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Table of Contents

I. Introduction Firm Description Awards

II. Representative Work Housing Mixed-Use and Institutional Buildings Houses Urban Design On the Boards

III. Biographies of Principles


Firm Description Solomon E.T.C. is an architecture and urban design firm that evolved from the practice of Daniel Solomon, established during his tenure as Professor of Architecture at U.C. Berkeley. His partners, John Ellis and Anne Torney joined the practice respectively 20 years and 16 years ago. From 2002 until 2010, Solomon E.T.C. has been a semi-autonomous practice group within the larger corporate practice of Wallace, Roberts and Todd. Solomon E.T.C.’s body of work has grown from a focus on residential architecture and the interaction between housing and urban design. Through writing, teaching, professional leadership and building, Solomon E.T.C. has contributed to the understanding of the complex relationship between architecture and town building. The firm’s work has expanded in several directions including large-scale urban planning, mixed-use and institutional architecture. The three principals are all deeply engaged in the design process and over time have built a core staff of seasoned professionals. Solomon E.T.C. has been widely exhibited and published in leading architectural journals in the US and abroad. The work has received over eighty-five design awards including four Progressive Architecture Awards, three national awards from the American Institute of Architects, the Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s Platinum Award of Excellence on two occasions, and three Charter Awards from the Congress for the New Urbanism. In 2004 the firm’s founding principal, Daniel Solomon, received the Maybeck Award for Lifetime Achievement in Design from the California Council AIA.


Housing

Solomon E.T.C. has designed houses and housing for people ranging from the formerly homeless to the extremely affluent, and from college students to frail elderly. Settings range from the densest urbanity to sylvan landscapes. Each project is different; each circumstance and nuance of program generates its own formal language. Each project serves a context larger and more important than itself.


Fulton Grove Townhouses San Francisco, CA

The older parts of San Francisco are criss-crossed with mid-block lanes. Fulton Grove is a new lane on the old pattern, separate from but connected to the streets. Sixteen small three-story townhouses, each with its own entry, garage and rear garden, face each other along the private drive which is lined with trees. Access at both ends is through large apertures in new buildings which span the lane. The townhouses are sunlit, modern versions of a traditional San Francisco residential style. They are clad in cedar shingle with glossy, dark trim and backs and have projecting bays along the drive. Fulton Grove is a new insertion in the historic center of San Francisco. It perpetuates the complexity and intimacy that make San Francisco the most livable of cities.

Housing Type:

For Sale, Market Rate

Date of Completion:

1992

Number of Units:

22

Parcel Size:

0.50 Acres

Density:

44 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

2 BR Townhouses, 1 BR Flats

Parking Ratio & Type:

1:1, Covered, 4 Guest at Surface

Access to Units:

At Grade, Stair walk up from Courtyard/Street

Square Footage:

30,080 GSF

Construction Cost:

$2,346,000


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.solomonarchitecture.com


Fine Arts Building Berkeley, California

This 100-unit (280 bed) courtyard housing is a private developer project designed for students at UC Berkeley. Located in Downtown Berkeley at the corner of Shattuck Avenue and Haste Street, the five-story building consists of four levels of residential accommodation above a tall ground floor containing the 200 seat Fine Arts movie theatre, retail and parking as well as the building entrance lobby. The upper floors are arranged around a landscaped south-facing courtyard. There are several different unit types responding to site conditions and the special needs of student tenants. The basic unit type, located on the perimeter of the building, contains two bedrooms and a living/ dining area, kitchen and bathroom. The two bedrooms interlock in such a way as to create an articulated building facade with deep recesses, breaking down the scale of the elevation. The use of parking lifts reduces the space devoted to parking. (64 cars are parked in 24 stalls, 195 sq ft per car in contrast to the typical 350 sq ft per car.) The architectural design reinterprets the Art Deco tradition as found in other buildings in Downtown Berkeley with the use of horizontally proportioned corner windows, sun-shading elements and other details.

Housing Type:

Rental

Date of Completion:

2004

Number of Units:

100 (280 beds)

Parcel Size:

0.58 Acres

Density:

172 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

One, Two Bedroom

Parking Ratio & Type:

0.25 spaces/0.64 cars

Access to Units:

Elevator and Corridor

using parking lifts Square Footage:

100,000 GSF

Construction Cost:

$22,500,000


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com

Nested Bedrooms Bedrooms interlock to create an articulated building facade with deep recesses and reduces the perimeter per unit ratio.

S E C O N D - F L O O R

P L A N

Walkable Streets The project reduces the footprint needed for parking, and minimizes the competition for ground floor space between pedestrian oriented uses along the street frontage and parking.

G R O U N D - F L O O R

P L A N

Parking Lifts The parking stalls are housed in mechanical parking lifts corresponding in height to the retail and theater floor, and reduces the floor area per car by half. EAST - WEST BUILDING SECTION


Othello Station Seattle, Washington Othello Station - Before

Site Plan

Othello Station, a project funded under the Hope VI HUD program, replaces existing public housing built during the 1940s with a new, dense neighborhood consisting of mixed uses for residents of diverse incomes. The master plan extends the existing street grid into the 36-acre site and is organized around a spine of public parks, providing a pedestrian connection between residences and neighborhood shopping and transit. The approximately 400 new housing units will vary in type and density; from rowhouses on the interior of the site to apartments-over-retail along the perimeter streets. This master plan includes planning of the future Light Rail Station Area on an additional 11-acre site, which builds upon the vitality of the existing Asian neighborhood shopping district. By introducing structured parking and civic facilities, and by re-focusing existing retail,

Othello Station - After

including a Safeway on the main street, a future senior housing campus will be connected to the neighborhood shopping district and the new residential neighborhood. Type of Project:

Mix of Public, Low-Income Tax Credit and Market-Rate Housing

Date of Completion:

2004

Number of Units:

219 Rental Units, 400 Total Planned

Parcel Size:

37 Acres

Density:

19 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

Single-Family, Duplexes, Rowhouses, and Apartments

Parking Ratio & Type:

1/1 residential plus Commercial, both Surface and Garage

Access to Units:

195 with Exterior Private at Grade or Walk Up Entries,

Square Footage:

275,000 GSF

Construction Cost:

$35,000,000

Firm’s Role:

Design Architect

Single Family Homes

24 with Elevator Access

Owner:

Seattle Housing Authority, Al Levine

General Contractor:

Walsh Construction, Mike Bang

Financing:

HUD Hope VI Grant, City of Seattle, Various other public agenceis Town house over Flat


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com

Typical Street View


Broadway Family Apartments Chinatown Community Development Center San Francisco, CA

The project, situated within a rich historical context in the Northeast Waterfront District of San Francisco, was presented with a difficult design challenge: How to integrate lowincome housing into an historic context of mid-rise commercial office buildings which was fragmented years ago through the introduction of the Embarcadero freeway. The project responds to this issue by restoring a continuous street wall on the block between Battery and Front Streets to give the neighborhood a cohesive identity which was lost years ago with the construction of the freeway. This complex of mid-rise and smaller buildings emulates the context. It lends a sense of dignity to a previously fractured block, while seamlessly integrating 81 units of low-to-moderate income housing into the neighborhood. Several semi-public functions on the ground level of the complex augment this intent, providing child care services, common gathering rooms, landscaped courtyards, and street-facing retail spaces which support both the residents of the project and the larger neighborhood. Housing Type:

Low to Moderate Income Family Apts.

Date of Completion:

2008

Number of Units:

81

Parcel Size:

0.71 Acres

Density:

114 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

Studios / Two / Three Bedroom Apartments

Parking Ratio & Type:

0.4:1, Garage

Access to Units:

Lobby access at grade

Square Footage:

124,692 GSF

Construction Cost:

$24,000,000


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com

Children’s courtyard

Children’s playroom


Mosaica San Francisco, CA

Mosaica was designed in collaboration with neighbors and stakeholders in an extensive community outreach process. The result is a mixed-use city block designed for residents of diverse ages and households, built over artist, light industrial and community use spaces. 151 units of mixed-income housing, including 93 family units, 24 for seniors, and 34 condominiums intended for low-income families are arranged around three distinct mid-block open spaces. A new alley bisects the site through three-story tall portals in the perimeter of the block. The alley is lined on both sides at ground level with workshops and artists’ spaces. The entry to the semi-public south-facing courtyard a half-level up from the street is flanked by a community room and classrooms for neighborhood programs, and is linked by mid-block portals to a quieter courtyard to the north. Parking a half level below grade is lined with lobby entries, workshops, and residential stoops, creating a vibrant, active streetscape. Mosaica’s green strategies and systems include highly efficient MEP systems and equipment to drastically reduce operational energy usage; recycled, durable and non-toxic materials, water efficient plumbing fixtures and irrigation, 75% construction waste diversion and renewable energy in the form of a 109.7 kw roof mounted photo-voltaic array, the largest such residential array in San Francisco. Housing Type: Begun/Completed: Phases of Service: Number of Units: Parcel Size: Density: Unit Configuration: Square Footage:

Funding Sources: Construction Budget:

South facing residential units with sun shades

Affordable/Rental/Ownership 2003-2009 Predesign through Construction 151 units 1.83 acres 82.5 DU per acre Studios, 1 BR, 2 BR, 3 BR, 4 BR, Stacked Townhomes 256,000 GSF; 12,000 sf of PDR; 132,000 sf of rental housing; 43,000 sf of ownership housing Tax Credits, Tax exempt bonds, California MHP, City of San Francisco Federal Home Loan Bank $41,000,000

Production Distribution and Repair (PDR) Space


SOLOMON

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com

Ground Floor

Typical Floor PDR-Production Distribution and Repair Affordable Family Rental Common Space Senior Supportive Ownership


101 San Fernando San Jose, CA with Togawa & Smith Architects

101 San Fernando is a mixed-use project located in the heart of newly revitalized downtown San Jose. The building consists of 322 rental units (with 1.75 cars per unit) and 10,00 square feet of commercial space organized around a series of mid-block pedestrian lanes, which are accessed through large portals in the street wall as well as from secured parking areas. Streets and mid-blocks are animated by stoop-served walk-up units with elevator served units above. The density achieved is 108 DU/Acre. Twenty years ago San Jose was synonymous with centerless non-urban sprawl. Its downtown was the moribund relic of the business district of a vanished agrarian town. In twenty years much has changed. Silicon Valley, of which San Jose is the largest part, has emerged as the paradigm of the post industrial economy. The sprawl that gave birth to this economic powerhouse has undergone a remarkable process of reurbanization and recentering. Through policies that are now central to the Charter for the New Urbanism, $2.3 billion has been invested in a light rail system, a whole fabric of cultural facilities and institutions, and now finally new downtown housing on a large scale. 101 San Fernando is part of that effort.

Type of Project:

Rental, Affordable and Market Rate

Date of Completion:

Summer 2000

Number of Units:

322

Parcel Size:

2.99 Acres

Density:

108 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

Studio, One, Two, Three BR

Parking Ratio & Type:

1.75:1, Garage

Access to Units:

Walkup, Elevator

Square Footage:

552,000 GSF

Construction Cost:

$43,000,000

Firm’s Role:

Principle designers: Daniel Solomon, Anne Torney

Owner/General Contractor:

Forest City Development, Greg Vilkin

Funding:

Private/San Jose Redevelopment Agency funding


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com


Vermont Village South Central Los Angeles, California

This project is the winning submission in a design/build competition sponsored by First Interstate Bank for a mixed-use development in South Central Los Angeles. It was completed in Summer 1998. The site is at 81st Street and Vermont Avenue, once a thriving commercial corridor and home to the administration building of Pepperdine College. The art deco Pepperdine Building remained as an empty relic on an otherwise vacant block of Vermont frontage. Vermont Avenue itself is a three mile long abandoned shell of a now moribund pattern of neighborhood commercial establishments. To the east of Vermont is a derelict residential neighborhood and immediately to the west is the handsome, well-planned, and well-maintained older residential enclave of Vermont Knolls, now deprived of the urban amenities and

Housing Type:

Moderate Income OwnershipTownhouses

services upon which it once depended.

Date of Completion:

1998

The premise of the project is that affordable home ownership is the key to

Number of Units:

36

neighborhood revitalization. The scheme includes 36 full sized owner-occupied

Parcel Size:

1.24 Acres

houses and townhouses. Each house has a secured private entry, a private yard or

Density:

29 DU Per Acre

large deck and two secure parking spaces which are either private or joined to the

Unit Configuration:

2/3 BR Townhouses

garage of one of the other houses.

Parking Ratio & Type:

2:1, Garage

Access to Units:

Shared stairs for walk up, At Grade

Square Footage:

53,355 GSF

Construction Cost:

$4,150,000


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com


Britton Courts San Francisco, CA in collaboration with Michael Willis & Associates

Geneva Towers, one of San Francisco’s most troubled public housing projects, was demolished in May 1998. Britton Street Housing will provide 91 units to re-house many of the residents of Geneva Towers as well as new low-income residents. The new setting is the inverse of the isolating and dangerous high-rise environment it replaced. Britton Court embodies the principles of neighborhood building and urban repair delineated in the Charter of the New Urbanism. The ideas underlying this project have evolved through Solomon’s twenty years of building respectfully in San Francisco neighborhoods. Pedestrian-oriented streets linked to the neighborhood are defined by humanly scaled and secure eight-plexes surrounding shared courtyards. Housing Type:

For Rent, Affordable

Date of Completion:

1999

Number of Units:

92

Parcel Size:

3.67 Acres

Density:

25 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

2/3/4 BR Townhouses, 2 BR Flats

Parking Ratio & Type:

1.3:1, Surface and Garage

Access to Units:

Walk-up and At Grade

Square Footage:

95,469 GSF

Construction Cost:

$11,366,000


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

Third Floor

Second Floor

Ground Floor

www.wrtdesign.com


Stanford Graduate Housing Palo Alto, California

The project consists of six four-story buildings—including a common building—containing 832 units of graduate student housing in Escondido Village, adjacent to the central campus at Stanford University. A thorough focus-group analysis was conducted to determine the units’ optimal arrangement of living, sleeping, kitchen, bathroom, and storage space. Each building also contains recreational, laundry, and service rooms. Surface parking and extensive bicycle storage are provided. The new buildings are designed to fit into the site’s existing mix of single-story wood cabins and later-built mid-rise tower blocks. The project was completed on a fast track schedule with a design-build contractor who provided on-going cost information. Solomon E.T.C. served as design architect in association with MBT Architecture, San Francisco, and James Guthrie & Associates, San Mateo.

Housing Type:

Graduate Student Housing

Date of Completion:

Phased thru 2002

Number of Units:

326 units

Unit Configuration:

Studios

Parking Ratio & Type:

.75:1

Square Footage:

390,000 GSF

Construction Cost:

$65,000,000


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


Mixed Use and Institutional Buildings

Increasingly , Solomon E.T.C. is engaged in complex urban buildings with multiple uses and programs. We thrive on these challenges and the problem-solving puzzles they present. The David Brower Center and Beth Israel Memorial Chapel show the potential of the firm to create iconic institutional structures and to give formal expression to strategies for sustainability.


David Brower Center and Oxford Plaza Berkeley, CA

The extraordinary mixed-use program for this project includes a LEED Platinum rated office building and conference center for environmental non-profits, 97 units of low-income family housing, retail space, a restaurant, a gallery and a city parking garage.

Firm’s Role:

Architect

Type of Project:

Rental/Affordable

Development Funding: 30 funding sources including RSF Social Finance, Section 108 Loan, CDE Loans, NMTC Tax Credits

Oxford Plaza, developed by RCD, provides workforce housing for those at 20-60% of AMI for the downtown Berkeley area. The project also serves special needs individuals including 10 units of housing for people with AIDS (HOPWA), 4 units dedicated to MHSA (Mental Health Services Act), and 24 project based Section 8 units. The project’s many sustainable features include: transit-oriented, urban infill development, 75% waste diversion, energy-efficient building envelope and systems, rooftop solar thermal hot water system, high content slag concrete, low-flow plumbing fixtures and water-efficient irrigation, and a rooftop garden for residents.

Location:

Berkeley, California

Number of Units:

Oxford Plaza - 97 Units

Square Footage:

244,000 G.S.F.; 29,000 s.f. for offices; 102,000 s.f. for housing; 82,000 s.f. for public parking; 8,500 s.f. for retail

Date of Completion:

2009

Final Budget:

$52m total; $26.6m for Housing; $25.4m for Office, Retail, and Parking

Owner:

Equity Community Builders John Clawson, 415-561-6200

The David Brower Center was founded to create a nationally recognized, permanent home for environmental and social change. The Center’s upper three floors include 29,000 square feet of office space, for tenants working in the environmental and social sectors, such as the International Rivers Network, Earth Island Institute, and the Center for Ecoliteracy. On track to receive LEED Platinum certification, the building will be one of fewer than 10 such buildings in Northern California. The Brower Center’s design features include: 100% daylighting of all office areas, photovoltaic panels which generate 40% of the building’s electricity, reuse of rainwater for irrigation and toilet flushing, extremely low energy mechanical systems using radiant heating and cooling, high-slag concrete to significantly reduce CO2 and to increase strength, exterior and interior materials that ensure healthy air quality and maximize recycled content, Berkeley’s first waterless urinals, and real-time systems monitoring, in order to publish and share findings with the public.

Resources for Community Development (Housing) Lisa Motoyama, 510-841-4410 General Contractor:

Cahill Contractors Chuck Palley, 415-986-0600


The view shows the couryards between the two buildings and termination of the vista with the multi-story Gaia Building next door.


Framed view of landmark Edwards Stadium .


Environmental Center

Housing

Restaurant

Retail Entry

ConferenceTheater Resident’s Parking

Residential Lobby

Public Parking

Ground Floor Plan

Lobby Parking Section


Environmental Center

Housing

Offices

Residential Courtyard

Second Floor Plan


The new urban edge to Downtown Berkeley as it faces the U. C. Campus.


The two story lobby contains gallery space. The staircase on the right has hold open doors and daylight to increase its visibility and encourage users to walk rather than use the elevator on the left.


Office spaces allow almost 100% daylighting during business hours with operable windows and low pressure ventilation via the raised floor system to maximize indoor air quality.


Theater Space. Dignified places to convene contribute to the building of community.


Oxford Plaza south side with sun control.


Oxford Plaza east side with sun control.


Garden with courtyard beyond

Ground Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan


Zygmunt Arendt House San Francisco, California

Corner Broderick and Golden Gate Zygmunt Arendt House is 47 units of supportive housing for formerly homeless seniors in San Francisco’s historic Western Addition. Acceptance of this program from a well organized neighborhood association demanded the utmost respect for the fragile context of meticulously restored Victorian houses. The three-story building is located on a corner parcel and steps down the hill with massing and detailing in the manner of its much smaller neighbors. Individual rooms are arranged on either side of generously dimensioned corridors and are typically paired around projecting bay windows. The units are all studios and range from 295 to 400 sq ft. Each unit has handicap accessible or adaptable bathroom, a mini-kitchen, storage area and plenty of light. An important feature is the tall ceiling in most units, made possible by floor to floor dimensions that match the scale of adjoining buildings. The project includes spaces for community/ supportive services, property management, a secured lobby with a security desk to welcome guests and residents, a courtyard garden, a landscaped roof deck, a lounge area and a large meeting room with its own kitchen. Sustainable features include green materials, solar panels on the roof and a rain detention system which directs roof water to street-side planters.

Lounge Area

Once skeptical neighbors have graciously welcomed this new addition and its residents in their beloved neighborhood. Housing Type:

Housing for Formally Homeless

Funding Sources:

Seniors

City & County of San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Housing,

Completed:

February 2010

City and County of San Francisco Human Services Agency,

Number of Units:

47

Zygmunt Arendt Fund, California Department of Housing

Parcel Size:

.29 acres

and Community Development Multi-Family Housing

Density:

162 DU/AC

Program – Supportive Housing, Silicon Valley Bank, Federal

Unit Configuration:

Studio Apartments

Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program, National

Square Footage:

30,727

Equity Fund

Construction Budget:

$9.7 million

Studio for a formally homeless Senior

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.solomonetc-wrt.com


Gough and Grove San Francisco, CA Currently in Design

This project occupies one of the sites vacated by the Central Freeway which was demolished after the ‘89 earthquake. A five-story building with retail at the base activates busy Gough Street and wraps around the corner onto Grove. Townhomes front onto the quiet alley at the rear of the site and onto a midblock garden. Parking is in an underground garage. This project with its portals to a mid-block courtyard and its activation or an historic alley is fulfills the intent of the Design Guidelines we authored for the Market/Octavia Neighborhood Plan.

Housing Type:

Condominiums

Date of Completion:

TBD

Number of Units:

61 units

Unit Configuration:

Flats

Parking Ratio & Type:

.5:1, subsurface garage

Square Footage:

102,577 GSF

Construction Cost:

NA

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.solomonetc-wrt.com


Lyceum Gateway Seaside, Florida

Lyceum Gateway is a mixed-use residential building that helps to complete the iconic town square at Seaside, Florida. It joins other buildings designed by distinguished architects to define and link two of the town’s most important public spaces. This site is larger then any of the existing and future sites on the town square. This condition demanded a highly articulated building that establishes civic presence without overwhelming its diminutive neighbors. The program includes 10,000 s.f. of retail space in four 20’ high spaces, lined with a 20’ high arcade as mandated by the Seaside Design Code. Above the retail stores are ten luxurious condominiums ranging in size from approximately 1,700-3,000 s.f. The developers of the project have targeted the high end luxury market and have chosen to build well and expensively. The building is made of poured-in-place concrete, with geothermal heating and cooling and with finely detailed mahogany cabinetry and fixtures. Type of Project:

Townhouses / Flats

Date of Completion:

March 2007

Number of Units:

10

Parcel Size:

0.5 Acres

Density:

20 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

2, 3, and 4 BR Flats, 3 BR Townhouses

Parking Ratio & Type:

2:1, Partially covered,

Access to Units:

Elevator access

Square Footage:

53,236 GSF

Construction Cost:

$25,000,000

Firm’s role:

Design Architect

Owner:

CDG, Brad Eidson

General Contractor:

Brasfield and Gorrie, Mike Culwell


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com


Congregation Beth Israel Cemetery Houston, Texas with Gary Strang

The Congregation Beth Israel Cemetery consists of a chapel to accommodate three hundred people and a two and a half-acre site design. Included are mausolea, fountains, an arbor walk, landscaping and meditative courtyard spaces shaded from Houston’s heat. Working within the constraints of the close proximity of a busy arterial, existing water tank and burials, the design establishes a site plan of absolute simplicity. The chapel is cooled by natural breezes and passive design technologies while the entire project seeks to reinforce one’s awareness of the cycle of seasons and tactility of nature as a respite from the sealed reflective glass environment of Houston. Type:

Chapel & Cemetary

Client:

Congregation Beth Israel

Program:

Chapel for 300 people; mausolea, memorial wall

Date of Completion:

1997

Parcel Size:

3 Acres

Square Footage:

5,280 GSF

Construction Cost:

$2,600,000

Special Features:

Meditation garden, water element

Awards Recieved for Beth Israel Memorial Chapel 1998 AIA Religious Art & Architecture, National Design Award 1998 AIA California Council, Design Award 1999 Metal Architecture, Design Award


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


Houses

During the early and formative years of the firm, single family houses, sometimes quite luxurious houses were a staple of the practice. This experience, though it is different from the firm’s current focus on large, budget constrained urban housing complexes, laid the ground-work for the current practice. These small commissions built skill and focus in the craft of building, on detail, and on manipulation of space and light.


Lee’s Orchard Milpitas, CA

Lee’s Orchard is a residential project at the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Thirteen Houses are clustered on the lower portion of a 50-acre site in the East Bay hills. The project includes a new working olive orchard with a grid of 1000 trees serving as the principal landscape feature of the entire developed portion of the property. The orchard is maintained as common area landscape with maintenance costs largely underwritten by the orchard’s own production. Houses, roads, and drives are aligned with the geometry of the orchard so that the grid of trees remains uniform to screen the view of the project from the valley floor. The road divides around a central space that serves as the site for a small recreation building. The houses are derived from California farmhouses, with deep set porches, white clapboards, and wooden rails. There are four seperate housing types, all interpretations of vernacular prototypes adapted to varying site conditions. Each house has a small peice of turf, while the bulk of the orchard is seeded with wild flowers, mustard, and grasses. There is an explosive bloom of mustard in winter and early spring, while in summer, the landscape is allowed to manifest its dry character resulting in massive savings of water.

Housing Type:

For Sale

Date of Completion:

1993

Number of Units:

12

Parcel Size:

50 Acres

Density:

25 DU per Acre

Unit Configuration:

12 Detached houses, 4 unit types, Pool

Parking Ratio & Type:

2:1, Garage

Access to Units:

At grade

Square Footage:

33,129 GSF

Construction Cost:

Withheld


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign

.com


Gleeson Residence San Francisco, CA

This house and studio space for two distinguished modern musicians occupies an infill lot on Potrero Hill. From the outside, it is a seamless black object of ambiguous scale, clad in black composition shingles. The interior is an open loft finished in stucco lustro, perforated steel, and zinc. At the center of the house are a skylit rotunda and a double spiral stair that allow daylight to penetrate down to a glass block entry at the street-level garage. There are two studio spaces at the back of the house, one of which is used for electronic composition and the creation of musical scores for films. The same geometry that serves the composer’s studio is appropriate acoustically for the other studio, a rehearsal space for the Kronos Quartet. The design combines the detailed acoustic requirements of the musicians’ studios with a comfortable domestic environment.

Square Footage:

2,220 sq. ft. living

Program:

1BR, 1 1/2 baths

740 sq. ft. garage two music studios wine cellar Date of Completion:

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

1989

Lot Size:

3,730 sq. ft.

Garage Spaces:

3

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


click on: www.610RhodeIsland.com


Urban Design

The most distinctive feature of the Solomon E.T.C. practice is the blurred line between urbanism and architecture. All of the firms buildings are conceived as constituent parts of settings larger than themselves. Conversely , the firms work as urban designers is firmly rooted in the practicalities of building, and in deep understanding of building typologies.


Lennar Urban Hunters Point Shipyard Design Charrette San Francisco, CA There are many steps that must occur between the preparation of a Master Plan and the successful realization of a vital new urban community. This brochure illustrates in summary form the results one such step. Lennar Urban, the developers of the San Francisco’s Candlestick Point and the Hunters Point Shipyard sponsored an extraordinary two-part design charrette to test and refine the urban design and design guidelines for the development of the Shipyard. Lennar commissioned six distinguished architectural firms to produce designs for six large, contiguous city blocks within the Shipyard Plan. The blocks represent the full range of building types, density and street conditions within the plan, including a high-rise tower, stacked flats of various heights, lofts, townhouses and buildings of mixed-use. Streets range from grand boulevards to small lanes that bisect each of the six blocks. The firms did the exercise twice over a period of five weeks, with the initial sketch designs forming the subject of a daylong seminar with the developers, critics and the design teams. This conversation spurred a major recasting of the designs, with results which are summarized on these pages. The dynamics of this exercise vividly illustrated both the challenges and the potential for different building programs, market profiles, and stylistic inclinations to come together in a neighborhood that has the character of a great urban place. In this exercise, architects responded to one another’s designs and produced ideas for beautiful, coherent streetscapes and for rich networks of lanes and courtyards that transcend the boundaries of individual sites.

7

10

6

9

5

8


Midrise buildings facing Park Boulevard

Two level garages with pedestrian courtyard above

Finger blocks open to waterfront at corner.

Highrise tower articulated massing integrated with base building

Ground Floor shops or workshops facing Fisher Street.

Permeable blocks with portals and mid block courts Taller buildings facing Park Mid-block lane with Boulevard townhouses


Hierarchy of Street Types and Building Types. To achieve the quality and complexity of a vital, living, neighborhood, the Hunters Point Shipyard Plan proposes a hierarchy of streets of different type, width and character. These include a 95’ wide north-south Park Boulevard,with a green median , an 81’ major east-west street that can accommodate game-day and BRT traffic, a 60’ wide retail street, typical 51’ wide residential streets and 40’ mid-block lanes. The charrette designs suggest some specific measures to strengthen this essential idea of street hierarchy. To make the differences between larger streets and midblock lanes more emphatic, the charrette team recommended that mid-block lanes be decreased from 40’ to 35’ making them more like typical San Francisco lanes. The mid-block lanes should not have any required setbacks in order to retain their narrowness and sense of enclosure. Mid-block lanes could be without curbs; paving them with unit masonry would enhance their urbane, pedestrian character.

A B C D

There are three areas on the study blocks (and by extension on other blocks in Parcel B) where the neighborhood would benefit from a prescribed relationship between street type and building type. These are as follows: The Park Boulevard should be lined with taller buildings along its length. These can be 60’ high four-story Type V wood-frame buildings on the blocks closest to the waterfront and up to 85’ high, mid-rise construction for the southern blocks of the Boulevard. These boulevard buildings should be articulated as large scale urban residential buildings and should not mimic the articulation of smaller buildings on smaller parcels. The mid-block lanes should be faced with lower buildings such as two- or three-story townhouses or, with a maximum height of 35’ and building entrances at 30’ intervals or less. The buildings facing the proposed neighborhood retail street, (a continuation of Fisher Street to the waterfront) should be built to the street property lines and have ground floor spaces that are 15 to 20 ft. high to accommodate retail or other street animating non-residential uses, such as workplaces workshops or community services. In addition, the block designs produced in the charrette show the benefits of restricting parking podiums to the outer northeastern and southwestern thirds of each block with no large aggregations of parking in the middle portion flanking the mid-block lanes. This arrangement is what enables most of the charrette designs to achieve their remarkable qualities of public and common spaces in the middles of blocks. Permeable Blocks, Courtyards and Lanes. The most dramatic contribution of the charrette designs is to demonstrate the potential richness that the design of mid-blocks can contribute to the experience of living in an urban neighborhood. A sharp contrast in scale between large dramatic gestures and vistas and tiny intimate ones characterize the best of San Francisco’s townscapes. The charrette block designs show how these aspects of the charm and character of the City can be created de novo. Many cities benefit in different ways from a complex sub-scale of urban space within city blocks. There are openings, portals and gates, sometimes providing public access, sometimes providing views into private or semi-private interior courtyards to give spatial relief from the continuous street wall around the perimeter block. On some of the charrette blocks, courtyards are located above ground floor parking garages with grand stairs to provide access to the upper level open space, replicating the changes in topography one frequently finds in San Francisco neighborhoods. The frequent portals to lanes and courts in the block designs are all at least twostories high to provide light and air into the courtyards and dramatic punctuation to streetscapes. Street frontage setback, stoops and entries. The urban design guidelines for Hunters Point call for 10’ setbacks for all buildings from the right-of-way on the residential streets and boulevards. This setback zone is intended to accommodate stairs and stoops to ground floor units as well as provide space for outdoor decks and gardens. In order to protect the privacy to ground floor units while avoiding blank walls at street level, the charrette designs limit the height of this setback zone to no more than 3’ above sidewalk level.


7 170 Units 184 Parking spaces Architect: Merrill, Pastor, and Colgan Architects

6 197 Units 197 Parking Spaces Architect: Michael Willis Architects

5 222 Units 239 Parking Spaces Architect: Mark Horton Architecture

10 146 Units 165 Parking spaces Architect: WRT | Solomon E. T. C.

9 188 Units 188 Parking Spaces Architect: Kennerly Architecture

8 331 Units 364 Parking Spaces Architect: Moule & Polyzoides Architects & Urbanists


Market Octavia San Francisco, CA

The Market/Octavia Neighborhood plan is a part of the San Francisco Planning Department’s Better Neighborhoods Program. Located at the heart of San Francisco, the area is at the nexus of three of the City’s street grids and contains important regional, cultural and civic destinations. Since the 1930’s, the area has been deluged with regional traffic and suffered from the intrusion of elevated urban freeways. The demolition of the Central Freeway, which was damaged in the Loma Prieta Earthquake of 1989, and its replacement by the new Octavia Boulevard will help repair the damaged fabric of Hayes Valley. The plan creates the potential for several thousand new dwellings to be built close to transit and proposes guidelines for infill development as well as opportunity through out the district. Solomon E.T.C. served as Urban Design Consultants to the San Francisco Planning Department and developed building typologies and design guidelines site by site for the district. Land Use:

Multi-family housing, retail and

Date of Completion:

Octavia Boulevard completion

Number of Units:

750-900 dwellings on former

commercial 2003-8 Freeway Cooridor 2,200-3,600 units in the SOMA West neighborhood Density:

35-200 dwellings per acre

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


Coyote Valley Vision San Jose, CA

The Vision was sponsored by the Greenbelt Alliance to create an alternative to sprawl for the 6,800-acre Coyote Valley, south of San Jose, which accomodates the same program that the City of San Jose established for a residential population of 80,000 and 50,000 new jobs. The plan is a compact, transit-oriented, mixed-use community organized around a grid of streets and blocks and a framework of parks and open spaces. The town is composed of several different neighborhoods each with its own parks, schools and local retail centers. The Town Center is located at the transit hub and is intended to have tall buildings and the highest densities. A range of building types at various densities provides the framework for the urban fabric, together with design guidelines, to establish the scale and character of each district.

All Right: A Town

All Wrong: Sprawl


Hydrology: Creeks and Flood Zones

Open Space: Parks

Major Arterial Roads

Street Network

Retail and Neighborhood Centers

Schools

Height Limits

Residential Districts

Employment Oriented Districts

Mixed Use Districts

Transit


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com

The plan consists of a grid of blocks and streets overlaying the site with a coherent pattern of neighborhood parks. There is a transit network of buses and a light rail in addition to a commuter station on the existing railroad line adjacent to the site. The proposed commuter train station would link with a new extension to San Jose’s Light Rail system. A transit/ pedestrian oriented Main Street would be lined with retail and high density housing and commercial buildings while a pair of one-way streets on either side would accommodate through traffic without creating barriers to the adjacent neighborhoods.

Low Medium Density Residential 2-3 story Tuck’under townhouses-cluster houses 35-40 DU/ac density

Medium Density Residential 4 story stacked flats over parking podium 40-50 DU/ac Density

Industrial Warehouse District Truck bays and perimeter parking

Commercial District Structured garages, remote lots

Mixed Use District 1 Loft space with surface parking Row house residential

Mixed Use District 2 Office and housing with surface parking structured garage with liner units.

Prototypical blocks were designed to accomodate a variety of mixed uses at various densities. The various uses are all accommodated in block typologies that support the pedestrian oriented street grid.


Hua Yuan Residential Neighborhood Beijing Distribution Center District, China

In 2003, Solomon E.T.C. was selected as the American participant in a field of distinguished international competitors for a 5000-unit residential and mixed-use master plan in Beijing. After the first stage of the competition, the firm was selected as one of two finalists along with French Pritzker Prize winner Christian de Portzamparc. This is the plan submitted for the final phase of the competition.

China’s strategies to counteract the effects of overcrowding have been similar to that of Western urbanism. New building codes and solar ordinances have succeeded in some ways and have failed in others. They have allowed people to move out of dark cramped slums into sunny, generous apartments. However, the residual open spaces between tall slab buildings are void of activity and life. Here, traditions of city building and the need for community collide with ideals of the private dwelling. The Hua Yuan residential plan attempts to recreate the social life of the Chinese street, courtyard, and hutong (lane) while designing housing that conforms to Beijing’s rigid solar access ordinance. These new building types transform slab blocks into perimeter blocks. As a result, there are a variety of lively and inhabited public spaces that are proximate to dwellings, contained and intimate in scale. Perimeter blocks allow for both public and private open spaces and continuous street frontages. Open spaces are places for recreation, gardening and socializing. Continuous street frontages with retail on the ground floor activate block perimeters with stores, restaurants and offices. This combination of open space and retail streets provides the framework for the growth of a healthy community.

Housing Type:

Rental/ Affordable

Date of Completion:

2003

Number of Units:

100 (280 beds)

Parcel Size:

0.58 Acres

Density:

172 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

One, Two Bedroom

Parking Ratio & Type:

0.25 spaces/ 0.64 cars

Access to Units:

Elevator and Corridor

Square Footage:

100,000 GSF


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


Recentering The Plan for Downtown Hayward Hayward, CA

Hayward’s moribund downtown had suffered from disinvestment, destructive regional traffic infrastructure, inappropriately scaled development, and the ravages of an earthquake fault. We were asked by the city to develop a plan for revitalizing this downtown area. The overall strategy of the plan has been to reintroduce the mix of functions necessary for a vital urban center within the structure of the existing grid. Through this planning effort, the downtown core has been repopulated by new high-density housing clustered around the BART rail station. A new civic center now serves as an anchor to a revitalized historic retail street. The transit station was reconfigured to create pedestrian links between neighborhoods instead of severing them. The Hayward Downtown Plan is one of the Bay Area’s most notable and successful transit villages.

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


Milwaukee Waterfront Development Plan Beer Line B Milwaukee, WI

This plan creates a new neighborhood that integrates the adjacent urban fabric of Brewer’s Hill and provides new places to live and work near downtown on the spectacular waterfront of the Milwaukee River. The site, located on a narrow strip of flat land stretching between the river and the steeply sloping bluff, generates the form of the urban layout. The plan continues the Riverwalk, which currently extends from downtown along the length of the site and which now provides a continuous pedestrian and cycle path, fully accessible to the disabled. The plan is organized around a series of blocks arranged between streets and pathways that connect to the surrounding neighborhood. The block layout acknowledges the existing pattern of site ownership and utility access as well as responds to areas that are restricted in excavation because of soil contamination. Seven new points of access are created in the form of steps or ramps from the top of the bluff to the new neighborhood below. The plan is being implemented rapidly by the City of Milwaukee and will be fully realized by the beginning of 2003. The resulting construction has served as a catalyst for extensive revitalization of adjacent blocks.

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com


Seawall Lot 337 San Francisco, CA Currently in Design

View of McCovey Cove Park

The design concept for Seawall Lot 337 begins with the idea of building a new neighborhood for all San Franciscans, with an emphasis on the San Francisco Art Community. This neighborhood includes a series of public spaces, some open, some enclosed, which have a special kind of life in them – the vitality of the artists, particularly the environmental artists of our region. The neighborhood context plan, in the setting of Mission Bay, McCovey Cove and the Ballpark, shows our central sequence of public spaces, terminating in a crescent plaza and water gardens, creating a hub for artists, art and art lovers. At the edge of McCovey Cove, we keep all of the existing improvements and propose adding large elements of environmental art to an enlarged public open space. Another central element of the plan is the 500 seat community performance pavilion at the northwest corner of the neighborhood. This community performance space sits over restaurants and galleries that line Terry Francois Boulevard. A landmark green residential building anchors the street at the eastern end. Neighborhood Context Plan


Art First SF: ArtSpace

Transit Link

Sunflower PV’s

Wind Turbines

Wind Screens

Wind Net

The central art space begins with a welcoming plaza where the T-Third Street light rail stops at Channel Street. It continues down Channel Street past two parking structures wrapped with kinetic wind screens or other art installations. It terminates in a crescent shaped public park which functions as an outdoor workspace, installation space and a festival place for the artist workshops that

Tree Boats

Fog Garden surround it in the Crescent buildings and in the reused Pier 48. The water space between Piers 48 and 50 is also part of the art space, with floating art installations in the water and a fog garden. The art installations in the water move easily and accommodate the continued tug boat operation at Pier 50, which is also a welcomed part of this active scene.


ArtSpace Crescent

View of ArtSpace Crescent

Mc Covey Park Terry Francois Street

Block 1

McCovey Plaza Terry Francois Street

Block 1

30 Story Residential Tower

Junior Giants Field

Retail

Community Performance Venue

3 Level Parking Garage

6 Story Flats / Townhouses

Pier 48 Pier 48 Street

Pier 48 Street

Block 2

Block 2

600 Car Parking Garage

Office

Channel Street

Block 3

Channel Street

Block 3

6 Story Stacked Flats

Artist Residences

Ground Floor Plan showing active uses at the edges of all the pubic spaces, including artist’s studios opening out onto the Crescent Plaza.

6 Story Stacked Flats

Terry Francois St.

Block 4 Pier 50

3rd Street

Mission Rock Street

Terry Francois St

Residential Parking Garage

Pier 50 Street 3rd Street

Block 4

ArtSpace Plaza

Office

600 Car Parking Garage

Live / Work Lofts

6 Story Stacked Flats

600 Car Parking Garage

Mission Rock Street

Artist Residences

Typical upper levels showing the residential and office spaces, the revenue generating program that subsidizes the public spaces and the art components of the proposal and provide a revenue stream to the Port.


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com

Aerial View of Base Proposal

Additional Open Space on Block 1

All Low-rise Block 1 Alternative

Bio-tech Office Building on Block 4

Additional Parking on Block 4

Program Alternatives Project Data Program:

Site Area: Parking:

Height:

Development Team

1,100+ rental units / market-rate & affordable (20%), including 70 affordable homes for artists 400,000 sf office space 170,000 sf of working artists space 75,000 sf of retail & gallery space 1,500 joint use parking spaces 500 seat community performance space 16.0 acres, including 6.0 acres open space 880 spaces residential (0.8 spaces per unit) 1500 joint-use parking spaces for Giants games, including 1200 commercial (3 spaces per 1000 sf) and 300 on-street All low-rise housing & retail: 6 Stories / 65’ above grade; 2 commercial Office buildings: 11 Stories / 160’ above grade; High-rise residential tower: 30 stories / 300’

Development Entity:

Urban Design & Masterplan Landscape and Open Space Construction Civil Engineering Geotechnical Engineering Historic Architecture Hazardous Materials Remediation Environmental Art Legal Sustainability Advisor

Contact:

Kenwood Investments, LLC c/o Bethany Fischer 100 Spear Street, Suite 1600 San Francisco, CA 94105

Lot 337 Community Developers LLC Boston Properties, Inc. Wilson Meany Sullivan LLC Kenwood Investments LLC WRT / Solomon E.T.C. CMG and Walter Hood Landscape Architecture Webcor Builders BKF Civil Engineers ENGEO Page & Turnbull Erler & Kalinowski, Inc. Ned Kahn Neil Sekhri, Esq., Gibson Dunn & Crutcher Jean Rogers, ARUP

T: 415-856-0584 x228 F: 415-856-0585 e: BFischer@kenwoodinvestments.com


Jordan Downs Watts, Los Angeles, CA (Design in process)

Laurel Street

Kalmia Street

Juniper Street

Hickory Street

Grape Street

Anzac Ave

Croesus Ave

Community Based Masterplan Plan Maestro de la Comunidad

96th Place

97th Street 5.6 acre Retail Center

Indiana Ave

2 levels, 60,000 gsf each level on Extensi Street Laurel

99th Street Family Resource Center

Nebraska Ave

Tweedy Blvd

Grape Street

Century Extension Jobs Resource Center

Reorganized High School Sports Grounds

Freedom Tree

Century Blvd

Privately Held Parcel

Park

(Not in Project) JHS Football Field Joint-use Gymnasium

101st Street

Potential Future Development of JHS Parking Lot

Joint-use Pool Facility

102nd Street

RR) t a Stree R & UP NSF R Alamed ridor (B h / Cor ecch ne Trrn aT Alamed Street lameda South A

1.5 acres

Wisconsin Ave

Privately Held Parcels (Not in Project) 102nd Street

David Starr Jordan High School

Retail Plaza

Mudtown Farms

Potential Future Teacher Parking Lot

Site Plan The site master plan is organized around a new central park, connecting the north and south sections of the Jordan Downs community. The new plan’s pattern of permeable streets and blocks reconnects Jordan Downs with the surrounding neighborhoods. At the heart of the plan is a new community building housing the Family Resource Center, home to community programs and services. The ¿rst phase includes 4 key community redevelopment components: a Community Services Building, an Urban Park, 7 acres reserved for Employment Land, and 300-400 new Homes. A new street connects Century Boulevard to Tweedy Boulevard. No relocation of residents or demolition of current homes are required for the implementation of the ¿rst phase.

Weigand Ave

Gorman Street

Kalmia Street

Juniper Street

Croesus Ave

Lou Dillon Ave

S. Hickory Street

Grape Street

103rd Street

Plano de Sitio El Plan Maestro se estructura alrededor de un Parque Central, el cual conectará la zona norte y sur de la comunidad de Jordan Downs. El Plan propone un nuevo patrón de calles y bloques permeables el cual reconectará la comunidad de Jordan Downs con las comunidades adyacentes. En el centro del Plan se localizará un Centro Comunitario que albergará el Centro de Recursos Familiares, hogar de los programas y servicios comunitarios. La primera fase incluirá cuatro componentes claves para la reconstrución de la comunidad: un Centro de Servicios Comunitarios, un Parque Urbano, 7 acres reservados para el desarrollo de empleos y 300-400 nuevos hogares. A demás una nueva carretera conectará el Century Boulevard con Tweedy Boulevard. La primera fase no requiere la relocalización de residentes o la demolición de los hogares existentes.


Aerial View of Jordan Downs

Vista Aérea de Jordan Downs

Looking East

Century Boulevard - A Neighborhood Center Street Jordan Downs will be reconnected to the surrounding neighborhood with a new street linking Century and Tweedy Boulevards. The new street is designed as a neighborhood center street, lined with residential buildings on both sides. The new street leads to the Central Park and the Family Resource Center - the heart of activity for the redeveloped community.

Direccion Este

Century Boulevard Calle Central de la Comunidad Jordan Downs será reconectada con las comunidades adyacentes a través de una nueva carretera que conectará Century y Tweedy Boulevards. La nueva carretera será la calle central de la comunidad, rodeada de edi¿cios residenciales en ambos lados.La nueva carretera conducirá al Parque Central y al Centro de Recursos Familiares - centro de la nueva comunidad.

The Family Resource Center and Central Park The new Central Park is the center of an 8 acre network of parks, greenways and other open spaces for use by the community. The new central park is over 6 acres, and includes a variety of passive and active recreational areas. The park is the symbolic front lawn of the new Family Resource Center, home to community services and programs.

Centro de Recursos Familiares y Parque Central El nuevo Parque Central será el centro de un sistema de parques de alrededor de 8 acres de terreno, veredas y otros espacios al aire libre para el uso de la comunidad. El nuevo Parque Central de al menos 6 acres de terreno incluirá una variedad de áreas recreacionales pasivas y activas. A demás, el parque será la entrada simbólica del nuevo Centro de Recursos Familiares el cual albergará los programas y servicios para la comunidad.


San Francisco State University Campus Master Plan San Francisco, CA

San Francisco State University occupies a sprawling 134-acre site on the southwestern part of the city. The campus is located between an urban edge along 19th Avenue and a rural one overlooking Lake Merced. The site was previously one of several narrow valleys whose stream beds fed the lake. From its founding in 1958, the campus has grown in a haphazard manner, one building at a time. SF State has recently purchased two adjacent residential properties, to the north and south of the main campus. Growth projection is for a 20 percent increase in the number of students to 25,000 full-time enrollees in the next ten years. The intention of the master plan is to begin shifting the campus from a commuter campus to a resident campus providing a balance of academic, residential and support uses. The master plan proposes to reorganize the composition of the campus by opening up the existing valley as a major natural and recreational resource, replacing outdated academic buildings over time, adding residential capacity, strengthening the urban edge along 19th Avenue, locating key facilities at the four corners of campus and establishing a series of formal landscaped axes linking important destinations. Our work at SFSU demonstrates our experience in working in the largest scale, on a complex, campus planning assignment. The ideas supported by the plan present a new direction for the campus – one that restores a lost ecology and engages a model of sustainability through redirecting the campus towards its historic watercourse and natural setting.


Central City Urban Design Guidelines and Plan Sacramento, CA Project in progress

Aerial view of Massing Model of the Downtown, illustrating the capacity of the C.B.D. with pipeline projects shown in pink

Working with the Development Services Department, our team has written an update to the Architectural and Urban design guidelines for the capital’s central city area. Sacramento is targeted to accept steady growth for the next 25 years, and like may mature cities, is presented with renewed interest in the residential development potential of its downtown. The guidelines regulate the most important features of urban design - building configuration, street-wall articulation, height limits, bulk and massing as well as ground floor activity and parking arrangements – without restricting the expressive potential of each building. Other controls address lot coverage, tower separation, tower massing and articulation of their tops. A key feature of this scope of work is the development of residential building prototypes, which are used to test the residential capacity of the central city, as well as illustrate that density is achievable without relying solely on tower development. The potential range of appropriate building types varies from two-story townhouses to 55 story high-rise towers.

Lot Coverage

Existing Aerial view of the Downtown

Bulk Controls

City-wide Major Redevelopment projects


1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

8 Story Midrise (1/2 Block) Stacked Flats 190 Du/Ac

Railyard District

Green Residential Street

30 Story Highrise Stacked Flats 250 Du/Ac

Cesar Chavez Plaza

Street Type: “Portland Option”

415-575-4722 (phone)

45 Story Highrise Stacked Flats 450 Du/Ac

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.wrtdesign.com

55 Story Highrise Stacked Flats 550 Du/Ac

Capitol Mall

Slow Street with Angled Parking

Two-way Street with Median


Sacramento 2030 General Plan Update Sacramento, CA 2008

“Urban Center High”

“Center - Urban Low”

“Center - CBD”

“Center - Regional Commercial”

“Corridor - Suburban”

“Corridor - Urban High”

“Center - Suburban”

“Center - Traditional”

“Rural Residential”

“Suburban Neighborhood”

“Corridor - Urban Low”

“Employment - Industrial”

“Traditional Neighborhood”

“Urban Neighborhood”

“Employment - Low-Rise”

“Employment - Mid-Rise”

Working with a diverse consulting team, the urban design task was to illustrate a series of “place types” related to General Plan land use designations. This approach represented a radical departure from normal General Plan practice in California, which tends towards text-only descriptions. The illustrations show how different places currently exist and how they can be redeveloped with in-fill development, typically more dense than the lower-intensity surroundings. The drawings shown here represent 16 place types illustrated for the General Plan document. All of the place type illustrations take as a point of departure a series of actual locations within the Sacramento area currently under development pressure.


E.T.C.

SOLOMON

Eugene Water & Electricity Board (EWEB) Master Plan Eugene, OR with Rowell Brokaw Architects

The proposed development of the 27 acre site owned by the Eugene Water and Electricity Board (EWEB) offers an unparalleled opportunity to connect Downtown Eugene with the Willamette River. The former industrial site has significant challenges being bisected by the elevated Ferry Street viaduct and separated from the city by the Union Pacific railroad. The illustrative site plan shows the framework of streets, open space and redevelopment blocks proposed for the EWEB riverfront property. A continuous area of public open space and the riverfront path system extend the length of the downtown riverfront. This open space includes riparian enhancement, new habitat, a public plaza, nature paths, a public boardwalk, and a “natives garden” as one of the experiential education opportunities in the open space program. The adaptive reuse of several existing buildings or portions of existing buildings is accommodated by the master plan. Mill St

High St

3rd Ave

4th Ave

Ferry St

Preliminary density studies show the ability to add 250-400 residential dwellings to the downtown core with this master plan. New office space, live/work options, and focused areas of retail and commercial are also proposed, specifically along “Restaurant Row,” which provides small-scale public amenities to the riverfront path system and new open space.

5th Ave

5th Ave

Parking Ratio & Type:

1:1, tuck-under, podium & subsurface garage

7th Ave

Ferry St

Stacked Flats, Penthouses and Townhouses

High St

Unit Types:

ER

30-50 DU per net developable acre

Av e

RIV

27 Acres

Density:

d

TE

Parcel Size:

oa

ET

250-400

ilr

AM

Number of Units:

Ra

6th Ave

ILL

2015 projected

W

Mixed-Income Housing, Retail, Commercial Office, Parks

Date of Completion:

e. t Av rfron Rive

Uses:

8th Ave

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 • 415-575-4722 (phone) • 415-436-9837 (fax) • www.solomonetc-wrt.com


On the Boards

Our current work continues and builds on the themes of the previous sections: urban housing, mixed-use, transit supportive, environmentally responsible. All are buildings and neighborhoods that repair and revitalize the cities of which they are a part.


Hercules Mixed Use Building Hercules, California Currently under Construction

Hercules is a New Urbanist planned town located between the eastern shore of San Pablo Bay and Interstate 80. Sycamore Avenue is one of two major streets leading into the town from the freeway and was chosen as the site for a neighborhood retail center. Sycamore Avenue divides the site into two with a small 2 acre parcel to the north and a 13 acre parcel to the south. The first phase on the north side is being designed by WRT | Solomon E.T.C. to contain 40,000 sq ft of retail and 96 units of for-sale and rental affordable units. The design consists of a five story street-wall building centered on a small plaza facing Sycamore Avenue. The south side is intended to complement the north side and to match it in scale and height. The second phase is planned to contain 40 units of affordable housing units, 25,000 sq ft of medical offices and 36,000 sq ft of retail. Parking is a combination of on-street angled parking, off-street surface lots and basement garages. Future phases are designed to be flexible to allow the potential of a small hotel, more office space and an anchor retail building. Housing Type:

Market Rate for sale, Affordable Rentals

Date of Completion:

Phase I - 2009, Phase II - 2011

Number of Units:

96 Units

Parcel Size:

2 Acres

Density:

48 DU Per Acre

Unit Configuration:

Stacked Flats, Townhouses

Parking Ratio & Type:

1.2 cars / DU,

Square Footage:

164.062 SF, Residential

Construction Cost:

$53m

Typical Upper Level

Ground Level

both Surface and Garage 40,000 SF, Retail Parking Level


University of California, Los Angeles Southwest Campus Graduate Student Housing Los Angeles, CA currently in design with Studios Architecture

Proposal in existing context This 520-studio graduate student apartment building will occupy a triangular site in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, just southwest of UCLA’s campus. The site is the final remaining parcel in an area that the University has developed to address its needs for graduate student housing. Increasingly, universities market themselves in a competitive marketplace by the quality and affordability of their undergraduate housing, graduate housing and faculty housing. This is particularly true of urban campuses like UCLA where housing costs can run exponentially higher than the university’s ability to keep up. Innovative unit designs and configurations allow the site’s capacity to be fully exploited while maintaining the somewhat informal character of neighboring university and privately-held residential buildings. Housing Type: Date of Completion: Number of Units: Unit Configuration: Unit Access: Square Footage: Construction Cost: Parking Ratio & Type: Principle Designers:

Graduate Student Housing 2012 ±520 units Studios Elevator with Corridor ±250,000 GSF ±$120,000,000 None (Offsite Parking Available) John Ellis (WRT | Solomon E.T.C.) Erik Sueberkrop (Studios)

Aerial View of Site

UCLA Campus Plan


Zipper 4-Plex

Nested 7-Plex

Dormitory Room Types & Prototypical Groupings

These typical graduate student room groupings illustrate how the number of units can be increased within a limited amount of street or courtyard frontage. Grouping strategies include the “Zipper,” with interlocked sleeping alcoves, and the “Nested” unit configuration, introducing a rhythm of solid and void along the exterior.

Site Plan (in progress)


New Railroad Square Santa Rosa, CA Currently in Design

New Railroad Square is designed to reinforce the renaissance of the area surrounding Santa Rosa’s historic railroad depot, slated to become an important stop on the proposed SMART commuter train service. It consists of a sustainable neighborhood of 250 new for-sale homes, a rich mix of new commercial and cultural activities including the Sonoma County Food & Wine Center, attractive facilities serving all passengers using the reactivated rail station, two levels of subterranean parking and a network of carefully shaped public spaces that will become a new focus for civic life in Santa Rosa. The central feature of New Railroad Square is a crescent shaped public plaza facing Fourth Street and the historic railroad depot, providing the “front porch” for both residents and the long-planned Sonoma County Food & Wine Center, and suitable for a range of public activities, including farmers’ markets, concerts, and other community-oriented events. The site-specific architecture pays tribute to, but does not mimic, its historic surroundings in Railroad Square and the West End neighborhood, and respects them in its scale and massing.


Third Street Facade

Railroad Promenade

Fourth Street Arcade

Railroad


d Depot

Fifth Street Arcade

Fifth Street Portal

Sixth Street Facade


Sustainability New Railroad Square is planned to achieve sustainability at two levelsthat of the neighborhood, and that of the buildings. At the scale of the neighborhood, the project achieves a “location efficiency” as an infill/ brownfield redevelopment which has good access to schools, open spaces, and creates both jobs and housing. It will reinvest in existing infrastructure and contribute to a reduction in sprawl and automobile dependence. The buildings themselves - designed to achieve LEED-NC Platinum ratings - will minimize the use of non-renewable resources in their construction and operation; reduce wastewater, reuse storm water and achieve a high degree of energy efficiency.

Project Data Housing Type: Construction Start: Site Area: Open Space: Floor Area Ratio: Density: Dwelling Units: Parking:

Square Footage:

Height:

Development Team For-Sale / Market-Rate & Affordable 2007 5.39 acres (4.08 acres net developable) 1.49 acres 2.46 61 dwelling units per net acre 250 451 spaces residential 235 spaces retail / visitor 50 on-street plus 15 along promenade 6 bus bays 727,000 GSF; 346,660 sf for residential; 60,800 sf for retail; 29,450 for other non-residential mixed uses 3-5 Stories / 30’-50’ above grade

Development Entity:

Railroad Square, LLC: - Creative Housing Associates LLC - Lambert Development LLC - Hugh Futrell Corporation Project Design: WRT | Solomon E.T.C., Architects & Urban Designers Shook Kelley, Retail Architect Agriculture & Outreach: SAGE Public Market: Oxbow Management LLC Restaurant & Fine Dining: Moana Hotel & Dining Group Civil Engineering: Carlile • Macy, Civil Engineering Dick Carlile, Civil Engineering Consultant General Contractor: Charles Pankow Builders LTD Transportation: OMNI-Means, LTD Parking: International Parking Design Sustainability: Dutko Worldwide Environmental Planning & Design Legal: Perry Johnson Anderson Miller & Moskowitz LLP Communications & Outreach: Messagesmith Sobel Communications Boxer & Associates Historic: Historic Resources Group


Hunters View San Francisco, CA Currently in Design

View of Block 4 Community Room overlooking Promontory Park

At the time Hunters View and its neighboring projects were conceived, planners, architects and public officials engaged in public housing and much of the City’s redevelopment turned their backs on the well-established principles of American urbanism that had made San Francisco one of the world’s most desirable and livable cities. Similar approaches to public housing throughout the country left a legacy of failure and created the will for HUD and Housing Authorities to adopt the principles of New Urbanism as the foundation for its HOPE VI program in 1996. Amongst the ideas clearly articulated in the original Federal HOPE VI guidelines are de-concentration of the poor, building practices that respect local heritage, and buildings that define and animate streets and open spaces as places of shared use. HOPE SF, the City of San Francisco’s extraordinary initiative for locally-funded public housing redevelopment, carries these ideas forward without the federal subsidies of the HOPE VI program.

View from Westpoint Road, Paulett Taggart Architects

Using town planning principles common to virtually all of San Francisco’s historic neighborhoods, the revitalization of Hunters View will transform an isolated and distressed site into a vibrant, sustainable, walkable mixed-use community. This LEED for Neighborhood Design pilot project replaces the current 267 public housing units in deteriorating barracks-style buildings with 800 new energy efficient, healthy townhomes and apartments for families of a range of incomes. New streets, parks and pedestrian linkages knit Hunters View back into the surrounding community, reconnecting residents with nearby neighborhood shopping, transit, daycare and schools. Entrance to Mid-block garden, Paulett Taggart Architects

Housing Type: Begun: Phases of Service: Number of Units: Parcel Size: Density: Unit Configuration: Program Area: Construction Budget:

Affordable Rental and Market Rate 2005 - Ongoing Conceptual Master Planning through Construction Administration Maximum of 800 units 22 acres (gross) over 50 DU per net acre A mix of stacked flats, ground-related multi-story units stacked over flats, with or without a parking podium over 700,000 net s.f. residential; approximately 12,000 s.f. retail; 25,000 s.f. community and child care space Not known for full site Fairfax Avenue


Fa ir

fa

xA

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nu

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nu

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re Keith St et

Promontory Park

West Point Road

Wills Street

Hare Street

e et x Str

Middle Point Road

New Street

Fair fa

Soujourner Truth Daycare Park Street East Panhandle Park Hunter s Po int Boul evard

Malcolm X Academy

India Basin Shoreline

Hare Street Community Youth

Park Fu

Park Hu ds o

In

ne

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ve

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nu

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Hu

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Str e

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Illustrative Plan

Existing iscolated deteriorating site

Proposed revitalization re--knit into neighborhood

The proposed street and block plan will provide much needed linkages to other parts of the neighborhood. Whereas at present Hunters View is segregated from its surroundings with a single way in and out, the new plan will create a variety of routes for pedestrians, vehicles and cyclists. In addition to retaining the existing Middle Point Road route linking Evans Avenue to the north and Ingalls Street and Innes Avenue to the south, a new connection with Fairfax Avenue is created. This will allow a new and a direct access to the Bayview Plaza retail center and the ‘T’ Line Light Rail on Third Street and an alternative

route for pedestrians to the busy Evans Avenue. Other linkages include a new stairway route to the extension of Hudson Avenue and the India Basin Park, an improved pedestrian connection to Cashmere Street and the existing Child Care Center, as well as a new stair path to and from the Malcolm X Academy. The new street grid allows a variety of access to places such as City College’s SE campus on Evans Avenue, and the RC Our Lady of Lourdes church at Hawes and Innes Avenue.


Westbrook Plaza San Francisco, CA Under Construction

Westbrook Plaza is the result of a partnership between two organizations, Mercy Housing, a non-profit residential developer, and the South of Market Health Center, a non-profit community clinic that has served low-income patients for over thirty years. The 20,000 s.f. health center occupies the first two floors of the site’s 7th Street frontage. Forty-nine apartments for families sit over this and in a separate building fronting Moss Street, one of SoMA’s quiet residential alleys. The two buildings form a garden courtyard which is lined with a community room, laundry and computer room for residents. Housing Type:

Affordable family apartments

Date of Completion:

2010

Number of Units:

47 units

Unit Configuration:

1, 2, and 3 bedroom flats

Parking Ratio & Type:

.5:1, subsurface garage

Square Footage:

Housing 56,000 SF; Clinic

Construction Cost:

$22,751,000

20,000 SF; Garage 22,000 SF

1328 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 415-575-4722 (phone)

415-436-9837 (fax)

www.solomonetc-wrt.com


1000 Fourth Street San Francisco, CA Currently in design with Kennerly Architecture

Corner of Fourth and Channel Streets

1000 Fourth Street marks the corner of 4th and Channel as a gateway to Mission Bay South. This gateway setting carries with it civic obligations unusual for an affordable housing project; it demands a welcoming, substantial, well-made and richly articulated building to mark this location and to set the standards for development to follow on the surrounding blocks. As a community-oriented development for 150 low-income families amongst larger, market-rate and institutional neighbors, it is essential that this building holds its own as a physical presence among them. Developed by the non-profit Mercy Housing California and funded in part by the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, the project includes 11,000 s.f. of retail space lining the Fourth Street corridor, anchored by a new restaurant space at 4th and Channel, and a significant and welcoming community room facing the park. Common areas include two mid-block courtyards and rooftop community garden; teen room, exercise room, day care and supportive services. The building is designed to exceed a LEED for Homes Midrise Gold rating. Housing Type: Begun: Phases of Service: Number of Units: Density: Funding:

Construction Budget:

Affordable family housing 2008/ongoing Schematic Design through Construction Administration 150 107 du/acre TCAC, TOD bonds, San Francisco Redevelopment Agency funds and conventional construction loan $55m

View from Park at Fourth Street Bridge

Corner of Channel Street and The Mews


Mission Street Housing San Francisco, CA Currently in Design

This affordable, mixed-use urban infill project for Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation houses 100 units for low-income families, including 20 for the formerly homeless, over ground floor retail space and common areas in a high-rise building designed to exceed LEED Silver standards. Common areas, including mid-block courtyard, roof deck, play room, and supportive services offices, are carefully designed with families in mind. The principal 13-story façade faces south onto Mission Street and is richly articulated with sunshades and crowned with wind-powered beacons designed by environmental artist Ned Kahn, who also designed the shimmering photovoltaic ‘murals’ on the exposed party walls. The building steps down to 9 stories at the rear where a tenant common room and teaching kitchen enliven Jesse Street. Housing Type: Begun: Phases of Service: Number of Units: Density: Funding: Construction Budget:

Second Level Plan

Affordable family housing 2008/ongoing Schematic Design through Construction Administration 100 294 du/acre TCAC, TOD bonds, San Francisco Mayors Office of Housing and conventional construction loan $47m

Ground Level Plan


Biographies of Principals


Daniel Solomon, FAIA Principal Director, WRT | Solomon E.T.C.

Daniel Solomon is an architect and urban designer whose 42-year career combines achievements in professional practice with academic pursuits of teaching and writing. His projects have been published in architectural journals worldwide and have been recognized with more than eighty awards. The main focus of his work has been residential architecture and the interaction between housing and urban design. From this base his work has expanded in several directions including large-scale urban planning, regulatory structures that govern urban design and residential, commercial and institutional architecture. He is the author of many articles and three books: ReBuilding , Global City Blues and Cosmopolis. Daniel Solomon’s commitment to urban repair and the construction and reconstruction of urban neighborhoods extends beyond his project work; he was one of the co-founders of the Congress for the New Urbanism, an organization whose principles have helped shape the contemporary practice of community design. EDUCATION Master of Architecture, University of California, Berkeley, 1966 Bachelor of Architecture, Columbia University, 1963 Bachelor of Arts (Honors in Humanities), Stanford University, 1962 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Principal, WRT Director Solomon E.T.C, A WRT Company 2002 - Present President, Solomon E.T.C.1989 to present Daniel Solomon & Associates, 1967 to 1989 HONORS AND AWARDS Daniel Solomon’s works have received more than eighty-five design awards, including the HUD Secretary’s Platinum Award for Excellence on two occasions and three national honor awards from the AIA. He has twice been named one of “The 100 Foremost Architects” by Architectural Digest Magazine, is the 1998 recipient of the Seaside Prize for contributions to American urbanism, and the 2004 recipient of the Maybeck Award from the California AIA for achievement in design. In 2008 he was named “Housing Hero” by the Housing Action Coalition. PUBLICATIONS Daniel Solomon’s works have been published in most of the leading architectural journals worldwide as well as some fifteen architectural anthologies. Journals include A & U, Architectural Digest, Architectural Record, Architecture, Global Architecture, Hauser, L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, Progressive Architecture, Time, Town & Country and Esquire. His own writings include: The Pedestrian Pocket Book, (with others, Princeton Architectural Press 1989), his two books: ReBuilding, (Princeton Architectural Press 1992), Global City Blues, (Island Press, Spring 2003) and Cosmopolis (University of Michigan, 2008). TEACHING University of California, Berkeley: Professor of Architecture, 1979 to 2000; Emeritus 2000 - present Associate Professor, 1973-1979; Assistant Professor, 1967-1972; Lecturer, 1966 Cass Gilbert Visiting Professor, University of Minnesota, Fall 1992 Adjunct Visiting Professor, Columbia University, New York, 1987 Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Southern California, Fall 1969 PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS/REGISTRATIONS Registered in California, Nebraska, Texas, Washington


John G. Ellis, AIA, RIBA Principal, Director of Urban Design, Solomon E.T.C. John Ellis is an architect and urban designer whose 35 years of experience embrace a wide range of projects. One important thread that ties together his work is a commitment to the principles of New Urbanism, which he helps clients apply to strategic advantage. John’s work often involves developing strategies for revitalization, whether at the scale of a downtown, such as Hayward, California; a corridor that links several neighborhoods, such as Sacramento Riverfront Master Plan; or the development of a distinct neighborhood or site, such as the Redwood Square, Santa Rosa. His work in Hayward was recognized with a 2002 Charter Award from the Congress of the New Urbanism. EDUCATION Cambridge University, England, MA(Cantab), Dipl.Arch. 1970

either integrated with the housing, or as a eccentric stand-alone feature building.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Solomon E.T.C. Architecture and Urban Design, San Francisco, Principal 1997 to present Anshen + Allen, Architects, San Francisco, Associate Partner, Senior Designer 1992-7 Kaplan McLaughlin Diaz Associate Principal, Senior Designer 1983-92

Milwaukee Beerline B Waterfront Plan, Milwaukee, WI (in association with Engberg Anderson Architects) Project Director for a specific plan for the regeneration of Milwaukee’s derelict riverfront and the creation of a new mixed-use neighborhood containing several hundred new dwellings, retail and parks as well as a continuation of the city’s riverwalk.

HONORS AND AWARDS AIA Honor Award for the Oakland Federal Building (with KMD Architects 1995) CNU Charter Award 2002, 2005 Department of Energy Sustainable Building Award 1980

Re-centering: The Plan for Downtown Hayward, Hayward, CA Project Director for a study to revitalize a downtown that had suffered from disinvestment, inappropriately scaled development and destructive regional traffic infrastructure. The plan’s strategy is to reintroduce the mix of functions necessary for a vital urban center within the structure of the existing grid. For example, high density housing is introduced around an existing BART station, which was redesigned to provide— instead of sever—pedestrian links to the surrounding context. The project won a 2002 Charter Award from the Congress of the New Urbanism.

PUBLICATIONS John Ellis is a contributing writer for Architectural Review, London and has written for several other architectural magazines since 1980. TEACHING EXPERIENCE Adjunct Professor at California College of the Arts, San Francisco. Visiting Lecturer, University of California, Berkeley. PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS/REGISTRATIONS Registered in United Kingdom and California SELECTED REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS New Railroad Square, Santa Rosa, California Project Director and Senior Urban Designer of the winning competition master plan for a 5-acre mixed-use project adjacent to a proposed commuter rail station. New Railroad Square is designed to reinforce the renaissance of the area surrounding Santa Rosa’s historic railroad depot, slated to become an important stop on the proposed SMART commuter train service. It consists of a sustainable neighborhood of 250 new for-sale homes, a rich mix of new commercial and cultural activities including the Sonoma County Food & Wine Center, attractive facilities serving all passengers using the reactivated rail station, two levels of subterranean parking and a network of carefully shaped public spaces that will become a new focus for civic life in Santa Rosa. University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, California Project Architect for a 300 studio graduate student dormitory in the Westwood neighborhood, just southwest of the UCLA Campus. The site is the last remaining parcel in an area that the University has developed to address its needs for graduate student housing. Increasingly, universities market themselves in a competitive market place by the quality and affordability of their undergraduate housing, graduate housing and faculty housing. This is particularly true of urban campuses like UCLA where housing costs run exponentially away from the university’s ability to keep up. Innovative unit designs and configurations allow the site’s capacity to be fully exploited. Along with the housing component, 25,000 sf of Commons program is included -

Othello Station at Holly Park, Seattle, WA Project Urban Designer for a plan that replaces distressed public housing with a new mixed-use and mixed-income neighborhood adjacent to a new light rail line. The master plan extends the existing street grid into the 36-acre site and is organized around a spine of public parks, which provides a pedestrian connection between residences and commercial and transit areas. Coyote Valley Vision Plan, San Jose, CA Project Urban Designer for an alternative smart growth vision for the 6,800-acre Coyote Valley, south of San Jose, sponsored by the Greenbelt Alliance. The vision—which accommodates the same program that the City of San Jose established for a residential population of 80,000 and 50,000 new jobs—is a compact, transitoriented, mixed-use community organized around a grid of streets and blocks and a framework of parks and open spaces. A range of building types at various densities provides the framework for the urban fabric. Market at Octavia Neighborhood Plan, San Francisco, CA Project Director for a plan that envisions the future of one of San Francisco’s key areas—one that is situated at the nexus of three of the City’s street grids and contains important regional and civic destinations. The plan explores the implications of and sets forth a vision for the Market/Octavia Boulevard proposed to replace a freeway, which was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. 2001 Sacramento Riverfront Master Plan, Sacramento, CA Senior Urban Designer for the update of the Sacramento Riverfront Master Plan for the cities of Sacramento and West Sacramento. The plan calls for three new bridges, continuous pedestrian and bicycle paths on the levee tops, new parks and open space, and several thousand new dwellings on former industrial or railroad land adjacent to the river.


Anne Torney, AIA, LEED®, AP Principal and Director of Housing, Solomon E.T.C. Anne Torney is an architect who has made affordable multi-family housing and transit-oriented urban infill the focus of her work for over 20 years. As a Principal and Director of Housing at the multi-disciplinary San-Francisco-based architectural design firm WRT/Solomon E.T.C., she has led award winning projects in San Francisco, San Jose, Los Angeles, and Seattle, WA. She brings a commitment to community outreach and sustainable design to all her projects, which range in scale from 47 units of supportive housing for formerly homeless seniors, to the master planning and architectural design for the redevelopment of distressed public housing into vibrant new mixed-income and mixed use communities. Anne earned her BA at Princeton University and studied for her masters degree at the University of California, Berkeley. EDUCATION Bachelor of Arts in Architecture, Princeton University; 1987. Master of Architecture, University of California, Berkeley, degree pending. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Principal and Director of Housing, WRT/Solomon E.T.C., 2001 - Present Principal, Solomon E.T.C. Architecture and Urban Design, San Francisco. August 1994 - 2001 David Baker + Associates, San Francisco. 1988 - 1993. The Ratcliff Architects, Berkeley, California. 1987-1988. Dewing and Schmid, Architects, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 1986 Sol-Arc, Emeryville, California. 1985. PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS/REGISTRATIONS ® LEED Accredited Professional August 2004 Registered Architect, California Board Member 2005-2006, San Francisco AIA Co-chair of the Housing Committee, San Francisco AIA REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS HUNTERS VIEW REVITALIZATION SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Project Principal for the redevelopment of a 22-acre distressed public housing into an 800 unit mixed-income neighborhood, including new streets and parks. ALABAMA STREET FAMILY HOUSING SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Project Principal for this 151 unit affordable project for Citizens Housing Corporation which includes 93 family, 24 senior/supportive, and 34 affordable condominiums. The housing is grouped around two podium courtyards and a new mid-block lane lined with light-industrial and artists spaces. The project includes two community rooms, class room spaces, supportive services offices and parking. WESTBROOK PLAZA, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Project Principal for this new mixed-use project on a redevelopment site South of Market consisting of 49 affordable family apartments for Mercy Housing and 20,000 s.f. for the South of Market Health Center, a community serving clinic, grouped in two buildings around a quiet mid-block garden. BROADWAY FAMILY APARTMENTS, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Project Manager for the Chinatown CDC’s 81-unit complex of mid-rise and smaller buildings in the Northeast Waterfront District. functions on the ground level of the complex include child care services, common gathering rooms, landscaped

courtyards, and street-facing retail spaces which support both the residents and the larger neighborhood. OTHELLO STATION HOPE VI, SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Project Architect and Manager. Solomon E.T.C. masterplanned this 400-unit mixed-income and mixed-use neighborhood in south-east Seattle and was architect for 219 public housing and tax-credit units in a mix of rowhouses, duplexes and single family homes. A first-phase mixed use building houses 24 apartments over a neighborhood health clinic, offices, and commercial space. The master plan is organized around a spine of public parks, providing a pedestrian connection between residences and neighborhood shopping and transit. VERMONT VILLAGE PLAZA, SOUTH CENTRAL LOS ANGELES, CA

Project Manager. The mixed-use scheme includes 36 owneroccupied affordable houses and townhouses intended as the cornerstone of the neighborhood’s revitalization. Each house has a secured private entry, a private yard or large deck, and two secured parking spaces. This project was the winning submission in a design/build competition sponsored by First Interstate Bank. ALCANTARA COURT, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Project Architect and Manager for this 50-unit HUD 202 housing complex for low-income seniors in San Francisco, developed by Mission Housing Development Corporation. Two buildings form a garden courtyard which is linked to a generous community room and lobby. The design is based upon extensive collaboration and review with geriatricians. 101 SAN FERNANDO, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA

Project Manager for this mixed-use project located in the heart of newly revitalized downtown San Jose, across from City Hall. The building consists of 322 rental units over common and commercial space, organized around a series of mid-block pedestrian lanes. Through policies that are now central to the Congress of New Urbanism, $2.3 billion have been invested in downtown San Jose improvements like 101 San Fernando. 850 BRODERICK, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Project Manager a 47-unit building for formerly homeless senior citizens. The project includes spaces for community/supportive services, property management, a courtyard garden, and a landscaped roof deck. Sustainable features include various green materials, solar panels on the roof, and a rain detention system which directs roof water to street planters.


= = = = = =

AWARDS PERSONAL RECOGNITION DANIEL SOLOMON FAIA

2008 2004 1998 1995 1991

“Housing Hero,” San Francisco Housing Action Coalition Maybeck Award, California AIA for Achievement in Design Seaside Prize for Contributions to American Urbanism Architectural Digest: 100 Foremost Architects Architectural Digest: 100 Foremost Architects

URBAN DESIGN AWARDS OXFORD PLAZA AND DAVID BROWER CENTER

2009

Growing Smarter Together Award, ABAG Award

COYOTE VALLEY:

2005 2004 2004 2004

GETTING IT RIGHT

CNU Charter Award APA Northern California Chapter: Outstanding Planning Project APA State of California Chapter: Outstanding Planning Award for a Project National AIA Honor Award for Regional and Urban Design

HAYWARD CANNERY AREA & HAYWARD RECENTERING

2002

CNU Charter Award

HAYWARD CANNERY AREA

2002

Local Gov’t Commission, Ahwahnee Award of Merit

OTHELLO STATION

2005

NAHB Best in American Living, Best Urban Smart Growth Neighborhood/Community, Silver Award

VERMONT VILLAGE PLAZA

1996

Success of the New Urbanism Award

COMMUNICATIONS HILL SPECIFIC PLAN

1995 1994 1994

National AIA Honor Award Progressive Architecture, Citation Local Gov’t Commission, Ahwahnee Award

A CITY OF GARDENS: MULTIFAMILY DESIGN ORDINANCE FOR THE CITY OF PASADENA ( w/ Christopher Alexander and Phoebe Wall )

1989 1988

American Planning Association Progressive Architecture, Citation

M I S S I O N B A Y P L A N ( w/ EDAW & ELS )

1987 1987 1987 1987

Progressive Architecture, Citation American Planning Association, First Place, Outstanding Planning ASCA, Merit Award CCAPA, Honorable Mention

TOWARD COMMUNITY: RESIDENTIAL DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR THE CITY OF SAN JOSE

1987

Progressive Architecture, Citation


= = =

=

= = = CHANGE WITHOUT LOSS: SAN FRANCISCO RESIDENTIAL ZONING STUDY

1979 1978 1978 1978

Progressive Architecture, Urban Design Award American Institute of Planners, National Award AIA, N. California Chapter, Award of Honor AIA, California Council, Award of Honor

MULTIPLE FAMILY HOUSING AWARDS OXFORD PLAZA AND DAVID BROWER CENTER

2009

ACI Construction Award – Green/Environmental Award

OTHELLO STATION

2007 2006

John Clancy Housing Design Award Gold Nugget Grand Award, Best Affordable Project-Under 30 units/acre

LYCEUM GATEWAY

2008

American Architecture Award, The Chicago Athenaeum

SHATTUCK FINE ARTS BUILDING

2005 2005 2005 2004

East Bay Business Times Residential Architectural Design of the Year Gold Nugget Award of Merit, Best Mixed-use Project AIA East Bay Design Award for Architecture, Citation Berkeley Design Advocates Award of Excellence

101 SAN FERNANDO

2003 2003

AIA/HUD Secretary’s Award for Mixed Use, Mixed Income Housing CNU Charter Award

BRITTON COURTS

2001

CNU Charter Award

VERMONT VILLAGE PLAZA

2000 1999 1999

AIA/HUD Secretary’s Award San Francisco AIA Honor Award Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s Award for Excellence, Platinum Award

INNOVATIVE HOUSING

1999 1999 1998 1997

Local Government Commission, Ahwahnee Award of Merit National Association of Housing & Redevelopment Officials, New Project Design Award of Merit Gold Nugget Award of Merit AIA, California Council, Award of Merit

DEL CARLO COURT

1996 1993

San Francisco AIA Honor Award National Association of Housing & Redevelopment Officials Design Award

FULTON GROVE TOWNHOUSES

1993 1992

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine Western Home Awards, Citation Golden Nugget Awards, Grand Award

LEE’S ORCHARD

1991

AIA, Santa Clara Chapter, Award of Merit


= = =

=

= = =

B E I D E M A N P L A C E T O W N H O U S E S ( w/ John Goldman, AIA)

1991 1990

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine Western Home Awards, Citation AIA, California Council, Award of Honor

B A U E R S C H W E I T Z E R H I S T O R I C S I T E ( w/ TLMS Architects)

1990

Golden Nugget Awards, Award of Merit

AMANCIO ERGINA VILLAGE

1989 1987

The Foundation for San Francisco’s Architectural Heritage AIA, California Council, Award of Honor

W E S T F A I R A C R E S V I L L A G E ( w/ John Goldman, AIA)

1987

AIA, California Council, Award of Merit

FILLMORE MEWS

1983

AIA, San Francisco Chapter, Award of Honor

CASTRO COMMON

1982

AIA, in cooperation with Housing Magazine Homes for Better Living, Award of Honor

WASHINGTON HOUSE

1982

AIA, in cooperation with Housing Magazine Homes for Better Living, Award of Merit

GLOVER STREET CONDOMINIUMS

1982 1982 1981

AIA, California Council, Award of Honor AIA, San Francisco Chapter, Award of Honor AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine Western Home Awards, Award of Merit

MIDWAY TERRACE CONDOMINIUMS

1981

AIA, in cooperation with Red Cedar Shingle & Handsplit Shake Bureau, Merit Award

PACIFIC HEIGHTS TOWNHOUSES

1980 1979

AIA, N. California Chapter, Award of Honor AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine Western Home Awards, Citation

RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE AWARDS

BETH ISRAEL CHAPEL

1998

AIA National Religious Architecture Design Award

INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURE AWARDS

THE DAVID BROWER CENTER

2009 2010

Green Building Super Hero Award, USGBC Best New Green Building, San Francisco Business Times

PRIVATE DWELLINGS AWARDS

ATWATER RESIDENCE

1991

AIA, San Francisco Chapter Award of Honor, for Design Excellence


= = =

=

= = = 1991

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Award of Merit

GLEESON RESIDENCE

1991 1989

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Award of Merit AIA, San Francisco Chapter Award of Honor

LEM RESIDENCE

1987

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Citation

BERELSON RESIDENCE

1983

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Award of Merit

SALTZMAN RESIDENCE

1977 1976

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Award of Merit AIA, in cooperation with House & Home Magazine, Award of Merit

SEFF RESIDENCE

1976

American Plywood Association, Plywood Design Award, Award of Merit

MORISON POOL AND GUESTHOUSE

1974

AIA, in cooperation with House & Home Magazine, Award of Merit

SOLOMON HOUSE

1974

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Award of Merit

COLE HOUSE

1971

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Citation

GOLDSTINE POOL AND POOLHOUSE

1970

AIA, in cooperation with Sunset Magazine, Western Home Awards, Citation


KimPStudio Work Samples  

Attached are some examples of work that I put together for Solomon ETC. I designed all the cut-sheets, organized photo-shoots, selected pho...

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