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Writing Program Instructor Companion 2012-2013 6th Edition

The Writing Program University of Arizona Department of English


CONTENTS About the Companion

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Chapter 1: Administration 1.1 Writing Program Contact Information

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Chapter 2: Policies and Procedures 2.1 Instructor’s Absence from the Classroom 2.2 Required Office Hours 2.3 Required Syllabus Elements 2.4 Required to use D2L Course Management System 2.5 Summer Teaching Stipulation 2.6 General Meeting and Contractual Obligations 2.7 Textbooks for First-Year Writing Courses 2.8 Photocopying Privileges 2.9 Placement—How Students Get Placed Into Your Classes

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Chapter 3: Committees—Getting Involved 3.1 English Graduate Union (EGU) 3.2 Committee on Difference and Inequality (D&I) 3.3 Graduate and Professional Student Council (GPSC) 3.4 Writing Program Advisor Committee (WriPAC)

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Chapter 4: Awards and Opportunities 4.1 Awards—Instructor and Student Fellowship and Teaching Awards 4.2 Professional Development Positions 4.3 Funds to Foster Collaboration

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Chapter 5: Advising and Resources 5.1 Advising Grades and Structure 5.2 Brown Bag Workshops 5.3 Writing Instructors’ Resources (WIRe)

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Chapter 6: Student Policies and Class Management 6.1 Absence and Attendance Policy—Student 6.2 Academic Integrity 6.3 Code of Conduct 6.4 Grading 6.5 Roster Outreach 6.6 Writing Program Research Policy

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Chapter 7: Technology for Teaching and Learning 7.1 Viewing Your Classroom and Technology Online 7.2 Ordering Classroom Technology 7.3 Using D2L 7.4 Listservs

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7.5 OSCR Labs 7.6 Streaming Video and UA Electronic Reserves 7.7 Teacher-Course Evaluations (TCEs) Online 7.8 UA Email Account 7.9 UAccess 7.10 Technology Workshops 7.11 Photocopying Chapter 8: Resources for Students 8.1 Dean of Students/Student Affairs 8.2 The Writing Center in the Think Tank 8.3 Writing Skills Improvement Program (WSIP)

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Appendices

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ABOUT THE COMPANION This sixth edition of the Companion contains some significant changes from the previous editions. It is designed to provide policy information about the Writing Program and the University of Arizona. MAJOR CHANGES INCLUDE 2.3 New Required Syllabus Elements—change to the documents and procedure for turning in syllabi to ML380 by the date of the General Meeting. There are revised attendance and late paper policies on the syllabus policies page. 2.4 Required to use D2L Course Management System—requirement to use D2L Gradebook for grading and attendance records and sending exported copy of electronic gradebook to uawriting@email.arizona.edu. 6.1 New Student Attendance Policy—changes to attendance during first week and rest of the semester. 6.5 Roster Outreach—new procedure for dropping non-attending students. APPENDIX that includes “Guide to Enforcing Key Writing Course Policies”

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Chapter 1: Writing Administrative Contacts 1.1 WRITING PROGRAM CONTACT INFORMATION1 Director of the Writing Program: Amy C. Kimme Hea ML 380, 621.3553

kimmehea@email.arizona.edu

Associate Director: Christine Tardy ML 386, 626.0790

ctardy@email.arizona.edu

Assistant Director: Aimee Mapes ML 372, 621.7411

acmapes@email.arizona.edu

Faculty Supervisors Beth Alvarado ML 344, 626.0769

eca@email.arizona.edu

Jo Anne Behling ML 344, 626.0769

jo.behling@comcast.net

Carol Nowotny-Young ML 361, 621.3416

can@email.arizona.edu

Jessica Shumake ML 344, 626.0769

shumake@email.arizona.edu

D.R. Ransdell ML 361, 621.3416

ransdell@email.arizona.edu

Kara Reed ML 344, 626.0769

karaj@email.arizona.edu

Erec Toso ML 361, 621.3416

netoso@email.arizona.edu

Writing Program Staff Senior Program Coordinator: Monica Vega ML 374, 621.7412

movega@email.arizona.edu

Administrative Assistant: Sara Soto ML 380, 626.8873

smbsoto@email.arizona.edu

Senior Office Specialist: Sara Vickery ML 380, 626.8678

sev@email.arizona.edu

Writing Program Office ML 380, 621.3553 Hours: Monday-Friday from 8:00am-4:00pm Email: uawriting@email.arizona.edu Fax: 520-621-5410

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See Appendix A for an Organizational Chart of the Writing Program

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Chapter 2: Policies and Procedures 2.1 INSTRUCTOR’S ABSENCE FROM THE CLASSROOM You must complete the Instructor’s Absence from Class Form and email it to uawriting@email.arizona.edu by attachment or leave it with the receptionist at the front desk in Modern Languages 380 when any of the following situations arise:    

You hold your class in a different location. Cancel class to hold conferences. Schedule a library visit. Cannot meet your class because of illness or an emergency.

The Instructor’s Absence from Class Form is available on the WIRe website under the Forms page: http://wire.english.arizona.edu/node/56#i Save the following number on your cell or home phone: 520-621-3553. In the event of sudden illness or an emergency call and leave a message. We check the Writing Program voicemail at 7:30 AM Monday– Friday and are prepared to run to post signs on your classroom door. Even if you use D2L to notify your students of alternative meetings places, assignments, and cancellations, you must complete and submit the above form. The Writing Program staff needs to know where you are (in case of emergency) and where to direct students. However, in the case of absence, do NOT call the main English Department office in Modern Languages 445 or email the English Department front desk, your Program Director, or Program Assistant. Please be aware that the Writing Program is the only office that can guarantee your students will receive the information they require when they cannot find your class. 2.2 REQUIRED OFFICE HOURS Instructors who are teaching one section must schedule a minimum of one face-to-face office hour per week. Instructors who teach more than one section need to add one office hour per section per week. 2.3 REQUIRED SYLLABUS GUIDELINES To ensure consistency across Writing Program syllabi, we have created three syllabus documents that together make up your course syllabus. All instructors are required to use these new files to create their syllabi: 1) syllabus policies, 2) syllabus cover sheet, and 3) syllabus schedule. IMPORTANT: Do not use your old syllabi as the starting point for your fall semester—these new files include important changes, especially in regard to revised policies! Starting this Fall 2013, all instructors are responsible for following the Writing Program procedure for creating, reviewing, and filing their syllabi. One hard copy of your syllabus documents, with accompanying syllabus checklist, is due on or before the General Meeting to ML380. Please make arrangements to have it completed, printed, and turned in by this date.

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What are the Syllabus Documents? Syllabus Policies These policies ensure all students are provided the same guidelines for their courses, and the document must not be revised. There are versions available for 100-level, 300-level, and summer courses. Be certain you are using the correct version for your class. IMPORTANT: The only new program-wide policy is the late work policy which reads, “Late work will not be accepted without penalty unless students make arrangements for an extension before the due date. Major assignments that are turned in late will incur a 5% penalty per 24-hour period.� Syllabus Cover Sheet All 100-level courses in the program have a specific cover sheet. You must use the correct version for your course number. This file includes red text that must be replaced by your own specific information, including name, office hours, etc. Note: If teaching any 300-level course, please consult WIRe for information about the scope and sequence of assignments you should use for your syllabus cover sheet. If you have any questions, please consult with your course director for further information. Syllabus Schedule Nearly all 100-level courses in the program have a specific syllabus schedule. You must use the correct version for your course number. This template is for you to complete your entire semester course calendar, and it is based on a T/TH calendar. A full semester calendar is provided for those instructors with a different schedule. Note: If you are teaching 109H or any 300-level course, you also are required to provide a complete course schedule to the Writing Program, but because these courses allow for more instructor customization in terms of scope and sequence, there is not a syllabus schedule template. Thus, you should create your own course calendar using the specific assignments for the course. If you have any questions, please consult with your course director for further information. What is the Procedure to Complete and File my Syllabus Documents? All the files you need to complete your syllabus are included on this page, and here is the step-by-step process. Go to WIRe (http://wire.english.arizona.edu/node/60) to access this same information online. Note: To complete this process, you will need access to a printer, and you will need to have information such as your section number(s), time(s), location(s), your office hours, and other information typical to the creation of your syllabus. 1. Download and print the syllabus checklist. Syllabus Checklist (new) 2. Download and print the syllabus policies for your course level (i.e., 100-level, 300-level, or summer). Do not make revisions to the policies. Syllabus Policies for 100-level Courses (revised) Syllabus Policies for 300-level Courses (revised) Syllabus Policies for Summer Courses (new)

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3. Download the syllabus cover sheet and replace the red text with your specific information. Save the cover sheet. Syllabus Cover Sheet for 101A (revised) Syllabus Cover Sheet for 107A (revised) Syllabus Cover Sheet for 101//107 (revised) Syllabus Cover Sheet for 102/108 (revised) Syllabus Cover Sheet for 109H (revised) 306, 307, and 308 instructors should create their cover sheets following the project guidelines developed by the course directors. See the course-specific pages for those guidelines. 4. Download the syllabus schedule and complete it for the entire semester. Save the syllabus schedule. IMPORTANT: If you are not teaching on a T/TH schedule, you also need to download the Fall 2013 Semester Calendar to adjust the dates and tables of the schedule template. Syllabus Schedule for 101A (revised) Syllabus Schedule for 107A (revised) Syllabus Schedule for 101/107 (revised) Syllabus Schedule for 102/108 (revised) 109H, 306, 307, and 308 instructors should create their schedules following the project guidelines developed by the course directors. See the course-specific pages for those guidelines. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Using the syllabus checklist, carefully review all three components of your syllabus. Make any revisions to your cover sheet or schedule based upon the syllabus checklist. Print your syllabus cover sheet and schedule after these revisions. Compile the four documents in a syllabus packet as follows: syllabus checklist (on top), syllabus policies (after checklist), syllabus cover sheet (after policies), and syllabus schedule (on bottom). 9. If you are teaching a split prep (i.e., 101 and 109H, 101 and 306, etc.), you must create a syllabus packet for each of your different courses. 10. On or before the General Meeting, turn in these syllabus packet(s) to ML380. 11. Upload all of these same syllabus documents (sans the checklist) to your required D2L site and be certain to review these files with your students. 2.4 REQUIREMENT TO USE OF D2L (DESIRE 2 LEARN) COURSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM You must use D2L as the means both to provide students access to your syllabus documents and to keep a gradebook/attendance record for your course. Often in the program, we encounter issues where grading and attendance records were needed, but the teachers had a difficult time providing these data. The electronic version will allow you to keep your students updated (should you choose to make it public to them) and to provide us in the Writing Program with records should an issue arise. Thus, you are required to use the D2L gradebook to maintain accurate grading and attendance records. At the end of the semester, before you leave Tucson for break, you also should export your grading and attendance roster and email it to uawriting@email.arizona.edu. If you need D2L support to set up your gradebook, you can visit (http://help.d2l.arizona.edu/instructors/home), or you can schedule a one-on-one appointment by contacting the D2L support team (D2L@email.arizona.edu or 520.626.6804).

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Note: All instructors are responsible for requesting their own D2L course sites via https://d2l.arizona.edu/csr/. 2.5 SUMMER TEACHING STIPULATION Instructors may hold only one summer teaching position per summer in the English Department, Writing Program, and its affiliate programs (New Start and Med-Start). If you have been offered multiple positions, tell Monica Vega immediately so that she can offer one of your assignments to the next person who is ranked for that position. 2.6 GENERAL MEETING AND CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS All instructors must arrange their travel to attend the General Meeting, which occurs in mid-August and in early January, just before the beginning of the semester. The General Meeting is required. During the time an instructor holds a contract with the department, it is mandatory to reply to all emails and questions from students, faculty supervisors, and the Writing Program staff and administration. 2.7 TEXTBOOKS FOR FIRST-YEAR WRITING CLASSES If you are teaching English 101A or 101, be advised that ALL instructors are required to use the 4th edition of Writing as Revision, which must appear on your syllabus or it will not be approved. If you are teaching English 102 and/or 108, be advised that ALL instructors are required to use Writing Public Lives, 3rd edition, which must appear on your syllabus or it will not be approved. Instructors teaching English 101A, 101, 102, 107 & 108 may use alternative readings/articles/plays that are not in the assigned texts only with prior approval of the Course Director. If you are teaching English 109H, 306, 307, 308, 313, 340, use the Alternate Book Request form. Completely fill out a separate form for each book you wish to order. English 109H instructors must submit text requests to the Honors Course Director, Patrick Baliani, before submitting them to Sara Soto. The Student's Guide to First-Year Writing, 34th edition, and Rules for Writers, custom UA edition, are also required for all first-year courses. All three books will be automatically ordered in bulk. No other anthologies or books may be used. Alternative Readings Request When requesting to use texts that are not on the approved list for your course, you will need to fill out a form asking for the following information: 1. Instructor’s Name, Email, Course 2. Approved texts being used 3. Alternative/Additional readings info: title, author, edition [If using a film, how is it rated? Include one review]. 4. Length of text 5. Price of text (if applicable) 6. Summary of text 7. Rationale for using text in course (how, why, and so forth) 8. What you can do with this text that you can’t do with the approved text 9. In what ways this text might be objectionable to students, and what alternative texts you will provide 9


This information will be given to the appropriate course director, who will decide whether to approve your request. 2.8 PHOTOCOPYING PRIVILEGES You have several resources for making copies for teaching and personal needs, but you need to respect the limitations and policies governing each of these resources, or you risk losing copying privileges. These resources and their policies are as follows: 1. CCIT—YOUR OFFICES You have printing privileges in CCIT. You should NEVER make more than 200 copies per year in CCIT, and you can make one copy of a class handout here. You should NEVER copy class sets of materials in CCIT. SELF-SERVICE PRINTING TEACHING PERSONAL 1 HANDOUT FOR PRINT ING ML445 200 COPIES ANNUALLY 2. ML 384—WRITING PROGRAM COPIER You have 200 copies per academic year in ML 384—you can do your personal copying here (for your own graduate work) or you can make one copy of a class handout here for copying in ML 445. SELF-SERVICE COPYING TEACHING 1 HANDOUT FOR PRINTING IN ML 445

PERSONAL 200 COPIES ANNUALLY

3. ML 445—ENGLISH DEPARTMENT COPIER You can bring all requests for class handouts to ML 445 and leave at the front desk with the requisite info about number of copies, sections, etc. This is always your best (and really only) option for making class handouts. OFFICE-ASSISTED COPYING TEACHING HANDOUTS UP TO 20 PAGES (MORE THAN 20 PAGES, NEED PERMISSION)

PERSONAL NO PRIVILEGES

NOTE: UNLIMITED SCANNING OPTIONS IN ML 445. FOR PERSONAL, YOUR OWN CLASS, OR CLASSES YOU ARE TEACHING. IF YOU NEED A SCAN FROM A BOOK, HOWEVER, YOU WILL HAVE TO MAKE THE SCAN YOURSELF, WITH PERMISSION, ON THE 445 PRINTER. COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACCOUNT One more option you have for copying/printing is to use the COH resources. You can request an "Instructional Development Account": http://humanities.arizona.edu/ric/access. Development accounts and access to COHIC labs are available for all instructors who teach in the College of Humanities (including Faculty, GATs, Adjuncts, etc.). Requesting an account gives instructors a door code for the ML 511 and 512 teacher labs for work on the computers and printing. Instructors cannot print class sets, and must bring their own paper when printing more than 10 pages at a time. Instructors can print class materials and materials for their own research/studies, as long as they are only printing 1 copy and bringing paper for longer print-outs. 10


Instructors can also reserve computer classrooms for occasional use from the same link (above) and can request equipment for checkout (teaching or professional purposes) at this link: http://humanities.arizona.edu/faculty-staff/instructional-computing/equipment-checkout 2.9 PLACEMENT—HOW STUDENTS GET PLACED INTO YOUR CLASSES First-year students are assigned to an appropriate English composition course through evaluation of their SAT or ACT English scores and their high-school GPA. Students are usually notified of their English placement prior to arriving for their freshman orientation. However, for a variety of reasons, some students cannot be placed on the basis of their SAT/ACT scores or high-school records. Such students will be notified that they have “Placement Pending” and will be required to take a brief English placement test during orientation. If a student comes to you with concerns about his or her placement, please advise the student to go to www.english.arizona.edu/placement. At this website, students can find out more information about the classes they have placed in and find information about how they might change their placement. They can also find contact information for the proper people to consult about their placement. Keep in mind that you should not suggest a student “doesn’t belong” in your course as all students are placed using current data or a sit down exam. Remember all writers have strengths and weaknesses, and your guidance will help them become stronger.

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Chapter 3: Committees—Getting Involved 3.1 ENGLISH GRADUATE UNION (EGU) The English Graduate Union (EGU) is an organization that represents all English graduate students at the University of Arizona. Founded in 1991, EGU monitors graduate student workload, advocates for graduate student concerns and issues on many departmental and administrative levels, and mobilizes graduate students across the campus around important issues like health care, tuition remission, workload reduction, and childcare. Membership in EGU is open to all students enrolled in English department graduate programs. Meetings are held every other Friday at 4 pm in the Barry Briggs Lounge in CCIT 236. The fall 2012 schedule is TBA. For more information, or if you have questions, please contact the EGU Co-Chairs Adam Meehan and Emily Lyons: egucochairs@gmail.com. The EGU Travel Fund The GAT Travel Fund is set up for English Department graduate students who present a conference paper at a professional conference. Each graduate student may apply for funding for only ONE conference per fiscal year (July 1-June 30). Who is eligible? 1) All Creative Writing, EL/L, Literature, RCTE, and SLAT GATs who have completed both semesters of preceptorship. 2) Non-GATs in degree-seeking graduate programs in English. The fund covers a portion (75%) of the following items only: 1) Conference Registration Fee. 2) Roundtrip Domestic Airfare. 3) Roundtrip Airport Shuttle/Taxi Fare. Please note that the fund does NOT cover: 1) Hotel costs 2) Food 3) International Transport 4) Car rental or mileage 5) Any other expenses 6) Membership fees that are sometimes required when registering for a conference Non-GATs are eligible for 75% of registration and domestic transportation costs up to a maximum of $150. Non-GATs should fill out the same request form as GATs and follow the same submission procedures for documentation. If the conference takes place outside the US and funds are available, you may be reimbursed for the domestic portion of your travel. The fund reimburses 75% of the combined total of conference registration and domestic transportation costs up to a maximum of $325.

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In order to be eligible for funds, you must apply for funding before you attend the conference. In addition, funds are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis, and funding requests have been known to exceed the budget. Therefore, as soon as you receive your conference acceptance, please apply for funding. To do so, go to the following website for all current information: http://english.arizona.edu/index_site.php?id=567. When applying for an EGU Travel Grant, please submit the following items: 1) 2) 3) 4)

Completed Travel Fund form A copy of the acceptance letter or email from the conference organizers A copy of the receipt for the paid conference registration A copy of your airline travel itinerary/e-ticket or an estimate of the domestic transportation costs (including airport shuttle/taxi fares)

After receiving your application, and determining eligibility, you will receive a written “Notification of Eligibility” via email. After presenting at the conference, you must provide the following additional documents in order to process your refund: 1) A copy of the credit card or bank statement(s), in your name, showing payment for transportation and conference registration 2) All original receipts for the domestic transportation costs, including airport shuttle/taxi receipts 3) A photocopy of the conference program cover page and the page listing your paper as proof of attendance You should turn in all paperwork at once, no later than 30 days after your return. Please note that the amount to be dispersed will be dependent on your actual costs, as verified by receipts and official paperwork. Any expenses for which you do not provide receipts will not be reimbursed. You should receive a refund check within 2-3 weeks after your paperwork has been processed. The GAT travel fund form is available here: http://english.arizona.edu/index_site.php?id=567. 3.2 WRITING PROGRAM’S DIFFERENCE AND INEQUALITY (D&I) COMMITTEE The Writing Program’s D&I committee considers issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability in curriculum, assessment, teacher training, research, and other areas related to the writing classroom. Contact Al Harahap or Ana Ribero (harahap@email.arizona.edu or aribero@email.arizona.edu ) if you would like to know more about the Writing Program’s D&I committee. 3.3 GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT COUNCIL (GPSC) The Graduate & Professional Student Council (GPSC) is a representative body composed of graduate and professional students from colleges across the University of Arizona. It serves as the voice of graduate students to the UA administration, representing graduate student concerns regarding campus and academic issues on UA committees.

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Each year, the GPSC hosts a number of events that are intended to enhance the social and academic life of graduate and professional students at the University of Arizona, including: Graduate Orientation Graduate Orientation is intended to introduce new graduate and professional students to the University of Arizona, help them succeed, and enjoy their experience at the University of Arizona. Socials GPSC hosts several graduate and professional student socials throughout the year. Watch your email for more information or contact your GPSC representative(s) for more details. Student Showcase Student Showcase is an exhibition of undergraduate and graduate student research in all areas of academic study. Student showcase serves as the academic portion of Homecoming weekend every year. In addition to receiving thousands of dollars in prizes, Showcase winners take their research “on the road” to the state legislature, in Phoenix the following spring, as a part of The University of Arizona’s Pride Night. Graduate and Professional Student Appreciation Week Each spring, the GPSC sponsors Graduate and Professional Student Appreciation Week. GPSA Week celebrates the contributions that graduate and professional students make to the University of Arizona and helps to build a sense of graduate and professional student community. A.) How to Get Involved in GPSC During the fall and spring semesters, the GPSC hold bi-weekly meetings. Any person may attend and address the GPSC. You can find a schedule here: http://www.gpsc.arizona.edu. Become a GPSC Representative or Officer During the spring semester, graduate and professional students elect students to represent their college on the GPSC. A call for reps is made in the early spring, and any graduate student may run to represent his or her college. Volunteer with GPSC Graduate and professional students may petition to become non-voting members of the GPSC by contacting the GPSC President. Additionally, we need travel grant judges and volunteers for events such as blood drives, socials and graduate orientation. Contact the GPSC for more information. Become a GPSC Director At the end of each spring semester, the GPSC hires a travel grants director, events director, and research & policy director. These opportunities are announced on our website, and via email to program coordinators and other campus listservs. B.) GPSC Funding Opportunities The GPSC administers several types of funds for the purpose of enriching the social and academic life of graduate and professional students at the University of Arizona. Please submit correspondence concerning all funding opportunities to gpscgrant@email.arizona.edu. Email is preferred over telephone calls.

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Travel Grants With the support of the Graduate College and the UA Bookstore, the GPSC awards travel grants for graduate and professional students who are attending or presenting research at academic or professional conferences, or similar events. The application deadlines for travel grants are Aug. 1, Oct. 1, Dec. 1, Feb. 1, April 1, and June 1. Applications must be received before 5:00 pm on the date of the deadline. Club Funding The GPSC provides club funding for clubs and student organizations whose membership is at least 50% UA graduate and professional students. Professional Opportunities and Development (POD) Grants The GPSC awards Professional Opportunity and Development Grants to groups of graduate and professional students for the purposes of holding academic conferences or similar events. The application deadlines for club funding and POD grants are: Sept. 15, Oct. 15, Nov. 15, Jan. 15, Feb. 15, Mar. 15, April 15, and June 15. Applications must be received before 5:00 pm on the date of the deadline. 3.4 WRITING PROGRAM ADVISORY COMMITTEE (WRIPAC) WriPAC members include: The Writing Program Director, Associate Director, Course Directors of ENGL 101 and 102, EGU (2 representatives), and one representative from each of the following positions: Transfer and Placement Coordinators, Guide editor, Writing Center coordinator. The committee meets each month to oversee and better articulate the curriculum, assessment, and instruction in composition courses. Additionally, they are responsible for policies and procedures, program assessment, research on composition, and diversity issues.

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Chapter 4: Awards and Opportunities 4.1 AWARDS–INSTRUCTOR AND STUDENT FELLOWSHIP AND TEACHING AWARDS All awards are described on the Writing Program web site at http://english.arizona.edu/index_site.php?id=277&preview=1 All the nominations and application process occurs in the spring semesters. Awards are made in April each year. Fellowships  Tilly Warnock Fellowships  Writing Program Fellowships Teaching Awards (Nominated)–for first year GATs only  Ruth Gardner Teaching Award  Johnnie Raye Harper Teaching Award Teaching Awards (Self-nominated)–all GATs eligible  Julie Christakis DeFazio Excellence in Teaching Award  Barry Briggs Teaching Award  Difference & Inequality Teaching Award  Professional Writing Teaching Award  Adjunct Lecturer Teaching Award  Service Learning Teaching Award 4.2 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT POSITIONS General Selection Criteria GATs who, as of Fall 2013, will have taught composition courses for a full academic year may apply. Applicants must have knowledge of the first-year curriculum (101 and 102) and A Student’s Guide to First-Year Writing, and they must be able to commit to the term for which they apply. All GATs in professional development positions must be able to work collaboratively and maintain accurate records of their work. Representatives from each area will also sit on WriPAC. See specific selection criteria for each position. Preference will be given to qualified applicants for Professional Development positions. You may not hold more than one position that results in a reassignment of duties (such as a .25 FTE or more of your teaching responsibilities). Applicants who are ranked at the top of the pool for any of the professional development position may be invited to interview for the position. All positions are contingent on funding. Application and Selection Process: Applications for available positions are invited in January each year. To help focus your application, you are encouraged to speak with the GATs currently in the positions, the Director or Associate Director, and others involved with the specific activities. Applicants should submit a vita, and drawing upon the 16


specific and general selection criteria, craft a letter demonstrating how their interests and experiences qualify them for the position. Materials must be combined into one (1) PDF file and emailed by attachment to Sara Soto, Administrative Assistant in the Writing Program. No paper materials or separate electronic files will be accepted. Applicants who do not follow these guidelines will NOT be considered for the positions. You may apply for more than one position, but you must submit a complete application for each position and indicate their ranked preferences for the positions in each application letter. Application letters should be addressed to the Director of the Writing Program, but keep in mind that they will be read by the Director and Associate Director, the supervisors of the various positions, and the GATs who currently hold the positions. These GATs will write a joint letter to the Director ranking the applications and discussing the ranks with the Director. The Director and Associate Director will review all applications, rankings, and applicants’ faculty advisor reports and will make the final selections. Each position carries a one-course reassignment each semester, and some positions require summer work (for an additional stipend). Specific duties and terms of the positions vary with the changing needs and commitments of the Writing Program. All positions include an obligation to a mid-year meeting with the personnel involved -- the Director and Associate Director of the Writing Program and the GATs -- to discuss various aspects of the positions and the development of the work and learning involved. In addition, all positions require an end-of-semester and/or annual report of activities that is written for the Director, Associate Director, and WriPAC. Transfer and Placement Coordinators (TPCs, formerly called Academic Transfer Assistants) Fall and Spring, two two-year positions to join continuing TPC, 10 hours a week. Applicants should expect to serve for two years upon a successful midterm review. Director and Associate Director coordinate work of the TPCs prior to the beginning of each semester and meet regularly with them throughout the term. Transfer and Placement Coordinators work extensively with representatives from the Writing Program staff, Graduation Services, the Registrar, and International Student Affairs, and a wide variety of officials at both the UA and other universities. The Transfer and Placement Coordinators prepare collaborative semester reports for Director, Associate Director, and WriPAC. TPC positions are two-year commitments with summer work (for extra stipend) expected. Responsibilities include, but are not limited, to the following: • Participate in training for use of computerized record system needed for transfer evaluation • Evaluate transcripts and institutional materials for course equivalency throughout the year • Evaluate Upper-Division Transfer Student Portfolios • Evaluate CLEP Exams • Organize and staff Roster Outreach • Staff online and/or face-to-face student orientation and facilitate placement process for students 17


• • •  

Help maintain and update web-based orientation materials Update Equivalist program (articulating other colleges’/universities’ courses with ours) Help implement and refine new procedures for equivalency evaluation process Participate in Writing Program Committees, WriPAC and Curriculum and Assessment Committee. Prepare an annual report due to the Director by late May.

In addition to the General Criteria for Selection listed, specific selection criteria include: demonstrated strengths in assessing and responding to student writing; demonstrated interest in issues involved in administration; experience using technology for multiple purposes, including record keeping, organizing information, and development and maintenance of web-based information; and ability to work with undergraduate and graduate students, transfer students, and university faculty and staff across the campus; and the ability to work collaborative with other TPCs. NOTE: All incoming TPCs must complete training to have access to vital university systems to complete their work. These trainings need to be completed in the spring of their hiring year. Summer work: Current Transfer and Placement Coordinators are expected to work summers for an additional stipend. Summer responsibilities and time periods may vary. Winter Session: Transfer and Placement Coordinators may be expected to work orientation sessions in January. When available, Transfer and Placement Coordinators may apply for additional winter-session work. Guide Editors Guide Editors can expect extensive work with Course Directors, Faculty Supervisors, Writing Program instructors (GATs and Adjuncts), undergraduate students, the English Department business manager, and the publisher’s representatives and editors. Editor positions are a two-year term. Responsibilities include, but are not limited, to the following:  Edit editions of A Student’s Guide to First-Year Writing.  Attend weekly or bi-monthly meetings among the three editors.  Present at new GAT Orientation (August), two General Meetings (August and January), and the 102 Preceptorship (November).  Organize Student Essay Contest, Cover Art Contest, and Spring Awards Ceremony.  Develop on-line WIRe and Guide materials with Course Directors.  Obtain copyright and publication releases for work published in Guide.  Work on merging Guide website into WIRe and providing a ―Teacher’s Guide to the Guide on WIRe.  Serve on the Course Directors Committee and WriPAC (Writing Program Advisory Committee)  Prepare annual report for Director due in late May. In addition to the General Criteria for Selection listed, specific selection criteria include: experience using the Student’s Guide and developing supplemental instructor resources; an assessment of the Guide to provide specific improvements; interest and experience in working in a team; experience in word 18


processing; and demonstrated strengths in organizing complex tasks, writing, editing, and proofreading work for diverse audiences. Experience with web site development is useful. Writing Center Graduate Assistant (WCGA) The WCGA position is housed within the THINK TANK and funded by the Division of Student Affairs. Because the department and the services being delivered are a part of a larger divisional transformation within Student Affairs, the responsibilities of the position are subject to revision. The person selected for this position will be expected to be optimistic, innovative, flexible, forward- thinking, and adaptable. A successful candidate will contribute to the goals, mission, and purpose of the Writing Center as one of the critical student services within the THINK TANK (the UA’s centralized academic learning support center). The WCGA will meet regularly with the Writing Specialist and other WCGA to ensure that students seeking writing support receive high-quality and well- coordinated services that align with Writing Program expectations. The WCGA works with undergraduate peer tutors at all levels (from new hires to experienced master tutors), the other WCGA, the Writing Specialist, THINK TANK personnel, faculty, advisors, and other campus representatives. Applicants receiving successful reviews will be eligible for rehire. WCGA has primary responsibilities including the following:  collaboratively work with THINK TANK leadership and the Department of English Writing Program to develop and deliver high-quality services to students using the Writing Center.  provide ongoing development, training, discipline based support, and mentoring to newly hired and experienced peer tutors.  work directly as needed with student clients seeking writing support.  research best practices of Writing Center pedagogy in order to develop new writing resources and services for UA faculty and students.  analyze usage patterns, and contribute to reports documenting use of the Writing Center. implement special projects as time allows. In addition to these responsibilities, excellent candidates match the following criteria:  in good standing in the Department of English Writing Program and in the candidate’s graduate program;  experience teaching writing with an emphasis on conferencing strategies for purposes of invention, organization, and revision;  experience with tutorial approaches to writing instruction with diverse student populations including ESL students;  supervisory and/or administrative experience;  prior experience in a Writing Center or similar organization;  demonstrated interest in working with a large community of academic support professionals that includes math, science, and general education as well as writing;  evidence of commitment to contributing to a unit that brings the best practices of both academic and student affairs together to benefit students.  ability to work occasional weekends and evenings.

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4.3 FUNDS TO FOSTER COLLABORATION/GRANTS The Writing Program will provide funding to instructors who wish to expand their collaborations with students beyond the confines of regular classroom activities, for example, by holding an academic conference or hosting a film series that involves more than one class or by inviting a speaker or having students attend a play. Funding from the Writing Program is similar to funding provided by the Xerox and Student/Faculty Interaction Grants, and applicants must show that they have applied to these funding sources before seeking funding from the Writing Program. The following link contains information about applying for Student/Faculty Interaction Grants: http://studentaffairs.arizona.edu/grants. To apply for Funds to Foster Collaboration, an instructor must submit a memo that specifies how the proposed activity will enhance students’ learning with an eye toward the learning outcomes for the particular course. Preference will be given to requests that are essential in holding an activity that will serve a purpose clearly integral to the outcomes of a course, and preference will also be given to support collaboration among teachers and sections. The proposal should include the following information: 1) Proposed expenses to be funded, with the cost generally $200 or below; there can be no direct stipend paid to students. The expenses can cover operations (copying, travel, food, production, etc.) only 2) The need for funded expenses within the planned activity 3) The ways that activity serves the goals of the course 4) The number of students involved 5) The funding that has been applied for and received from other sources, with the provision that no application will be considered until after the applicant has sought out funding from other available sources. If funds are approved, a summary report of the project must be submitted to the Director of the Writing Program. Submit proposals to the Director of the Writing Program kimmehea@email.arizona.edu or deliver in person to ML 380. Contact Amy C. Kimme Hea at the above email address if you have any questions or need more information.

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Chapter 5: Advising and Resources 5.1 ADVISING GRADES AND STRUCTURE A.) Graduate College First-year GATs In order to qualify for a “Superior” rating, GATs must have successfully done the following: 1) Achieved a minimum of 2 As and a B on Preceptorship duties 2) Fulfilled a minimum of all but two required responsibilities listed for the work of Preceptorship 3) Successfully completed the Teaching Assistant/Associate Training Online (TATO) “Required Policies” test and modules 4) Successfully completed the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) test and modules. In order to qualify for a “Satisfactory” rating, GATs must have successfully done the following: 1) Achieved a minimum of Bs or above on Preceptorship duties 2) Fulfilled a minimum of all but four required responsibilities listed for the work of Preceptorship 3) Completed the required TATO and FERPA policies test and modules After the First-Year (2nd/3rd, and 4+) In order to qualify for a “Superior” rating, GATs must have successfully completed the following: 1) Attended the General Meeting, the supervisory meeting, and the appropriate course director’s meeting at the beginning of each semester. 2) Submitted the syllabus with the program policies and a web address (if applicable) 3) Submitted all major assignments 4) Contacted their faculty supervisor in a timely manner about problems 5) Responded to faculty supervisor’s messages in a timely manner 6) Assigned final grades according to Writing Program standards (see rubrics on WIRe and the Student’s Guide, but in general instructors should have a spread of grades) 7) Submitted final grades to UAccess on time 8) Fulfilled a “superior activity,” as designated on the Superior Activities Form, which must be turned in to the faculty supervisor before the end of the semester so that the faculty supervisor may assess the GAT’s eligibility for a “Superior” rating. The form can be found under “forms” at the following link: http://english.arizona.edu/index_site.php?id=138 9) Complete any required reporting or observations that are required for your year in the program. In order to qualify for a “Satisfactory” rating, GATs must have successfully accomplished all but one of the responsibilities listed above. Note: GATs should keep accurate records of attendance and grades in case they are needed. GATs must turn in their grade books to ML 380 when they graduate. B.) Preceptorship First-year GATs will receive an S (superior) in this year-long course (ENGL 591) if they contribute and collaborate with their colleagues each week. If a GAT misses preceptorship meetings or does not

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contribute, he or she will receive a P (pass). If he or she fails to fulfill the course requirements, then a grade of U (unsatisfactory) can be expected. Your faculty supervisor is responsible for determining your grade. Faculty supervisors will write endof-semester reports based on your fulfillment of preceptorship responsibilities: copies are given to you, your Graduate Program Director (GPD), the Writing Program Director. They are also made available to the Graduate College. 5.2 BROWN BAG WORKSHOPS There will be Writing Program professional development workshops offered each semester. Brown Bag workshops are organized by faculty supervisors and are lead by exemplary teachers in the Writing Program. Stay tuned for podcasts of our Brown Bag series. 5.3 WRITING INSTRUCTORS’ RESOURCES (WIRe) WIRe contains teaching resources that instructors have contributed for you to use and adapt. On WIRe you will find a range of teaching materials to support every aspect of course design from grading rubrics to model syllabi and journal assignments. To access WIRe, go to the following location: URL: http://wire.english.arizona.edu/ You will be prompted for a user-name and password. Use the following: Username: write Password: teach

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Chapter 6: Student Policies and Class Management 6.1 ABSENCE AND ATTENDANCE POLICY–STUDENT All instructors must clearly communicate the Writing Program’s absence policy to their students at the outset of the semester. Most of the issues that come up for instructors are related to the attendance policy. Remember that you should mention the policy on the first day of classes, but you want to reiterate it often in the first week or even two so that students who register late for your course are well aware of the policy. Also, many of them are enrolled in courses where attendance may not be required, and you need to be clear that coming to class is required. There only two acceptable excuses for non-attendance: a religious observance or an official Dean of Students’ excuse. In regard to the former, the Writing Program’s policy is to count all religious holidays as an excused absence. Students who demonstrate religious affiliation are required to disclose in advance if they will be observing a religious holiday at any point during the semester so that instructors can make arrangements for students to do equivalent work in their absence. In the case of the latter, students may have a Dean’s excuse which is the only official attendance notification you should accept. A dean’s excuse is provided for students who need to miss class due to sports competitions, travel with the school band, or other legitimate university functions, and you should excuse these absences. However, they do not include fraternity or sorority functions. Since doctor’s notes, court dates, family emergencies, missed flights, and so forth do not count as excused absences, instructors need to be reasonable and skeptical simultaneously when a student misses class for any reason. You must upload to your class D2L site, the official Writing Program policy, without alterations to its language. Consistency of policy saves Writing Program staff from hours of labor trying to figure out your policy, and instead, the program requires consistent policies among all teachers. Remember if you have any questions about the attendance policy, you should contact your supervisor. The official syllabus policy states Attendance Attendance is mandatory. Missing one or more days in the first week of classes will mean you are dropped, and missing after the first week may lead to an administrative drop, grade penalty, or even a failing grade in the course. Writing courses are workshop classes that include in-class writing, peer group work, and conferences. Therefore, students should not be late and should not miss class. Any class work missed as a result of tardiness or absence is the student’s responsibility to make up, if the instructor allows make-up work. First-week Attendance Policy In accordance with the university's policy for high-demand classes, the Writing Program drops students for non-attendance as follows: During the first week of the semester, a student who missed even one (1) day of a 1-or 2-day a week class will be dropped for non-attendance. During the first week of the semester, a student who missed any two (2) days of a 3-day a week class will be dropped for non-attendance.

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2-week and beyond Attendance Policy After the first week, attendance is managed as follows: Students enrolled in a traditional sixteen week semester cannot miss more than a week of classes without penalty. For example, if your class meets one day a week, you may miss only one class meeting, two days a week, only two, and three days a week, only three. For each class meeting missed thereafter, your final course grade will be reduced by 1%. Students who exceed the allowed number of absences during the first eight weeks of a semester may be dropped with a W. Students may fail during the second half of the semester for excessive absences. All holidays or special events observed by organized religions will be honored for those students who show affiliation with that particular religion. Note that a dean’s note justifies absences for UA functions but must be presented to your instructor. Doctor’s appointments, job interviews, and other important appointments do not count as excused absences. If you have a legitimate conflict or an extreme emergency, discuss the situation with your instructor. NOTE: Being dropped from your English class may mean you are below the minimum number of units, thus violating financial aid/scholarship OR international student status. International students should consult with the International Student Services Office before dropping below full time. A.) Email text for the attendance policy warning: When a student reaches the maximum number of absences allowed but has not yet exceeded the attendance policy, send the following message: As a courtesy, I am notifying you that you have missed “x” classes within the first 8 weeks of the semester. Your next absence would exceed the number of excused absences allowed, thus violating the attendance policy of this course and of the Writing Program as stated in the course syllabus: Students who miss more than three classes of a MWF course or more than two of a TR course may be dropped within the first 8 weeks with a W. Each absence above the allowed number will result in a one percent deduction from a student’s final grade if that student remains in the course. Please note that being dropped from this class may reduce the total number of units you are carrying, changing your status thus possibly jeopardizing scholarships and financial aid. Your attendance is your responsibility. 6.2 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY Of particular importance to writing instructors is the Code of Academic Integrity. Instructions for holding and recording a Faculty/Student Conference, to discuss a suspected breach of the Code, are available here: http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/academicintegrityforfaculty. A violation of the Code of Academic Integrity includes copying material from other students and using another student’s work as well as lifting phrases, sentences, and even whole paragraphs from sources that are published on paper or on the internet.

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Please note the following guidelines when dealing with suspected violations of the Code of Academic Integrity: 1. You may not alter a student’s grade in any way based on suspicion or even on evidence of plagiarism without following required procedure and filing a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity. To alter a grade without filing a violation is to deny the student due process. 2. Cases of suspected plagiarism require a faculty-student conference within 15 academic days of discovering a possible violation. You should seek the advice of your faculty supervisor about how to conduct the conference. 3. Always make a photocopy of the assignment that you suspect is plagiarized and gather evidence to support your suspicion. Do this before you talk to the student. 4. Follow protocol in notifying the student of the need for a faculty-student conference. The required steps are available at the link above and summarized for you, with additional information, in the following documents available on WIRe at the Policies link on the left side of the page:  Steps for Following the Dean of Students Guidelines for Filing Violations  Email Template for Notifying Student 5. The steps you take after the faculty-student conference will depend on what you learn during the conference. If you are able to determine that the plagiarism is inadvertent, you will likely be advised by your supervisor to treat the situation as a teaching moment involving revisions and corrections. If you decide that deliberate plagiarism has occurred, you must decide upon an appropriate sanction (seek your supervisor’s advice if you are uncertain) and follow the required steps for reporting the violation. See the documents available to you on WIRe under the Policies link on the left side of the page. Note that under the section devoted to grades, your syllabus also states, “Instructors will not evaluate an essay or assign credit for it without first seeing the required drafts.” Because students are sometimes tempted to plagiarize when they have procrastinated and find themselves facing an impossible deadline, you can announce to your class that if you are seeing a paper for the first time when it is submitted for a grade, that paper will be considered a draft, not a final version eligible for a grade. Drawing on this policy and reminding students about it periodically will give you more latitude for dealing with suspicious papers. It is always best to announce these policies more than once and to explain to students why we have them. 6.3 CODE OF CONDUCT All UA students are responsible for upholding the Student Code of Conduct, which can be read online at http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/studentcodeofconduct. From the Code of Conduct of Student Behavior, this includes the following: “Interfering with or disrupting university or university-sponsored activities, including but not limited to classroom-related activities, studying, teaching, research, intellectual or creative endeavor, administration, service or the provision of communication, computing or emergency services.” This means no electronic devices in an ON position in class without your instructor’s permission. Advice on dealing with Code of Conduct issues: 1. The Student Code of Conduct covers situations in which you perceive a student to be a threat to others OR to him- or herself. While such cases are rare, you need to know how to act quickly.

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a. Perception of an immediate threat to you or to other students should be handled by calling 911.  During the first week of class, enter the physical address of the building in which you teach into your cell phone or record it someplace where it will always be available to you. You will need this address if you have to make a 911 call during class. b. Concern about a student who appears to be in crisis should be directed to the Dean of Students Office at 621-7057. c. If you become aware of a possible crisis situation that seems to warrant immediate attention after normal business hours, you should go to the Dean of Students web site (http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/) and search for “Dean on Call.” The screen will ask you to log in with your UA Net ID and password, after which you will see the phone number for that dean. Call that number and report the situation. The person on call will decide what steps to take next. 2. Student behavior that is disruptive rather than threatening is more common and should be addressed sooner rather than later. You will find disruptive behavior defined and steps for how to address it clearly explained in the following publication from the Dean of Student s Office: https://d2l.arizona.edu/d2l/lms/content/preview.d2l?tId=1784631&ou=257416 Note that persistently arriving late and/or leaving early is clearly an example of disruptive behavior, as is the student who talks incessantly while you are teaching and the student who loudly and frequently interrupts you with questions or comments. Addressing problems such as these immediately is always recommended. Other students notice and may lose respect for a teacher who does not address disruptive behavior. 6. Address disruptive behavior as soon as you become aware of it—before it becomes an emotional issue for you. You need to remain calm and professional when talking to a student. Avoid public confrontation. The steps you need to take are listed in the publication link above. You will also find these steps outlined and additional helpful information in the following documents available on WIRe under the Policies link on the left side of the page: a. EXCERPT: Three Steps for Dealing with Disruptive Student Behavior b. Email TEMPLATES: Student Code of Conduct 3. Document all steps taken related to Student Code of Conduct issues. Save this documentation until the deadline for filing a grade appeal has passed. Notify your faculty supervisor of any Student Code of Conduct complaint that you will be reporting to the Dean of Students. The Writing Program requires notification of such complaints. 6.4 GRADING A.) Grading rubrics You can find sample grading rubrics on WIRe for each of assignments in the courses offered in the Writing Program. The username is “teach” and the password is “write.” Distributing and discussing a grading rubric in advance of the date an assignment is due is the best way to help students understand what is expected of them in the assignment and forestall grade complaints. 26


B.) Group norming All new instructors will participate in norming or group grading sessions with their faculty supervisor in their Preceptorship groups. These sessions will enable new instructors to define grading criteria, to share rubrics, and to discuss strategies for commenting on student work. C.) Grade inflation Students who perform exceptionally well ought to be awarded an A. Conversely, an instructor should never assign a grade that exaggerates a student’s proficiency or actual achievement. Instructors assign grades so that students can evaluate their progress and learning. Moreover, grades allow future employers and graduate schools to make meaningful distinctions between students. Instructors who assign grades that are not an accurate reflection of student achievement are doing their students a disservice and can expect to be called for a meeting with the Director of the Writing Program. D.) Incompletes The Writing Program rarely awards a grade of Incomplete, and it is only an option if the student meets the minimum requirements for consideration. Those include 1) extenuating circumstances for a student, 2) 70 percent of the graded work is already completed, and 3) the student currently is passing the class. Then, only if the student meets all three criteria will the Writing Program Director consider the award of an incomplete. The instructor and student must then agree to the following aspects of the complete (putting it in writing with Sara Soto in ML380): 1) the student’s current grade (in a number format), 2) the work to be completed (specific assignments), 3) the percentage of the overall course grade that this work represents, and 4) a due date by which the student will deliver the work to you for grading. You are responsible for grading that material and filing a change of grade form. I.) UA Grading Scale (unofficial, nuanced version) UA does not have a plus or minus system. If you are used to that system, below is how instructors at UA make these distinctions. If you come from another system and have questions, talk with your faculty supervisor. E.) Changing a grade If you decide to change a student’s grade after you have submitted your grades, you have 5 days after submitting when you may change the grade on the UAccess grade roster. After that period, you must file a paper change-of-grade form, which you can get in the Writing Program office, ML 380. When filling out the form, you may use only one word in the “Reason for Change” space: “Miscalculation.” No further explanation should be given. In the case of changing an incomplete to a letter grade, no reason should be given. Plus and Minus Percentage Scale Unofficial Percentage A 95–100 A90–94 B+ 87–89 B 84–86 B80–83 C+ 77–79

UA Equivalent A A B B B C 27


C CD E

74–76 70–73 60–69 < 59

C C D E

Plus and Minus Point System Scale A 4.0 A3.7 A-/B+ 3.5 B+ 3.3 B 3.0 B2.7 B-/C+ 2.5 C+ 2.3 C 2.0 C1.7 C-/D+ 1.5 D+ 1.3 D 1.0 D0.7 E 0.0 6.5 ROSTER OUTREACH At the General Meeting each semester, the Transfer/Placement Coordinators will announce the days and times for Roster Outreach. At Roster Outreach, we assist students who have a problem with their registration or do not appear on the class roster. We also assist instructors who have questions or problems with their rosters. Instructors should send students with registration problems to ML 376 as soon as the issue becomes apparent. The Writing Program policy stipulates that no students shall be added to a Writing Program English course after the first two weeks of class. For this reason the Writing Program’s last date to add differs from the University of Arizona’s last date to add. Instructors need to check their department mailbox for red slips each time before teaching during the first two weeks of the semester. Send red-slipped students to ML 376 with the red slip immediately. These students cannot return to your class unless they have a white admit slip. Instructors should under no circumstances add students by signing a Change of Schedule Form or by putting students on a “wait list” at any time. Students may come to your class or email you pleading to be signed into your course, but you must refuse them. Students wishing to add a Writing Program course must register themselves online through UAccess. Instructors should print a newly updated class roster prior to teaching each class during the first two weeks of the semester. Students should be prepared to provide proof of registration. This is important because instructors cannot permit students missing from the class roster to remain in class. If a student claims to be registered, but the instructor does not have the student's name on his or her roster, the instructor should send the student to ML 376 immediately. The Transfer/Placement Coordinators will

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confirm whether the student is registered and will either send the student back to class with a white admit slip or will ask the student to register for the class online through UAccess. Attendance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Week one (1) of each semester MWF Instructors During the first week of the semester, a student who missed any two (2) days of a 3-day a week class must be dropped by the instructor for non-attendance. MW and TR Instructors During the first week of the semester, a student who missed even one (1) day of a 2-day a week class must be dropped by the instructor for non-attendance. Saturday Instructors During the first week of the semester, a student who missed even one (1) day of a 1-day a week class must be dropped by the instructor for non-attendance Attendance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Week two (2) of each semester: Writing Program Attendance Policy takes effect. 6.6 WRITING PROGRAM RESEARCH POLICY Because writing courses are required by most entering freshman, researchers often want access to students in your courses. The policy for research is that all research projects require the permission of the Writing Program Director. This policy applies to GATs in our program as well as other researchers seeking access. Research requests should be sent the Director, and most will need to include IRB proposals. Further depending upon timing, the proposal will be vetted by WriPAC.

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Chapter 7: Technology for Teaching and Learning 7.1 VIEWING YOUR CLASSROOM AND TECHNOLOGY ONLINE To see a picture of your classroom and the technology available, go to the Room Database tool. Your classroom can be viewed online at http://cdb.uaav.arizona.edu/. 7.2 ORDERING CLASSROOM TECHNOLOGY For those in the ILC, the order form you need to complete to request a cart of laptops is available through UA Audiovisual Equipment Services: http://www.uaav.arizona.edu/equipment_services.php If you have questions about equipment or audiovisual services, please call 520-621-3852. 7.3 USING D2L Desire2Learn (D2L) is an online course management system supported by the University that allows instructors to post announcements, publish course content (such as syllabi, documents, course readings, links, etc), set up a course calendar, maintain forums for online discussions, post student grades, give quizzes, and accept and evaluate student work on-line. The program requires you to post the following documents to your D2L site: Syllabus policies Syllabus course description Syllabus schedule Note: You also must use the D2L gradebook feature to maintain accurate grading and attendance records. It is up to your own discretion whether or not you make the grades visible to students. You must export this information at the end of semester and email it to the Writing Program address of uawriting@email.arizona.edu before you are released for the semester. Initial requests for a D2L site will take 3-5 business days to administer. For this reason, it is advised that you request an account as soon as you know what sections you are teaching. All instructors must request their own D2L sites via the following link: https://d2l.arizona.edu/csr/. For questions about using D2L, email D2L@email.arizona.edu or call 520-626-6804 and ask to speak to a D2L staff member. 7.4 LISTSERV WPADMIN Email List This listserv allows us to provide you with valuable program announcements. This list gives you information about required deadlines, policies, and administrative updates to all instructors in the Writing Program. If you suspect you are not on this crucial listserv, contact Monica Vega immediately at movega@email.arizona.edu. 7.5 OSCR LABS To book a computer classroom contact the OSCR labs at http://www.oscr.arizona.edu/locations/reserve

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Click on the “Online Reservation Request” to complete the necessary form to reserve a computer lab. They have labs available, but you will need to be flexible about the date and submit your request at least 72 hours before you need the lab. 7.6 STREAMING VIDEO AND UA ELECTRONIC RESERVES Anyone teaching a course offered on the University of Arizona main campus may request that a video title be streamed. To ensure that needed video titles will be prepared for streaming, please submit your requests for streaming video through the UA library’s Express Document Delivery Service. Visit the Course Reserves page at: http://www.library.arizona.edu/services/faculty/bookings.html If you want your students to watch a streaming video from home or the dorms, they must do the following: 1) Download 2) Install 3) AND connect via password to the UA library Students can download the free VPN software required to connect the UA library from here: https://sitelicense.arizona.edu/vpn/ Remember, students must establish a VPN connection with the library before they will be granted access to a film. They MUST enter a valid UA log-in name and password to make the connection. After, and only after, students have established a VPN connection, may they click the link the library provides to watch the film. 7.7 TEACHER-COURSE EVALUATIONS (TCES) ONLINE This link will take you to the report designed for instructors, instead of students, so you can see numerical summaries and comparison groups: https://aer.arizona.edu/FacultyOnline/. 7.8 UA EMAIL ACCOUNT All instructors are employees of the University of Arizona (UA) and required to have and use a UA email account. Your UA email account is the only means of communication across campus. This includes the distribution of sensitive and important information regarding payroll, financial aid, health insurance, Campus Health test results, and emergency notices. 7.9 UACCESS All new instructors will be granted access to UAccess by the time of the General Meeting. After this date, instructors can access their class rosters on UAccess using their standard UA Net ID and password. Please check your class lists (course/section numbers) to make certain you are assigned to the right classes. If you are not assigned to the right classes, please contact Monica Vega immediately at movega@email.arizona.edu. In order to take attendance and verify the most current enrollment, please access your class roster via UAccess Student—Instructor Center before each class day for the first two weeks of class: http://uaccess.arizona.edu.

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You will also want to refer to the class roster via UAccess periodically to make sure it corresponds with your D2L class roster. D2L is not a sufficient method for verifying enrollment due to the 48-hour lag time between updates. 7.10 TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOPS Want to learn how to design your own website or do digital video editing? Sign up for a free workshop with University Information Technology Services (UITS) staff here: http://www2.uits.arizona.edu/workshops/current_workshops.

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Chapter 8: Resources for Students 8.1 DEAN OF STUDENTS/STUDENT AFFAIRS The University seeks to promote a safe environment where students and employees may participate in the educational process without compromising their health, safety, or welfare. To this end, threats of physical harm to any member of the University community, including oneself, are prohibited. Threatening behavior is defined as any statement, communication, conduct or gesture, including those in written form, directed toward any member of the University community that causes reasonable apprehension of physical harm to a person or property. A student can be guilty of threatening behavior even if the person who is the object of the threat does not observe or receive it, so long as a reasonable person would interpret the maker’s statement, communication, conduct or gesture as a serious expression of intent to physically harm. Anyone who observes what appears to be threatening behavior must report it to the Dean of Student Office at the following number 520-621-7059 to initiate a Student Code of Conduct investigation. The investigation is initiated once a written complaint is received. Due to the confidential nature of the report, complaints should be brought to the Dean of Students Office, Old Main Room 203, Tucson, Arizona, 85721. Do not send complaints via email. If you experience disruptive behavior, which is defined as behavior that “interferes with university or university sponsored activities, including but not limited to classroom related activities, studying, teaching, research, intellectual or creative endeavors, administration, service or the provision of communication, computing or emergency services” consult your faculty supervisor. 8.2 THE WRITING CENTER IN THE THINK TANK The Writing Center is part of the Think Tank which offers free, individualized tutoring for UA undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty and staff. At the Writing Center, a trained peer consultant will work with you on anything you are writing, at any stage in the writing process. Appointments are recommended, but not required. The Writing Center is located in the Bear Down Gym if you want to visit; also, more information is available at http://studentaffairs.arizona.edu/thinktank/. 8.3 WRITING SKILLS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (WSIP) The Writing Skills Improvement Program offers free professional tutoring in writing for all students at the University of Arizona. Any student who wishes to sign up for a regular tutor to work with one or two hours a week or to work with a tutor on a drop-in basis must go in person to the WSIP main office at 1201 East Helen Street. To learn more about WSIP, go to http://wsip.arizona.edu.

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Appendices

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Appendix A: Writing Program Organizational Chart

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Appendix B: Department of English Organizational Chart

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Appendix C: Writing Program & English Department Staff Listings

Writing Program Soto, Sara , Administrative Assistant- Writing Program 520-626-8873 Modern Languages, Room 380 smbsoto@email.arizona.edu    

Instructor absences (reporting). Registration and administrative dates and deadlines. Teaching policy and student issues. Textbook orders.

De Soto Vega, Monica , Program Coordinator, Senior - Writing Program 520-621-3553 Modern Languages, Room 374 movega@email.arizona.edu    

Teaching schedules, classroom set-up (space or seating). Teaching forms distribution: GAT Reappointments, course proposals, teaching schedule forms, and summer teaching requests. Technology equipment inquiries. UACCESS Instructor Center (class rosters, taking attendance).

Vickery, Sara, Office Specialist, Sr.- Writing Program 520-626-8678 Modern Languages, Room 380 sev@email.arizona.edu      

Administrative forms (drops, adds, Change of Grade). Class enrollment/attendance roster issues. Copy codes. Faculty Supervisor Evaluations. Syllabi. Teacher Course Evaluations.

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English Department Canto, Lourdes , Business Manager, Senior – English Department 520-621-1836 Modern Languages, Room 445 lcanto@email.arizona.edu 

Responsible for the Financial Management and Operations regarding the Department of English. Direct supervisor for the staff within ML445.  Point of contact for payroll and hiring questions/concerns.  Point of contact for any issues or concerns regarding CCIT 236 Computing, The Sonora Review Journal, the New Directions Conference and the GAT Travel fund. Galvez, Mary Jo, Accountant- English Department 520-621-1836 Modern Languages, Room 445 mgalvez@email.arizona.edu 

Works closely with Lourdes Canto and assists her with many of the operations of the English Department. Instructors should see Mary Jo when Lourdes is unavailable.

Godoy, Julie, Office Specialist – English Department 520-621-9325 Modern Languages, Room 445 jgodoy@email.arizona.edu   

Oversees the front office student workers. Responsible for the mailboxes and photocopy jobs in ML 445. Process supply orders as needed.

Marma, Marcia, Program Assistant for ELL/LIT- English Department 520-621-1358 Modern Languages, Room 454 mmarma@email.arizona.edu  

Liaison for Literature and ESL graduate students with Graduate College questions, concerns, issues, and paperwork. Registers graduate students for their ESL or Literature graduate courses.

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Meyerson, Sharonne, Program Assistant for CW/RCTE- English Department 520-621-7216 Modern Languages, Room 456 sharonne@email.arizona.edu  

Liaison for CW and RCTE graduate students with Graduate College questions, concerns, issues, and paperwork. Registers graduate students for CW or RCTE graduate courses.

Pearmain, Stephanie , Administrative Associate- English Department 520-621-1836 Modern Languages, Room 445 pearmain@email.arizona.edu  

CatCard access for CCIT 236 (instructor pod spaces, computer lab, & lounge). Processes adjunct hiring packets and renewals.

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Guide to Enforcing Key Writing Course Policies

Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism: What your syllabus states: All University of Arizona (UA) students are responsible for upholding the Code of Academic Integrity, available through the office of the Dean of Students and online at http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/codeofacademicintegrity. You must do your own writing for all the assignments in this class and have a full understanding of all terms and concepts you have used. If your instructor questions whether the work you have submitted is your own, he or she may test you on its content. Submitting an item of academic work that has previously been submitted without fair citation of the original work or authorization by the faculty member supervising the work is prohibited by the Code of Academic Integrity. Advice on following this policy: 7. You may not alter a student’s grade in any way based on suspicion or even on evidence of plagiarism without following required procedure and filing a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity. To alter a grade without filing a violation is to deny the student due process. 8. Cases of suspected plagiarism require a faculty-student conference within 15 academic days of discovering a possible violation. You should seek the advice of your faculty supervisor about how to conduct the conference. 9. Always make a photocopy of the assignment that you suspect is plagiarized and gather evidence to support your suspicion. Do this before you talk to the student. 10. Follow protocol in notifying the student of the need for a faculty-student conference. The required steps are available at the link above and summarized for you, with additional information, in the following documents available on WIRe at the Policies link on the left side of the page:  

Steps for Following the Dean of Students Guidelines for Filing Violations Email Template for Notifying Student

11. The steps you take after the faculty-student conference will depend on what you learn during the conference. If you are able to determine that the plagiarism is inadvertent, you will likely be advised by your supervisor to treat the situation as a teaching moment involving revisions and corrections. If you decide that deliberate plagiarism has occurred, you must decide upon an appropriate sanction (seek your supervisor’s advice 40


if you are uncertain) and follow the required steps for reporting the violation. See the documents available to you on WIRe under the Policies link on the left side of the page.

12. Note that under the section devoted to grades, your syllabus also states, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instructors will not evaluate an essay or assign credit for it without first seeing the required drafts.â&#x20AC;? Because students are sometimes tempted to plagiarize when they have procrastinated and find themselves facing an impossible deadline, you can announce to your class that if you are seeing a paper for the first time when it is submitted for a grade, that paper will be considered a draft, not a final version eligible for a grade. Drawing on this policy and reminding students about it periodically will give you more latitude for dealing with suspicious papers. It is always best to announce these policies more than once and to explain to students why we have them.

Attendance: What your syllabus states: Attendance Attendance is mandatory. Missing one or more days in the first week of classes will mean you are dropped, and missing after the first week may lead to an administrative drop, grade penalty, or even a failing grade in the course. Writing courses are workshop classes that include in-class writing, peer group work, and conferences. Therefore, students should not be late and should not miss class. Any class work missed as a result of tardiness or absence is the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to make up, if the instructor allows make-up work. First-week Attendance Policy In accordance with the university's policy for high-demand classes, the Writing Program drops students for non-attendance as follows: During the first week of the semester, a student who missed even one (1) day of a 1-or 2-day a week class will be dropped for non-attendance. During the first week of the semester, a student who missed any two (2) days of a 3-day a week class will be dropped for non-attendance. 2-week and beyond Attendance Policy After the first week, attendance is managed as follows: Students enrolled in a traditional sixteen week semester cannot miss more than a week of classes without penalty. For example, if your class meets one day a week, you may miss only one class meeting, two days a week, only two, and three days a week, only three. For each class meeting missed thereafter, your final course grade will be reduced by 1%. Students who exceed the allowed number of absences during the first eight weeks of a semester may be dropped with a W. Students may fail during the second half of the semester for excessive absences.

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All holidays or special events observed by organized religions will be honored for those students who show affiliation with that particular religion. Note that a dean’s note justifies absences for UA functions but must be presented to your instructor. Doctor’s appointments, job interviews, and other important appointments do not count as excused absences. If you have a legitimate conflict or an extreme emergency, discuss the situation with your instructor. NOTE: Being dropped from your English class may mean you are below the minimum number of units, thus violating financial aid/scholarship OR international student status. International students should consult with the International Student Services Office before dropping below full time.

Advice on following this policy: 1. GENERAL: Explain this attendance policy and our reasons for having it during the first week of the semester, and return to it periodically to remind students. a. Reasons  We emphasize attendance because of the collaborative nature of the course. Students are not participating fully if they are not attending class regularly.  Regular attendance is an effective way to keep up with course work and to increase the likelihood that students will submit the required drafts of major papers (see related policies).  Allowing students to miss more than the allowed number of classes often ends up creating more work for the instructor. It complicates recordkeeping.  Allowing students to miss extra classes also raises questions of fairness and consistent enforcement of this policy. How do you decide to enforce the policy with one student and not another, aside from documented emergencies? b. Student misunderstanding  Students frequently assume that staying home when they don’t feel well will be “excused” as long as they notify you of the reason for their absence. Many also assume that if they bring you a notice from Campus Health, their absence will be treated as excused instead of counting as one of their allowed absences. Neither of these situations, however, constitutes an excused absence, and you should not treat it as such or talk about it in those terms with students.  Only absences for which students present a Dean’s excuse—a paper form from the Dean of Student’s Office with the Dean’s signature—or absences which are affiliated with a religious holiday constitute excused absences.  It takes several explanations for many students to finally understand that staying home with a cold counts as one of their allowed absences and that missing class to attend a court date or to help a friend with an emergency also counts as one of their allowed absences. Help them 42


understand that they have a limited number of allowed absences they should use wisely. 2. THE FIRST 8 WEEKS: Students who exceed the allowed number of absences during the first eight weeks should be administratively dropped. You maintain more options by dropping a student because you will still have the power to reinstate if presented with a good reason for doing so. Once the eight-week deadline passes, however, you lose the power to drop students. a. Drops processed during the first four weeks of a semester leave no record on a student’s transcript. Drops processed during weeks five through eight result in a “W” (withdraw) notation on the transcript. b. The exception to this practice of dropping students during the first eight weeks would be those who have been communicating with you about unusual extenuating circumstances which they have documented or which someone has documented on their behalf. Such circumstances would include hospitalization and extraordinary family emergency. You should discuss such cases with your faculty supervisor. If there has been no communication from the student or from someone notifying you on the student’s behalf and no documentation of highly unusual circumstances, you should administratively drop him or her. You can always reinstate the student later if you are presented with good reasons for doing so. c. As a courtesy to students, it is a good idea to send a warning email when they have accumulated their allowed number of absences. The Writing Program provides a template you can use for this purpose. You can find it on WIRe under the Policies link on the left side of the page. d. Always remember that FERPA prohibits you from sharing any information about a student’s situation and/or academic performance with another person, even a parent. 3. AFTER WEEK 8: After the first eight weeks of a semester, you may reinstate a student if additional information comes to light; however, you may not administratively drop any student after the eight-week deadline has passed. You maintain more options by dropping a student during the first eight weeks. a. You may encourage students who accumulate excessive absences after the eight-week deadline to attempt to withdraw from the course themselves. In their Dates and Deadlines calendar, the Office of the Registrar publishes the following notice about any attempt to withdraw after the eighth week: “ALL REGISTRATION CHANGES REQUIRE not only the instructor’s signature indicating permission on a Change of Schedule form, but also the Dean’s signature. By policy, permission from the Dean to make a registration change requires an extraordinary reason.” The reference to the Dean’s signature in this passage refers to the dean of the student’s college. If you are encouraging a student to drop him- or herself, you should agree to provide the signature that student needs from you. Usually, you would select the WP (withdraw—pass) option on 43


the form. If you are not willing to indicate WP, there is less incentive for the student to drop. b. Students can attempt to withdraw from a course through the last day of classes. c. The Registration Dates and Deadlines Calendar provides the exact dates for withdrawal in a given semester. Deadlines for dropping summer and winter courses occur much earlier in the term, and are listed through the Office of Summer and Winter Session. (This bulleted item has been borrowed verbatim from the University of Arizona Advising Resource Center website.) d. Students who need help considering their options and how to pursue them should be referred to Student Advocacy and Assistance in the Dean of Students Office: http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/studentassistanceandadvocacy.This program offers one-on-one consultations with trained coordinators. These coordinators, however, are not psychological counselors or academic advisors. According to their statement, their role “is to assist students who face complex issues and crisis that could impact their ability to remain successful.” They specifically mention attendance and withdrawal issues as among those they are prepared to address with students.

Class Conduct: What your syllabus states: All UA students are responsible for upholding the Student Code of Conduct, which can be read online at http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/studentcodeofconduct. From the Code of Conduct of Student Behavior, this includes the following: “Interfering with or disrupting university or university-sponsored activities, including but not limited to classroom-related activities, studying, teaching, research, intellectual or creative endeavor, administration, service or the provision of communication, computing or emergency services.” This means no electronic devices in an ON position in class without your instructor’s permission. Advice on following this policy: 4. The Student Code of Conduct covers situations in which you perceive a student to be a threat to others OR to him- or herself. While such cases are rare, you need to know how to act quickly. a. Perception of an immediate threat to you or to other students should be handled by calling 911.  During the first week of class, enter the physical address of the building in which you teach into your cell phone or record it someplace where it will always be available to you. You will need this address if you have to make a 911 call during class. b. Concern about a student who appears to be in crisis should be directed to the Dean of Students Office at 621-7057. c. If you become aware of a possible crisis situation that seems to warrant immediate attention after normal business hours, you should go to the Dean of Students web site (http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/) and search for “Dean on Call.” The screen will ask you to log in with your UA Net ID and password, after which you will see the phone 44


number for that dean. Call that number and report the situation. The person on call will decide what steps to take next. 5. Student behavior that is disruptive rather than threatening is more common and should be addressed sooner rather than later. You will find disruptive behavior defined and steps for how to address it clearly explained in the following publication from the Dean of Student s Office: https://d2l.arizona.edu/d2l/lms/content/preview.d2l?tId=1784631&ou=257416 Note that persistently arriving late and/or leaving early is clearly an example of disruptive behavior, as is the student who talks incessantly while you are teaching and the student who loudly and frequently interrupts you with questions or comments. Addressing problems such as these immediately is always recommended. Other students notice and may lose respect for a teacher who does not address disruptive behavior. 13. Address disruptive behavior as soon as you become aware of itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;before it becomes an emotional issue for you. You need to remain calm and professional when talking to a student. Avoid public confrontation. The steps you need to take are listed in the publication link above. You will also find these steps outlined and additional helpful information in the following documents available on WIRe under the Policies link on the left side of the page: a. EXCERPT: Three Steps for Dealing with Disruptive Student Behavior b. Email TEMPLATES: Student Code of Conduct 6. Document all steps taken related to Student Code of Conduct issues. Save this documentation until the deadline for filing a grade appeal has passed.

7. Notify your faculty supervisor of any Student Code of Conduct complaint that you will be reporting to the Dean of Students. The Writing Program requires notification of such complaints.

Conferences: What your syllabus states: Writing program instructors may cancel a class session to host individual or small group conferences. Students should come to conferences prepared to discuss their work. If your class has been cancelled to hold student-teacher conferences and you miss your assigned conference time, it may be counted as an absence by your instructor. Advice on following this policy: 1. The number of classes you may cancel during a semester depends on the number of sections you are teaching and on how often you meet: ď&#x201A;ˇ If you are teaching two sections and your course meets three times a week, you may cancel a total of six (6) class meetings to accommodate required conferences.

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If you are teaching two sections and your course meets twice a week, you may cancel a total of four (4) class meetings to accommodate required conferences.  If you are teaching one section and your course meets three times a week, you may cancel a total of three (3) class meetings.  If you are teaching one section and your course meets twice a week, you may cancel a total of two (2) class meetings. 2. When setting up your conference schedule, make sure you announce several times that missing a conference for which class has been canceled counts as an absence. Posting such a statement on the News page of your D2L site is a good idea. If you do not cancel classes to accommodate a conference schedule, you may not count a missed conference as an absence.  Conferences should always take place in your office space, pod, or designated conference rooms in UITS (CCIT)236 for the safety of both you and your students. 3. Talk to your faculty supervisor about options for handling students who attend conferences but arrive unprepared. 4. You must submit a completed Instructor’s Absence from Class form for any class meeting that has been canceled to accommodate a conference schedule in a location other than your assigned classroom. You will find this form on WIRe. Select “Forms” on the left side of your screen.

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Companion revisions 2013