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A R C H I T E C T U R E KIMBERLY JUSCZAK


K I M B E R L Y J

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a body of s elec ted work s


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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FAIRCLIFF PLAZA EAST A RESIDENCE TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE

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446-452 RIDGE STREET AN URBAN POCKET COMMUNITY

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926 N STREET: BAILEY FLATS A HISTORIC DC ALLEY RECEIVES LIGHT AND AIR

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NORTHSIDE ACADEMIC SITE A MASTER PLAN FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATION

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MOMENTS OF SOCIAL INTERACTION A HUMAN APPROACH TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE

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SOLAR DECATHLON: MIDDLE EAST A HOUSING SOLUTION FOR A MIDDLE EASTERN CITY

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FUTUREHAUS: BATHROOM AN EXPLORATION OF THE FUTURE OF BATHROOMS

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PHOTOGRAPHY + SKETCHING EUROPEAN TRAVEL

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PHOTOSHOP COMPOSITE WINDHOUSE

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GRAPHITE WASH WALL OF THIRDS


FAIRCLIFF PLAZA EAST A RESIDENCE TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE

SUMMER 2018

The concept design phase for a 300 unit, mixed use building is guided by the desire to connect residents with nature, inspire vibrant experiences, and provide an excellent quality of life. The design reflects the inherently strong desire for an indoor-outdoor connection. Planted roofs, outdoor terraces, open shared spaces, and large glazed surfaces all facilitate connections to sky, nature, and community. Serenity and calmness are achieved with minimally programmed spaces, ample natural light, and ventilation in all living spaces. At the core of the approach is slender than typical units. Most units are only 20 feet deep, allowing daylight to reach the full living space. Services are then placed in a band along the interior corridor walls. Additionally the strategic utilization of bays increases the rentable square footage without increasing the FAR.

FIGURE GROUND

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| SUZANE REATIG ARCHITECTURE

1:64


14TH STREET ELEVATION

1:16

7


FAIRCLIFF STREET ELEVATION

1:16

8


LOWER LEVEL

GROUND FLOOR

1:16

1:16

1:16

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL

PENTHOUSE 1:16

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446 - 452 RIDGE STREET AN URBAN POCKET COMMUNITY

SPRING 2018

Conceived as an urban pocket community, 446-452 Ridge Street elevates the urban rowhouse typology. Instead of the typical two-unit townhouse where units stack, the project separates and spreads the units across the site. The units are connected by an open outdoor space and shared passageways to the street, a feature relating to the pre-1870 residences in the neighborhood. The tranquil outdoor space not only offers respite from the city but serves as a resident gathering place. The project offers rare urban luxuries such as double-height spaces access to semi-private and private outdoor spaces, windows in every room, double exposures, cross ventilation, and ample natural light. While the concept is a rowhouse redux, the architecture and materials remain compatible with the neighborhood. The less-is-more economy of form, materials, and landscape unite the project with the neighborhood and create a simple, nuanced approach to urban dwelling. FIGURE GROUND

10 | SUZANE REATIG ARCHITECTURE


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FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

ROOF DECK


FRONT PASSAGE

COURTYARD

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The simple, elegant proportions of the facade and bright, warm entry doors speak to the neighborhood character and renew a sense of vibrancy and activity to the street. Using a modified split-level approach, double height living spaces are achieved while still meeting zoning height restrictions and maximizing rentable square footage.

SECTION

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926 N STREET BAILEY FLATS A HISTORIC DC ALLEY RECEIVES LIGHT AND AIR

WINTER 2018

Bailey Flats is a 15 unit apartment building located in Blagden Alley, Washington, DC. Previously home to working class immigrants and riddled with crime and poverty, Blagden Alley today is a thriving, racially diverse community. The project’s challenge became how to balance 21st century living while cultivating what makes the alley such a historically, unique place. The response is a vibrant, expressive exterior facade - marking the alley entrance - and an interior courtyard plan. Together, the courtyard, roof garden and terraces provide a healthy, quiet respite for residents and connects them to nature, each other, and their surrounding community.

ALLEY PLAN

14 | SUZANE REATIG ARCHITECTURE


NORTH - SOUTH SECTION

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ALLEY ENTRY

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ROOF PLAN

RESIDENTIAL PLAN

GROUND PLAN 17


NORTHSIDE ACADEMIC SITE A MASTER PLAN FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATION

SUMMER 2016

A plan, developed for the City of Spartansburg, South Carolina, began as a discussion about the placement of a new early childhood learning center. Situated between an existing elementary school and a soon-tobe community center, proved to be the ideal location. This location takes advantage of an important neighborhood intersection and highlights the importance of early learning in the community. The building’s form develops from establishing a relationship to the other buildings, showing the early learning center will interact programmatically to both. The inner courtyard space establishes an enjoyable learning environment and safe outdoor play space. Additionally, plans for an outdoor learning center are proposed to extend the impact of all three buildings and programs and to take full advantage of an otherwise difficult typography. All of these concepts are developed through identifying, understanding, and reflecting the values of various community groups actively and passively involved in the project. OUTDOOR LEARNING SKETCH

18 | MCMILLIAN PAZDAN SMITH ARCHITECTURE


MOMENTS OF SOCIAL INTERACTION A HUMAN APPROACH TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE

SPRING 2018

Our urban neighborhoods are increasing dominated by ubiquitous, mixed use buildings that rarely contribute to the authenticity of a place. This project proposes a place for elderly living and early learning in the Buzzard Point neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Guided by the desire to improve the quality of urban life through a human approach, the architecture creates opportunities for active and passive social interactions. The concept aims to create opportunities between people. Dwellings and education spaces surround a central courtyard. Each dwelling has two exposures, providing access to natural ventilation and sunlight, and arranged in pairs with entries set back, creating a nod to the urban stoop. The education space is placed on the second floor above the lobby; elevating the Child off the ground floor yet still providing engagement to the urban street and garden context. Each space has physical, visual, or sensed connections to the greater building.

20 | UNDERGRADUATE THESIS


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EAST-WEST SECTION

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COURTYARD

LEARNING

DWELLING

CORRIDOR

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SOLAR DECATHLON: MIDDLE EAST A HOUSING SOLUTION FOR A MIDDLE EASTERN CITY

SPRING 2017

The FutureHAUS Dubai is an ongoing project set to compete in the Solar Decathlon Middle East competition in the Fall of 2018. It is the next generation of Virginia Tech’s FutureHAUS and an iteration of the 2010 Solar Decathlon project, LumenHAUS. In FutureHAUS Dubai, various questions are explored related to how to appropriately balance vernacular architecture with innovate technologies, how to allow for separation of and relation of the public and private spaces, and how to create transitional spaces – that is spaces that actively change depending on the occupant’s current needs. These beginning curiosities have led to much research and exploration. A primary concept in the initial design phase is to challenge and rethink the conventional Middle Eastern courtyard. Here, the courtyard is reimagined as a perimeter element, a protector.

24 | 4TH YEAR STUDIO


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EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION


In the same way a shell protects a pearl, the exterior screen protects its inhabitants. The screen provides the inhabitants privacy and protects the core from sandstorms. Between the screen and the core exists multiple courtyard spaces, each designed in sympathy to the interior uses and conditions.

SECTION A-A

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The materials evoke a sense of the project’s essence. Situated on a desert site, the materials bring about comfort and luxury while remaining sensitive to the site context. Alternatively, the overall project is rethought as a high rise. Employing the same concepts as the single house, the high rise utilizes the grouping of services to adopt to a multiple unit building. The exercise proves not only the versatility and efficiency of the project but also the effectiveness of the ideas.

MATERIALS

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HIGH RISE FLOOR PLAN, TYPICAL

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FUTUREHAUS: BATHROOM AN EXPLORATION OF THE FUTURE OF BATHROOMS

SPRING 2016

The FutureHAUS Bathroom is the third stage of the Virginia Tech FutureHAUS project. The fundamental concept of the house proposes that home components, such as kitchens, bathrooms, and closets, can be prefabricated as cartridges and shipped to sites as prefinished assemblies. Here, the interdisciplinary team designed, developed, and constructed the bathroom cartridge. The ideas revolve around integrating new and innovative fixtures, technologies, and materials to create comfortable, smart, user friendly, accessible, and efficient spaces. Independently explored is the question of how a space can adapt overtime to meet changing accessibility needs. The team had the opportunity to present the constructed bathroom prototype at the Kitchen and Bath Industry Show (KBIS) in Las Vegas, where the project received praise by the industry leaders, the media, and potential everyday users.

30 | VT CENTER FOR DESIGN RESEARCH


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PHOTOGRAPHY + SKETCHING European Travel During an eleven-week travel program across Europe - from eastern Germany to Croatia to Central Italy and Switzerland to Northern Denmark and the Netherlands - photography and sketching were used as a method of understanding buildings, urban conditions, and culture. Exploration into the conditions and situations that led to the successes of urban plazas, specifically Norman Foster’s Carré d’Art, proved insightful. An appreciation for the spacial qualities created by structure can be seen in

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the photography exercises. And, the same appreciation for spacial qualities created by the vertical plane can be seen in the sketching documentation methods. Moving forward, these findings will prove to be great influence in the thesis year and continued studies. The overall experience provided exposure to numerous, diverse cultures - sparking a desire to understand how our built environment can and should reflect our values as a society.

POSTPARKASSE

GARE DE LYON

FLUME ADIGE

VENEZIA

NY CARLSBERG

NEMAUSUS


CARRE D’ART

PIAZZA SAN MARCO

MAISON CARREE

VILLA ROTONDA

KREMATORUM BERLIN

BARCELONA PAVILION

FONDAZIONE QUERINI STAMPALIA

BEYELER MUSEUM 33


PHOTOSHOP COMPOSITE Windhouse

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GRAPHITE WASH Wall of Thirds

A First Year project explores the idea of a three-dimensional wall cut into three parts. The graphite wash and photographs seek to understand the relation of the parts through reinterpreting the methodology of Brancusi.

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KIMBERLY JUSCZAK, ASSOC. AIA kimberlyjusczak@gmail.com 215.350.8772

Portfolio | abridged  

a body of selected works

Portfolio | abridged  

a body of selected works

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