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Introduction "Easy DIY Animatronics" gives you the complete step-by-step instructions for 11 different animatronic projects. Make your own Wall-E robot, learn how to make a talking robot and much more. All projects come from Instructables.com, are written by our creative community, and contain pictures for each step so you can easily make these yourself. Instructables is the most popular project-sharing community on the Internet. We provide easy publishing tools to enable passionate, creative people like you to share their most innovative projects, recipes, skills, and ideas. Instructables has over 40,000 projects covering all subjects: crafts, art, electronics, kids, home improvement, pets, outdoors, reuse, bikes, cars, robotics, food, decorating, woodworking, costuming, games, and more. Check it out today! Laura Khalil Editor, Instructables.com

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Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Author and Copyright Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

Disclaimer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Animatronic Penguin Torso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Intro: Animatronic Penguin Torso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Step 1: Parts and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Step 2: Design Torso Pivot Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Step 3: Base Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Step 4: Servo Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Step 5: Riser Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Step 6: Linkage Mounting Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Step 7: Basic Plate Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Step 8: Mount Servos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Step 9: Assemble Linkage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Step 10: Route Servo Control Wires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Step 11: Connect to Servo Controller and Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Simple Animatronics (robotic hand) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Intro: Simple Animatronics (robotic hand) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Step 1: Parts and tools you need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Step 2: Making the template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Step 3: Creating some fingers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Step 4: Mounting the fingers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Step 5: Mounting the fingers -continued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Step 6: Thumbs up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Step 7: Wrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Step 8: Controlling the beast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Step 9: Bringing it to life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Animatronic Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Intro: Animatronic Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Step 1:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Step 2: Make base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Step 3: Make eyelids pivot point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Step 4: Make eyelids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Step 5: Make eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Step 6: Mount eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Step 7: Mount eyelids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Step 8: Test the servos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

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Step 9: Animatronic in Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Wall-E Robot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Intro: Wall-E Robot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Step 1: Gear motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Step 2:

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Step 3:

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Step 4:

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Step 5:

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Step 6:

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Step 7:

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Step 8:

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Step 9:

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Step 10:

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Step 11:

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Step 12:

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Step 13:

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Step 14:

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Step 15:

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Step 16:

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Step 17:

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Step 18:

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Step 19:

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Step 20:

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Step 21:

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Step 22:

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Step 23:

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Step 24:

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Step 25:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Step 26:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Step 27:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Step 28:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Step 29:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Step 30:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Step 31:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Step 32:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Step 33:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Step 34:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Step 35:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Step 36:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Step 37:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

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Step 38:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Step 39:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

Step 40:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

Step 41:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Step 42:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Step 43:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Step 44:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Step 45:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Step 46:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Step 47:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Step 48:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Step 49:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

Step 50:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Talking Animatronic Robot Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Intro: Talking Animatronic Robot Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Step 1: The Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Step 2: Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Step 3: The Spotlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Step 4: Setting up the Robot Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Step 5: Making the trunk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Step 6: Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Step 7: Having fun.....! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Simple Animatronics with Servos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Intro: Simple Animatronics with Servos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Step 1: Dismemberment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Step 2: Turning Heads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Step 3: Rotator Cuffs and Hip Flexors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Step 4: The Illusion of Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Step 5: Analog Puppet Strings in a Digital World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Halloween Animatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Intro: Halloween Animatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Step 1: Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Step 2: Modifing the Skull Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 Step 3: Making the Talking Pumpkin Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Step 4: Creating the audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Step 5: Starting to tie it all together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Step 6: The Controller Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Step 7: Setting the Stage & the Final Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Step 8: What's Next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Animatronic Rat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Intro: Animatronic Rat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Step 1: The Rat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Step 2: The Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Step 3: The internal Skeleton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Step 4: Servos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Step 5: Water Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Step 6: Putting the skin on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 Step 7: Set him up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Arduino Wireless Animatronic Hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Intro: Arduino Wireless Animatronic Hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Step 1: Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Step 2: Control Glove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Step 3: Custom PCB (Glove) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 Step 4: The Hand! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 Step 5: Hand PCB Shield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Step 6: CODE!!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Step 7: How I Tested This . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Step 8: Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 Step 9: Awards!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128 Humanoid robot arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 Intro: Humanoid robot arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 Step 1: Motors and Encoders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 Step 2: Sizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 Step 3: Get your motors, encoders, misc parts and print out STLs on a 3D printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 Step 4: Assembly step 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133 Step 5: Assembly step 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133 Step 6: Assembly step 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133 Step 7: Assembly step 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134 Step 8: Assembly step 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134 Step 9: Assembly step 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135 Step 10: Assembly step 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135 Step 11: Assembly step 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Step 12: Assembly step 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Step 13: Assembly step 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 Step 14: Assembly step 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 Step 15: Wrapping up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137

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File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138 Animated 'Haunted' Ouija Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Intro: Animated 'Haunted' Ouija Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Step 1: Stuff you will need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Step 2: Building the box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 Step 3: Build the magnet bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 Step 4: Mount the motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142 Step 5: Pulley shafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142 Step 6: Set up a tension pulley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143 Step 7: Guide rails and home switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143 Step 8: The Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144 Step 9: Making the board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145 Step 10: Make the planchette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145 Step 11: Finishing Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146 Step 12: Serial Communications Project Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146 Step 13: The Updated PCB and Code... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148 Step 14: More Details for building - including some ideas for simpler projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149

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Author and Copyright Notices Instructable: Animatronic Penguin Torso Author: djsfantasi License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Simple Animatronics (robotic hand) Author: tanntraad License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Animatronic Eyes Author: djsfantasi License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Wall-E Robot Author: 4mem8 License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Talking Animatronic Robot Head Author: knife141 License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Simple Animatronics with Servos Author: gzip License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Halloween Animatronics Author: mik3 License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Animatronic Rat Author: Falcon_3dee License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Arduino Wireless Animatronic Hand Author: njkl44 License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Humanoid robot arm Author: powderly License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Animated 'Haunted' Ouija Board Author: askjacob License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa)

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Disclaimer All do-it-yourself activities involve risk, and your safety is your own responsibility, including proper use of equipment and safety gear, and determining whether you have adequate skill and experience. Some of the resources used for these projects are dangerous unless used properly and with adequate precautions, including safety gear. Some illustrative photos do not depict safety precautions or equipment, in order to show the project steps more clearly. The projects are not intended for use by children. Many projects on Instructables are user-submitted, and appearance of a project in this format does not indicate it has been checked for safety or functionality. Use of the instructions and suggestions is at your own risk. Instructables, Inc. disclaims all responsibility for any resulting damage, injury, or expense. It is your responsibility to make sure that your activities comply with all applicable laws.

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Animatronic Penguin Torso by djsfantasi on February 21, 2011

Author:djsfantasi dj's YouTube Channel I am an IT Manager in an Internet company. When I am not working, I love to putter around - whether it be a household project or animatonics. The interest in animatronics came from a combination of my involvement with theater and running a Haunted House for my children's school as a fund raiser. I designed many scenes that were animated, either mechanically and electrically or with puppets (small and large). I read extensively, anything from novels to technical manuals. All this "stuff" stuffed in my head becomes synthesized into my projects. I hope you enjoy them.

Intro: Animatronic Penguin Torso I had a dream of developing an animated Christmas Holiday Season display, potentially as a fund raiser for the arts. My original idea was to use puppets as characters, but reading and investigating made me curious as to whether I could build an animatronic penguin. This instructable concentrates on the torso, which has four degrees of freedom, allowing the figure to move about in many directions. As a goal, I wanted a penguin that could "dance". 18+

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Step 1: Parts and Tools The body skeleton was made of model aircraft plywood, with homemade servo brackets of 1/2" square strip wood. I used the following items in the construction of the torso 4 sheets of 12x24 3mm plywood ? 24" lengths of 1/2" square poplar stripwood (I bought out the craft store's supply!) 4 HITEC HS422 servos 1 6" Servo extension cable 2 10" Servo extension cables 6" Ball 2/56 threaded rod 4 pair Ball Link sets 4 Aluminum servo horns 8 3/4" RC aircraft Hinges Scrap aluminum angle Miscellaneous small screws, nuts and bolts. The tools I used were: Saber Saw Flat head and Phillips screwdrivers Cutoff Saw Drill press Portable drill Gorilla glue ACC glue (super glue) small Spray bottle of water Clothes pins

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Step 2: Design Torso Pivot Points I wanted the body to move left and right, front and back and to both lean as well as "shimmy". A shimmy motion would be a move to one side or the other, where the head remains up straight; a lean would be where the head would follow the direction of the torso. I decided to divide the body into four sections. two sections would pivot front and back, while the remaining two would pivot left and right.

Image Notes 1. Hinge. Note that each level's pivoting axis is at a right angle to it's neighbors. 2. Servo locations. They are placed a short distance away from the riser to leverage mechanical advantage.

Step 3: Base Plate There were five plates required to divide the torso into four sections. After some experimenting, measuring plastic penguin toys waist sizes (Rico is pretty broad) and some estimating/resizing/projecting in Excel, I came up with the following diameters for the plates (from the bottom up) 10", 12", 11", 10", 6". The plates have a 1" outer diameter circle, joined by a cross of 1" wide radial arms. All of the cutout material have rounded corners, to make it easier and neater to cut.The picture shows this rounded corner in the center, but it was used at the outside corners as well. This allowed the corners to be drilled on a press with a 1" Forstner bit and the cutouts were made from these access holes with a saber saw. Centered along one cross arm, a piece of 10" long stripwood was cut. I originally had a shorter piece specified for this support, but practical experience proved it did not provide enough support for the servo linkages added later. This is called the riser mount. I use a cut off saw for square edges; this is critical in some steps, so be accurate. This piece is glued with Gorilla Glue so that one edge is just on the center line, centered on the cross braces. I like to apply the glue to one part and spray the other part with a fine water mist. I then align the parts and clamp. Clothespins make great inexpensive clamps for this purpose. On the second sketch, I add a 5" piece of stripwood for strength. This was glued to the cross arm at right angles to the side of the riser mount strip closest to the centerline.Do not butt this piece against the riser mount, but space it with a scrap of plywood so that there is a 3mm space. This space will be needed to insert the Riser Plate in Step 5.

Image Notes 1. These corners are rounded like the inner corner as described in the text.

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Step 4: Servo Mount One of the cross arms will be at a right angle from the side of the riser mount wood strip that is not on the center line. (The sketches show the plate at each point in this step). On this arm we will glue another piece of stripwood at right angles. Use one of your servos to determine the length of this piece. Make a mark on the center line at the 3-1/2" mark. With a round servo horn in place, slide the servo mounting tabs along the center line, until the mark is halfway between the edge of the servo horn and its center. Mark both sides of the servo and extend these marks across the cross arm. From the mark furthest from the center of the plate, add another 1/2". From the center to this mark is the length of this strip wood piece. This will be the servo mounting base. Glue it along the center line with Gorilla glue. Cut two pieces of stripwood 1-1/4" long (Actually, you will need 8 of these). Place it upright at the end of the servo mounting base and trace it's outline. Drill a pilot hole in the center of the square that you have just drawn and glue the stripwood piece upright in the square. Use the pilot hole you drilled to screw in a small screw into the wood, to clamp it to the plate while the glue cures. Once it has cured, this screw can be removed. For the second piece, place the servo on the mounting base so that its mounting tabs overlap the upright stripwood. Then slide a second upright piece up snug on the other side of the servo and trace the 1/2" square outline of its base on the cross arm. Mount with glue as you did the other piece, Note these steps can be done together on each of the four large plates, to minimize construction time delays to to glue curing times.

Image Notes 1. Front view of servo mount with servo installed 2. Rear view

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Step 5: Riser Plate The riser is a 4" wide by 3" high rectangle of plywood. It has two holes for small screws drilled along one long edge, At the other long edge, two RC aircraft hinges will be mounted. I drilled a larger hole in the center of each hinge (on both sides/leaf of the hinges), for mounting with a nut and bolt on the riser plate. If you do this, may I suggest adding a flat washer as well to distribute the holding power and to use Loc-Tite on the nut and bolt (#6, 3/8"). Once the hinges have been attached, place the riser plate on the base plate, centering it on the cross arms and 8" riser mount on the cross arms, in the slot left during the construction of the base place in Step 3. Screw the riser plate to the riser mount with small screws (#6 pan head, 3/8") I have attached the Google SketchUp file of the base plate. Viewing it from all sides is instructional.

Image Notes 1. The riser mount extends along this side as well in the final design

Image Notes 1. RC airplane hinges mount here 2. Screw into riser mount here.

File Downloads

Plate-v4.skp (121 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'Plate-v4.skp']

Step 6: Linkage Mounting Tab In the sketch, this is shown as having been built up with two pieces of wood (so far my favorite material). This proved to not have sufficient strength, so these aluminum mounting tabs were built to replace them in a couple of critical locations. Drill two holes approximately 1/4" from the end and 1/4" apart, on the aluminum angle, to accept a #6, 1/2" bolt. On the other face, drill a 1/16" hole to accept the ball joint of the ball link set. Insert, tighten and use Loc-Tite, the ball joint. Cut off this short section of the angle on the cut off saw. Drill a hole, to accept a #6 bolt, in the cross arm with the riser plate that is counter-clockwise one position from the servo mount. You can do one position clockwise or three positions counter clockwise (never two positions), but all plates must be made the same. To keep it simple - follow the directions; one position counter clockwise. The holes should be positioned so that the following three criteria are met. 1) The angle corner is at the edge of the cross arm, 2) the holes are clear of the riser mount plate and 3) the ball link is 3-1/2" from the center of the plate. Bolt the Linkage mounting tab to the plate's cross arm through the holes just drilled.

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Image Notes 1. This assembly had to be replaced with a section of aluminum angle in the actual penguin.

Step 7: Basic Plate Assembly You should now have four assemblies that resemble (closely!) the picture. The next step is to attach them together. This will require some agility, as the larger assembly is quite floppy without its "muscles" (servos and linkages) Two holes in the plate above must be drilled to match the holes in the RC airplane hinges. If you have been careful with your measurements, you might be able to drill all the holes together. If you are like me, trace the holes from the hinges on the riser to the plate above. Note the orientation of plates above each other. The risers of each subsequent plate should be at right angles. The servo mounting posts should be directly below a linkage mounting tab above. Note that this assembly requires five plates; we have been working with four. The top plate is the 6" diameter one. It will require that a linkage mounting tab be mounted. Also note: The second from the bottom plate should tilt to the left and right. (The bottom plate is static). This should result in the top plate tilting back and forth. The full assembly will look like the second picture. A Google SketchUp file has been attached to show how all of the sections would look assembled; view it from all angles and you may find it informative.

Image Notes 1. Riser mount extends along this side as well in the final design.

File Downloads

PlateAssbly-v2.skp (277 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'PlateAssbly-v2.skp']

Step 8: Mount Servos Place a servo on a plate so that the axle is to the outside edge of the plate. Secure it to the posts with two screws on each end of the servo motor. Attach the circular servo horn to an aluminum bracket. I used a Lynxmotion ASB-19B, with the last hole on its narrow end trimmed off for clearance. I originally used the plastic arm servo horns (seen in the picture on the top servo; the aluminum horn is seen on the bottom servo), but these were not strong enough under use for the lower two plates, which bear the highest load. While the horn is detached, tightly attach one of the ball joints to the end of the bracket, with Loc-Tite, so that the ball is on the opposite side of the bracket from the circular servo horn. The ball joint must be attached solidly, as it bears the brunt of the torso movement's load. Temporarily snap this sub-assembly onto the servo axle. Hold the servo vertical, the axle facing you and on the top of the servo. Then, manually twist the horn as far right as it can go. At this point, take the horn off and replace it so the arm is facing right. Then, if you twist the servo as far right and left as it can, halfway should be pointing straight up. Attach the servo horn in this position with the supplied screw. Be careful; these screws are s-m-a-l-l. Place a servo on a plate' servo mount so that the axle is to the outside edge of the plate. Secure it to the posts with two screws on each end of the servo motor.

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Image Notes 1. View from the rear...

Step 9: Assemble Linkage Cut a piece of the threaded rod approximately 2" in length. Screw on one of ball sockets to one end of the rod. Snap this onto the ball joint attached to the servo. Snap another ball sockets onto the ball joint attached to the linkage mounting tab above. Align the ball socket and rod while holding the two plates parallel to each other. This is where you need good fingernails or a third hand. Carefully mark the point on the rod that corresponds to the end of the ball sockets threads for the threaded rod. The fingernail can be used to mark the thread where the cut should be made. The third hand can hold a Sharpie for the same purpose. Cut the threaded rod at this point. Remove the ball socket from the linkage mounting tab and screw it onto the end of the linkage rod that was just cut. Snap it back onto the ball joint above. Note that the servo motors will just (barely) hold the plates parallel, if they are not disturbed by a sneeze, careless brush of fingers or a nearby open window. This is to be expected with standard analog hobby servos. Higher quality servos may not display this behavior. You have to do this four times.

Image Notes 1. Threaded rod 2. Servo ball joint. The aluminum brackets should be used for strength (Lynxmotion ASB_19B)

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Step 10: Route Servo Control Wires Connect servo extension wires to each of the servos. The bottom servo will not have an extension. The second servo will have a 6" extension and the top two servos will have a 10" extension. For the quite obsessed, custom servo cables can be made. Important! Label all ends of the cables, at the servo and both ends of the extension. If you remember to do this, you will thank me later. Dress the cables down the center of the torso with spiral cable wrap or split cable tubing. Both are available at Radio Shack and the split cable tubing can be found in automotive supply stores. At the base, I attached the servo controller to the riser with some stand-offs. The servo cables are plugged here into the servo controller. Write down which channel to which each cable is attached. I had tested the torso and controller with the controller separate from the body and mounted it to the riser later. When the cables were plugged in, nothing worked! I had plugged the cables in upside down on the controller. Document all connections!

Image Notes 1. SSC-32 servo controller 2. Audio envelope follower circuit to provide input to control mouth servo (more on this later!)

Step 11: Connect to Servo Controller and Test I use an SSC-32 (serial servo controller - 32 channel) from Lynxmotion (http://www.lynxmotion.com ) to control my servos. Lynxmotion has a USB to serial converter that works well with their products, if you don't have a serial port on your laptop, desktop or microprocessor. Additionally, they have a downloadable free terminal program (LynxTerm) that you should use while testing the torso's motion. Individually move each of the servos and watch the body motion. I recommend starting with the top servo and working your way down. There should be no interference and the servo should be able to move the entire length of its travel. Once each servo is tested, try moving them in pairs to make the torso move in what I call a shimmy or to have the torso lean forward and back or left and right. Combinations of the forward/back and left right servos will make the torso rotate or dance... I have written software to script the Penguin's actions. This software communicates via the serial cable to make the animatronic perform. A description of the software can be found at http://www.lynxmotion.net/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=6695

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http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

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Simple Animatronics (robotic hand) by tanntraad on May 31, 2007

Intro: Simple Animatronics (robotic hand) I made my first animatronic hand when I was about 10 years old using stuff I found around the house. Now I want to share with you how to easily make your own at home! This hand is made from readily available materials and is perfect for your Halloween haunted house, scary pranks, as a movie prop or just good old fashion fun. It also serves as a good starting point for further work that might include the use of servos, remote controlling and more advanced animatronics. There's a few videos at the end of this instructable that shows the building process and some of the movement of the hand. Here's one;

Step 1: Parts and tools you need Tubing String Tape Sharp knife Hot glue-gun Marker/ pen CD-cover Plastic or wooden clothes hanger The two latter can be replaced by other materials as you will find out later.

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Image Notes 1. I use this routing tube (for electrical wires etc) for this Instructable 2. This is the tubing I used for one of the hands in the video

Step 2: Making the template First off, draw an outline of your hand on a sheet of paper. Mark off the joints of each finger including your knuckles. If you're lazy, just print out the last picture:)

Image Notes 1. Don't forget the knuckles!

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Step 3: Creating some fingers For this hand I used a plastic tubing that electricians use when they route wires trough walls. It is easy to cut and have a nice "spring" to it. Almost any kind of tubing will do so just take whatever you can get. Cut the tube at a length equal to that of the distance from your finger to your wrist. Do this for all fingers. From the template, mark off the joints and then cut a V-shape in the tube at each joint. Make sure the to check the angle of the bend so that it closely matches your fingers.

Step 4: Mounting the fingers Get your string and insert it into the tube. I used nylon string so that it doesn't frizz. Use a few feet for each finger as you can always cut it later. Tie a few knots at the end as depicted and secure it all with some tape to hold it all together. At the other end (wrist-side), pull and tape the string. This makes the next step much easier!

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Step 5: Mounting the fingers -continued Make use of those old CD-covers that clutters your desk and snap off a piece of plastic. Cut it to size and power up the glue gun. Glue the fingers to the plastic strip (just below the knuckle joints). Make sure the right fingers are in the right place!

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Step 6: Thumbs up Depending on the diameter of the tubing, you might want to tape the fingers before gluing the thumb in place. It might seem a bit tricky placing the thumb, but study your hand and you'll work it out. Use a big blob of glue and hold it steady until it cools.

Step 7: Wrist Remove the tape from the wrist-end of the tubes and insert them in a foot or so of tubing. To stiffen things up a bit, attack that old CD-cover again and snip out one or two pieces as per picture. Glue it all together leaving an inch for the wires. Some extra tape might also be in place here.

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Step 8: Controlling the beast To get things in motion we need to make a bracket of some kind. A plastic clothes hanger is about to be hacked. Make a square by taping and gluing the pieces together. Secure it to the end of the tube by using even more glue and tape. Tie loops for all fingers. The thumb is a bit tricky to control at first but with time you'll get the hang of it. That's basically it! The next step is really not necessary but more depending on the usage.

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Step 9: Bringing it to life To add a more human touch, I glued some cell foam to the tips of the fingers and palm. This helps if you plan to use a glove for further realism. On the other hand*, if the aim is a skeleton look, this might be redundant and you'd be better off with some spray paint. This is where your creativity should take over:) Here's a quick video I made of another hand. I used my stiff MC glove so the movement doesn't really show on that one.

This is a low quality video I made during testing. I will replace it with a better one later!

Thanks for viewing my Instructable. Now, go and scare someone:)

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Animatronic Eyes by djsfantasi on February 13, 2011

Author:djsfantasi dj's YouTube Channel I am an IT Manager in an Internet company. When I am not working, I love to putter around - whether it be a household project or animatonics. The interest in animatronics came from a combination of my involvement with theater and running a Haunted House for my children's school as a fund raiser. I designed many scenes that were animated, either mechanically and electrically or with puppets (small and large). I read extensively, anything from novels to technical manuals. All this "stuff" stuffed in my head becomes synthesized into my projects. I hope you enjoy them.

Intro: Animatronic Eyes This instructable shows how I made a set of eyes for an animatronic robot character. They only move from side to side, but have working eyelids. (18+) I actually modified a manually controlled set of DIY puppet eyes, to use servos. Hence, I originally performed the steps in a drastically different order. In this instructable, I try to present the steps more logically. The eyes were made with the following: model plane plywood (3mm) 2 mini RC servos, 1 standard RC servo (another mini would work) scrap styrene, epoxy, glue, paper clip, small screws

Step 1: Here is an example of how they work. I control them from my laptop with an SSC-32 controller from Lynxmotion, seen to the right of the eyes.

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Step 2: Make base I used a piece of 3mm plywood, approximately 3 inches square to make the base for the eyes (the sketch is not necessarily to scale). There are two pieces of stripwood glued to the bottom (which can be seen as "bumps" on the bottom edge and in the picture in step 6) that are 1/4" square by the length of the base. They are separated by the width of the mini RC servo cases and are used to screw the servos to the base. Note the two 1/2" square posts mounted to one side. They will be used to mount the servo that controls the eyelids. They are separated by the width of the RC servo case, are the height of the case and are installed so that the servo arm will be in a direct line with the control arm of the eyelids (See step 2). The eylid pivot point and the large holes are actually made in a separate step.

Step 3: Make eyelids pivot point We will need a pivot mount for the eyelids. Cut from .060" styrene plastic strip 1/2" wide, to the height desired. Real specific about the height, eh? Here's how we determine the height. Place a ping pong ball on the eye plate. Measure from the eye base to the center of the ball. Add the height that the servo axle protrudes from it's case. Make a mark on the 1/2" strip this distance from the end. From this mark, add 1/4" and cut the strip to length; make two such strips. Centered at the mark you just made, drill a hole slightly larger than the styrene rod. Then, from each side of the hole, slightly towards the center, cut a line to the end of the strip. repeat on the other side. This should result in a channel to the hole, slightly narrower than the rod, so that when the rod is snapped in from above, it will be held within the hole by the smaller channel. Look at the sketch! And remember to make two of these (you should drill the center hole in both at the same time). mark the front edges so that this hole remains aligned when assembling. Now that the sides are made, cut several pieces of the strip about 1/4" below the center of the hole. You will need about six, depending on your desired eye spacing. Glue these strips together in a block and then attach the pivot sides to either end. Make sure the front edges you marked earlier are both on the front. You can also use a solid piece of styrene or wood as well. Coat this assembly with a layer of epoxy, except for its bottom. Place the assembly between the eyes on the eye base, centered side to side as well as front to back on the eye centerline drawn in the last step. Mount this assembly on a small square of plywood, to lift the eyelid above the eyes and make it easy to mount. Drill a hole in the base for a small screw and drill a corresponding pilot hole in the pivot point assembly. Use a small screw to mount it to the base. I like to make my assemblies so that they can be taken apart.

Step 4: Make eyelids The eyelids are made from the round end of plastic Easter eggs; they fit comfortably over Ping Pong balls. Also, an old piece of T-shaped plastic sprue from a model kit was used as the axle for the eyelids. A straight cylindrical plastic rod can also be used. On one edge of each ball, a hole was drilled and reamed to fit tightly on the plastic sprue. Then, close to the holes but not too close, a wedge shape was trimmed from the hemisphere to make the eyelids. Note the sketch shows a segment that is actually too large; the picture in step 7 is more accurate. The two halves are then positioned on the rod (the sprue or styrene) and arranged so that they are inline. Mine are spaced approximately 7/8" apart; you will have to leave room for a pivot mount. Initially, a drop of super glue was used to keep alignment. Note that the separation on the sprue/rod and the width of the pivot mount determines the eye spacing. Once the super-glue has set, the assembly was spray painted black on all sides. Once the paint has had time to cure, mix up a batch of epoxy and coat the lids (only! not the connecting rod) with epoxy. First the top half, then turn the assembly over and epoxy the sprue connection points with more epoxy. Once the epoxy has dried, it is time to make the lever for operating the eyes. Straighten a large paper clip. Then, heat the end of the wire and carefully press it into the pivot rod/sprue directly in the middle between the eyes. It should melt into place. Hold it still, while it cools and the styrene becomes firm enough to hold the wire. A drop of super-glue and/or a coating of epoxy will also hold it in place.

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Step 5: Make eyes The eyes are made from Ping Pong balls. First, a small (1/16") hole was drilled from top to bottom. I have a drill press and the ball fit into the circular hole of my baseplate. I had carefully centered the baseplate hole, so that the resulting pair of holes in the ball were radially aligned. The hole is used to screw the "eye" to the mini servo. After both holes were drilled, then I drilled the top hole larger to a 1/4" opening. This larger hole is to allow screwdriver access to the bottom of the ball. I then used a circle template and chose a hole approximately 1/2 the size of the ball. I positioned the template so that it was as close as I could place it parallel to the axis of the two holes drilled earlier. I traced the hole and then carefully using a razor blade knife, cut the circle out of the side of the ball. Once the cut was complete, I laid a sheet of sandpaper on a smooth surface, and rubbed the cut edges of the ball over it to smooth any rough edges remaining. This large hol is used for access, when mounting the eyes to their servos. The circle template was then used to draw a smaller circle for the iris directly opposite the large hole. positioning it higher and lower on the ball is possible for various looks, but the distance from each side to the outer circumference of the large hole in the back should be equal.

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Step 6: Mount eyes Mark the position of the RC servo axle where it falls when the servo is mounted between the two pieces of strip wood. Make this mark at one end of the base, nowhere specifically along its length (it doesn;t matter - yet). Then repeat this process along the edge, on either side of the pivot mount and the far side. Draw lines between the marks. Note that a servo's axle is closer to one end; make sure this side is at the front when making your marks. Mount the servos with screws from the bottom of the plate. My mini servo had a round protuberence where the xle exitted that determined the size of the hole I was about to drill (next paragraph). The holes to be drilled for the servo axles will be placed along this line, equidistant from the center. Whatever distance from the center you choose is determined by the spacing of the eyelids, as constructed in step 3. Mine are somewhere close to 7/8". Fiddle by placing the eyes on the base beside the eyelids. You should really read ahead to the next step, because you are going to have to leave room for the eyelid pivot mount, which will be between 1/2" and 5/8" wide. The two RC servos were screwed to the base plate wood strips, such that their axle protruded through the two holes drilled in step 1. A servo mounting screw was placed in the small hole and a screwdriver inserted to the larger hole directly above it to hold it in place while the eye was placed over the servo. Then, a few quick turns will tighten the orb to the servo. This connection does not need to stand a lot of torque, so hand tightening and no adhesives are all that is needed. Position the irises so that both are facing forward.

Step 7: Mount eyelids First, screw an RC servo to the two mounting posts on the eye base from step 1. The axle should be towards the rear. Use the long, adjustable servo arm. Cut a 1/4" x 3" (approximately) piece of plywood to use as a crank arm. Attach it to the servo arm with small screws and nuts. On the other end, drill a 1/16" hole. This is where a bit of fiddling about occurs. Bend the eyelid pivot lever (the piece of paper clip) up at a slight angle; measure about where it crosses the crank arm and bend it 90 degrees in the direction of the arm and trim it to 1/2" of the bend. Insert the end of the lever through the crank arm and gently bend the remainder of the lever back parallel to itself. Note in the picture that there is another wood post. I found that the rotation of the servo sometimes went too far and the crank was unable to return and open the eyelids. This post serves as an end stop. As your sizes may vary (as mine did through several prototypes), I cannot be more specific about this process. It really takes a bit of tinkering.

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Step 8: Test the servos I use an SSC-32 (serial servo controller - 32 channel) from Lynxmotion (http://www.lynxmotion.com ) to control my servos. Lynxmotion has a USB to serial converter that works well with their products. Additionally, they have a downloadable free terminal program (LynxTerm) that you can use while testing and fiddling with the servo alignment. The first step in aligning the servos is to set the two micro servos to their centered position. Then gently turn the eyes so that the irises are facing forward. Aligning the servo arm, crank arm and pivot lever will take a little more effort. Note the relative angles and positions of these three elements in the attached picture. You can adjust from the servo arm by loosening and reattaching the servo arm with it's screw. Lynxmotion also have a forum that provides excellent support, which is linked to from their main site. You can see my project there under "Projects | Peter Penguin" http://www.lynxmotion.net/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=5948 or on YouTube, djl02184's channel.

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Step 9: Animatronic in Action Here is a video of the completed project (sans skin; we're working on that)

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Wall-E Robot by 4mem8 on June 6, 2008

Author:4mem8 clw woodcraft a busy busy man with his hobbies lol.

Intro: Wall-E Robot This is my Wall-E project that I am currently working on it is 150mm x 150mm x 160 high, it uses a pair of Mattracks http://www.litefootatv.com/html/litefoot_in_the_news.htm for motive power and two robosapienV2 hip motors. It will be controlled by a BS2P40 stamp CPU and will have the following functions described below. I build robots quite prolific but my let down is programing "hopeless but learning" I have a friend at http://www.robocommunity.com who is programing it for me, From this I hope to learn how this program is put together and eventually program myself. We are in the progress of designing the H-bridge for the motors using the L298 chip, The head is finished apart from his adorable eyebrows which http://www.musclewires.com/shapememoryalloys.shtml wire or Muscle flex and pan/tilt has been run. The main reason for building this project was to see if I could use parts from my stock of components that I have lying around my basement and electronics room, The only thing so far that I have had to buy is the Mattracks , uOLED screen and L298 H-bridge ic. Which GWJax is sending me. I was inspired to build this project after seeing a Pixar demo video and thought WOW what a neat bot to build. I have been in R/C scale and other unorthodox aircraft for over 30yrs and modeling is my passion, so this comes in handy when creating something like Wall-E. I hope you like how it is coming along. I would also like to add that GWJax has been an inspiration to me on the programming side.The main construction of Wall-E is 5mm lite ply, sides,front,back and top, with 2mm balsa cladding on the sides with some 1.5mm ply to form the raised panels. Rivets were made using PVA glue watered down 40% and applied to the required area's with a sharp pointed rod, One dip will give you 3 rivets. The arms were constructed out of 1.5mm ply and balsa, and uses 4 of my Technics air rams back to back, The fingers were modded Technics angle beams covered in 1mm ply for the sides and balsa top and bottom. The base is constructed out of 5mm Acrylic sheet as this is good for boring holes to mount your fittings. the head H'mmm a real challenge here, I had to draw it out first to get the pear shaped eye right then work from there. The main eye tube was a pair of alloy pill containers which worked out to be the right size for the head. The Blue LEDs x 6, 3 in each eye are mounted on a 5mm acrylic disc and inserted in the tube about 2/3rds down, then another Acrylic disc in front with the ping sonar in each eye.The ping sonar is from TX and RX had to be removed from the board [tricky and an extension lead [screened] run from the board to the Tx and RX in each eye. I was not sure at the time if this would alter the characteristics of the range, but after testing this was unfounded. The eyes light up at present using a circuit which has a CDS cell and when you switch the lights of the eyes come on, GWJax may code this to work also with some other functions on Wall-E.Wall-E was finished with off the shelf spraykote enamel cans, grey primer, followed by antirust primer, then layered with yellow, rivets applied, then sliver over the rivet area, followed by an airbrushed rust over the rivets. The whole body was then rubbed with scotchbrite pads until the rust and some silver was showing through, then airbrushed with a mix of satin varnish and grey primer to give Wall-E that weathered effect.The head was done in a similar way but with different colors. Phew, I think that's it guys. Check out my web site. http://robosapienv2-4mem8.page.tl/ Robotic Madness 1. Use my Mattracks as the main drive unit 2. Motor drive gear motors using H bridge controllers 3. Pan/tilt head using Parallax ultra sonic ping 4. 3 GP2D12 IR edge detectors or similar detectors 5. raise and lower the arms as a pair [up and down only] 6. raise and lower the front door 7. [Maybe not sure yet] raise and lower the head 8.Use Parallax ping in both eyes 9. airbrush Wall-E to look authentic as possible. 10. Fit a uOLED in the front panel 11. Use a Parallax emic text to speech chip for wall-e's voice 12. Fit Ultra bright blue LEDs in Wall-E's eyes 13. Make a pair of H bridges for the drive motors 14. solar cell to charge batteries 15. voice changer circuit for Emic text to speech 16. Speaker

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Image Notes 1. Does anyone own these? If not I'll take them

Image Notes 1. Outer Mattrack casing 2. Hex nylon rod 3. Gear with hex insert for rod

Image Notes 1. RSV2 Gear welded to the bevel hex gear

Image Notes 1. Hex rod inserted into hex gear, NOTE the bevel gear is not used.

Image Notes 1. Brass bush added to the hex nylon rod

Image Notes 1. Outer bearing support and bearing

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Image Notes 1. Outer bearing cover being bored for bearing.

Image Notes 1. Shafts inserted into the Mattracks

Image Notes 1. Alloy brackets for circuit board

Image Notes 1. Double sided tape on top of alloy

Image Notes 1. Acrylic 5mm base and alloy mounting brackets

Image Notes 1. Cutout for uOLED screen

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Image Notes 1. The back of the uOLED screen

Image Notes 1. Left, uOLED screen, right LED power meter.

Image Notes 1. Balsa discs for the simulated metal plates.

Image Notes 1. All layers now added.

Image Notes 1. Layers of balsa and ply to simulate the metal plates.

Image Notes 1. More layers.

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Image Notes 1. PLy box starting to take shape.

Image Notes 1. One of the ply layers.

Image Notes 1. Another balsa plate.

Image Notes 1. More plates.

Image Notes 1. Arm 1mm ply box's.

Image Notes 1. Box temp fitted to Mattracks.

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Image Notes 1. Wall-E's door 2. uOLED screen cut out 3. RSV2 hip motors

Image Notes 1. Front door. !/8 lite ply.

Image Notes 1. Arms using Technics LEGO air rams back to back, Also ply box covering air rams, and Technics parts for the hands.

Image Notes 1. Another shot from the side.

Image Notes 1. Technics parts for hand.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [1]

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Image Notes 1. Assembly [2]

Image Notes 1. Assembly [3]

Image Notes 1. Assembly [4] Technics cut down to form hands.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [5]

Image Notes 1. Assembly [6] ply box's and 5mm bolt.

Image Notes 1. assembly [7] 1mm lite ply for the hands.

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Image Notes 1. Assembly [8] ply covering the Technics LEGO.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [9] Thumb installed.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [10] remove LEGO pin for sanding.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [11] Balsa sides for fingers.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [12] Sides now added to hand.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [13] front view.

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Image Notes 1. Assembly [14] Ply box's to slip over the air rams.

Image Notes 1. Assembly [15] Finished hands.

Image Notes 1. Size comparison, Ruler is 150mm

Image Notes 1. Front door detail.

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Image Notes 1. Front/Side view.

Image Notes 1. Door down.

Image Notes 1. Middle shelf added.

Image Notes 1. Rivet detail and primer added.

Image Notes 1. Neck detail, rivets and primer.

Image Notes 1. Masking for the stripes.

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Image Notes 1. Arm covers being painted.

Image Notes 1. White covered and black sprayed.

Image Notes 1. Humbrel paints used.

Image Notes 1. Spray cans used in Wall-E.

Image Notes 1. Finished parts ready to assemble.

Image Notes 1. Black masked and white sprayed.

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Image Notes 1. Masking removed.

Image Notes 1. Detaii painting of hand.

Image Notes 1. Weathered front door.

Image Notes 1. Close up of the weathered detail, rivets ect.

Image Notes 1. Starting to take shape now.

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Image Notes 1. Parts for the cds light activated eyes.

Image Notes 1. 4mm Acrylic sheet drilled out for the LED eyes.

Image Notes 1. LED's wired up.

Image Notes 1. Ultrsonic ping and LEDs neatly wired in Acrylic discs.

Image Notes 1. CDS circuit for LED eyes.

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Image Notes 1. ping u/s with the RX and TX removed.

Image Notes 1. Wiring from the LED's and U/S

Image Notes 1. CDS circuit, This is one of two designs, one being by GWJax.

Image Notes 1. First light eye test no U/S added here.

Image Notes 1. Circuit added and diagram.

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Image Notes 1. Close up of the U/S circuit.

Image Notes 1. Technics parts for the side covers on the head.

Image Notes 1. front view.

Image Notes 1. Wiring of the u/s circuit board.

Image Notes 1. Neck mods, Alloy and ply.

Image Notes 1. Alloy channel cut to shape.

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Image Notes 1. Alloy and ply bolted together.

Image Notes 1. Brass rod and bushes to house the neck to the body.

Image Notes 1. Another shot of the housing blocks.

Image Notes 1. Linkage for the servo tilt.

Image Notes 1. Housing blocks added to the brasss rod.

Image Notes 1. Front view of housings.

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Image Notes 1. Mounted inside of Wall-E box.

Image Notes 1. Electronic parts for H-bridge, and lower left the BS2P40 basic stamp CPU to control Wall-E.

Image Notes 1. First stages of inserting components. LM298 H-bridge mid right.

Image Notes 1. 5v voltage reg for the CPU mid left.

Image Notes 1. Connecting blocks for motors, Data I/O between blocks. 4 ic sockets for the opto couplers.

Image Notes 1. Side view.

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Image Notes 1. Most components soldered in.

Image Notes 1. Underside of board showing the main motor wires.

Image Notes 1. I had it a minute ago.

Image Notes 1. It was really this BIG!

Image Notes 1. Give me a can.

Image Notes 1. Something in my eye again

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Image Notes 1. My hands are dirty.

Image Notes 1. I had it a minute agao.

Image Notes 1. What a shinny surface.

Image Notes 1. If nobody wants them, I will take them.

Image Notes 1. Is that a power socket.

Image Notes 1. M'mmmm more metal.

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Image Notes 1. What are you looking at??

Image Notes 1. Is that you 4mem8??

Image Notes 1. Look at all those stars.

Image Notes 1. I did'nt do it?.

Image Notes 1. Slight adjustment needed.

Image Notes 1. Light, I can see.

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Image Notes 1. I'm sad!!

Image Notes 1. Now where did I put that bolt??

Step 1: Gear motors RobosapienV2 Hip motors with bevel hex gear.

Image Notes 1. Hex shafts inserted to gear

Step 2: Hex shafts fitted to motor

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Image Notes 1. Hex shafts inserted to gear

Image Notes 1. Hex nylon shaft fitted to motor

Step 3:

Image Notes 1. Hex nylon shaft fitted to motor

Step 4:

Image Notes

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Image Notes 1. Mattracks and parts


1. Mattracks and parts

Step 5: Motors fitted to Mattracks

Image Notes 1. Motors fitted to Mattracks

Step 6: Motors fitted to acrylic base

Image Notes 1. Motors fitted to acrylic base

Step 7: Alloy brackets fitted to acrylic base

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Image Notes 1. Alloy brackets fitted to acrylic base

Step 8: 5mm lite ply base and sides

Image Notes 1. 5mm lite ply base and sides

Step 9: Front and back ply added

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Image Notes 1. Front and back ply added

Step 10: Extra side panels from 1.5mm ply, uOLED in front panel

Image Notes 1. Extra side panels from 1.5mm ply, uOLED in front panel

Step 11:

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Image Notes 1. Extra side panels from 1.5mm ply, uOLED in front panel


Image Notes 1. Close up of uOLED screen

Step 12: Solar led recharge panel right

Image Notes 1. Solar led recharge panel right

Step 13: Front panels now in place

Image Notes 1. Front panels now in place

Step 14: Laminated side panels 1.5mm ply

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Image Notes 1. Solar led recharge panel right


Image Notes 1. Laminated side panels 1.5mm ply

Step 15: Technics LEGO rams for the arms, glued back to back

Image Notes 1. Technics LEGO rams for the arms, glued back to back

Step 16: 1.5mm ply box to cover the rams

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Image Notes 1. 1.5mm ply box to cover the rams

Step 17: Various layers to represent the metal panels

Image Notes 1. Various layers to represent the metal panels

Step 18: Side panels now glued in place

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Image Notes 1. Side panels now glued in place

Step 19: Arms in place

Image Notes 1. Arms in place

Step 20: Door and grippers now in place

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Image Notes 1. Door and grippers now in place

Step 21: This is the eye section, four 1.5mm ply formers

Image Notes 1. This is the eye section, four 1.5mm ply formers

Step 22: Two alloy pill containers and formers

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Image Notes 1. Two alloy pill containers and formers

Step 23: Ply formers glued in place on the alloy containers

Image Notes 1. Ply formers glued in place on the alloy containers

Step 24: Formers now covered in balsa, and back sections added

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Image Notes 1. Formers now covered in balsa, and back sections added

Step 25: More balsa added to the rear

Image Notes 1. More balsa added to the rear

Step 26: Neck section made out of 1.5mm ply

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Image Notes 1. Neck section made out of 1.5mm ply

Step 27: Internal formers to accommodate servos

Image Notes 1. Internal formers to accommodate servos

Step 28: Ply box joined together and 1.5 mm balsa glued around the edges

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Image Notes 1. Ply box joined together and 1.5 mm balsa glued around the edges

Step 29: Balsa detail added to the neck

Image Notes 1. Balsa detail added to the neck

Step 30: Pan/tilt servos head and neck ready for assembly

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Image Notes 1. Pan/tilt servos head and neck ready for assembly

Step 31: Neck added to the head via pan servo

Image Notes 1. Neck added to the head via pan servo

Step 32: Tilt servo added at the base

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Image Notes 1. Tilt servo added at the base

Step 33: All parts ready to put together

Image Notes 1. All parts ready to put together

Step 34: Main body primed ready for painting

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Image Notes 1. Main body primed ready for painting

Step 35: 2nd stage of priming, rust brown

Image Notes 1. 2nd stage of priming, rust brown

Step 36: Rivet detail is watered down PVA glue 40% and applied by a sharp nail

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Image Notes 1. Rivet detail is watered down PVA glue 40% and applied by a sharp nail

Step 37: Gripper detail, 3rd stage silver applied

Image Notes 1. Gripper detail, 3rd stage silver applied

Step 38: Silver applied over rivet detail

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Image Notes 1. Silver applied over rivet detail

Step 39: A lot of detail is now coming together, 4th coat yellow applied and weathering starting to take place

Image Notes 1. A lot of detail is now coming together, 4th coat yellow applied and weathering starting to take place

Step 40: Rams at rear, and weathering taking place, using scotch brite pads.

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Image Notes 1. Rams at rear, and weathering taking place, using scotch brite pads.

Step 41: Arm detail now added, and front door, more weathering also done

Image Notes 1. Arm detail now added, and front door, more weathering also done

Step 42: Wiring for the 6 LED blue lights in his eyes

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Image Notes 1. Wiring for the 6 LED blue lights in his eyes

Step 43: Internal discs for the eyes, these are inserted in the alloy tubes and house the LEDS, front rings are for the Ping sonar

Image Notes 1. Internal discs for the eyes, these are inserted in the alloy tubes and house the LEDS, front rings are for the Ping sonar

Step 44: Wiring the LEDS

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Image Notes 1. Wiring the LEDS

Step 45: Wiring loom and ping sonar now installed

Image Notes 1. Wiring loom and ping sonar now installed

Step 46: Weathered detail of Wall-E and ping sonar eyes

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Image Notes 1. Weathered detail of Wall-E and ping sonar eyes

Step 47: Head/neck attached to body

Image Notes 1. Head/neck attached to body

Step 48: almost finished Wall-E

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Image Notes 1. almost finished Wall-E

Step 49: Here's looking at you

Image Notes 1. Here's looking at you

Step 50: Wall-E's eyes lit up

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Image Notes 1. Wall-E's eyes lit up

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Wall-E's first head movments (video) by 4mem8

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http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

the robotic walle by the modifyer

My Autonomous HomeMade Wall-E Robot (Photos) by djsures

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Talking Animatronic Robot Head by knife141 on February 12, 2011

Author:knife141 I enjoy taking a pile of junk and making something unusual out of it. I like wheeled vehicles, and currently own two motorcycles, two electric bikes that I've built, and an electric scooter pushed by a sock monkey on a unicycle. I also enjoy building animatronic devices. My favorite is a talking robot head I made a few years ago called Robot Head 2. RH2 has spoken at numerous meetings and schools. His largest audience was 1,000 sales managers at a national meeting.

Intro: Talking Animatronic Robot Head (Robot Contest Entry Catagory = 18+) This instructable is about a talking animatronic robot head I built, which I call Robot Head 2. To get an idea of Robot Head 2's functionality, click on the short video below or you can copy and paste the following link in your browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhPnrvdMArM Robot Head 2 is a fairly complex animatronic. I built him from scratch using the following items: - plywood - wooden knobs (for the eyes) - doll eyes (the kind that move when you shake them) - screws, nuts, bolts, & various other hardware items - 1/8th inch brass rod - misc. pieces of metal cut & bent to shape for various things - latex (for the lips) - various servos (the kind used in model cars & airplanes) - wire -- lots of wire! - one servo controller (MiniSSCII) - powered computer speakers - many, many electrical connectors of various configurations - a large trunk - wooden box (found at a thrift store) - a clip-on lamp - power strip - an old cooling fan unit salvaged from a computer - several extension cords - a pair of old sunglasses - a single-board computer (RAPU) - compact flash card (used in the RAPU) - one micro switch - one plastic box (to house the RAPU) - hot glue - heat shrink tubing & electrician's tape - varnish, paint, brushes, and rags to clean up the mess! Tools used included: - drills & drill bits - bandsaw - scroll saw - wire stripers - soldering gun & solder - heat gun - hot glue gun - hammer, scredrivers, pliers, etc. I had no plans when I began this project, other than a previous head that I built as a prototype (Robot Head 1 -- now disassembled). The head stores in a trunk that I customized, and then mounts on top of the trunk when it is in use. This is a fairly complex project, but if you break it down into major goals, it becomes more doable. So, the approach I will take is to tackle the head itself, the electronics, the other components, and the trunk it travels in and mounts on.

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Image Notes 1. RAPU 2. power strip 3. spotlight 4. robot head with base and power supply box (all attached as one unit) 5. misc. tools & spare parts 6. misc. tools & spare parts 7. cables 8. spotlight servo switch (wrapped in an elegant piece of denim!)

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Step 1: The Head I built the head from 1/2 inch plywood. First I made a cardboard head and jaw, and experimented with the design to ensure I could get the movement I wanted, make sure all the servos would have room to fit, and figure out the pivot points for the jaw and the head tilt. This is where a laser engraver/cutter would have been very beneficial. It would have been nice to be able to do all the design in a CAD program, then laser the design onto the wood. But without one, I had to resort to my usual trial & error! In each photo below I have tried to provide sufficient documentation on the role of each servo, and you can see visually how each servo connects to the component it controls. Just do a mouse-over on each box to see the description / explanation. Once all the wooden parts of the head were cut out and test-fitted with servos, I put a couple of coats of polyurethane varnish on the wooden parts.

Image Notes 1. back side of servos explained in first photo 2. rod connecting head to servo for tilting 3. servo controlling left / right eye movements 4. servo controlling sunglasses 5. the head and jaw tilts at this pivot 6. stiff wire was molded into the lips for attaching them to the head

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Image Notes 1. servo controlling "eyelids" 2. servo moving entire eye section up & down 3. servo controlling jaw movement 4. counterbalancing spring -- this takes some of the weight off the head for tilting movements 5. servo controlling head tilting


Image Notes 1. servo and linkage for controlling left / right head movement. This is a photo from inside the wooden box the head sits on. 2. servo controller -- more on this in a later step

Image Notes 1. locking bolt -- one on each side

Image Notes 1. the sunglasses can be rotated up out of the way, or down in front of the eyes 2. The "eyelids" -- made from some brass sheet and brass rod. They tilt up and down to simulate eyelids blinking.

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Image Notes 1. I built a wooden mold and cast the lips in latex


Image Notes 1. lazy susan bearing for left / right head movement

Step 2: Electronics The heart of Robot Head 2's electronics is the servo controller and the RAPU. The servo controller takes serial signals from the RAPU and translates them into servo movements. The RAPU takes programs I've written on a pc and stores both the movement commands and the audio portion. The RAPU was not entirely necessary. I could have used a pc to do this task, but that would have required me to either carry a laptop with me when Robot Head 2 travels. I chose to go with the little single board computer for efficiency. I program each routine on a pc, then download it to a compact flash card on the RAPU and run it from there. All power supplies and the powered computer speakers are housed in the black wooden box beneath the head. Although you can't see it in this photo, a fan in the box immediately beneath the head continually pulls cooling air through here to dissipate any heat buildup. I cut holes in the front of the power supply box to keep the speakers from sticking out too far, and fastened them in with hot glue. In the last photo below, you will see a small piece of wood with a slot in it just above the center of the speakers. This is where I mount the spotlight.

Image Notes 1. The servo controller takes signals stored on the RAPU and converts them to movement in each servo.

Image Notes

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1. This is the RAPU, which is a single board computer that processes the programs stored for each of Robot Head 2's routines. I'll show you where it attaches in a later step.

Image Notes 1. Power supplies to power the servos, the speakers, and the RAPU.

Image Notes 1. Three cables come from the lower box (containing power supplies) the the upper box where the head is mounted. One carries serial signals, one carries power for the servos, and one carries power for the spotlight switch. 2. air is pulled through this hole in the top of the power supply box.

Image Notes 1. The spotlight (shown in a later step) mounts here. 2. An old pair of powered computer speakers.

Step 3: The Spotlight The spotlight is more than just for illumination. Because I can control its on/off position via programming, I can also use it to augment a routine. For example, if I want to include the sound of thunder in a routine, I can also flash this light on and off to mimic lightening. Although I generally have it come on at the beginning of a routine, sometimes I turn it off or flash it for effect. The spotlight is made from a cheap clamp-on light which I tore apart and attached to a piece of "mystery metal" I found in my shop. At the other end I attached an angle brace, which allows me to mount the light by sliding this angled bracket into the slot I built above the speakers (shown in the 2nd photo). This light is controlled by a servo that opens/closes a micro switch that is in the box in the third photo. I built this switching unit to control the light and one other thing (to be decided in the future). I could have built this inside the power supply box, however it was sort of an afterthought. So, I made it removable for packing and traveling. The switch box mounts on the back of the robot head's base and attaches to a servo control cable that sticks out of the back. On the back of the unit I've also labeled some of the other connection/control points, including the serial connection (goes to the servo controller from the RAPU), the audio-in port (also connects to the RAPU), the master on/off switch, the main power input (goes to the power supplies), and the exhaust fan.

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Image Notes 1. This started life out as a cheap clamp-on light 2. An unknown piece of metal from an old desk. 3. piece of angled steel to attach to the slot above the speakers

Image Notes 1. input cable from the servo controller 2. outputs -- one for spotlight and the other for future use 3. This box contains a servo and set of micro switches. It is currently use to control the spotlight, but is engineered to control other things (not yet conceived) in the future.

Image Notes 1. The switch box for the spotlight mounts on the back of the base of the head. I made it removable for packing. 2. Serial signal in 3. audio in 4. master power switch 5. power cable plugs in here 6. fan forced exhaust 7. "high-tech" screen door latches!

Step 4: Setting up the Robot Head Setting up the robot head is reasonably simple. The first thing I do is remover the robot head and all its accessories from the trunk and attach it to the top with two locking bolts (photo 1 & 2). These endure the mounted head will not fall off in case someone gets careless around it. Next, I attach a power strip to the back of the trunk. All incoming power will come through this strip. I then attach the RAPU unit to the back. A bracket on the wood case simply slides into a bracket I have mounted on the back of the trunk. Then I plug in the RAPU power supply, and plug in the serial connection and the audio cable into the back of the case that holds the other power supplies. Since the serial communications used by the RAPU only use two wires, I made my own serial cable from an old telephone cord. That way I was able to use a phone jack instead of a 9 pin serial plug & socket. The audio wire is then plugged in (I used a stereo phone jack and cord. Next, I plug in the power cable that powers all the power supplies in the power supply case (it is the cord with the yellow plug). The last thing I do is attach the spotlight and the spotlight servo switch, plug the power strip into an outlet and I'm ready to go! Near the upper right of the 3rd photo you will see a white plug dangling down. This is an additional serial connection to power a 2nd animatronic device (like the small one in the video). I only use this when I'm using a 2nd device -- otherwise it just dangles in the back. I also have two security plates mounted -- one on the power supply box and one on the trunk. If I have to leave the robot head unattended in a public place, I use a laptop lock to secure the unit.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. I use the same locking bolt to keep the head's base locked down to the case holding all the power supplies (the back of this base is hinged).

Image Notes 1. locking bolt -- one on each side

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. RAPU unit 2. serial cable 3. audio cable 4. main power cable 5. power strip 6. power cable for spotlight 7. RAPU power supply 8. serial cable for future use 9. lock panel (the type used to secure laptops) 10. locking panel

Step 5: Making the trunk Modifying a trunk to hold everything was a challenge in itself. I started with a new trunk, and continued to play around with modifications until I was satisfied that it would provide a safe "home" for Robot Head 2, and would hold everything I need to make him come alive! In the 1st photo I have shown where all the components are stored. EVERYTHING, including a big yellow extension cord that I sometimes need fits inside the trunk. Pretty much every bit of space is used, including the space provided by the lid. The 4th photo shows the inside of the trunk with the head removed. At the back of the trunk I hot glued a "custom" piece of semi-ridged foam (from a shipping box). This keeps the movable part of the head from flopping around when it is being transported. On the left and right sides of the trunk's opening, you can see some black painted wood reinforcement. I thought the original trunk was not quite ridged enough when the lid was opened, so I added these pieces to add stiffness. At the bottom is a shelf. This gives me enough clearance to house the robot head and to have an area underneath for storage. This trunk came with a fairly weak set of wheels, so I removed them and added industrial casters. The casters at the rear are in a fixed position and the front casters swivel. In hindsight, I wish I had done more planning for the trunk. While I am happy with the way it ultimately came out, I went through numerous renditions before I got it right. And finally, you probably noticed a lot of stickers on the trunk. These are duplications of old travel stickers I found on the internet. I printed them, laminated them with clear film, attached double-sided carpet tape to the back, cut them out, and stuck them on. I figured they would sort of give the trunk a nice, interesting look.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. RAPU 2. power strip 3. spotlight 4. robot head with base and power supply box (all attached as one unit) 5. misc. tools & spare parts 6. misc. tools & spare parts 7. cables 8. spotlight servo switch (wrapped in an elegant piece of denim!)

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. a better view of the inside of the trunk lid

Image Notes 1. shipping foam that keeps the robot head stabilized when traveling (attached with hot glue) 2. this old camera pouch holds the compact flash cards that contain the program routines 3. extra cables in case one dies (never have had to use them....yet!) 4. wood reinforcement for the frame (on both sides) 5. bottom shelf allows for storage underneath

Image Notes 1. heavy duty casters. 2. Heavy duty casters mounted to the lid. When the lid is closed, all 4 casters make it easy to roll the unit around. When open, the casters mounted on the lid help to stabilize the lid (keeps it from trying to sag).

Image Notes 1. this sticker on the back sort of tells it all......

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 6: Programming The subject of programming the head is a bit too detailed to go into on an instructable, but here is the process I use. First, I begin by writing the dialog in Microsoft Word. Next, I use a text-to-speech utility to convert the written dialog to a spoken dialog. The end result of this process is an mp3 file. Next I use an audio editor to add in any sound effects that I want to use with the dialog (phone ringing, siren in the background, knock at the door, etc.). Once I have the audio file completed, I then use a program that allows me to position each servo while both hearing and visually seeing the audio file. It generally takes me about an hour to program a minute's worth of movement. Interestingly enough, programming the mouth's movement is not the most difficult part. The most difficult part is programing all the other movements, because when a person talks, there are a lot of subtle movements that go along with their mouth movements -- all of which become a person's expression. For example, when you ask a question, you might raise your eyes slightly and simultaneously turn and raise your entire head. If you go back and view the video listed in the introduction you will see what I mean. All these slight, subtle movements is what makes the animatronic look like he has real expressions. Once I finish all the programing of the servos, I then download both the servo control file and the mp3 file as a single control file onto a compact flash card. I then put this card into the RAPU, and Robot Head 2 comes "alive!" There are a lot of web sites relating to animatronics. If you're interested, Google is your friend.

Step 7: Having fun.....! I had a lot of fun designing and building this animatronic talking head. In addition to taking him to parties, he's also been to a family reunion (where he talked about his own ancestors -- they were powered by steam, you know), he has spoken to 1,000 sales managers at a sales convention, and he has been at a number of schools, where he usually talks to them about technology. I guess my favorite place to take him is to elementary schools. Kids literally sit on the edge of their seat while Robot Head 2 performs. With kids, he always starts out by telling them a little about himself (usually a funny story), then he talks to them about technology (generally via a story about some gadget he owned or used, or knew of personally), and then finishes by encouraging the kids to study hard in school. When he is finished, he tells them goodbye, yawns, then closes his eyes and begins snoring loudly! I hope you've enjoyed this project. It may seem a bit overwhelming on the surface, but keep in mind all that makes up any animatronic is sound and movement. In terms of building one, it is good to start simple (my very first one had one servo), then build up to more complicated undertakings.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Robot Head 2 talking to 100 3rd graders about technology

Image Notes 1. Robot Head 2 getting filmed at a corporate event

Image Notes 1. No matter where he is, people like to hear what he has to say!

Related Instructables

Grim Reaper Animatronic by woofboy111

ChatBot + Talking Toys by monigarr

Robotic Talking Turret by RazorConcepts

Make an animatronics pac man tree ornament by alexander.m

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

FrankenDog! DIY Animatronic - Controlling an i-cybie robot dog with a toy piano (video) by mskogly

Arduino animatronicsmake your awesome costumes more awesome! by Honus

Animatronic Fawkes the Phoenix by MikeT19278

Simple Animatronics with Servos by gzip


Simple Animatronics with Servos by gzip on January 22, 2011

Intro: Simple Animatronics with Servos Servos are surprisingly easy to use. Even more so than simple DC motors and steppers when you have a microcontroller. In this instructable we'll use a 'duino to drive five servos which will control a doll's limbs and neck. I bought the servos at HobbyPartz for a couple bucks apiece and found the doll at a swap meet for a dollar. The doll says 1967 Mattel on the back and I later learned she is a See 'n Say type doll. The hard plastic body was important for a successful installation.

Image Notes 1. Casting Call. She'll do just fine. 2. The solid plastic body was very useful. The speaker holes were a nice touch.

Step 1: Dismemberment Pop off the arms and use a coping saw to split open one side. Then crack open the other side and remove the guts. Be careful along the way to ensure that everything can be put back together after. I also spent at least 20 minutes trying (and failing) to get the inner workings functional.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. This side is pretty broken. Could've been more careful. 2. She remains happy even after being torn limb from limb, what a sport.

Image Notes 1. Turns out these parts made up a simple phonograph in a 1967 Speak 'n Say. Imagine that, a talking doll in the 60s. 2. The neck had a heavy flare which was removed so the head could come off and on easily.

Step 2: Turning Heads The Neck First dry fit the server horn in the neck and trim it as needed. The servo needs a base to stand on so we'll use some Mighty Putty (aka Epoxy Putty) to fill in the neck. This stopper will serve as a base for the servo which turns the head. It must stick to one half of the body but not the other to allow the torso to be opened and closed freely. Use a little petroleum jelly on one half of the torso and the servo horn to prevent them from sticking. Fill the neck with putty while focusing on how the torso comes apart. Allow the putty to cure for a minute or two to eliminate some of the tackiness. Then press the servo horn into the neck to create a firm footing for the servo. Finally remove the servo and top half of the torso. Allow the putty to cure further while testing the fit a few times before it cures completely. The putty can be filed and sanded after it's hard but it's much easier to adjust it prior. The Head Now it's time to mount the servo to the head. The first thing we want to do is remove the scalp. Follow just under the hairline with a razor and remove it completely. Take a moment to orient the horn so that it has an even range of motion in either direction while it's oriented perpendicularly to the face. Place the horn in it's footing and run the wire down the side of the putty. Turn the servo in the direct opposite the wire and make sure it has enough slack to turn completely. Mark the wire and the putty when you're happy with the positioning. Make a groove in the putty with a saw so the servo wire can run down the neck and into the body while it's closed. Next put the servo in the head and feed the wire down through the groove. Close the torso and put the head back on. You should now have head on the body with the motor in the head and the wire running down the neck into a closed torso. Adjust the head and servo so that they're lined up. Make sure there's an even amount of spacing between the servo and either side of the head. Take a measurement of this space and cut a length of 3/8" dowel. Dry fit the piece of dowel on either side of the head and re-cut if necessary. Cut another piece of dowel the same length once you're happy with the fit. Now wedge the pieces of dowel on either side of the servo. Drop a small amount of hot glue on each side where the dowel meets the servo and allow it to dry. Remove the servo with the dowels sticking to it. The dowels should hinge on the small drop of hot glue while maintaining an accurate placement. Take advantage of this hinging effect to apply more glue between the servo and dowels before clamping them together to create a secure, tight fit. The dowels should now be attached to the servo but not the head. I initially tried gluing the dowels to the head but the glue didn't stick. Drill a small pilot hole through either side of the dowel. Place the servo back into the head with the horn planted firmly in its footing and use two screws to fasten the dowels to the head. Remove the head from the body and disassemble the torso.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Trim the horn as needed to fit in the neck.

Image Notes 1. Create a footing for the servo. 2. The front half of the torso comes off prior to letting the putty cure completely.

Image Notes 1. What a cute profile. 2. Scalped. 3. Split her wig.

Image Notes 1. Groove for head wire. 2. Top half slides on easily. 3. A little filing and sanding was necessary after curing to get a tight fit.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. A small drop of glue is applied first and then it's used as a hinge to apply more glue between the servo and dowel. 2. The glue did not stick to the head at all. 3. The screws double as earrings. 4. The servo wire will run down the neck and into the body. 5. Not quite there yet.

Step 3: Rotator Cuffs and Hip Flexors Now it's time for the limbs. First spend some time getting familiar with the rotation and stops of your servos. You want to find an orientation that's going to allow for a natural range of motion. The horn may need to be removed and readjusted so that it correctly lines up with the arm. We'll be modding the torso so that it will support the remaining four servos. Start by cutting the arm sockets so that they allow the servo to protrude slightly. Next, take and arm and cut three slots in the flange. Cut a hole which goes down into the arm and another which goes back up into the shoulder. Your servo should come with a horn that has four long arms or two long arms and two short arms. The one with two short arms is the one you want or you can cut the other in the same manner. Fit the horn into the arm, guiding horn down into the length of the arm and then back up into the shoulder so that it grabs firmly. Finish the other arm. The body will likely need a bit of modification to allow the servos to mount well. Cut away as needed and use would or plastic build up scaffolding as needed. Remove any stickers applied to the servos and scuff up the housing with sandpaper or a file to allow a good hold for the glue. Apply ample hot glue and hold the servos in place while it dries. Repeat the same steps for the legs. The servos for the legs just barely fit and may end up sticking out quite a bit. This baby has some wide hips! Lastly, figure out where the top half of the torso will make contact with the servos and add some material if necessary to create a tight fit when the torso is closed. Run the limb wires so that they come out hips and the head wire so that it comes out the side. Close 'er all up.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. One of the long servo arms will go down into the hole which runs the length of the arm. 2. Another hole goes up into the shoulder. 3. Three slots a cut into the flange to allow the servo horn to be forced into the arm. 4. The other arm of the horn should be wedged up here as much as possible. 5. The horn will be wedged down into here somewhere. 6. This got mangled and broke while forcing it into the arm. Don't cut anything until you know that it's too long. 7. The two small arms of the horn also help to get a firm grab.

Image Notes 1. Cut away material until the servo fits snugly and sticks out enough to clear the arm's rotation.

Image Notes 1. The arms fit nicely in the chest cavity.

Image Notes 1. Two pieces of angled wood brace the servos. 2. Cut away quite a bit and added a base for additional stability. 3. Servos were put in the same way as the arms.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. This makes good contact with the top half of the torso. 2. This makes good contact with the top half of the torso. 3. Plenty of room for more goodies or even a 'duino!. 4. Run the head cable out the side for now.

Step 4: The Illusion of Life The only thing left is to wire her up and apply a bit of code. The servos have three wires. Red is positive, black or brown is ground, and white, yellow, or orange is signal. The code uses the Arduino Servo library. Principia Labs also has some good info on how servos work.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. The money shot. No, seriously, this is where most of the cost is, the 'duinos.

Image Notes 1. This isn't the exact same code that's running in the video.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. Three signal pins. 2. An AVR-less RBBB. I'll probably try to stuff this into the torso but I might need a teensy. 3. Power bus. 4. Just the reset wire. 5. Breadboard. 6. Freeduino. 7. Should've been more careful cracking the case.


Step 5: Analog Puppet Strings in a Digital World It's too limiting to move the servos purely with code. What we need is a controller. Some puppet strings so to speak. I decided to use four slider potentiometers for the limbs and a rotary trim pot for the head. The sliders were purchased from Futurlec (Mono Sliding Potentiometers - 30mm Travel) and the trimpot was laying around from the famous Electronic Goldmine surprise box . I also used a right angle IDC header for all the connections but any type of header will do. The first step is to connect the sliders directly to the Arduino to get the correct orientation. The positive and negative terminals of the power out should connect to either end of the slider and the wiper pin should connect to an analog in on the Arduino. You can use a multimeter to determine the correct connection if it isn't immediately clear. You're looking for a voltage that varies between zero and five volts as you move the slider. Use the debug flag in the provided code to get serial output which will help you determine the correct orientation of the pot. Basically you just want a limb to move up when the slider moves up. It's pretty easy to get the orientation wrong when soldering but don't worry if you do because it can be corrected through the software. Solder everything to a perfboard once you're happy with the operation of each pot. I kept all positive connections to one side and all negative to the other. I took a reading from each wiper pin once this step was complete to verify that everything was soldered correctly. I then soldered each individual wiper to one of the pins one the IDC connector. When everything is complete you should have two inputs for the power and five outputs for each of the pots. Write the sketch to the Arduino and connect everything up to verify that it works.

What's Next - Connect a few LDRs or motion sensors to track movement for the head to follow. - Add a few LEDs for the eyes. - Make it talk. - Stuff everything into the body and make it wireless. - What else?

Image Notes 1. Power comes in here and gets distributed to a power bus on either side of the board. Each pot connects to both the positive and negative buses. 2. Wiper pin. 3. Wiper pin. 4. Wiper pin. 5. Wiper pin. 6. Wiper pin.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Five outgoing signal connections.

Image Notes 1. Added some knobs which were salvaged from an old stereo years ago. 2. Power the controller. 3. Analog ins from each pot on the controller. 4. Power out. 5. Digital outs to control each servo. 6. Switch to cut power from the servos. 7. Power for limb servos. 8. Power for head servo. 9. A few of the servo headers. 10. USB power is enough to get started but an external power supply would be better for the servos. 11. DC jack for an external power supply. 12. Plenty of outs left to power accessories.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. Power 2. Head 3. Limbs 4. Unused (futures). 5. A few globs of hot glue provide support for an otherwise fragile pot connection. 6. A few standoffs to finish it off.


Related Instructables

Arduino Wireless Animatronic Hand by njkl44

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Robotic Talking Turret by RazorConcepts

How to create simple animatronicspart one: using the MAKE controller by Honus

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

control servo using arduino and rock band guitar by everywhere

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Halloween Animatronics by mik3 on November 3, 2007

Intro: Halloween Animatronics Build a Talking Animatronic Skull and Pumpkin After seeing the Animatronics Workshop exhibit at the Wired NextFest , our family was inspired to try making an animatronic display for Halloween. For your enjoyment -- The Gashlycrumb Tinies, by Edward Gorey -- narrated by Nick & Lexi.

Step 1: Materials RC Servos are the "muscles" that make the moving parts of the animatronic do something. A Parallax USB Servo Controller is the interface between the computer and the servo motors. Visual Show Automation runs the show & tells the servo controller what to do. The servo controller circuitry is powered via USB, but requires an external power supply to run the servos. Audacity can be used to record & edit the sound track.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. HiTec HS311 Servo 2. This plugs into the servo controller board

Image Notes 1. Parallax USB Servo Controller 2. Power Supply 3. Servo cables plug in here 4. USB connection to the computer

Step 2: Modifing the Skull Character We found a sound activated skull that was perfect for the first figure. The existing mechanism was gutted, and replaced with a two servos. I had a couple of ball & socket joints that were perfect for the connections.

Image Notes 1. Our Patient!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. We can rebuild him...


Image Notes 1. This lever moves the jaw 2. Moving this makes the eyes move

Image Notes 1. The original eye mechanism

Image Notes 1. Isn't this a scene from Blade Runner?

Image Notes 1. Ready to be hooked up to a servo

Image Notes 1. Shortened jaw lever hooked up to a servo

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 3: Making the Talking Pumpkin Character The talking pumpkin started off with a styrofoam pumpkin from a craft store. Cut the pumpkin in half, with a zigzag in the front for the teeth. Use a straight cut in the back so that there's no interference when the top moves. Hollow out space for the servo & bracket. The top is fastened to the servo horn with a piece of aluminum bent into an L shape. Paint any visible cut surfaces of the styrofoam with a water-based paint (that won't eat away the foam)

Image Notes 1. Styrofoam pumpkins from a local craft store

Image Notes 1. Teeth carved out of the front

Image Notes 1. Testing fitting a carved out place for the servo

Image Notes 1. Used a H2O based paint to hide the white styrofoam 2. The servo is hot-glued into place 3. The servo arm bolted to an aluminum bracket. The top is very light, so the screws provide enough holding power.

Step 4: Creating the audio Audacity is a open source software for recording and editing sounds. If you're going to have more than one character talking, or add sound effects, make sure to keep the voice tracks separate -- more on this later. In this case, we've got two voice tracks (skull & pumpkin). Export each voice track as it's own wav file, and a third file containing both tracks.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Talking skull voice track 2. Talking pumpkin voice track

Step 5: Starting to tie it all together Each servo wire has three strands: black(+), red(-), & yellow(control). Plug the servo wires into the servo controller. Keep track of which servo is plugged into which channel. A couple of things to look out for: watch the orientation of the plugs, and note that the odd-numbered channels are flipped. Connect a 5 volt power supply to the servo controller. Look here on Instructables for directions on how to convert an ATX computer supply to a bench-top power supply.

Image Notes 1. Parallax USB Servo Controller 2. Power Supply 3. Servo cables plug in here 4. USB connection to the computer

Step 6: The Controller Software Visual Show Automation is used to choreograph the servo movements with the sound. First thing is VSA configuration. The Tools/Settings menu brings up a dialog box listing the configurations for all tracks. Change the type to "Parallax Servo" & set the port number. Change the address to match the channel that the servo is plugged into on the Parallax board. You can give a descriptive label to the track, like Eyes, Jaw, etc. Check the baud rate under Port Settings & make sure it's 38400 for the Parallax board. The +Value, -Value, & Default set the limits of the servo, and the default starting postition. VSA has a useful tool called "WaveMotion Analysis" that can automatically generate events from the volume of an audio file (This is why we saved each voice in it's own wav file). Load each voice track & generate control events for the appropriate servo. Afterwards, load the combined audio track.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 7: Setting the Stage & the Final Product We made a stage for the figures from a piece of plywood for the base, posterboard for the backdrop, and foamboard for the mountains & tombstones. PVC pipe helps hold up the backdrop, and can be taken apart for moving. The final result can be seen on YouTube:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 8: What's Next? Future plans... Add another servo to both the skull & pumpkin so that they can turn. Have multiple pumpkins that talk togethers. (What do you call a group of pumpkins -- a patch?) Servos are controled via pulse width modulation (PWM). It might be possible to control LED brightness via the servo control channels of the Parallax board. Add glowing eyes to the skull. Thanks for looking, and Happy Halloween!

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Simple Animatronics (robotic hand) by tanntraad

How to create My Halloween simple Light animatronicsShow/Animatronics part one: using (video) by the MAKE dominator24 controller by Honus

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http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Animatronic Eyeball Monster by woofboy111

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my halloween costume (video) by firehopper

NYC Crosswalk Sign by weinbergmath


Animatronic Rat by Falcon_3dee on October 22, 2008

Intro: Animatronic Rat This is a prop you can use on Halloween to greet the kids. And maybe give them a surprise to boot. Put it in a scene or just by the front door. You can leave it plain or dress him up. This rat can move about in place, talk with a wireless microphone and spit acid (really just water). Watch the videos to see how he moves. The star of the show is a latex rubber rat I found at Wal-Mart for $7. It's about 14" tall and was filled with some kind of poly stuffing. The goal is to build a movable skeleton that conforms to the inside of the latex rat. You don't have to use a rat, any kind of hollow latex creature that is flexible can be used like a cat, gargoyle, snake, bat ect... But look for something that can be easily animated. For example if the mouth has no depth to it you really can't animate that. I had no plans drawn up for this project and created it as I went with stuff I scrounged up around the house and at home improvement stores. This is a crudely built prop with rusted bits and popsicle sticks, but hey it actually works! You will have to use your imagination to come up with substitutions if needed. The most expensive part of this project is getting hold of a 4 channel radio control. I used one from an old RC airplane that I never could fly. It doesn't have to be fancy or programmable, look on ebay, there are deals to be found there. You could even use a RC car radio with 2 channels and just animate the mouth and something else. If you want to see more follow the steps to see how it was done. Here are some videos to give you an idea of what he does. Demo of Rat in motion Video YouTube messed up the audio sync on this one. The mouth is supposed to be synced with my voice. Internal Skeleton video Rat shooting water Video Putting the skin on Video This one below is a little dark but it was from this Halloween.

Image Notes 1. Water refill cap

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 1: The Rat To start you need a willing subject. Rubber creatures don't complain much. Whatever you use make sure its plyable and has areas that can be animated. Here is a general parts list, but you will have to use your imagination and substituted what will work for you I cant give you a detailed list to take to the store and shop as every creation will be very different. Rubber creature 3 or 4 channel radio with standard size servos water pump. (out of an electric squirt gun or you could probably buy a small pump) Micro switch Battery Case for 4 1.5V D cells ( or a transformer to supply the power) Plastic tubing Aluminum angle and u stock Wood for the base and wood scraps for other things Sports water bottle 2 red leds for the eyes Electical wire Piano wire for linkages I cut the tail off and slit the rodent up the back to behind the head and halfway across the bottom. I removed the stuffing but didn't throw it away as it was needed later to pad out the arms, head and some of the body. The internal metal skeleton doesn't support the latex shell well and it droops in spots if not supported.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Slice it

Image Notes 1. Rubber rat guts

Image Notes 1. Save some of this for later

Step 2: The Base The base was made out of some wood scraps to make an 12"x15"x4" box with an open ended bottom. Make sure its large enough to allow for whatever you want install in it. I wanted speakers but I ran out of room. I located the center and drilled a hole to provide a pass though for the pivot post of the skeleton of the rat. I also cut a small arc in the top to allow the tubing and wires to slide around when the rat rotates. You need to find or make something to mount the internal skeleton to that will allow the prop to rotate freely about 45 degrees. The bottom part of the metal frame is attached to that. I used a flywheel from a very old VCR but you can make something similar with a circular peace of thin wood or hard plastic and a thin bolt passed through and some washers. Think lazy susan. This provides a rotating platform with center bolt that can be used to rotate it from below, with a servo. The picture shows the bottom part of the frame already attached to the rotating part and passed through the top of the box. Inside the base is mounted the radio receiver and 2 servos for the rotation of the rat and activation of the water pump, the water pump was ripped out of an old leaky squirtgun. The power is provide by a battery pack with 4 D cells to provide 6 volts for the radio receiver and the water pump. The water reservoir is a sports water bottle with some pluming installed. Make sure you drill a small hole in the cap otherwise you will get a vacuum lock when the pump starts running.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Slot cut to allow wires and water tube to move. 2. Water pump from squirt gun 3. Battery Pack 4. Radio receiver 5. Servo and switch to turn water pump on 6. Servo connected to bottom pivot for side to side movement 7. Water resevoir

Image Notes 1. This part will rotate side to side 2. Water bottle cap for refilling. Make sure there is a small hole in the top for airflow

Step 3: The internal Skeleton I added two pieces of L bracket to the rotating part to make up the lower half of the body. I kind of gauged where the rat would bend at the waist and drilled a hole between the two brackets and passed a bolt through to make a pivot point. I cut a piece of U channel to reach from the pivot point to the head of the rat. I passed the bolt through the two L channel and U channel holes creating the basic frame. The upper part can pivot forward and back. To make the mouth open and close I made a beak like contraption that would fit inside the head and into the snout. It's easier to look at the picture. I formed some wood and attached some manipulated thin metal to make a pivot point, the top part moves up and down and the bottom is stationary. Then it was pop riveted to the upper U channel at the level of the mouth. The bracket looks sloppy with some extra protrusions that can be cut off. I left them to be used as attachment points for future improvements I am thinking of. Now I have all the movable parts. Left and right on the bottom rotating part, forward and back bending at the waist and the mouth can open and close. This would allow me to aim it in just about any direction within a 45 degree arc.

Image Notes 1. L channel. Lower part of body

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. Mouth pivot area and attachement point for servo


Image Notes 1. U channel stock

Image Notes 1. Pivot area for upper body 2. U Channel 3. L channel 4. Servo connector

Image Notes 1. Upper body movement servo

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Mouth servo 2. Pivot

Step 4: Servos Now comes mounting the servos. I didn't use store bought mounting hardware and just used some scrap basewood. Its crude but it works. I mounted the mouth servo on the upper U channel so it will move with the upper body and can open the mouth at the same time. I attached the servo linkage as shown and mounted the servo using a scrap of wood. The body servo is mounted to the lower body L channel and connected to the bottom of the upper body U channel with a music wire connecting rod and linkage connector. The forward and back travel does not need to be extreme. You only need it to help you aim up and down about 45 degrees, if that much. The servo travel was extended by adding a cut down popsicle stick to the servo arm. To rotate the rat side to side the servo is mounted in the bottom box. An R/C steering horn is attached to the rod or bolt that passes through the top of the box and linked to the servo. If you don't have something similar you can cut a control arm out of a piece of metal and jam two nuts on both sides. On the servo end I added a popsicle stick and metal strip to it to increase the servo arm travel. They are connected together with music wire. You only get 45 degrees of travel side to side, that's the limit of the servo travel. That means you can't squirt someone directly to the side of the prop but if you arrange your rat so people can't go behind it or directly to the side then it's not a problem. You could probably come up with improvements to let it rotate in a greater arc. I mounted the water bottle, pump, rotate servo, battery pack, and receiver in the bottom with a on off switch. Everything is battery operated so the prop can be put anywhere in the yard without having to attach a power cord. For longer run times a wall wart would be better.

Image Notes 1. Mouth servo 2. Pivot

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Upper body movement servo

Image Notes 1. This servo contorls side to side movement

Image Notes 1. Slot cut to allow wires and water tube to move. 2. Water pump from squirt gun 3. Battery Pack 4. Radio receiver

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. Led eyes 2. Mouth servo 3. Upper body movement servo 4. Water fill access cap


5. Servo and switch to turn water pump on 6. Servo connected to bottom pivot for side to side movement 7. Water resevoir

5. Water outlet 6. Water tube and wires

Step 5: Water Pump The water pump was pulled out of a battery operated squirt gun. The pump is attached inside the bottom and vinyl tubing was run from the water reservoir to the pump and up through the frame to the mouth area. I used copper tubing velcroed to the frame to try and control the placement of the exit end of the tubing. There is probably a better way to do it. The water reservoir is just a sports water bottle. I cut a hole in the top and attached the top of a soda bottle with cap to provide a water refill hole. This passes through the top of the box so I don't have to turn it over to refill. I used the nozzle end of the squirt gun where the water comes out and attached it to the end of the copper tubing in the mouth area with a short piece of vinyl tubing so it's flexible. This will shoot water just like the squirt gun did. You can use any cap\plug type thing with a pinhole in it to the same effect. The pump is activated with a 3rd servo mounted to a piece of wood. I cut the servo disc into a cam shape to activate the micro switch which feeds 6 volts to the pump motor and at the same time lights up the red led eyes. This setup allows me to operate the mouth independent of the water pump so I can open and close the mouth without squirting people. If you want you can eliminate the 3rd servo and activate the pump using the servo for the mouth. Just add some linkage to activate a switch at the same time the mouth is all the way open.

Image Notes 1. Water pump from squirtgun

Image Notes 1. Sports bottle for water resevoir

Image Notes 1. This servo and switch will activate the water pump 2. Receiver for 4 channel radio 3. Cam activates switch

Image Notes 1. Water outlet

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Water refill cap

Step 6: Putting the skin on Once you have the internals completed the latex shell is then pulled over the frame and some stuffing re-added to fill out the droopy parts, making sure the stuffing doesn't cause the servos to bind. The red leds are just poked through pin holes in the eyes just enough to see the light. The squirting end is poked through the tongue. The back can be taped shut with black tape or use Velcro or you could also just put a shirt on him to hide the slit.

Image Notes 1. Led eyes 2. Mouth servo 3. Upper body movement servo 4. Water fill access cap 5. Water outlet 6. Water tube and wires

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 7: Set him up It's ready to go. Put some kind of decorations around it so it fits in and maybe hides the bottom box some. I glued a cereal and soda box on the outside of my base so it would fit in with trash and stuck him on the top of a trashcan. Last year he was a trash rat but this year he is going to be a gangster rat. You can move it around and follow people, talk to them while actuating the mouth, get people to look closer at it and interact with it then wham you squirt them. I have never had so much fun, you can control it completely and even keep squirting people as they try to move out of the way. My only suggestion is to not squirt the very young as they tend to cry and their mothers tend to want to beat you. I did try to part many a young kid from their candy by offering to trade some trash for it but I couldn't get any takers. Next year I plan to make the mouth servo actuated by audio input like I have seen on some skulls on the net that way I don't have to manually manipulate the mouth to match what I am saying. Or maybe have a script that animates him unattended. This was a lot of fun to make and more fun to play with.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Speakers

Image Notes 1. Thats part of my 5' remote control spider...but thats another story

Related Instructables

Simple My Halloween Animatronics Light (robotic hand) Show/Animatronics by tanntraad (video) by

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dominator24

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

How to Bring Treats to Tricko-Treaters by elgranzombo

How to create simple animatronicspart one: using the MAKE controller by Honus

BONES NETMF halloween reaper prop (video) by Foekie

my halloween costume (video) by firehopper


Arduino Wireless Animatronic Hand by njkl44 on December 22, 2010

Intro: Arduino Wireless Animatronic Hand BTW!!!!! This instructable is awsomeeeeee This is a very simple but at the same time a very hard project depending on your skill level. Lets get to building! What this is, is a wireless animatronic hand that doesn't need a computer to operate. The user wears a control glove and can control the animatronic hand precisely. Bellow are some pictures of the final product:

Image Notes 1. Flex Sensors 2. Custom PCB, Xbee, Arduino

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. xbee/Arduono 2. Animatronic hand 3. Servos


Step 1: Video

Step 2: Control Glove Materials: Arduino w/ ATMEGA 328 Xbee w/ Shield 5 Flex sensors Glove 9v Hook up wire Custom PCB making tools (5) 10k resistors

1. Power both of the Arduinos to make sure they operate correctly. 2. Assemble the Xbee radio shields. 3. Connect the Xbee shields to the Arduino by placing on top of the Arduino. 4. Connect the Xbee’s to the shields and connect them via USB. 5. Take the ATMEGA328 chip off the Arduino so there is a direct link between the computer and the Xbee radio. 6. Configure them in XCTU (default settings will work). 7. From here i built my own PCB (I'm not going to touch on how to do that, there are other very good tutorial out there) I used the data sheet for the sensors from this site, this is also where i got these sensors: http://www.sparkfun.com/products/8606 8.From here i put all the boards together and tested it out to see if everything worked (powered on). 9. I sewed the flex sensors onto the glove by poking a hole at top and running the string over and under the sensor so it can still freely move. 10. i built the arm band with some elastically and some STRONG double sided tape.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 3: Custom PCB (Glove) So for the glove i made a custom PCB to connect to the arduino. This PCB is for the 5 flex sensors for arduino inputs. This is my first PCB so it wasn't by any means complex nor professional. I made this in EAGLE CAD and used the Sharpie Method.

Image Notes 1. PCB

Image Notes 1. Sharpie!!

Image Notes 1. Copper Board

Image Notes 1. Finshed!

Step 4: The Hand! Materials: electrical wire tubes (http://www.instructables.com/id/Simple-Animatronics-robotic-hand/) fishing tackle electrical tape LEGOS 5 servos xbee w/ shield arduino ATMEGA 328 exact o knife This took the longest to build... 1. I researched hands and found a diagram where the joints are. 2. I then cut the joints with the exacto knife 3. I put all the fingers together without the thumb. 4. i put the four fingers together and reinforced them with legos 5. i taped the securely and put the thumb over those so it would have human like flex. 6. i taped the servos together filling the spaces with Styrofoam 7. i added all 5 servos to the hand with legos and tape 8. I built the circuit on a breadboard with just delivering power the servos and having the control wires into the Digital input on the arduino 9. i ran fishing tackle from the finger tip through the tube and anchored it onto the servo

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 5: Hand PCB Shield For the hand i am still in the process in building a pcb to take away the wires and reduce space. This time i am using to toner transfer method. I again made the schematic and board layout in EAGLE CAD. i used magazine paper to print onto. I engineered this to be used as a shield on the arduino.

Image Notes

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


1. This needs to be reversed 2. Servos! 3. Power (+) 4. Power (ground) 5. Digital Outputs

Image Notes 1. Arduino Pins 2. Servo 3. Arduino Power

Step 6: CODE!!! The Very first thing you want to do is make sure your shield or xbee's are unplugged from the arduino. Or make sure the correct jumpers are the in the right place (in my case). I have written this code and if you do use it want credit. This is the code for the sending Arduino: int Finger1 = 0; int Finger2 = 1; int Finger3 = 2; int Finger4 = 3; int Finger5 = 4; void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); } void loop() { byte servoValue1; byte servoValue2; byte servoValue3; byte servoValue4; byte servoValue5; int FingerV1 = analogRead(Finger1); int FingerV2 = analogRead(Finger2); int FingerV3 = analogRead(Finger3); int FingerV4 = analogRead(Finger4); int FingerV5 = analogRead(Finger5); if (FingerV1 < 200) FingerV1 = 200; else if (FingerV1 > 460) FingerV1 = 460; if (FingerV2 < 200) FingerV2 = 200; else if (FingerV2 > 460) FingerV2 = 460; if (FingerV3 < 200) FingerV3 = 200; else if (FingerV3 > 460) FingerV3 = 460; if (FingerV4 < 200) FingerV4 = 200; else if (FingerV4 > 460) FingerV4 = 460; if (FingerV5 < 200) FingerV5 = 200; else if (FingerV5 > 460) FingerV5 = 460; byte servoVal1 = map(FingerV1,460, 200, 255, 0); byte servoVal2 = map(FingerV2,460, 200, 255, 0);

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


byte servoVal3 = map(FingerV3,460, 200, 255, 0); byte servoVal4 = map(FingerV4,460, 200, 255, 0); byte servoVal5 = map(FingerV5,460, 200, 255, 0); Serial.print(servoVal1); Serial.print(servoVal2); Serial.print(servoVal3); Serial.print(servoVal4); Serial.print(servoVal5); delay(100); }

Here is the receiving: #include Servo myservo1; // create servo object to control a servo Servo myservo2; Servo myservo3; Servo myservo4; Servo myservo5; void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); myservo1.attach(2); // attaches the servo on pin 9 to the servo object myservo2.attach(3); myservo3.attach(4); myservo4.attach(5); myservo5.attach(6); } void loop() { if(Serial.available() >=5) { byte servoAng1 = Serial.read(); byte servoAng2 = Serial.read(); byte servoAng3 = Serial.read(); byte servoAng4 = Serial.read(); byte servoAng5 = Serial.read(); // Send the servo to the position read... <-- you get to make this happen myservo1.write(servoAng1); myservo2.write(servoAng2); myservo3.write(servoAng3); myservo4.write(servoAng4); myservo5.write(servoAng5); } }

File Downloads

Xbee_Send.pde (1 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'Xbee_Send.pde']

Xbee_Receive.pde (831 bytes) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'Xbee_Receive.pde']

Step 7: How I Tested This I did do this for science fair! Here is some of my work for it: So pretty much what i did was take a HD video at 60 fps to get high resolution skills.i came up with three positions to test, fully extended, half extended and unextended. From here i went into geometers sketchpad and found the angle of each finger at each position for both hands. From here i was able to compare a real hand to my animatronic hand.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 8: Results Upon conductions of the experiment, using the variables finger, angle, sensor value and position, the fallowing results were produced. During the first test I measured the angle relationship between my finger and the corresponding finger on the animatronic hand. I found that the index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and pinky all had about the same sensor value from the flex sensors. The thumb on the other hand was limited in movement compared to the other fingers, and therefore the sensor data was in a smaller range. I then came up with three positions to test, fully extended, half extended, and unextended. From here I created a video of all my fingers at these different positions. I then analyzed the videos through the use of editing software and found the angle of each finger at each position. I then conducted the same procedure for the animatronic hand, finding the angle of each finger at each position in the process. I found that at the fully extended position the relationship between my finger and the corresponding finger on the animatronic hand was about a 20째 difference. At half extended the relationship was the closest at about a 10째 difference. At unextended I noticed the most difference with my fingers bending almost 30째 more than the animatronic hand. The thumb was the most consistent finger with only about 10째 difference on all three tests. Overall, the comparison of my hand compared to the animatronic hand was greater than I thought. The position with the greatest difference was fully flexed. What all this means is that the animatronic hand has a relationship with my hand.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Regional Science Fair New Paper Photo

File Downloads

sensor value graphs.xls (58 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'sensor value graphs.xls']

Step 9: Awards!! A few weeks ago i attended the regional science fair in Durango Colorado. The first award i won was 1st place in the Air Force Engineering. The second award i won was a Davin chi award which qualified me for the state competition in Fort Colins. The best award i won qualified me to go to the international science fair in LA for a week, all expense paid, to be an official observer. So i pretty much go to LA for a week and get to check out the sweet project whether i do good at state or not. http://www.durangoherald.com/article/20110304/NEWS01/703049910/Hands-on-learning

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Regional Science Fair New Paper Photo

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Configuring XBees for API Mode by quasiben

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http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Carlitos' Projects: Wireless SpeechControlled Arduino Robot by RobotShop

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Humanoid robot arm by powderly on August 26, 2005

Author:powderly I work in new york city at Eyebeam Atelier making robots that look like me and my wife michelle...

Intro: Humanoid robot arm The following is Instructions for assembling the first generation robot arm that I am developing for the Eyebeam Atelier AiR program as part of an animatronic selfportrait. This arm has 4 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) from the wrist to the shoulder, runs at less than 20 W and is about 12 ounces. I am currently working on V2 with limit and home switches for each DOF, a single DOF hand and adding another 2 DOF to the shoulder. Motor control units for the arm are also currently being developed. You can check out the progress of the arm by clicking here or go to robot clothes dot com

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 1: Motors and Encoders I decided I would try to find separate shaft encoders and motors and try to make an assembly (or a couple varieties of assemblies) that would couple them via gear pairs or pulleys. We tried out a number of different motors and finally decided we would use a few gearmotors from solarbotics. We chose the solarbotics motors because they had a range of reductions, sizes, shaft output orientation and were overall very light, very cheap and very available. We are using the encoders to provide closed loop feedback for precision and obstacle sensing. The GM3 224:1 gearmotor and the GM14 Sanyo 297.1:1 gearmotors have seen the most action so far in our arm assembly. The GM3 (and the GM2, GM8 and GM9) are all similar, use the RM3 DC brushed servo motor and have plastic gears and housing. They all also have an output D-through- shaft that can couple to an encoder shaft. The regular output shaft is also easy to couple to and the motor is pretty easy to mount with two built-in mounting through-holes. They are capable of 50 in*oz of torque, with a kludge clutch rated at 60 in*oz and a weight of 1.31ounces. They cost ~ $6.00 each. The GM14 is smaller, lighter and has metal gears. This is a very small motor, small enough to universally make people say ?cute? when they see it. It produces ~40 in*oz of torque and weighs .29 ounces. The output shaft has a flatted side, so it is easy to mount to, though there isn?t much shaft axially in general. Not particularly easy to mount but it does have some mounting holes and can be mounted by putting the whole motor in a rectangular recess. They cost ~ $25.00. Both motors run on ~5VDC and draw current in the range of 100 ma to 600 ma. I choose the U.S. Digital S4 miniature optical shaft encoder as the proprioceptive feedback device. This encoder is cheap, small, very accurate, comes in a number of resolutions, is easy to mount and can be purchased with a gear bearing shaft so the encoder can handle a substantial radial load. They cost ~ $45.00.

Step 2: Sizing So with these motors in mind I started trying to build an arm starting with the assembly for the elbow of the james robot. I picked the elbow for no particular reason, but it turns out biomedical engineers also use the elbow diameter as a figure of merit for human factors engineering. It looks like the smallest I can make the elbow joint is ~2" diameter. I could go smaller but it will actually cost more, as the gearmotors I would need are real cute and realy pricey. I decided to lock the size at ~52% scale to the 50 percentile man age 20-65 as documented by The Measurement of Man and Woman You can look at the overall arm dimensions in the Arm_Dimensions.xls in the Arm section of the DIY robot KIT. Click here for arm Dimensions The following design represents our first generation robotic arm. The current design has 3 DOF not including the wrist and up to the shoulder. This arm allows for motion approximating the motion of a human arm, including bending the elbow, forearm pronation/supination and gross supination/pronation.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 3: Get your motors, encoders, misc parts and print out STLs on a 3D printer Collect all 7 ABS parts, 3 S4 shaft encoders, 2 GM14 small metal gearmotors, 1 white plastic GM2 gearmotor, 3 plastic gears, 2 plastic hubs, 2 #2 socket head cap screws and nuts, and a heavy duty rubber band. STL, inventor and Step Files are at the end of the email.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 4: Assembly step 1 Insert S4 encoder 1 shaft into the 0.372? hole in the upper arm motor/encoder mount (Part 1) until the encoder is flush. Lock it into place with the nut using a small wrench or pliers. click for image

Step 5: Assembly step 2 Insert S4 encoder 2 shaft into 0.372? hole in the upper arm mounting substrate (Part 2). Then begin to attach the encoder/motor mount (Part 1) to upper arm mounting substrate (Part 2) by lining up the two 0.115? mounting holes by inserting 1-1/2? #2 socket head cap screws through the upper arm mounting substrate and the encoder/motor mount. Click here for image

Step 6: Assembly step 3 Insert motor onto #2 screws until flush with encoder/motor mount. Tighten down nuts with socket set or wrench. Insert the hubs (Hub 1 & 2) onto the GM2 motor and the encoder shafts. Stretch the rubber band from hub to hub such that the movement of one shaft is mechanically coupled to the other. I am going replace this eventually with a v-shaped drive belt made of rubber. Click here for image

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 7: Assembly step 4 Insert the shaft of the S4 encoder 2, while still mounted on the upper arm mounting substrate, into the 0.25 mounting hole on the gear feature at the bottom of the upper arm/shoulder rotational drum (Part 3). Click for image

Step 8: Assembly step 5 Next, insert the small, thin pinion gear (Gear 1) onto the D-shaft of the GM14 motor 1. Insert the motor into the motor cavity in the upper arm substrate (Part 2). You will need to help rotate the upper arm/shoulder rotational drum so the teeth of the pinion and gear will mesh. Click for image

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 9: Assembly step 6 To finish the upper arm mate the other half of the upper arm substrate, the upper arm mating substrate (Part 4) to the upper arm mounting substrate. Use the motor and motor cavity as the alignment feature. I am going to add a latch to these parts very soon but for now fasten the two halves of the upper arm substrate together with rope, wire ties or rubber bands. Click for image

Step 10: Assembly step 7 Next grab the forearm mounting substrate (Part 5) and place the large pinion gear (Gear 2) vertically in the slot on the mounting substrate so that it is parallel and colinearly aligned with the 0.372? hole on the mounting substrate. Insert S4 encoder 3 into the 0.372? hole on the mounting substrate and the 0.25? hole on the large gear. Use needle nose pliers to tighten the nut on the encoder Click here for image

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 11: Assembly step 8 Insert the double flatted shaft of the GM2 motor 1 into the double flatted feature on the forearm mounting substrate. Click for image

Step 12: Assembly step 9 Insert the GM14 motor 2 D-shaft into the small, thick pinion gear (Gear 3). Insert motor 2 into the motor cavity on the forearm mounting substrate so the gear and pinion are aligned. You may need to help rotate the large gear so the gear and pinion teeth can mesh. Click for image

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 13: Assembly step 10 Lay the Forearm rotational drum (Part 7) shaft and gear features so that the gear meshes with the thick pinion gear (Gear 3) and the shaft aligns and fits into the forearm mounting substrate shaft recess feature such that the forearm drum is secured in the X and Y planes. Click here for image

Step 14: Assembly step 11 Finally, mate the forearm mating substrate (Part 6) with the forearm mounting substrate using the motor and motor cavity and the shaft recess as alignment features. As before, I am going to make a latch for this so use rope, wire ties and rubber bands to secure these two forearm substrates. Click for image

Step 15: Wrapping up The overall integration of the arm with its actuators can be accomplished in under ten minutes not counting soldering of leads, cabling and harnessing. The following numbered list describes and illustrates the basic assembly and integration of the arm. In the next post I will illustrate and describe how to create and run the wiring harness for the arm, create service loops to accommodate rotational joints and how to properly solder the motor and encoder leads. click here for image All the arm design files can be found in the arm design zip files in the Arm section of the DIY robot KIT. Click here to go to the laboratory blog to download the zipped design files The zips include STLs for printing at service bureaus on FDM machines or ABS 3D printers, IGES part files, Autodesk Inventor part and assembly files, part DWF files and DXF files. All zip files are named according to file type and revision. Download the latest revision as we will be constantly upgrading. For more information on the design, fabrication and/or assembly of the 1ST generation arm please send me an email. The files are licensed under the creative capital non-commercial, attribution, share-alike contract. If you use or modify the design we would love to hear about it and we will be glad to host your new designs (and sing your praises) on the Lab Blog.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


File Downloads

InventorFiles.zip (3 MB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'InventorFiles.zip']

STLFiles.zip (936 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'STLFiles.zip']

STEPFiles.zip (258 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'STEPFiles.zip']

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my animatronic arm (Photos) by aceLED

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

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Animated 'Haunted' Ouija Board by askjacob on November 4, 2007

Author:askjacob Like making things. Like breaking things (to see how they work). Lost many a great toy in my youth to curiosity. Now I feel more confident to put thing back together again...

Intro: Animated 'Haunted' Ouija Board This animated "haunted" Ouija board was made as a Halloween prop. This was made with mainly junk materials from my garage, but if you have none of the parts you should be able to source them reasonably cheaply enough. You need handy-man skills, some electronic know-how, and be able to program a microcontroller or pic (or know someone who can do it for you!) Update Alert The board can now say messages sent to it via a serial device - step 12 covers the changes I made! This is part build-log, part how to. I hope I give you enough info to inspire you to make something similar. Here is a video of the completed board with the lid off:

And here is a video of the completed box I had ready for Halloween 2007:

New Video This new clip shows the serial communications link working:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. Here is the planchette that moves about on it's own (or so it seems...)

Step 1: Stuff you will need A Stepper motor, with gear box, pulleys and toothed belt - I had a set stripped from a dead cheap scanner. You could modify this project to use a braided steel wire or even string instead of the belt, it shouldn't be too hard. Some wood to suit your design. I messed up when I built mine, and used some poorly finished pine and my not so great woodworking lead to nasty corner joints, which left me needing to veneer the wood with a thin plywood... so keep this in mind, and perhaps use some nice ply to start with, and skip needing to do the annoying veneer finish. Alternatively, you could use the oldest and most worn timber, for that 'ye olde' antique look. Heck, be creative and make it your project! Something to drive the stepper motor (I'll provide a sample circuit and the microcontroller code) but if you already have something else, or know what you are doing, then knock yourself out, you'll figure it out from the steps I have outlined.... A microswitch for the home position sensor (I got mine out of an old printer) A power supply (12v 400ma plugpack or 12v worth of batteries if you want it cordless) Some hookup wire 5 minute epoxy Items I used but you can substitute with something similar: piano wire, brass tubing, a strong magnet from a broken HDD, brass shim, copper shim, brass split pins, brass box corners, rubber o-rings, scrap aluminium angle stock, screws, small piece of self adhesive felt, hotglue. Basic tools: Pliers, cutters, soldering iron

Image Notes 1. stepper motor 2. toothed belt pulley 3. gear assembly 4. toothed belt

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 2: Building the box You need to build a basic box to contain the mechanics of this project. I originally made mine to be about the size of a sheet of A4 paper, as I was going to print out the Ouija top and glue it on. That also worked with fitting in my proposed mechanical setup size wise. I made the box deeper than needed for the mechanics as I wanted it to seem like a piece of furniture rather than a 'board'. The box has plenty of empty space - room for other features you may want to add, like batteries, a sound chip, or a 'knocker' device (something I started to do but didn't get to finish in time for this year)... Remember, as I said before, make this step count so you don't have to do what I did and veneer it to hide the dodgy sides...

Image Notes 1. Pine sides, mine were 80*20 mm 2. 6mm ply base

Step 3: Build the magnet bracket Next I built the magnet bracket that attaches to the toothed belt. This was so I could then work out what height the stepper motor and pulleys needs to be mounted in the box. I cut two small pieces of aluminium angle. One of the pieces was been shaped to allow it to securely clamp the belt, yet still smoothly pass over a pulley. The other was cut into a small square. I then drilled through them both, and used a small bolt and nut to clamp them to the belt. Next I epoxyed a chunk of strong (neodymium?) magnet broken from a larger flat magnet pulled out of an old hard drive. I stuck some felt on top of the magnet as a low friction surface. A note here: you need to use a non-ferrous metal for the bracket otherwise it will cause problems with the magnets - e.g. it will get stuck somewhere, or worse will affect the magnetic field and make the magnet seem weaker.

Image Notes 1. magnet 2. bracket cut from a piece of aluminium angle 3. clamp also cut from same aluminium angle 4. nut 5. bolt

Image Notes 1. Magnet glued to aluminium bracket 2. self adhesive felt 3. Square price of aluminium to clamp to belt 4. nut and bolt 5. I filed this down, and put a bit of a curve on it so it will go more smoothly over the pulley

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Step 4: Mount the motor Now I had the bracket, I measured what height I had to install the motor and pulleys so that the magnet would be level with the top of the box. I then mounted the motor, and cut the pulley mounting blocks from scrap wood, and screwed them to the bottom of the case.

Image Notes 1. This is the height that worked out right for my bracket/magnet combo 2. Stepper motor drives this gear 3. I used rubber o-rings on the screws to minimise noise from the stepper motor being transmitted to the cabinet 4. scrap wood pulley mount block

Step 5: Pulley shafts With the pulley blocks and layout ready, we need to install some shafts for the pulleys to run in. I had some brass stock that was the right size, so it was simply a matter of cutting off 3 lengths (you will need the third in the next step), drilling the holes in the pulley mounting blocks and expoxying them in. I then waited for the epoxy to set, then slipped two washers over the shaft to get the pulley to the right height - to make sure the bracket runs flush with the 'lid' of the box

Image Notes 1. brass shaft 2. pulley 3. washers 4. mounting block

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Step 6: Set up a tension pulley Now we need to setup the tensioning pulley - this is to keep the belt tight enough to engage the stepper motor, regardless of any slop and inaccuracies in the build, but also shlould allow the belt to slip if something goes wrong, without breaking anything. I soldered the third shaft (from previous step) onto some scrap metal (from an old heatsink) with a hole for a pivot at one end, and a hole for a spring at the other. I then used a screw to loosely mount one end, and the other it pulled by some springs (pulled from old pens) to keep the belt tight. The tension is not very critical at all - you just need enough to make sure it doesn't slip.

Image Notes 1. Spring to tension the belt 2. brass shaft 3. pivot point

Step 7: Guide rails and home switch I found that the weight of the bracket and magnet made the belt twist, if it is running without the planchette. The magnet in the planchette pulls the bracket up straight in norrmal use, but I wanted it to be able to cope with people picking up the planchette without it breaking or getting stuck. I used some piano wire to make some guide rails. The guide rails stop the bracket drooping so it won't be getting caught on anything. I also glued in the microswitch at the home position of the belt, so the controller knows when the bracket its 'home' position

Image Notes 1. guide rail 2. guide rail

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Image Notes 1. microswitch 2. These joints are why I veneered the box 3. the veneer


Step 8: The Electronics OK so we now have the mechanism basically complete... now we need it to move! Attached is the schematic and PCB done in eagle cad. I also included the PCB images as a bitmap file - make sure you print them at 300dpi if you don't want to use eaglecad to print the pcb. This is a handy board for driving any bipolar stepper motor - also known as 4 wire steppers. They are a bit more complex to drive than 6 wire ones, but come with the bonus of higher torque. Most circuits out there I could find were for 6 wire motors - one of the other reasons I wanted to 'roll my own'. Also attached is the bascom source file, and a compiled hex file for the atmega8. I know that the Atmega8 is pretty overpowered for this simple job, but I had some around and had been doing other work with them recently. The code uses only 14% of the flash on this controller, so there is room aplenty for more customising! The circuit has my own ISP header - easy to figure out the pinouts for another programmer if you need to. I also added some ballast resistors suitable for my motor to run from 12v (18 Ohm 5 watt) instead of 5 volts so it had better torque and top speed. I had no idea which direction the motor would go, nor how many steps were needed to go from one end of travel to the other, so this is what I did: I moved the bracket to the middle of the travel (so it won't jam somewhere if it goes too far), set the program to step in one direction only for 500 steps, and saw which way it went. Easy huh? Next, I sent it 'home' - it goes back to the home microswitch and sent it forward in ever increasing number of steps until I was happy that was as far as I wanted it to go. Then I had all the data I needed, to write the final program code. Most likely you will need to change these numbers to suit your layout, size and stepper/gear combo. The final code has some failsafe work - if it hits the home switch unexpectedly it will recalibrate itself, and after 1000 moves it also recalibrates - just in case the stepper motor mis-steps - small errors in stepping cumulatively will add up over time, and we don't want this thing jamming up by moving too far...

Image Notes 1. Stepper motor connector 2. programmer connector 3. home switch connector 4. power in connector 5. aux relay connector - I didn't end up using it but it was going to drive a solenoid to knock on the box 6. L293D H bridge motor driver 7. Atmega8P microcontroller

File Downloads

OUIJA1.0.HEX (3 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'OUIJA1.0.HEX']

ouija1.0.bas (3 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'ouija1.0.bas']

eagle-ouija.zip (58 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'eagle-ouija.zip']

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. more of that famous aluminium angle bracket 2. ceramic power resisitors 3. cable ties - the resistors barely get warm, so these are fine to hold it together


Step 9: Making the board Ok, so now the magnet assembly is moving how you want, you now need to make the 'lid' with the Ouija symbols on it. This usually is the alphabet, 0-9, yes, no and goodbye. There are no hard and fast rules on how they should look or where they need to go (I have seen literally hundreds of different designs), so do it how you want! My original plan was to use a sheet of plexiglass or Perspex for the lid, and print out my Ouija design on some parchment looking paper and varnish/glue it on top - so there is an idea for you. I did however think that would not have looked very handcrafted at all, so I ended up doing something else... I fired up my old soldering iron for some wood burning action. You don't want to use your good iron here as it is pretty tough on the tip. If you have a woodburner tool (which is kinda like a soldering iron) then you have better tools than me, and you'll have more fun than I did. I still printed out my design on paper, but then transferred the design onto my plywood top with a pencil - the old scribble on back of paper with soft pencil, flip over then trace over the design I-don't-have-any-carbon-paper trick. I then proceeded to spend an inordinate amount of time burning the design into the timber. I also got to discover that harder grain takes ages to burn into, and that my extremely el-cheapo plywood had filler in some areas - filler does not burn well!! I then gave the lid 3 coats of stain/varnish with a light sanding between. I used a satin finish for two reasons... firstly because I wanted it to look old, and secondly I wanted the plachette to move in a slightly jerky movement (like a disembodied hand moving it) rather than just slip and slide around. The satin finish gives a bit more friction. I think matte would be too much, and would end up shiny from the sliding over time anyway. Gloss should be ok too, but the planchette movement would be much smoother. On the bottom side of the board, I wanted to make sure the magnet bracket could slide along easily - so I used some spray glue to attach a sheet of OHP transparency film on the wood.

Image Notes 1. burnt in characters 2. I added some designs for decoration 3. countersunk screw holes 4. yes, I forgot to put numbers on the board

Image Notes 1. glued on transparency

Step 10: Make the planchette Next I needed to make the planchette. I decided after a few sketches, and after how my lid came out that I would like to have a bit of a steampunk theme, so I designed it in that way. Whatever you want to make, the main parts of construction still are applicable. I looked around for what a planchette should look like, and there are infinite variations, but a majority look like a 'stretched love heart' shape. I sketched out this shape onto some scrap 6 mm ply (left over from the base of the box) and cut it out. Next I drilled the hole which is pretty common on the planchettes I have seen. I then got my piece of magnet matched with the magnet on the bracket/belt in the box, and carved out a small recess on the bottom of the planchette with a knife to fit the magnet (and deep enough for the magnet to sit flush with the surface of the wood). The magnet is not centered with the planchette on purpose as it helps make the movement look less mechanical (or symmetrical). Important! Make sure you match the magnet - if you don't it will be repelled by the one on the bracket inside the box, and won't work. You need to flip over the planchette magnet and make sure it is attracted to the bracket magnet! Doubly sure the magnet is the right way up, I epoxied it into the recess on the planchette. I then covered the planchette with brass shim, copper and used a small glass lens (also from the scanner the motor came from) to 'punk it up'. You may just want to stain the wood. Finally, cover the bottom of the planchette with some felt, for a nice smooth base that won't scratch up your lid/board.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Image Notes 1. this is plwood covered in thin metal sheeting

Image Notes 1. Cutout for magnet 2. underside view of planchette

Step 11: Finishing Up There you go, it is pretty much finished now... All you need is some finishing details. I added some brass box corners, legs and beading trim to make it look more like a piece of furniture than just a box. All in all I think it came out pretty good... one of those satisfying projects that actually came out somewhat how I hoped! This was my 1st instructable. I hope you enjoyed it. I was blown away by how much work is needed to do one of these - it really helps me appreciate the work everyone else has put into this site. Thanks everyone! Considering this is my 1st instructable, I would really appreciate comments and feedback.

Image Notes 1. glass lens 2. brass screws 3. brass box corners

Image Notes 1. beading 2. legs made out of the wood used for the beading 3. stained wood veneer

Step 12: Serial Communications Project Update Due to popular opinion, I have now enabled the ouija board to comminucate - not with the dead, but with any device with serial output (like a PC, phone, bluetooth module). I have no fancy stuff like a bluetooth module, so for this step I have used my laptop to send the messages to the Ouija board. The video is now added, it is the 3rd video in the intro step to this instructable. The Ouija board is now functional with full capacity - it can 'carry on' as it did originally, but connecting a serial device can invoke new behavior: The board can talk to any serial device (so if you had a fancy bluetooth module or mobile phone or something tucked away in the case) for programming messages. It has a simple command structure, such as: (asterisk) - begin new message

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# - end message @ - repeat message over and over (carat) - go to sleep (turn off) ! - stop moving $ - turn off/on (toggle) random movements (I had to type asterisk and carat as the actual characters made the text act weird in instructables!) so, to say 'askjacob' over and over one would send the string '*@askjacob#' if you just send '*askjacob#' , it would spell out askjacob and then go back to random movements. if you send '$*askjacob#', it would spell out askjacob, and then stop, awaiting further instructions. You can send stuff to the board at any time and it will not interrupt the movement - unless of course the command specifically does affect movement. I am very happy with how it turned out. Because my original design didn't expect this capability, there are some mechanical limitations - I can't get the planchette to reach the L, M , Y or Z, but in this age of txt msgs isn't too bad... From what I have heard, messages from beyond don't always come through clearly anyway and need some 'interpretation'.

The images below are 1 - the changes to the PCB (I will upload new eagle schematics for the changes) 2 - how the serial connector goes 'outside' the box 3 - the setup with a laptop for testing 4 - soundproofing the box 5 - soundproofing the lid

Image Notes 1. CD-ROM audio cable hot-glued into slot cut in bottom of the case Image Notes 1. cut in PCB track 2. new connections to L293D motor controller chip 3. black - ground 4. Old CD-ROM audio cable for serial cable

Image Notes 1. Bosh IXO - great little screwdriver!!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/

Image Notes 1. Foam! came in some PC parts packaging


2. behind the beer (bad photo!) is my ttl serial to RS232 level shifter pcb (using a max232) - needed for PC comms, but not for a bluetooth module etc 3. Laptop (!) 4. Beer - not vital, but helps 5. chatting to the board via hyperterminal, 38400bps, 8-n-1, no flow control

2. don't insulate the PCB - it may overheat if you do! (remote chance, but why risk it?) 3. make sure nothing will get into the works!

Image Notes 1. more foam, stuck where the magnet won't go, to minimise noise

Step 13: The Updated PCB and Code... Finally, I have now uploaded the revised PCB and code. Note that this PCB and code can be recycled to be used for any project that needs to use a 4-wire stepper motor, not just a haunted Ouija board! The L293D motor controller is a pretty handy little chip - the PCB as is can also use it to control up to 2 DC motors, both forward and in reverse. With a bit of code work, you can also have proportional speed control using PWM for the two motors, so the PCB could be handy as a robotics motor control system. Rather than just a simple control for the motors, having the Atmega8 on board means you can make it an advanced controller, leaving your robot CPU free to do other work.... If anyone wants me to develop some revisions to the code for a general motor controller let me know and I'll get on it. Attached are: the .hex file : pre compiled code for the atmega8 the .bas file: Bascom AVR source code the .sch file: The EagleCAD light schematic file the .pcb file: The EagleCAD light circuit board file Cheers and Happy New Year for 2008!

File Downloads

OUIJA1.9-SERIAL.HEX (9 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'OUIJA1.9-SERIAL.HEX']

ouijaserialv2.sch (174 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'ouijaserialv2.sch']

ouijaserialv2.brd (17 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'ouijaserialv2.brd']

ouija1.9-serial.bas (9 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'ouija1.9-serial.bas']

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-DIY-Animatronics/


Step 14: More Details for building - including some ideas for simpler projects Additional Details coming soon I promise! I have had a few questions around the project lately, so I feel I should add some more information to the project! I'll be adding more information around making the PCB, as well as some thoughts on making a simpler version for those who feel this version is in the 'too hard basket'. I'll work on the updates over the weekend! Regards Jacob

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