANALOG IN pins on the Arduino. From left to right, connect the ground legs of the photocells to pins 0, 1, 2, and 3 on the Arduino, which correspond with up, down, left, and right in the code, respectively. Jump power and ground to the breadboard from the Arduino GND and 5V pins.

Image Notes 1. GND (black) and 5V Power (red) from the Arduino

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Step 6: Motors and photocells Now we will try some code that uses the photocells to move the stepper motors. Type in the following code, verify it, and upload it to the Arduino. Once that is done, try covering up the photocells one at a time. • When you cover the up photocell, the left motor should turn counterclockwise and the right motor should turn clockwise. • When you cover the down photocell, the left motor should turn clockwise and the right motor should turn counterclockwise. • When you cover the left photocell, both motors should turn counterclockwise. • When you cover the right photocell, both motors should turn clockwise. /* Using photocells to drive two stepper motors with an Arduino through Sparkfun's EasyDriver v4.3 CC-GNU GPL by Ben Leduc-Mills and Dustyn Roberts Created: 2010.06 */ #include //import stepper library #define STEPS 200 // 360/1.8 (step angle) = 200 steps/revolution //declare new stepper objects from stepper library (one per motor) Stepper right_motor(STEPS, 6, 7); //6=DIR, 7=STEP Stepper left_motor(STEPS, 11, 12); //11=DIR, 12=STEP int distance; // how far motors should go int lowest; // variable to store lowest photocell value int i; // for looping // variables for 4 photocell values int photo_up; int photo_down; int photo_left; int photo_right; void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); //start serial printout so we can see stuff // set motor speeds (in RPM) right_motor.setSpeed(200); left_motor.setSpeed(200); } void loop() { //read and print all photocell values from analog pins 0-3 photo_up = analogRead(0); Serial.print("up"); Serial.println(photo_up); photo_down = analogRead(1); Serial.print("down"); Serial.println(photo_down); photo_left = analogRead(2); Serial.print("left"); Serial.println(photo_left); photo_right = analogRead(3); Serial.print("right"); Serial.println(photo_right); delay(1000); //give me time to read them in the monitor //store photocell values in an array int photoValues[]= {photo_up, photo_down, photo_left, photo_right}; lowest = 9999; //set this higher than possible photocell values //loop to find lowest photocell value for(i = 0; i < 4; i++) //4 = number of photocells { Serial.println(photoValues[i]); //prints out photoValue array //assign actual photocell value to "lowest" variable if it's lower //than whatever "lowest" is set to (starts at 9999) if (lowest >= photoValues[i] ) { lowest = photoValues[i]; } //print it out to confirm that the lowest value is being selected Serial.print("lowest:"); Serial.println(lowest); delay(1000); //wait one second before looping so we can read the values }//end for distance = lowest; //set travel distance variable = lowest value //find the sensor that matched the lowest, go that direction //see below for what the up, down, left, right functions do if (lowest == photoValues[0]) {

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up( distance ); } else if (lowest == photoValues[1]) { down( distance ); } else if (lowest == photoValues[2]) { left( distance ); } else if (lowest == photoValues[3]) { right( distance ); } }//end loop /* Here are the directional functions. Loop size = distance. Positive step numbers are clockwise, negative counterclockwise */ void up(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++){ right_motor.step(10); left_motor.step(-10); } } void down(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++){ right_motor.step(-10); left_motor.step(10); } } void left(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++){ right_motor.step(-10); left_motor.step(-10); } } void right(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++){ right_motor.step(10); left_motor.step(10); } }

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Step 7: Mount the motors and pulleys Get out your plywood board and put on your safety glasses. The stepper motor data sheet from SparkFun indicates that the motor mounting holes are 31mm apart in a square, with the shaft at the center. Make pencil marks up on the corners of your board where you want the motor shafts to go, and then measure and make marks at each corner of a 31mm square centered on that motor shaft mark. Plan your motor mount so one motor is in each of the top corners of your canvas. Use the 1/8 in drill bit to drill out the clearance holes for the M3 screws the motor will mount with. Use the 3/8 in drill bit to drill out the center hole. Remove the screws that came with the motor from the shaft side so we can use those holes as mounting holes with the longer screws. Now mount your motors with the M3 screws, lock washers, and washers creating a sandwich with your canvas board. You may need fewer washers, depending on the board thickness youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re using. Once both motors are mounted, confirm the circuit still works as intended and none of the wires in your circuit have come loose. Press the pulleys onto each motor shaft.

Step 8: Go solar Now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get SADbot running off the battery charged by the solar panels through the charge controller (the Arduino should plug into the wall through the AC adapter). First, simplify the wiring by choosing one EasyDriver board as the power hub (see picture). Designate one side of the breadboard as the hub, and then use small jumper wires to jump the GND and M+ pins of the EasyDriver to this hub. Connect the power and ground columns of this hub to GND and M+ on the other EasyDriver breadboard with long lengths of hook-up wire.

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Step 9: Solar charger setup Cut some more hook-up wire and connect this power hub to the two far-left screw terminals on the charge controller. Solder hook-up wire to the battery terminals (red for positive and black for negative). Use the screw terminals in the center of the charge controller to hold the stripped ends of these wires. Cut off the RC plug that comes on the solar panel wires. Separate the two wires and strip the insulation off the ends to expose about 1/4 in of wire. To figure out which one is positive and which one is negative, use your multimeter. The black lead should be in the COM connection, and the red lead in the voltage-measuring connection, just as for testing batteries. Now touch the red lead to one of the solar panel wires and the black lead to the other. If the reading on your multimeter is positive, you guessed right. If not, you guessed wrong. Do this with both solar panels and squish both negative wires in the charge controller on the remaining negative terminal. Each positive wire gets its own screw terminal on the far right of the charge controller.

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Step 10: Staging and testing This step will change a little bit depending on your setup. You can set SADbot up in a window, a table, or anywhere you want really. These pictures show SADbot being setup inside a window with the photocells pressed up against the inside of the glass, but you can keep the photocells on the breadboard if you want a desk-sized controller. Just cut and route wires accordingly to accommodate your installation. In the setup below, the Arduino was mounted between the two EasyDriver breadboards. Once you've double (and triple) checked all your wiring, turn on the power supply to your Arduino (just plug it in if you're using an AC adapter) and turn the solar charger on. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done everything right, your motors should be moving! The battery comes charged so you'll be fine for a few hours, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to put your solar panels in a sunny spot so the battery can charge as the motors use up the initial charge.

Image Notes 1. right EasyDriver 2. wires to left EasyDriver 3. wires coming from photocells pressed up against the inside of the window

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Image Notes 1. soldering wires to photocell legs


Image Notes 1. photocell ready to be hot glued inside window

Step 11: Make it interesting Now let’s make SADbot draw something interesting. Cut two approximately 5 ft lengths of fishing line and tie each on through the hole in the center of the pulleys. Tie the other ends of the line to a spring clamp and clamp onto a marker. Mount the white paper on your canvas board with tape or clamps. Let’s tell the stepper motors to draw in random directions by default, and then to behave as they did before when someone is covering a photocell. This will create a drawing like the ones SADbot made in Eyebeam’s window gallery. Enjoy! Play with the photocells so you can interact with SADbot and make interesting drawings. /* SADbot v.03 SADbot will draw a random distance in random direction until a photocell is blocked. When SADbot detects a photocell has been blocked, it will draw towards it. Stepper motors are driven through Sparkfun's EasyDriver v4.3 CC-GNU GPL by Ben Leduc-Mills and Dustyn Roberts Created: 2010.06 */ #include //import stepper library #define STEPS 200 // 360/1.8 (step angle) = 200 steps/revolution //declare new stepper objects from stepper library (one per motor) Stepper right_motor(STEPS, 6, 7); //6=DIR, 7=STEP Stepper left_motor(STEPS, 11, 12); //11=DIR, 12=STEP int distance; // how far motors should go int lowest; // to store lowest photocell value int i; // for looping // variables for 4 photocells int photo_up; int photo_down; int photo_left; int photo_right; // Set canvas size. 1000 steps is roughly .4 inch #define CANVASWIDTH 32000 #define CANVASHEIGHT 20000 //total distance for bounds checking //SADbot starts at center (canvaswidth/2 and canvasheight/2) float totalWidth = CANVASWIDTH /2; float totalHeight = CANVASHEIGHT /2; int randomDirection; int randomDistance; void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); //start serial printout so we can see stuff // set motor speed (in RPM) right_motor.setSpeed(200); left_motor.setSpeed(200); //use random seed to get better random numbers //*set to an analog pin that you're not using randomSeed(analogRead(4)); }// end setup

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void loop() { //read and print all sensor values from analog pins 0-3 photo_up = analogRead(0); Serial.print("up"); Serial.println(photo_up); photo_down = analogRead(1); Serial.print("down"); Serial.println(photo_down); photo_left = analogRead(2); Serial.print("left"); Serial.println(photo_left); photo_right = analogRead(3); Serial.print("right"); Serial.println(photo_right); delay(1000); //give me time to read them in the monitor //before drawing, check our totalHeight and totalWidth Serial.print("totalHeight:"); Serial.println(totalHeight); Serial.print("totaWidth:"); Serial.println(totalWidth); delay(1000); //give me time to read them in the monitor //store photocell values in an array int photoValues[]= {photo_up, photo_down, photo_left, photo_right}; lowest = 9999; //set this higher than possible photocell values //loop to find lowest photocell value for(i = 0; i < 4; i++) //4 = number of sensors { Serial.println(photoValues[i]); //prints out photoValue array //assign actual photocell value to "lowest" variable if it's lower //than whatever "lowest" is set to (starts at 9999) if (lowest >= photoValues[i] ) { lowest = photoValues[i]; } //print it out to confirm that the lowest value is being selected Serial.print("lowest:"); Serial.println(lowest); delay(1000); //wait one second before looping so we can read the values }//end for distance = lowest; //set travel distance = lowest value //if lowest value indicates a covered photocell, draw towards lowest //change this threshold depending on lighting if (lowest < 550 ) { //find the sensor that matched the lowest, go that direction, //but only if SADbot is within the bounds of the canvas if ((lowest == photoValues[0]) && ((totalHeight + distance) < CANVASHEIGHT)) { up( distance ); totalHeight += distance; //increment totalHeight variable } else if ((lowest == photoValues[1]) && ((totalHeight - distance) > 0)) { down( distance ); totalHeight -= distance; //decrement totalHeight variable } else if ((lowest == photoValues[2]) && ((totalWidth - distance) > 0)) { left( distance ); totalWidth -= distance; //decrement totalWidth variable } else if ((lowest == photoValues[3]) && ((totalWidth + distance) < CANVASWIDTH)) { right( distance ); totalWidth += distance; //increment totalWidth variable } }//end if //otherwise, no one is covering any sensors, draw according to random else { //pick random number 1 through 9 to map to direction randomDirection = random(1, 9); Serial.print("random direction:"); Serial.println(randomDirection);

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//pick random number 1 through 200 to map to distance randomDistance = random(1, 200); Serial.print("random distance:"); Serial.println(randomDistance); //directions for any randomDirection value generated switch (randomDirection) { case 1: //go up if((totalHeight + randomDistance) < CANVASHEIGHT) { up(randomDistance); totalHeight += randomDistance; } break; case 2: //go down if((totalHeight - randomDistance) > 0) { down(randomDistance); totalHeight -= randomDistance; } break; case 3: //go left if((totalWidth - randomDistance) > 0) { left(randomDistance); totalWidth -= randomDistance; } break; case 4: //go right if((totalWidth + randomDistance) < CANVASWIDTH) { right(randomDistance); totalWidth += randomDistance; } break; case 5: //go upRight if(((totalWidth + randomDistance) < CANVASWIDTH) && ((totalHeight + randomDistance) < CANVASHEIGHT)) { upRight(randomDistance); totalWidth += randomDistance; totalHeight += randomDistance; } break; case 6: //go upLeft if(((totalWidth - randomDistance) > 0) && ((totalHeight + randomDistance) < CANVASHEIGHT)) { upLeft(randomDistance); totalWidth -= randomDistance; totalHeight += randomDistance; } break; case 7: //go downRight if(((totalWidth + randomDistance) < CANVASWIDTH) && ((totalHeight - randomDistance) > 0)) { downRight(randomDistance); totalWidth += randomDistance; totalHeight -= randomDistance; } break; case 8: //go downLeft if(((totalWidth - randomDistance) > 0) && ((totalHeight - randomDistance) > 0)) { downLeft(randomDistance); totalWidth -= randomDistance; totalHeight -= randomDistance; } break; default: //just in case left(0); } //end switch } //end else } //end loop() /*

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Here are the directional functions. Loop size = distance. Positive step numbers are clockwise, negative counterclockwise */ void up(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(1); left_motor.step(-1); } } void down(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(-1); left_motor.step(1); } } void left(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(-1); left_motor.step(-1); } } void right(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(1); left_motor.step(1); } } void upRight(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(2); left_motor.step(-.2); } } void upLeft(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(.2); left_motor.step(-2); } } void downRight(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(-.2); left_motor.step(2); } } void downLeft(int distance) { for( i = 0; i < distance; i++) { right_motor.step(-2); left_motor.step(.2); } }

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Image Notes 1. spring clamp hanging from fishing line 2. pulley pressed onto motor with other end of fishing line wrapped around it

Image Notes 1. this clamp is holding drawing paper, but you can use tape or whatever else works

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http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/

Remote Controlled SOLAR POWERED Barge (Photos) by prabbit22m

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DoodleBot360 by dlcain on November 29, 2010

Intro: DoodleBot360 This is a very simple vibrobot to make, and a lot of fun to play with. I was a cubmaster for 3 years, and this is the kind of project that is perfect for that age group (8 to 11 years-old). Even if you are not in that age group, you can still have a lot of fun making and experimenting with DoodleBot360!

Step 1: Here's what you need... Like I said, this doesn't get much easier and it's cheap. 1 - CD or DVD. This is something you can make with those old scratched up discs. 1 - Dollar Store vibrating toothbrush. 1 - Package of Markers. 1 - Hot glue You will also need a drill and drill bit to make the holes. The size of drill bit depends on the diameter of the markers. The markers that I used are 3/8" in diameter

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


Step 2: Drill and Glue If you couldn't tell from the intro, this is going to be so simple. 1> You need to measure the diameter of your markers. The ones that I used are slightly tapered, so a 3/8" drill worked perfectly. 2> Drill a series of at least 3 holes in your CD. I recommend having a wood block under the CD as you drill. The hole stays cleaner, and is less likely to break the disk. As you can see I did one with 3 holes, and another with 8 holes. Why the difference? That is what makes DoodleBot360 so much fun. You can experiment with different hole configurations to see what happens. (Note: I found that I could not get it to move much with 8 markers and 1 motor. I might try 8 markers and 2 motors) 3> Remove the toothbrush head, install batteries, and then hot glue the base to the CD. Becareful not to glue the battery holder down, so you can change the battery when it goes dead. Almost done...

Step 3: Add markers This last step might just be the hardest. Hmmm...What colors to use? After you have decided what colors to use, simply insert the markers in the holes. If your markers are like mine you will find that as you insert the markers, they will start to fit tight in the holes. This is another way that you can continue experimenting with DoodleBot360. You can insert the markers in at different heights to get it to go different directions. You can make an arena using video cases, and watch it work its way around. Have fun with your DoodleBot360!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


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http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/

Car Doodles (Photos) by TheFoofinator

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Soft doodles! by jessyratfink


PosterBot: Make a Marker-Writing Robot out of an Old Inket printer and an iRobot Create by W_world on September 3, 2007

Intro: PosterBot: Make a Marker-Writing Robot out of an Old Inket printer and an iRobot Create I decided to make this robot because I've never had very neat handwriting, so making large letters has always been difficult. When I was on Student Council in high school, I always got marked down for posters that weren't "neat" enough. Like any nerd, I figured "If I can't do it, I'll make a robot to do it for me." This robot will draw out any small monochrome bitmap onto poster paper. It can mark out the individual pixels just as a printer might. It works best with strings of characters.

This is a moderately difficult project which requires about $50 in parts and basic electronic skills (This doesn't include an iRobot create,Command Module and old Inkjet printer) . You should be able to read a schematic and make a basic prototype or bread board. Some familiarity with C or C++ is handy too. I recommend that you read through the entire Instructable before beginning your project. It's important that you get the bigger picture because the process will vary depending on your materials. Parts List: An Old inkjet printer An iRobot Create and Command module Electronic prototype board or bread board Several rubber bands Two 9-pin serial cables with at least one male end 4 PC-Mount DPDT 5v DC relays rated at least 1A 4 2n222 transistors 4 1k 1/4 watt resistors 4 diodes some wire to make jumpers with (unbraided) ~3' of 1/8" Bass wood Poster marker Butcher paper (get at least 20') Voltage regulators (values vary) White acrylic paint (optional) Tools: Hack saw Epoxy Box Cutter or Exacto knife Drill and bit set Soldering iron/solder Hot melt glue gun Multi-meter

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


Step 1: Get the parts from the printer You need two parts from the printer: the carriage and the paper advancer The carriage is what the ink cartridges slide back and forth on. It's a metal rack with a motor, a belt, a plastic strip, a white ribbon cable and the actual print-carriage (usually black) where the ink cartridges sit. You can go ahead and remove the white ribbon, the ink cartridges and the clear plastic strip with the black marks. The paper advancer is a little harder to remove. It's usually deep in the printer and is attached to a lot of other things. From the advancer, the parts we want are: the motor, its gear train, its axle (with the little foam wheels) and any bearings it has. Try to keep these parts in working condition. We're going to cut the paper advancer axle with a hack saw just outside the second bearing. This will be our medium lowerer which is a not-too-fancy way of saying it the thing that is going to move the marker to and from the paper.

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Image Notes 1. Metal rack 2. Actual Print-carriage 3. metal rod 4. You don't need to keep this. It'd be really hard to hack anyway 5. This holds the white ribbon on 6. The print-carriage is screwed to this thing on the belt 7. If this top piece comes off, don't remove it. It keeps the carriage from tipping away from the rack.

Image Notes 1. bearing 2. We want the gear train so that the motor will have plenty of torque going to the motor 3. This clear wheel is used so the printer can get feedback about the position of the axel... we don't need it.

Image Notes 1. bearing 2. bearing 3. I cut off all the rest of the axle that was attached here.

Step 2: Making the control board and configuring the serial cables Here we're going to make the control board. This board will control turn both motors on and off and control their directions with signals from the command module. The ports will be as follows: PC5 (top center pin 1) - motor 1(carriage) on/off PC1 (top center pin 2) - motor 1(carriage) direction PC4 (cargo bay pin 1) - motor 2 (maker) on/off PC0 (cargo bay pin 2) - motor 2 (marker) direction Top center pin 7 - motor 1 supply Cargo bay pin 7 - motor 2 supply Top center pin 4 - +5v Cargo bay pin 5 - grnd You'll need to strip the serial cables and use the multi-meter to determine which colors go with which pins. Remember: Pin 1 is the top left pin on the female command module.. this means it will be the top right pin on the male serial cable To make the control board you will need the PC prototype board, the relays, diodes, transistors, resistors and jumpers.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


4 PC-Mount DPST 5v DC relays rated at least 1A 4 2N222 Transistors 4 1k 1/4 watt Resistors 4 1N4003 Diodes RadioShack usually won't have everything. Look for a local electronic supply store or try DIgikey or JameCo Mount and wire the components according the schematic. I got this schematic from Robot Builders Bonanza 2nd edition I guess there is a third edition now, but I'm not familiar with it. I highly recommend the book for anyone looking to continue building robots. This next bit is going to sound like obvious advice but, remember that you want the leads of the components going through to the copper side. I made the mistake of setting up almost the entire board before realizing it was upside-down. The colored cables you see running away in the photos are the serial cables that correspond to the various pins. I used hot melt glue to attach them to the board to lessen the strain on the solder joint. I've added picture of my board so you can get an idea how to add them

Image Notes 1. DPDT Relay 5V nominal votage rated at at least 1A 2. resistor 3. Transistor 4. diode 5. grnd 6. motor 7. the switches on the relays 8. The relay's control coil

Image Notes 1. transistor 2. resistor 3. diode 4. Jumper I accidentally stripped 5. marker of the emitter on the transistor 6. jumper

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Image Notes 1. Grnd 2. To Motor1 3. To Motor2


7. relay

Step 3: Make the marker lowerer In order to make the marker lowerer, you'll need to remove the black print-carriage from the larger structure as seen in the picture showing the separate components. You will need to unscrew the screws that fasten it to the belt. You will also need slide out the metal rod so that the plastic piece can come out. You'll then want to attach the paper advancer to this black print-carriage piece. Keep in mind the orientation of the future marker and the need for the carriage to slide without impediment. I used epoxy to attach the bearings to the carriage. I found that Hot-melt Glue is handy to use to keep the parts in place while the epoxy cures. By attaching a piece of wood (bass), you can create a platform so that the marker can be rubber banded on and replaced easily. The small perpendicular piece allows the epoxy to have a greater surface area against the metal. After this is done, reassemble the complete carriage. I suggest that you add a foam block or some other stopping device that will stop the marker at it's vertical position. Also, a smaller rubber band to help the marker return to it's neutral position is helpful. While you're welcome to experiment with different mediums, the best one I found was the fumeless poster paint marker; it's surprisingly long lasting. You should be able to buy both the bass wood and the marker at your local craft store

Image Notes 1. Metal rack 2. Actual Print-carriage 3. metal rod 4. You don't need to keep this. It'd be really hard to hack anyway 5. This holds the white ribbon on 6. The print-carriage is screwed to this thing on the belt 7. If this top piece comes off, don't remove it. It keeps the carriage from tipping away from the rack.

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Image Notes 1. wood piece 2. bearing


Image Notes 1. Foam block to keep it from going to far

Image Notes 1. press down and paint... it's perfect

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Image Notes 1. There's a little plastic piece on the belt under here that you need to screw the print-carriage to

Image Notes 1. I twisted the rubber bands three times

Image Notes 1. rubber band to help it reset

Step 4: Adding the carriage to the robot at large This step, of all of them, will be the one that will vary the most from what I'll outline here. Every print carriage is different, and depending how you attached your marker lowerer, you may need to mount it in an entirely different way. So with that in mind, let me show you how I mounted my carriage. First, I cut the bass wood in a way that would let me attach it to the cargo bay. I epoxied the pieces together and added paper to help strengthen the joint. Next, I drilled holes in the wood that lined up with the holes on the cargo bay. I was able to screw down the wood pretty securely This next step gets a little fuzzy: I added balsa wood extenders and smaller pieces to take some of the stress. It just so happened that my print carriage was just high enough that I was able to raise it an 1/8th of an inch (by cutting the extender and reattaching it to the top of itself) in order to get the marker in just about the perfect marking position. You can trim this position by moving the rubber bands that hold the marker. I also painted all the wood white. It was amazing how a little paint made the robot look so much better. You'll also need to run wires out from the control board to the motors. I recommend taking the extra wires from your serial cables and using them. I used hot-melt glue to attach them at the right points to keep them from getting tangled.

Image Notes 1. box cutter, score the wood over and over until you can break it cleanly

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Image Notes 1. it took a couple tries to get these holes right 2. the paper absorbs the epoxy so it works great to strengthen things


Image Notes 1. I epoxied the carriage onto here

Image Notes 1. cut to raise the hight of the carriage 2. strengtheners to help carry the weight of the carriage

Image Notes 1. glued wires here 2. Glued wires here (to protect the solder joint 3. glued wires here

Step 5: Calibrating your robot Connect the serial cables (one to the top center, and the other to the cargo bay port) and reattach the wood leaving the PC board in the cargo bay. One of the first things you'll need to calibrate are the two control motors. The output from the command module is 20V, this is likely far too much for the motors. You can add voltage regulators to limit this voltage to a level that is safe for the motors. 20V is far too much for most DC motors. You'll need to test them at other voltages to figure out where they work best. I used old RC car battery chargers to supply the voltage to test the motors with. I found out that my Carriage motor worked well at 12V and that the marker motor worked at 6V. So I just bought a couple voltage regulators rated at those voltages and 1A. You want to wire these in series with the motors (that is, in the middle of one the wires running to the robot). If these regulators have a ground pin, it might be a good idea to run up an extra wire from the ground on the PC board. If you haven't already installed all of your iRobot software including Programer's Notepad and the virtual serial port do so now. Instructions are available in the documentation (which is completely available online here) Follow the instructions in the Command Module in the "your first project section". Add the Printer.c file as the main file for the code. Be sure to modify the "target =" in the makefile. it should read "TARGET = printer" Connect the serial cables (one to the top center, and the other to the cargo bay port) and reattach the wood leaving the PC board in the cargo bay. You'll also want to modify the wait values on the program "printer.c". Namely, you'll want to trim the wait times in the "car" and "mark" function. These will vary with the differing sizes and speeds of your motors. You'll want to trim them so that the marks overlap slightly and are plenty heavy. Follow the instructions in the manual to compile, download and start the program on the robot (my tip: if it's not working push the reset button). You made need to spend a fair amount of time calibrating the robot. Pictured below is one of my many test papers.

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When everything is trimmed right, the robot should work like this:

Image Notes 1. 6v regulator, the grey cable runs to ground. I glued it here with hot melt glue. 2. 12V regulator. I drilled little holes for the pins to go through

Image Notes 1. be sure to tuck in any wandering wires

File Downloads

printer.c (11 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'printer.c']

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/

Image Notes 1. when I was testing the marker with my hand 2. trying to get a normal straight line


Step 6: Creating and adding your own Bitmaps Finally you have a working robot; but you want it to write other things besides "Instructables.com". Well here's how you do it. First you need to create a monochrome bitmap in MSPaint. After opening paint, Click on "attributes" in the image menu. Set the measurements to pixels and set the specs to (for now) 162 wide by 70 high. Fill in the bullet point next to black and white. When you click "OK" you'll get a threatening warning telling you you're about to lose all the colors in your drawing. Click continue. Create a text box and open the "text toolbar" set your font size to 12pt and select what font you want. Go ahead and type your string out, and make the box longer if you need to. When you're finished, select the text and move it to the top left corner of the white area. Drag the corner of the white space up so it's pretty close to the text. Now go to the view menu, move the cursor over the "zoom" and select custom. Choose 800%. You can now resize the white area to 16 pixels tall. Save the bitmap as a "monochrome" bitmap. (on the dropdown menu) Next we have to convert the bitmap to a "c" array. Use the "Fntcvtr" application to convert your bitmap (directions available here) This program outputs data in a "char" array, we need this to be an Unsigned 8-bit array. To convert it open the ".out" file in Programmer's notebook. Select "replace" on the edit menu (CTRL-R). In the "find what:" box, enter '\ (apostrophe backslash) Set the replace to "0" (zero) Click replace all Run another replace sequence to replace ' (apostrophe) with nothing (empty) Replace all again. The purple characters should now be blue. We now need to redefine the array. Manually replace "Char" with "uint8_t" (it won't turn blue). Now just copy and past the entire array (including green specs) over the old one in Printer.c. Be sure to modify the constants "rows" and "col" to the new values of the bitmap. Compile, load and run. Your set.

Image Notes 1. this is where the size of the white space is shown

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Image Notes 1. select black and white


Image Notes 1. replace '\ with 0 2. replace other ' with nothing 3. replace char with uint8_t

File Downloads

Fntcvtr.exe (91 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'Fntcvtr.exe']

Step 7: Share what you draw I'd love to see what your PosterBot can do. Email photos or video links to: wyattfelt@gmail.com I'll post them here on the Instructable. Thanks and Good luck. Here's a video of PosterBot drawing "School Starts" in 5x Speed. The funny things at the beginning and end are a schoolhouse and bell, respectively.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


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How to enter the Belvedere - A iRobot Create Butler Robot by Challenge by wolffan jeffreyf

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How to Make a Better Bristlebot! by JetGrindMods on April 6, 2011

Intro: How to Make a Better Bristlebot! A bristle bot is a fun little robot that you can make out of a few things around the house. They are really quite easy to make and are a lot of fun! Many Bristlebots are the same, mine is different! I will be teaching you how to make a Bristlebot using a Pulsar Oral B Toothbrush! These new Bristlebots also look really cool!

Image Notes 1. The New BristleBot

Step 1: Supplies & Tools Supplies 1. Pulsar Oral B Toothbrush (the reason we need this brush is because there is a tiny vibrating motor inside which will be powering our little robot!) 2. Double Sided Adhesive Tape 3. 1.5V Button Cell Battery Tools 1. Wire Stripper 2. Scissors 3. Tiny Scissors 4. Pliers/Wire Cutter 5. Heavy Object (book)

Image Notes 1. Pulsar Oral B Toothbrush 2. Double Sided Adhesive Tape 3. 1.5V Button Cell Battery 4. Wire Stripper

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5. Scissors 6. Tiny Scissors 7. Pliers

Step 2: The Toothbrush The first thing you will do it take your toothbrush and remove the battery cover and take out the battery inside it. Hey! Now you have a spare AAA battery! (Figure 1.1 & 1.2) Use your pliers to remove the guts of the toothbrush. This may take some force but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break the motor.

(Figure 1.3 & 1.4)

Once you have removed the guts of the toothbrush take your pliers and use the wire cutting part to cut the head of the toothbrush of off the body. (Figure 1.5) The bristles are facing strait down but we wish for the to have an angle. Place a book on top of the toothbrush head. (Make sure the bristles are facing towards the uncut end.) (Figure 1.6 & 1.7)

Image Notes 1. Figure 1.2 Image Notes 1. Figure 1.1

Image Notes 1. Figure 1.4

Image Notes 1. Figure 1.3

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Image Notes 1. Figure 1.6

Image Notes 1. Figure 1.5

Image Notes 1. Figure 1.7

Step 3: The Guts! Now take the guts of the toothbrush and bend back the plastic encasing the motor, and also pull off the plastic covering the blue wire. (Figure 2.1 & 2.2) Should you cut the blue wire or the red one?... Both! Cut both of the wires with your small scissors and remove the motor from the plastic. (Figure 2.3) Now that you have the motor you will need to strip the plastic off the wires. Do this using a wire stripper. (Figure 2.4)

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


Image Notes 1. Figure 2.2

Image Notes 1. Figure 2.1

Image Notes 1. Figure 2.3

Image Notes 1. Figure 2.4

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Step 4: Putting It All Together! You can now take the brush head out from under the book and see if the bristles are staying angled. (Figure 3.1) Take your double sided adhesive tape and cut it so it fits on the brush head. (Figure 3.2) Stick one side to the brush head and then place your motor on the tape. Place the blue wire on the tape and then place the negative side of the battery on top of it so that the wire and battery connect. (Figure 3.3) Your Done! When you want to turn on the little critter just bend the red wire over so it is touching the side or top of the battery! (Figure 3.4)

Image Notes 1. Figure 3.1

Image Notes 1. Figure 3.3

Image Notes 1. Figure 3.2

Image Notes 1. Figure 3.4

Step 5: Tips After playing with the Bristle Bot for a little bit you may start to notice how it likes to fall over quickly. An easy way to fix this problem is to take the toothbrush head and make it wider by pulling it apart slowly. It is quite easy because the toothbrush head is already cut. This fixes the problem with falling down. Another fun thing I started doing was dipping the bristles in paint and creating art work! :) (Figure 4.1 & 4.2) I hope you enjoyed my Instructable on creating a fun little Bristle Bot!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/


Image Notes 1. Figure 4.1

Image Notes 1. Figure 4.2

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Cool Bristlebot by porkisgreat Bristle bot by Dounia

Big $3 Solderless Giant BristleBot Bristle bot by JoshuaZimmerman by frenzy

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Artist bristlebot (Photos) by masynmachien

Vibrobot Paintings by hay_jumper

How to make a easy bristle bot by jason the redneck guy

Bristle Bot 2.0 by Schooniedude


The High Writer by resistor on July 25, 2006

Intro: The High Writer NYC writer KATSU demonstrates the functionality of the latest tool from the Graffiti Research Lab: The High Writer . Drawing on previous paint-pole designs from innovators like Barry McGee and the Citizens Against Ugly Street Spam , the High Writer is a tool that amplifies the scale and height of marks rendered with a spray can. The high writer is easily constructed from materials available at Home Depot and your local bike shop. All praise be to the Eyebeam R&D OpenLab . To view high writer photos on flickr Click here . Benefit Art Show and Auction for Daniel McGowan The prototype High Writer will be auctioned off at the "If They Come for You in the Morning" Benefit Gallery Show for Daniel McGowan hosted by Visual Resistance . All proceeds from the show will benefit the legal fund of environmental and social justice activist Daniel McGowan. Thursday, July 27 & Friday, July 28, 2006, 5-10pm ABC No Rio , 156 Rivington St, Lower East Side, NYC Art Auction on Ebay The AMERIKA1 mural by KATSU pictured in the video is currently up for bid on ebay. Click here to place your bid . Now lets learn how to write naturally high.

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Image Notes 1. KATSU Graffiti Analysis

Step 1: Parts, Materials and Tools Parts: All of these parts can all be purchased at the local Home Depot or art supply store. Look for the bike parts at used cycle shops. Hardware store 12-15 foot painter's pole 3 pole extension set Paint edger attachment Handyboard sheet Balsa wood blocks 2-inch #8-32 bolts, nuts and washers 2.5-inch #8-32 bolts, nuts and washers 3/4-inch #8-32 bolts, nuts and washers 1-inch #8-32 bolts, nuts and washers 3-inch 360 swivel coaster 3-inch C-clamps Transparent tape JB Weld 5-minute epoxy Bike shop Bike V-Brake system: hand lever, bike cable and one brake arm/pad bike water bottle holder Art store Spay-paint can NY fat caps Tools: MItre box Mitre box saw screwdriver set pliers box cutter hex key set measuring tape cordless drill and 13/64th drill bits

Image Notes

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1. Scotch transparent tape 2. Handyboard 3. Bike brake hand lever and brake cable 4. Paint edger attachemtn 5. can 6. NY FAT Caps 7. 360 swivel coaster 8. JB WELD 9. 5-minute epoxy 10. 12-15 foot telescoping painter's pole 11. balso wood riser blocks 12. #8-24 bolts and nuts of varying lengths 13. Threaded six-inch extension pole 14. Schimano brake arm and pad and bike water bottle holder 15. three-inch C-clamps

Image Notes 1. pliers, screwdrivers, box cutter, hex key set 2. Mitre box saw 3. drill and measuring tape

Image Notes 1. And the GZA happens to for the head 2. water bottle holder 3. #8-32 bolts, nuts and washers 4. C-clamps 5. edger attachment 6. 6-inch x 13.5-inch Handiboard, pre-drilled with balsa wood riser blocks 7. 3-inch 360 swivel coaster 8. V-brake arm

Step 2: Make the head If you're going to make the Hight Writer you might as well start with the head. The head consists of the water bottle holder that secures the paint can, the mechanisms that spray the can and counter-weights. Fabricate the Head First you must fabricate the wood risers and support panel. 1. Download this PDF file and print it actual scale. Use it as a template to help you (a) cut a 6-inch by 13.5-inch panel out of the 1/8th-inch handyboard and (b) drill a number of holes using a 3/16th or 13/64th drill bit. 2. Cut two riser blocks from the balsa wood using a mitre box and saw. The wheel riser block will be: 2.35-inches x 2-inches x 1.35-inches The brake arm riser will be: 2-inches x 2-inches 1.2-inches 3. Using the holes in the panel as your template, mark and drill matching sets of holes in the riser blocks.

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Assemble the head Use the #8-32 bolts and nuts, using washers where appropriate, to attach both risers, edger attachment, brake arm and water bottle holder. If your water bottle doesn't line up with the generic holes in the template you will have to experiment with the location of the bottle once you assemble the rest of the head. You can leave the actual brake pad on the arm use it as the contact point with the spray-can cap, or you can make your own contact surface like we did with a 2-inch x 2-inch piece of 1/4-inch Plexiglas. Check the attached images and photo notes for more specific info. Tighten the C-clamps down on the bottom of the support panel as pictured. This help the system stay flush to the wall.

Image Notes 1. head

Image Notes 1. This is the template taped on top of the handyboard. You can use the template to drill the holes and draw out the general shape and size of the support panel

Image Notes 1. wheel risers

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Image Notes 1. add counter-weights so the head will naturally hangs normal to the wall. Thi

Image Notes 1. the paint can is taped so that it can rest securely in the oversized water bottle holder 2. tape on the can allows it to rest securely in the ovesized water bottle holder 3. brake arm riser 4. water bottle holder

Image Notes 1. caster and risers. I used 4 #8-32 to attach the wheel to the riser, the riser to the support panel and the paint edger to the whole system as shown.

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Image Notes 1. paint edger attachmet -- Use two 3/4-inch bolts with washers and four 2 inch botls with washers. The wheel riser must be mounted at the same time as the paint edger.

Image Notes 1. attach brake arm and brake arm riser. use 2 2-inch bolts to attach the riser to the support panel. Use the 2.5-inch bolt to attach the brake arm to the riser and support panel.

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Step 3: Make the tail Fabricate the Tail To build the tail and connect it to the head you will need to fabricate a few parts: the cable, the hand lever and the cable constraints. 1. To make a night writer with a full extension of less than 10-feet you can just go to your local bike shop and ask for a tandem bike brake cable. For lengths greater than 10-feet, I don't know any way other than to make your own cable. (a) Get your local bike repair guy to cut you as much bike cable housing as you got pole to extend. (b) Cut the end connector features at either end of an old bike break cable. (b) Go to the Home Despot and get 1/16th or smaller aircraft cable and JB Weld. (c) Go get a coffee. save the stirrer. (d) Slide your aircraft cable into the cable housing. Experiment with your pole in order to get the right length of housing and cable. (e) Mix the two part JB Weld with the coffee stirrer. Scoop up some of the epoxy into the stirrer. Cut a small section of the epoxy filled stirrer around a 1/4-inch in length. Stick two ends of aircraft cable or bike break cable into the two ends of the stirrer. Let the connection dry for at least 12 hours before use. Assemble the Tail 2. To make the hand lever that controls the spray-can remotely, you simply need to slide the bike lever over the base of the extension pole and connect the bike cable to the hand lever using the round retention feature on the end of the cable. If you are using a smaller diameter pole, less than 1-inch, this will not be a problem. For those using larger diameter poles (1" dia. or larger), you will need to modify the pole. I modified my Mr. Long Arm painters pole, by removing the rubber grip at the end. This reveals a hollow cavity inside the pole. I epoxied a threaded junction inside this inner cavity and screwed-in a cut section of 0.90-inch diameter extension pole. The hand lever slides easily over this small section of extension pole. 3. For the bike cable to work, you will need to secure the cable housing at a minimum of two locations: the top and bottom of the pole. While a number of ways exist to constrain the cable housing, I use transparent tape. Just wrap the housing and pole with tape. Remember to leave a service loop so the telescoping pole can extend to its full length. Check out the attached images to get more details. 4. Once you have welded the cable to its intended length, attached the hand lever, inserted the cable retention feature into the lever and constrained the cable housing, you can insert the other cable retention feature into the brake arm. You should initially leave a good deal of slack in the cable so you don't inadvertently trigger the paint can during assembly.

Image Notes 1. tape cable housing constraint 2. cable housing constraint 3. Hand lever 4. cable housing constraint

Image Notes 1. Threaded extension pole 2. Tapped extension pole junction. I epoxied one of these inside the cavity in the tube and screwed in the adjacent section of pole, on which the hand lever can be attached.

Image Notes

Image Notes

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1. Tighten hex nut to allow you to adjust the tension on the cable 2. Cable retention feature inserted into the hand lever 3. Hand lever on extension pole

1. low tech cable constraint

Image Notes 1. You must constrain the cable housing at the top of the high writer on the Cclamp to allow the system to work

Step 4: How to write high Before you use the High Writer to communicate your message on a large scale, you will need to: practice writing with the high writer, prepare and load a spray-paint can and fine tune the bike cable and hand lever to make sure you can spray the can by squeezing the lever. If the cable is too tight it will trigger the can to spray inadvertently. If it is too slack, it won't trigger at all when you squeeze. Preparing and Loading a Spray-Paint Can To prepare a spray-paint can, you need to make a ball of transparent tape. You can then tape the small crumpled ball of tape to the front of the paint can. Then continue to wrap the paint can with transparent tape until it looks like the paint can is pregnant on one side. This tape is needed to thicken the can and thus secure it in the water bottle holder that is slightly over-sized relative to the can. The paint can should go into the water bottle holder with the tape lump pointing toward the front. High Writer Calibration The High Writer can be fine tuned by loosening the hand lever hex bolt and sliding the lever along the length of the pole. The opposite end of the cable should be secured by the retention feature on the brake arm. This should increase and decrease tension on the cables Experiment with the right amount of tension necessary to trigger the can to spray when you pull the handle. Using the High Writer In order to use the high writer you should treat it like a giant paint brush. The swivel wheel allows you to rest the majority of the weight of the High Writer against the wall. You don't need to lift the wheel off the wall to most efficiently operate it. You just release the hand lever when you want the writer to stop spraying. Good Luck.

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Image Notes 1. spray-paint can wrapped in tape

Image Notes 1. Tighten hex nut to allow you to adjust the tension on the cable 2. Cable retention feature inserted into the hand lever 3. Hand lever on extension pole

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Image Notes 1. retention feature on cable inserted into the brake arm at the top of the high writer


Image Notes 1. the swivel wheel is placed on the wall, lightening the load and allowing the high writer to roll around.

Image Notes 1. wheel risers

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Image Notes

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1. fat caps

Related Instructables How To Start Your Own Graffiti Research Lab by fi5e

PROJECTION BOMBING by fi5e

Electro-Graf by Q-Branch

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LED Throwies by Q-Branch

All Surface LED Throwies by SniperNinja

How to Go Postal by QBranch

How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) by fi5e

My LED Throwies by zildjian


Write or Draw with Light! by T3h_Muffinator on April 9, 2007

Author:T3h_Muffinator

olopede I'm a just a not-so-average human with a passion for making. I see a world of hackers, makers, and producers as the sun rises in the near future. I'm starting olopede, an educational electronics kits company, with Zachninme.

Intro: Write or Draw with Light! Ever wonder how I made my avatar? or even how these guys (pikapika) make their movies? Here's how! (If you've got lightsticks, check out askacollegekid's light instructable!) Materials: Camera with long exposure capabilities (the longer the better) Source of light (flashlights work the best) Pitch black room (if you want a nice black background) Note: Please excuse my room's messiness! Subnote: I'd like to thank StepsoftheSun for inspiring me to make this Instructable =) UPDATE!: Yesterday was the "annual" Science Olympiad paratay! I brought a camera and some lights and we made some pretty nice pictures (added pics to the intro page)!

Image Notes 1. Needs to have long exposure!

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Image Notes 1. One of the devices

Image Notes 1. Shen's first attempt at a Smiley. Close, but only one eye.

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Image Notes 1. Nancy's second attempt! Two eyes, not much of a mouth.


Image Notes 1. Third time's the charm!! Yay Nancy!! 2. My muffins I baked the previous night. (I'll post an instructable on these shortly)

Image Notes 1. These next ones are group shots, Taken of Me, Sobia, Diana and Shirley!

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Step 1: Set Up Get your camera a nice place to sit and aim it at a spot about 10-15 ft away where you will easily be able to draw your picture. Take a regular shutter speed shot in the light to make sure that your spot is in focus (see picture) Set your camera's shutter speed (you'll have to set your camera for manual mode) - I use 30 seconds most of the time Either turn on a time delay or set the shutter speed to compensate for the time it takes to walk 10-15 feet away. Grab your flashlight and shut the lights out.

Image Notes 1. I'll be about here 2. Hey! The back of my Beating Heart T-shirt made a guest appearance!

Image Notes 1. Manual Mode!

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Image Notes 1. 25 seconds now, but I usually use 30

Step 2: Take the picture! Press the capture button, run to wherever your camera is focused on, and turn on your light source. Draw the picture you want, trying not to shine the light source directly at the camera. This will produce a "twinkle" where you shined it from (see picture). If you want to stop a line segment and start a new one, you can cover the light source with your hand and move it over to where the new line segment will start. If you have a flashlight, just turn it off, move it over, and turn it back on! <-- Much easier! When you're done drawing: If it's a simple picture (a square, circle etc) you can go over it again If not, don't bother trying to go over it. It will probably get messed up. DO NOT TURN THE LIGHTS BACK ON UNTIL YOU ARE SURE THE CAMERA HAS FINISHED TAKING THE PICTURE!

Image Notes 1. Commander, I am in position!

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Image Notes 1. Cover it up!


Image Notes 1. This 4 second exposure was taken in a pretty dark room. Apparently, it wasn't dark enough!

Step 3: Admire! Admire your one of a kind picture! Feel free to experiment with different techniques etc! Check out my works! (so far)

Image Notes 1. Valentine's day card I made... I actually got a whole lot of "wows" from this!

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Image Notes 1. Twinkle Twinkle little star!


Image Notes 1. Unintentional "wink". Sometimes mistakes can make your art even better!

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Image Notes 1. 42 LEDs from my Beating Heart T-shirt

Image Notes 1. Moving the camera around for a change! (That's my LED Christmas Tree, by the way)

Image Notes 1. M.C. Escher: My favorite artist!

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Image Notes 1. New Style: Long exposures of stuff that's not moving

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Related Instructables

Long Exposure Photography by enero1170

LED Light Writting by h2oboy

Photography Light Box by tekjock

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Photography for Dummies! by ledzeppie

How to make an istructable Photography by MysteryPills

Cyborg Light Painting Gloves! (an easy LED switch) by partsandcrafts

Laser Photography / Drawing by Revva

Arduino Christmas Light Controller by dany32412


Laser Photography / Drawing by Revva on July 9, 2008

Intro: Laser Photography / Drawing Ever written your name by waving sparkler around? This instructable will teach you how to make pictures consisting of words or objects, drawn in laser. It's pretty damn simple and can produce some awesome photos. (Note awesome laser guitar) I first thought of doing this when I noticed that when I flung rubber bands into the trail of a laser, they lit up and made a red line in the air. I played around with the camera, took photos of this and then thought of using the laser directly to draw. Not sure if this is up anywhere, didn't see it. If it is, I hope this will add some more information or help anyone with anything. It's a very simple process I thought I'd tell anyone who didn't know.

Image Notes 1. Note awesomeness.

Step 1: Materials You won't need much. First of all, you will need a laser. Whatever colour you want, as long as you can draw with it. Mine's red. Next you'll need a decent camera, one of those big fat ones. It must have adjustable shutter settings and maybe ISO settings if you want. You will need a tripod, or something to stabilize the camera, as any shaking will blur the image. Oh, and a dark room is desirable.

Image Notes 1. My laser. Shown here being used as an aiming sight for a toy gun.

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Step 2: Preparation & method Setup First of all, get into a dark room, attach the camera to the tripod and then set it so it's facing whatever you want. Make sure it's not going to move, even on the tripod. Camera settings I find that an ISO of 100 - 200 works well, as to keep the backdrop dark and the laser still bright for the best contrasting photos. I set the shutter speed to 4 seconds, partly because it's good for most drawings, and it's the maximum on my camera. To those unfamiliar with camera stuff, a 4 second shutter speed will leave the shutter open for 4 seconds and everything the camera sees in that time enters the photo, so you have 4 seconds to make a good drawing. Method Try and position the laser so when you're drawing, you're pretty much parallel and on the same axis as the camera to reduce the laser making shadows from being shone on an angle, if you know what I mean. Make sure you know what area will be in the photo, as it sucks when you draw it all perfect and half of it is left out. Finally, click the button, write or draw what you want on whatever you want and then marvel at the awesomeness you have created. This process is great for tagging stuff and the pictures make great desktop wallpapers.

Step 3: Product Here are some good ones I've done, and a picture of that rubber band laser trail thing I mentioned earlier. The quality dies a bit when I upload the photos though, please excuse. Enjoy.

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Related Instructables

Laser Wall Art by Solaryellow

LED Light Writting by h2oboy

Long Exposure Photography by enero1170

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How to Create a Light Stop Motion Video by thomp5km

How to write with a blue or green laser pointer and take photos by grannybasher

Alternative laser writing by jovolomo

Creating a simple moving light. by mailkd7

Write or Draw with Light! by T3h_Muffinator


miniSADbot - outdoor edition by dustynrobots on July 20, 2010

Author:dustynrobots

dustynrobots I'm an enginerd, author, and teacher.

Intro: MiniSADbot - outdoor edition This miniSADbot was created for the Kickstarter backers who supported the original SADbot exhibit that Ben Leduc-Mills and I created. Thank you! Here you will learn what to do with the kit of parts we sent you. If you didn't back the project but still want to make one, a full parts list is included. There's not much to it so it's an easy first solar project.

Image Notes 1. DC motor 2. solar cell

Step 1: Gather materials Shopping List: small DC toy motor like the CAT# DCM-368 from AllElectronics.com shown here small solar cell like the CAT# SPL-61 from AllElectronics.com shown here some wire - ideally red and black a 4.5" x 4.5" piece of cardboard 2 markers or pens You'll also need a soldering iron and some solder.

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Step 2: Solder wires to solar cell Use tape, glue, or putty to hold the two longer lengths of wire (red and black) onto the thin metal strips on the back of the solar cells. CAREFULLY solder each side - the strips are very fragile! The black wire goes on the side marked - in black permanent marker, and red on the other.* *It doesn't actually matter what wire color goes where in this case. However, it's standard to use black for negative/ground/- and red for positive/power/+ and will matter in other solar projects. So, it's good to get in the habit.

Step 3: Solder wires to motor Take two short lengths of wire and solder them onto the metal tabs on the motors. Use the holes in the tabs to first stick the wires through and bend them so they stay put while you solder.

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Step 4: Create the base If you're building this from the kit, you already have the base done. If not, use the template here (made in Inkscape) or just cut a 4.5" x 4.5" piece of cardboard with X marks for the pens/markers and a cut out for the motor.

File Downloads

miniSADbot base.svg ((540x540) 3 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'miniSADbot base.svg']

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Step 5: Final assembly and soldering Stick two pens or markers into the X marks so about a 1/2 inch sticks out the bottom. Then stick the motor in, shaft down, until it sticks out the same amount. The markers and motor should fit snugly, but feel free to reinforce with duct tape or glue. Now place the solar cell on the cardboard base. Twist the end of each wire coming from the solar cell together with the matching color wire coming off the motor. Then solder this twisted connection. Now take it outside! This setup will only work in direct sunlight - hence the name miniSADbot: short for Seasonally Affected Drawing robot (named after a mood disorder of the same name). Experiment with different marker colors, putting something on the motor shaft to create different swooping patterns, etc. Watch a video of one in action here.

Related Instructables

SADbot: The Seasonally Affected Drawing robot (Photos) by dustynrobots

SADbot: the Seasonally Affected Drawing robot by dustynrobots

Making a Solar Battery Panel without Soldering (video) by dkdls09

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drawbots/

Solar tracker using an old hard drive (video) by scraptopower

Build an ALL SOLAR Remote Controlled Boat RC Boat Using Solar Attic Fan Parts -Rescue Boat- by prabbit22m

Solar powered nocturnal using Solar personal fan by Cells, To make Glass frame DIY Wonko the sane Solar Panel by EARTHFORSOLAR

Building a Solar Powered R/C car by brightwhite


Take Awesome Open Shutter Photography With Sparklers by MonkeyBoy3217 on September 15, 2009

Author:MonkeyBoy3217 I love to blow up things! Im a big computer geek

Intro: Take Awesome Open Shutter Photography With Sparklers Using open shutter photography plus sparklers makes for some awesome pictures. I'll show you how to make these awesome pictures with almost any camera.

Image Notes 1. to infinity and beyond!!!!!

Image Notes 1. its a person :)

Step 1: Taking The Picture First you need to get some sparklers, all kinds will work well. The best time to take the picture is at night so you can see the sparkle. You might need experiment with the shutter speed. To get the best picture if you finish "drawing" you picture keep going over it so you don't have this long trail. Also if your doing your name you need to do it backwards. Also don't turn if you need to take a step, or it wont show up.

Image Notes 1. pretty star

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Step 2: Mistakes There will always be mistakes with open shutter photography. Check them out. The first one was supposed to be Lisa but it got jumbled so it looks like Lois or Love. The second one was supposed to be a horse but it got a little messed up. The third one was supposed to be a flower but the pettles shifted a little. And the last one is just kinda cool.

Image Notes 1. this can be a multitude of things: Love, Lois, Lisa

Image Notes 1. It was supposed to be a horse, it looks cool though

Image Notes 1. flower- kind of...

Image Notes 1. expiramenting with circles

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Step 3: All the Pictures Doing sparkler pictures is fun! So check out all of the pictures! Enjoy! Please Vote!

Image Notes 1. this can be a multitude of things: Love, Lois, Lisa

Image Notes 1. pretty star

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Image Notes 1. It was supposed to be a horse, it looks cool though


Image Notes 1. I dont even know what this is

Image Notes 1. flower- kind of...

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Image Notes 1. expiramenting with circles


Image Notes 1. hmm...try and guess what this one is

Image Notes 1. its a person :)

Related Instructables

Easy home made flexible fuse by goeon

householde volcano sparklers by caco caco

make quick use flare for self defense by GZNG

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SparklaretteThe cigarette that's also a sparkler by pandaweb

Creating a Flaming Arrow That Works by poofrabbit

Cool sparkler explosion by elisawesome

Laser Photography / Drawing by Revva

Sparkler Shower by stncilr


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3 drawbots