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THE

i n fusi o n report... vol 7, issue 2 • Fall 2012

HELLO f r o m LISA As the Summer comes to a close, we hope you will enjoy the beautiful array of colors that Autumn beholds and the wonders of the Holiday Season. Welcome to all of our new patients and families, as we are privileged to provide care and services. Thank you all for allowing us to participate in meeting your healthcare needs.

inside...

One of my most favorite and inspiring quotes is from Walt Disney; “Around here, however, we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things. Because we’re curious . . . and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” Looking back with pride on the accomplishments of the past and learning from the errors of our way, make us stronger and more determined to keep moving forward. The “Keep Moving Forward” mindset intrigues me, because most often that is the only thing left to do, as we all strive to persevere in our everyday lives. This newsletter is packed full of resources and fun; from immunizations, nutrition health, the gift of reading; to the ongoing antics of Captain Clot and ARJie! Learn and laugh as you read through our newsletter. Continue to keep in touch, as we always love hearing from each of you. On behalf of the Dedicated Team at ARJ Infusion Services, I want to convey our appreciation and respect for each of you. Thank you for sending back the Patient Satisfaction Surveys. Your perceptions and opinions matter to us. The comments you provide on those surveys help us to keep moving forward in our mission, to exceed your expectations. We thank you for choosing us to be a part of your Healthcare Team!

FEATURED ARTICLES what immunizations should I consider an overview: nutrition and exercise my plate the importance of reading FOR YOUR INFORMATION employee spotlight pocket health bulletin board kids corner captain clot beckers books and much more...

If you would like to receive THE I n fus io n report... by email, please contact newsletter@arjinfusion.com or call toll free 866.451.8804

LISA SACKUVICH PRESIDENT/OWNER OF ARJ INFUSION SERVICES

please look for us on facebook for up to date information and events


THE

Employee Spotli g ht...

L ONNIE K E RS E Y

Tell us a little bit about your family? I only have one daughter: McKenzie, who is now 17 going on 25. She is a volleyball FREAK! Who said raising kids was easy? How long have you been with ARJ? I’ve been with ARJ for 3 years now. What are your Hobbies and Interests? I truly love restoring old cars and am currently restoring a 1967 Chevelle Super Sport…..396 with 425 horse power! What has been your Proudest Moment? Watching my daughter set and achieve her goals. I am proud to be there to help her up when she tries and sometimes fails. What has been your Biggest Challenge? Surviving my late teens and early twenties due to a lead foot (snicker). What was your first job? Sacking groceries at Paul’s Food Mart.

LISA ANNOUNCES NEW ARJ TEAM MEMBERS ARJ has grown, adding many new faces and smiles. Please join me in welcoming: DIRECTOR OF NURSING Edie Williamson, RN BSN INFUSION NURSES Anna Ewbank, RN BSN Sarah Thompson, RN Sue Schamp, RN BSN Paula Walker, RN Tracy Evans, RN Robert Boles, RN BSN RECEPTIONIST Melanie Johnstone, the new “voice” of ARJ Infusion Services. WE ALSO WOULD LIKE TO CELEBRATE THE PROMOTIONS OF ARJ TEAM MEMBERS. Lori Bennett, RN, BSN, CRNI has accepted the role of Nursing Supervisor and will oversee the Safety Committee. Laurie Rupe, RN goes full time

i n fusi o n report...

Who or what inspires you? People who continue to persevere when they have great struggles in their life. Our patients, for example! What are your favorites? Movie: The Matrix-I usually have movies figured out early….this one really messed up my mind. Book: Of Mice and Men-an amazing book--better than the movie. Where might I have heard that before? Color: BLUE, of course, although PURPLE has been growing on me for the last 3 years now! Food: Lasagna, every time! Ice Cream Flavor: Raspberry Swirl Cheesecake…….now I’m hungry!

for your

H E A LT H

Personal Mobile App PocketHealth is a comprehensive mobile personal health record platform that will allow you to control and manage your health and wellness through a suite of products that will grow with, and support, your needs. It features a secure folder on your device that lets you document and track such items as immunizations, vitals and measurements (with graphing), medical conditions, medications, allergies and side effects, social history, family history, health insurance information, healthcare power of attorney contacts, provider appointments, ICE (in case of emergency) information, export information as a report, and a continuity of care document. One may upgrade and add procedures, lab results, radiology results, daily tracking of blood sugars (with graphing) and may manage multiple individuals’ information within your family. Best of all, this is a FREE app provided by Cognovant, Inc. There are other medical apps available also. You can research them online first, to determine which app best fits your individual needs.


vol 7, issue 2 • Fall 2012

WHAT I m m u n i z a t i o n s should i consider? By Megan Caul, BSP Pharm D Many of us are aware of the recommended vaccinations for infants and toddlers through their pediatricians at wellness visits. Do you know what vaccines are recommended for preteens and teens? Because adolescents typically have fewer wellness visits, it’s important to find out if they’re up-to-date on all ageappropriate vaccinations. School, sports, or camp physicals are a good way to address this with their pediatrician. As adolescents approach their teen years, they are at greater risk for certain diseases. This article will guide you through some of the new recommendations for adolescents of which you may not be aware. Pertussis, or whooping cough-as it’s more commonly Known-is a highly contagious and potentially deadly bacterial disease. Pertussis is especially serious for infants who are too young to be fully immunized against the disease. In fact, 92% of whooping cough deaths occur in infants younger than 4 months. Usually, a parent, sibling, or other close family member is the source of an infant’s whooping cough. Because Pertussis starts like a common cold, adolescents and adults can unknowingly pass it to a family member. Infants and children receive protection from the DTaP vaccine in the first 4-6 years of life. However, the protection wears off, and preteens need a booster of TdaP (Adacel or Boostrix) between 11 and 18 years of age, preferably between 11-12 years of age. It is recommended that adults get a tetanus and diphtheria booster every 10 years and substitute with a dose of TdaP for one of the boosters. Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States. It is estimated that 20 million people, male and female, are affected. It is most often found in people in their late teens to early twenties. Most people infected don’t show symptoms and may unknowingly spread it to a partner. At least 50% of sexually active people will get HPV at some point in their lives, and many won’t even know they have it. There are many different types of HPV. Some cause genital warts, and some cause cervical cancer. Two different vaccines are available to protect against HPV. Gardisil provides protection in females for cervical cancer, and in males and females for protection against anal cancer and precancerous lesions caused by HPV. It is the only vaccine approved for the prevention of genital warts. Ceravix is only approved for females in the prevention of cervical cancer. Both vaccines are given in three doses. It is recommended that the first dose be given to boys and girls between the ages of 11-12. The second dose should be given 1-2 months later, and the third and final, dose

should be given six months after the first dose. For the best protection, pre-teens should get all three doses before their first sexual encounter. Meningococcal Disease is caused by bacteria and is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children. Invasive meningococcal disease affects approximately 1 in 100,000 people annually. About one of every ten people who get the disease dies from it. Survivors of meningococcal disease may lose their arms or legs, become deaf, or suffer serious neurological defects. The bacteria are spread through exchange of nose and throat droplets, such as when coughing, sneezing, or kissing. People at most risk of meningococcal disease are those ages 16-21 who are living in a community setting where large groups of people gather, such as college dormitories or military barracks. The vaccine for meningococcal disease provides protection against most types of disease but does not prevent all cases. All 11 and 12-year-olds should be vaccinated, and then this should be followed up with a booster dose at age 16. When the vaccine was first recommended for adolescents, it was expected that the protection would last for 10 years. However, current data suggests that the vaccine loses its effectiveness after five years. Based on that, a single dose at 11 or 12 years of age may not offer protection through the years when an individual is at the highest risk for meningococcal infection. Influenza is not your common cold, but it is easy to see why so many people confuse the two. Colds and flu can share many of the same symptoms. Influenza is highly contagious and can result in serious complications, even death. Because of this, the flu vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older. It is especially important to receive the flu vaccine if you, someone you live with, or someone you care for is at high risk of complications from the flu. This would include infants and children, pregnant women, seniors, people with disabilities, and people with chronic health conditions. You should get the vaccine as soon as it is available in your area. Flu season usually peaks in December or January, but it can occur as late as May. Early immunization is the most effective way to prevent influenza. The vaccine will provide protection for one flu season and is designed to provide protection from the strains of flu that are expected to circulate that season. The vaccine is available as a shot or a nasal spray and can cause mild reactions such as soreness, headaches, and fever. The only flu vaccine approved for people with a chronic health condition is the shot. Sources: www.cdc.gov www.vaccines.gov


THE

i n fusi o n report...

bulletin board... GRADUATION CONGRATULATIONS Hannah S. of Witchita, KS Honors, Science, Social Studies and National Orchestra Awards Zachary R. of Rayville, MO DADDY ROCKS AWARD Adolfo M. of Kansas City, MO MOMMY ROCKS AWARD Jennifer L. of Blue Springs, MO Erika G. of Overland Park, KS Judy F. of Ness City, KS Jessica S. of Maumelle, AK MIXING FACTOR AWARD Nathaniel G. of Belleville, IL Charles H. of Winfield, MO BRAVERY AWARD Ruben A. of Wichita, KS CONGRATULATIONS Ciara C. of Kansas City, MO, on the arrival of your baby girl! Melissa and Paul L. of Moline, IL, on the arrival of your baby boy! THANK YOU Hunter M. and Alex H. of Lee’s Summit, MO for donating bicycle helmets, kneepads and books to the Beckers Books program!

ready, set, read ... At ARJ Infusion, we feel the Becker’s Book program provided for our patients is a vital resource. We encourage reading by sending birthday books and books in shipments to patients ages twelve and younger. A magazine subscription is sent to patients and their families for ages eighteen and younger. If you would like more information about this program or would like to donate books, please contact Patient Services at 1.866.451.8804.

L A U N C H E S

ITEMS PROGRAM F O R PAT I E N T S Hemophilia Federation of America’s (HFA) Helping Hands Emergency Assistance Program has begun taking applications for the Bleeding Disorder Items Program – a program that Patient Services, Inc. (PSI) previously managed. This program allows patients to be reimbursed for durable medical equipment. These items include: • Protective gear • Braces and Supports • Walking Supports • Heating/Cooling Items • Over the Counter Items* • Nutritional Drinks* *Requires physician statement of medical necessity. If you are in need of item assistance, please contact HFA at 1-800-230-9797 or online at http://hemophiliafed.org/what-we-do/programsand-services/items-program/ We would also be happy to assist you at ARJ’s Patient Services Department at 1.866.451.8804.


vol 7, issue 2 • Fall 2012

AN OVERVIEW:

n u t r i t i o n and exercise By ARJ Infusion Nursing Team

If we can get past the idea the world gives us that weight gain makes us ugly, unhealthy, and undesirable, we can look at eating and exercise as a great way of treating our bodies and ourselves well. While there are many programs, gyms, profit and nonprofit businesses offering ways to “get healthy/lose weight” through diet and exercise, eating “right” and exercising “effectively” does not need to be complicated or costly. This article outlines some of the benefits of both to help get you motivated and get you started. Remember, good nutrition and exercise are ways of being good to yourself. You deserve that. In the past (and the present) we used foods, spices, and herbs as medicines – ways to treat illness and increase health and happiness. A healthy diet helps to prevent losses of muscle strength and bone density. It prevents vitamin deficiencies. It helps to prevent heart attacks, strokes, obesity, osteoporosis, and certain cancers. It helps to control and treat chronic conditions, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and celiac disease. Healthy diets include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, milk products, cheeses, meats, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts. The USDA recommends that foods be low in saturated fats, trans fats, salts and added sugars. Remember to read food labels and inquire about those things at restaurants. The beginning of any good nutritional program is a good check-up with a trusted physician. Look over the new food pyramid at www.choosemyplate.gov to establish a healthy mix of foods. Eating the right foods can do a variety of things for us. It can provide us with comfort, reduce stress that takes a toll on our body, and strengthen our body by strengthening our immune system. Complex carbohydrates, like whole grain breads and cereals, boost serotonin and stabilize blood sugar. The release of serotonin has a calming effect on us. Foods like oatmeal boost serotonin and often have a comforting effect, as well. For example, a food may remind us of happy childhood memories, and we may be drawn to eating the same food for that reason. Pistachios, walnuts, and almonds decrease the production of stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol, that make us nervous. Salmon and tuna also decrease stress hormones in the body. The Omega-3 fatty acids these fish contain are, beneficial for heart disease, depression, and pre-menstrual syndrome. Avocados, aside from being delicious, have diuretic properties and may assist in blood pressure control. Spinach has a high magnesium content and can reduce headaches and fatigue.

Simple carbohydrates, like sugars, cause serotonin and blood sugar to spike rapidly, and then fall rapidly, often causing us to feel worse than we did before we ate the sugar. Do your own research. Evaluate how you feel after a few weeks of eating “good” foods. Ask yourself which “good foods” make you feel the best.

Thou shouldst eat to live; not live to eat. Socrates Dieting should not be so much about weight loss. It should be about you feeling good enough about yourself to take good care of yourself…as Socrates so accurately and eloquently stated in the above paraphrased quote. In additions to eating right for your body, you may want to make significant changes in your exercise regime, especially if you don’t currently have one. The beginning of any good exercise program is a check-up with a trusted physician. Exercise improves your health, mood, and stamina. Generally aim for 30 minutes of physical activity every day. The health benefits of regular exercise are hard to ignore. The more intense the activity, the more calories you burn. If you cannot do an actual workout during the day, try taking the steps instead of an elevator or walking instead of riding. Exercise increases the production of HDL, the good cholesterol and decreases triglyceride levels. These two benefits help in preventing or managing a wide range of diseases, including strokes, metabolic syndromes, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Exercising increases brain chemicals that make us feel better. It delivers oxygen and essential nutrients to our muscle tissues, decreasing fatigue and helping our heart and lungs work more efficiently together. Plus, exercise will improve our bodies’ appearance. We feel better when we feel good about the way we look. Exercising several hours before bedtime helps you sleep more soundly. Do not exercise right before bedtime. It raises the body’s temperature and it will take longer to drift off to sleep. Bottom line: Exercise and nutrition go hand in hand for a healthier happier you! Medicine.Net.com; 6-27-2011; Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD The Dietary Guidelines for Americans; 2005; USDA Obesity and disease risk by Dr. Robert Hoffman; 1998-2012; Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research


THE

i n fusi o n report...

ki d s corner... reci p es CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER DIP

SWEET TORTILLA CHIPS

2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter 1 tablespoon fat-free milk 1/3 cup frozen fat-free whipped topping Apples, Fruit or Celery

6 flour tortillas Canola or vegetable oil for baking Confectioners’ sugar Edible glitter (optional)

In small bowl, whisk together peanut butter and milk until combined. Gently fold in whipped topping. Serve with fruit wedges or celery.

Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Warm the tortillas (about 15 seconds) in the microwave. Individually fold the tortillas in half once and then in half again, so that you end up with a shape that resembles a wedge of pie (it will be thick). Using clean scissors, cut triangle, circles, or squares out of the edges, as if you were making paper snowflakes. Unfold the tortillas. Lightly brush the tops of the snowflakes with canola or vegetable oil and place them slightly apart on a cookie sheet. Bake them until lightly browned and crisp (about 4 minutes). Sift confectioners’ sugar on the snowflakes while still warm. For an extra sparkly effect, you can sprinkle on a bit of edible glitter. Makes 6. Variation: Sprinkle on cinnamon and sugar while still warm . www.familyfun.go.com


vol 7, issue 2 • Fall 2012

I n t r o d uc i n g MyPlate • MyPlate is part of a larger communication initiative based on the 2010 Dietary Guideline for Americans that help consumers make better food choices. • MyPlate is designed to remind Americans to eat healthfully. It is not intended to change consumer behavior alone. • MyPlate illustrates the five food groups using a familiar mealtime visual, a place setting. The website features practical information and tips to help Americans build healthier diets. • Go to ChooseMyPlate.gov for more information. Also check out www.nourishinteractive.com. It has a large selection of information and fun, interactive computer games for kids of all ages to play.

WORD BANK salt rainbow every fruit seeds green balanced

your

sugar grains meal whole vegetables bones lean


THE

THE

i n fusi o n report...

I m p o r t a n c e of reading By Katie Grigg

  Reading has become increasingly critical in our quickly changing world. It is the foundation on which our academic skills are built. We read, synthesize, analyze, and process information throughout our daily lives. Pre-reading skills begin at birth. Babies hear the word patterns, rise and fall of our voice tones, and they see our facial expressions and body movements.   The right time to cultivate an individual’s reading ability is at a young age. Skills and strategies of reading help to foster the child’s ability to comprehend, develop critical thinking skills, improve vocabulary, and increase their likelihood of having a good command of the language by speaking and writing.   As parents and grandparents, we can help our children become better readers by reading aloud to them. It is the single, most important way we can prepare our children to succeed in school. Why? • • • • • • • •

Children who live in a print-rich environment and who are read to during the first years of life are much more likely to learn to read on schedule. Reading aloud to young children is not only one of the best activities to stimulate language and cognitive skills, it also builds motivation, curiosity and memory. Early language skills are based primarily on language exposure provided by parents and other adults talking to young children. Research shows that the more words parents use when speaking to an eight-month-old infant, the greater the size of their child’s vocabulary at age three. The landmark Hart-Risley study on language development documented that children from low- income families hear as many as 30 million fewer words than their more affluent peers before the age of four. Books contain many words children are unlikely to encounter frequently in spoken language. They actually can contain 50% more rare words than is provided by television programming. One-on-one attention provided by parents during reading time encourages children to form an appreciation of books and reading for a lifetime. Reading aloud actually helps children cope with stress or tragedy. Reading difficulty contributes to school failure, absenteeism, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse, and teenage pregnancy.

How do parents go about helping children learn to read? Frankly, reading has never been the sole responsibility of the schools. That charge has always been given to the adult in the home to promote early literacy and reading readiness skills before school even starts. For those parents who feel unqualified, relax!

Use the following tips to promote success. • Make reading a part of every day. It will become a special time with your child. • Have fun. • A few minutes of reading is okay. Know when to stop. • Talk about the pictures. Name objects. • Let your child turn the pages. • Show your child the cover page and explain what the story is about. • Run your finger along the words as you read. • Silly sounds are fun to share. “Cock-a-doodle-doo,” said George the rooster. • Choose books your child can relate to. • Make the story come alive by creating character voices. • Ask questions about the story like, “What do you think will happen next?” • Let your child ask questions about the story. • Allow your child to re-tell the story. Many children by the age of three can memorize their favorite books. • Take advantage of libraries and the Internet. • If you suspect a problem, get your child evaluated. Is your home literacy-friendly? Families can help promote early literacy and school readiness by creating a literacy-rich environment in the home. Look at this simple checklist and see what steps you take to improve your surroundings.   For further ideas and tips, visit www.GetReadytoRead. org. This site includes activities, games, screening tools, educational webinars, a newsletter, and an opportunity to sign up for free books online.   Libraries offer thousands of free books to children, story hour, and special events for your child to enjoy. Librarians can offer help in selecting books that are age and subject matter appropriate. Don’t discount the Internet. Some believe technology has deteriorated the importance of reading by providing instant information. Actually, technology has opened the door to gathering a massive amount of knowledge and has provided software to teach and improve reading skills.   Reading is an important source of knowledge and pleasure that can last a lifetime. Beyond the immediate satisfaction, a number of benefits come our way: expanded vocabulary; increased world knowledge; improved reading skills; better communication skills; strengthened knowledge of language; new insights; power to compete in an information-driven age; and, perhaps, a certain amount of additional confidence. Reading matters, after all! www.buzzle.com www.GetReadytoRead.org www.education.com


vol 7, issue 2 • Fall 2012 www.GetReadytoRead.org

Home Literacy Environment Checklist Is your home literacy-friendly? You are your child’s first teacher. Your home is where your child will get his or her first experiences with books and reading. Look around your home and think about what you do with your child. If the statement on the checklist is true, place a check in the “true” column. If the statement is false, place a check in the “false” column. When you are finished, count up the number of checks in the true column and find that number on the chart at the end of the checklist. Use the results as a guideline to see what you can do for your child. What my child has…

TRUE FALSE

My child has at least one alphabet book (e.g., Dr. Seuss's ABC book). My child has magnetized alphabet letters to play with. My child has crayons and pencils readily available for writing and drawing. My child has paper readily available for writing and drawing. My child has a table or surface readily available for writing or drawing. My child has at least one rhyme book (e.g., Joseph Slate’s Miss Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten). My child has more than one rhyme book. My child has at least 10 picture books. My child has at least 20 picture books. My child has at least 50 picture books. My child plays beginning reading and alphabet games on a computer (e.g., Reader Rabbit or Bailey’s Book House). My child has materials and games to help learn the alphabet. What I or another adult do…

TRUE FALSE

I or another adult in the house read a picture book with my child at least once a week. I or another adult in the house read a picture book with my child at least four times a week. I or another adult in the house teach new words to my child at least once a week. I or another adult in the house teach new words to my child nearly every day. I or another adult in the house have a detailed and informative conversation with my child at least once a week. (e.g., “How do you think ice cream is made?”). I or another adult in the house have a detailed and informative conversation with my child nearly every day. I or another adult in the house help my child learn nursery rhymes. I or another adult in the house encourage my child to tell me what he or she wants using complete sentences. I or another adult in the house take my child to the library or a bookstore at least once every two months. What my child sees me or another adult doing… My child sees me or another adult in the house reading books, magazines or the newspaper at least once a week. My child sees me or another adult in the house reading books, magazines or the newspaper nearly every day.

TRUE FALSE


alphabet and beginning reading (e.g., Reader Rabbit). I or another adult in the house help my child learn to sing or say the alphabet.

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i n fusi o n report...

I or another adult in the house help my child learn to name letters of the alphabet. What I am… I or another adult in the house help my child learn to write letters of the alphabet. I am a good reader. I or another adult in the house help my child learn to write his or her name. I have a large vocabulary. I or another adult in the house help my child learn to write other people’s names. I began to read picture books with my child before he or she was a year old. I or another adult in the house help my child learn how to rhyme. I enjoy reading picture books with my child. I or another adult in the house help my child learn the sounds that letters of the alphabet make I expect that my child will work to his or her potential in school. (e.g., “M makes the mmmm sound”). Now or in the past, I or another adult encourage or help my child… Count up the number of statements marked TRUE and put that number in the box to the right. I or another adult in the encourage my child to watch reading on TV See the chart below to house find out how literacy-friendly yourbeginning family child careshows program is. or tapes (e.g., Between the Lions on PBS).

TRUE FALSE

TRUE FALSE

I or another adult in the house encourage my child to play with computer games that introduce the alphabet and beginning (e.g., Reader Rabbit). 30 - 37 reading Home literacy environment has most of the necessary supportive elements 20 29 Home literacy environment has many I or another adult in the house help my child learn to singsupportive or say the elements alphabet. 11 - 19 Home literacy environment has some supportive elements I0or another adult in the house helpneeds my child learn to name letters of the alphabet. - 10 Home literacy environment improvement I or another adult in the house help my child learn to write letters of the alphabet. I or another adult in the house help my child learn to write his or her name. I or another adult in the house help my child learn to write other people’s names. I or another adult in the house help my child learn how to rhyme. I or another adult in the house help my child learn the sounds that letters of the alphabet make (e.g., “M makes the mmmm sound”). Count up the number of statements marked TRUE and put that number in the box to the right. See the chart below to find out how literacy-friendly your family child care program is.

30 - 37 Home literacy environment has most of the necessary supportive elements 20 - 29 Home literacy environment has many supportive elements 11 - 19 Home literacy environment has some supportive elements 0 - 10 Home literacy environment needs improvement Get Ready to Read! is a project of the National Center for Learning Disabilities. For more information about this program please visit our Web site www.GetReadytoRead.org. © 2004 by National Center for Learning Disabilities, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to reproduce this checklist for non-commercial purposes. Developed by Grover J. (Russ) Whitehurst, Ph.D., for NCLD.

scholarships...

There are three competition levels: grades 4-6 (100-250 words), grades 7-8 (250-500 words), and grades 9-12 Letters About Literature is a national reading/writing (500-750 words). Two winners are selected from each contest sponsored by the Center for the Book in the level and awarded a $500 gift card from Target. US Library of Congress in partnership with Target Stores. The contest opens in September, and the deadline is The contest is open to US students in grades 4-12. Entries December 1 (postmark). State winners are announced consist of a personal letter to an author, living or dead, from in March, and national winners are notified in April. For any genre, explaining how the author’s work changed the more information, send e-mail to lettersaboutlit@epix.net. student’s way of thinking about the world or themselves. Winners will receive a college savings bond! Get Ready to Read! is a project of the National Center for Learning Disabilities. For more information about this program please visit our Web site www.GetReadytoRead.org.


vol 7, issue 2 • Fall 2012

THE

i n fusi o n report... Editor: Katie Grigg

Toll Free: 866-451-8804 newsletter@arjinfusion.com www.arjinfusion.com If you have a submission that you would like to see in an upcoming newsletter, feel free to send it to: ARJ Infusion Services - Newsletter 10049 Lakeview Avenue Lenexa, KS 66219 The articles contained in this newsletter are for entertainment and informational purposes only. © 2012 ARJ Infusion Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Welcome to the National Hemophilia Foundation’s (NHF) 64th Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida. This location needs no PR to sell itself— abundant sunshine, gleaming golf courses and theme parks galore. NHF’s Annual Meeting is the largest gathering of the bleeding disorders community in the United States, with more than 2,500 guests attending. It is unique in bringing together not only patients and their families, but healthcare providers, industry representatives, chapter staff and volunteers. The theme of this year’s conference is “Mapping Our Future.” It is an exciting future, with many research breakthroughs on the near horizon.

HEMOPHILIA INFUSION EDUCATION FOR PATIENTS AND FAMILIES At ARJ Infusion Services we know the most effective way to manage and treat your disorder is to ensure you are educated and in control of your treatment. Our team of award winning, highly skilled nurses provide self infusion training in the home setting or at one of our many Infusion Clinics we offer throughout the year. They also help teach proper management of drugs and supplies. Our Patient Services staff makes sure you receive the educational information you need to manage your disorder. These and other components combine to provide you with comprehensive care and peace of mind. ACCOUNTABLE To the patients we serve and their healthcare providers RELIABLE Delivery of services to exceed your expectations JOINT PARTNERSHIP With our patients and families to attain treatment goals OUR MISSION To provide caring, comprehensive, cost conscious infusion therapy to people affected by chronic disorders. OUR PHILOSOPHY We are a large enough company to handle your needs, but small enough to understand them. That is what makes us unique and sets us apart.


ARJ

10049 Lakeview Avenue Lenexa, Kansas 66219

Infusion services


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