Super Rod #3 - August 2020

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KILLER ISSUE #3 - AUG 2020

P rtist PICKUA r e n n u t S w o Sh

'32 Ford HAULER

‘32 COUPE

Is this Australia’s Toughest ‘32?

E U S S I S I H T E D I ALSO INS ville is u o -L s t a N A R S 51st N oadster R d r o F 7 ‘3 h c e -T High stom ‘52 Studebaker Cu udor T l e d o M A l a n io it Trad rd Coupe o F 4 ‘3 i m e H n w Blo More! h c u M + d o R t a R 2000hp


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FIBREGLASS VS STEEL – THE BATTLE RAGES ON! I read a recent social media posting about whether using a fibreglass body to build a Rod was considered a kit car over a Hot Rod. Those that are lucky enough to have found a genuine steel car within their price range were adamant that anything other than factory steel was not the real deal, with some even suggesting that these ‘plastic cars” as they called them, shouldn’t even be allowed into the Hot-Rodding scene. Seems a bit extreme, but everyone is entitled to an opinion I guess. Here’s how I see it. If we were to rely on steel cars only to feed the scene, how long would the scene survive? Would we see as many new builds started and finished? There’s definitely some merit in having fibreglass bodies available. The sheer variety of body styles on offer is a bonus, especially when car builders are always looking for ways to outdo what the last guy built. On top of that, they are a relatively affordable way to kick start a hot rod build. With most bodies needing just a small amount of work before paint could be paid on, and most available with the swinging panels hanging and, in some cases, can be purchased with a matching chassis! All of this adds up to time (and lots of money) saved. Unaffectionately referred to as ‘Tupperware Cars’ by some, the fact remains that fibreglass bodies have allowed more cars to be entering the scene. Sure, you can buy a Brookville steel body, but with a hefty price tag, they are still out of reach for some people, making fibreglass a great alternative.

CONTACT PAUL FOR ALL ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES 0432 795336 paul@killerrides.com.au

At the end of the day, this argument will battle on forever, with both sides believing they are right. And as long as the cool cars keep appearing and the Hot Rod & Custom scene keeps flourishing, who cares what the car is made from? Enjoy Issue No.3 of Super Rod… Unitl next time...

Paul 03


SUPER ROD MAGAZINE Po Box 165 Oak Flats NSW 2529 PUBLISHING EDITOR Paul Beck (0432) 795336 paul@killerrides.com.au

ISSUE NO.3 Aug 2020

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06 THE DASHBOARD News, views and things of interest 14

LETTERS Got something to say?

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IN THE BUILD Bonneville Hot Rod’s ‘32 Ford Coupe

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HAULIN’ CLASS Injected Pickup Perfection

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PRIZED POSSESSION He came. He saw. He made it his...

Don’t forget to Subscribe at www.superrod.com.au

WEBSITE www.superrod.com.au

48 SUPER PHOTO Gatt’s oh-so-cool Lincoln Zephyr 50 DEUCES WILD Killer Pro-Street Hemi-powered ‘32 Coupe 62

COUPE D’COOL Slick, slammed ‘52 Studebaker Coupe

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PIN UP CHIC Rivz with Guy Ford’s Custom Lincoln

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TIMELESS Sometimes its better to buy ready to cruise!

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COPPIN’ AN ATTITUDE Bad ass Blown Hemi-powered ‘34 Coupe

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AGAINST ALL ODDS The 51st NSRA Street Rod Nationals - USA

104 STREET & STRIP 820-cubes of street-legal, 7-sec ‘28 Ford Tudor 114 CRUISIN’ THE WEB Hall of Flame

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WE WANT YOU!

Think your Hot Rod or Custom is good enough for a feature in Super Rod? Maybe you have a project that your building and want the world to see the progress so far? Whatever the case, send me some happy snaps and info to paul@killerrides.com.au and I’ll see if I can make it happen for you.

THERE’S COOL GARAGES, AND THEN THERE’S THIS GUYS…

This would have to be one of the most amazing home garages I have seen. Built in the basement of a suburban mansion in Maryland, USA, this garage compliments the house of 7 bedrooms, 8 full-size bathrooms and no less than 10-fire places. The garage itself has been modelled after the town centres of yesteryear and features stone-paved roadways, and 15 brick store fronts including a fully-functioning Movie Theatre. The palatial home sits on 4 acres and is on the market for around $4.5mil USD. That’s around $6.6million Australian pasos. Bring on the next Powerball…

25th AUSTRALIAN STREET ROD NATIONALS - POSTPONED

What was promising to be a huge event next Easter, the 25th Australian Street Rod Nationals is another event fallen victim to the Covid-19 pandemic. I’m sure it wasn’t an easy decision to make by those involved, but after lengthy discussions with the local Councils and others involved in staging the event, everyone agreed it was best to postpone the event. With around half of the current entrants coming from Victoria and Queensland, and with increased border closures, there’s no guarrantee that these entrants can even cross into NSW when the time comes around. There’s been so much work done behind the scenes by the committee, its a shame not to run the event in Albury, so as an alternative, the 25th Australian Street Rod Nats will now take place in Albury, Easter 2023...

D E N O P T POS

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The palatial home sits on 4 acres and is on the market for around $4.5mil USD.

30th BRIGHT ROD RUN IS GO!

At the time of making this issue live, the 30th Bright Rod Run was still set to be held from Nov 6th to 8th and once again promises to be another huge turnout of Hot Rods, Customs and Muscle cars. As with any major event, regular updates will be added to the FB page in regards to the Covid-19 situation, but the organisers are confident the event will go ahead as scheduled. Keep an eye on the page for information as it comes to hand - https://www.facebook.com/brightsiconicrodrun/ 7


GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW DATES CHANGE

It has just been announced that the 2021 Grand National Roadster Show dates have changed and will now be held over the weekend of May 14th-16th instead of the Jan 29-31 dates previous advertised. More than 500 amazing vehicles will be featured indoors whilst the annual Grand Daddy Drive-In will see another 400800 vehicles attend over the Saturday and Sunday. The venue remains the Fairplex in Pomona for the 73rd running of what most consider to be America’s Greatest Car Show.

SUPER ROD CAR OF THE YEAR

I think the mix of cars featured in Super Rod are amongst the best currently on the scene and now I want to hear what you think. In Issue #5, one of the cars we have featured in Issues 1 to 4 will be named the Super Rod Car of the Year 2020! Who wins the bragging rights and cool, custom trophy will be entirely up to you. In Issue #4, I will have all of the cars listed with a code that you can email, SMS or PM through the social media pages. The winner will be announced in Issue #5.

1ST AUSTRALIAN HOT ROD & HARLEY MASTERS POSTPONED UNTIL 2021

It’s with great disappointment that due to the most recent outbreak of Covid-19 in Victoria, there’s a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the possibilty of whether the same could happen in other area’s. This brings a lot of concern of whether we can run the event the way we want to. So the hard decision had to be made to postpone the event until 2021. Stay tuned for new dates when they are secured. You can keep up to date with what’s happening at the official Facebook page by clicking the image below.

Australian

HOT ROD & HARLEY

Masters

D E N O P T POS Illawarra Hockey Centre, Unanderra OCTOBER 24/25, 2020

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T-BUCKET NATIONALS UPDATE

Set to be held over the weekend of Oct 10th and 11th at the Hawksbury Showground in Clarendon NSW, the T-Bucket Nationals will not only showcase the largest gathering of T-Buckets in one area, but also feature a huge show and shine that also includes other model Hot Rods, Muscle Cars, Rat Rods, Classics, Bikes, Ute and Trucks. The show and shine will be held only on the Sunday at the venue. Other notable features of the event include Live Entertainment, a cruise track, Kids activities, Market stalls and a Miss T-Bucket Competition. For regular updates, check out the Facebook page by clicking the poster... 9


KOOL KIDDIE KRUISER

They say some kids are born into hot rodding, and that’s certainly the case with Andy and Sian , whose son William Clive Mario has just recently made his entrance into the world. With quite a collection of cool rides in the garage, there was no way Baby Colalillo was going to have to blend in with the other kids in a traditional stroller. Andy, along with a long list of helpers, has spent plenty of time piecing together this slick, ’36 Ford Coupe push car / stroller that is sure to turn heads everywhere they go. Having grown up around cool rods and customs himself alongside his Dad, the late, great Mario, Andy knows the importance of getting them involved early on. Might as well make it from day one!

Pics by Andy Colalillo

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SHOW US YOUR SHED

It’s no secret that Hot Rodders care just as much about their garage as they do the vehicle(s) they store in it. Some ae amazing works of art, whilst others have more memorabilia than most museums. Cool hot rod garages don’t need to be full of neon signs and have million dollar tool boxes in each corner! Check out this old school cool backyard garage I found on the Internet recently.

HOT ROD VIDEO OF THE MONTH

Hot Rod Burnouts - Just the boys lettin’ off a bit of steam…

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TOTAL OVERKILL

G’day Paul, Damn, that twin-turbo ’34 Roadster in Issue 2 was amazing. It’s great to see people thinking outside the box and not just bolting on a blower to follow the trend set by many others. Don’t get me wrong, I love blown cars too, but I crave things that are different and Craig’s roadster is certainly different. We don’t see many rods using staggered injection these days either so it would be great to find them if they are out there. Well done on another fantastic issue. Can’t wait till number three! Ken T Via Messenger

Letters’

Hi Ken, Yes, Craig’s candy Roadster is an eye catching ride for sure. I’m all for things that are different and the engine powering the ’34 is sooo different to what else is out there, ensuring the car gets plenty of attention. I agree with the staggered injection. I do have a couple coming up, I just need them to finish them off and I’ll get them in the mag. Stay tuned…

AWESOME MIX

Hi Paul, I just finished reading Issue 2 of Super Rod and I have to say, this one was awesome! The mix of cars you’ve put in this issue was second to none. It’s so nice to be able to read about the variety of cars that make up the Hot Rodding scene. I particularly like the blown Flattiepowered ’32 5-window – what a great car. Please keep bringing us a mix of cars like you have. Super Rod is quickly gaining a big reputation. Well done! Stewart P Via Messenger. Hi Stewart, Thanks for clicking on Super Rod #2. I go to great lengths to make sure the cars featured in Super Rod offer a great mix for the readers to enjoy. It would be a bit boring to just feature one style and/ or make of car each issue. The varying build styles are what attracted me to the Hot Rod scene in the first place. And as mentioned in Issue one, Super Rod is nothing more than a look at the Hot Rod & Custom scene through my eyes. It’s what I enjoy and hope others do to. Hope you like Issue #3… 14

WELL WORTH THE WAIT, BUT...

G’day Paul, Three months is a long time between each Super Rod issue. But with each off the first two issues very impressive, I reckon they are worth the wait, but would rather wait just 4 weeks! Do you think the mag will ever become monthly or maybe even bi-monthly? Bring on Issue 3, 4, 5 etc. Sonia J Via Email Hi Sonia, I have to agree that 3 months is a long time between issues, but being a one-man operation here, trying to find the time needed to produce any more than 12-issues of Killer Rides and 4-issues of Super Rod is difficult at the moment. I’m sure the time will come where the frequency will increase, but for now, Super Rod will remain quarterly. Thanks for your support.

If you have something to say about Super Rod, the scene or even you’re own project car, and want to sahre it with us, simply send an email to: paul@killerrides.com.au

ONLINE IS GREAT, BUT PRINT WOULD BE BETTER!

Hi Paul, I can’t believe it’s taken so long for a magazine like Super Rod to surface. The photography is first class and the range of featured cars is amazing. Now I don’t mind it being online and completely understand why you have chosen to do it that way (I read Killer Rides too!), but I can’t help thinking that if Super Rod was a printed magazine, it would be an instant hit. Yes I am a little old school in that way, but am slowly buy surely getting my head around the new technology and quite enjoy the benefits it offers. Will Super Rod ever be printed? Terry K via Messenger Hi Terry, Thanks for your kind words about Super Rod. I really enjoy putting this mag together and I’m glad it shows in the quality. To be honest, Super Rod will remain a digital only magazine. As much as I would love to see the mag in print, putting a third mag on the dwindling newsagents shelves would be crazy right now. Australian Street Rodding and Cruzin have earned their place there and are both great reads who have their core market. Super Rod was never intended to go head to head with either magazine, it was always meant to be an extension of what their have built up with feature cars and events covered in my own way. Hopefully, I have succeeded in that aspect.

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In The Build

FLAME GRILLED After a fire all but destroyed Ian Crannaford’s ’32 Ford project, it was up to brothers Daniel and Steve Cooke at Bonneville Hot Rods to add one of their slick fibreglass bodies to Ian’s chassis.

Bonneville Hot Rods, in western Sydney are gaining a huge reputation for producing high quality fibreglass hot rod bodies and associated parts such as guards and running boards, so when tragedy struck, it was an easy decision for Ian to drop the slightly-singed chassis out to their workshop to have a Bonneville Hot Rods ’32 Ford three-window coupe body adapted to it.

BONNEVILLE HOT RODS '32 FORD 3-WINDOW BODY

Ian Crannaford Bonneville Hot Rods ‘32 Ford Coupe

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COMING SOON 650hp BLOWN 383ci CHEV POWER

FOUR-BAR DROP AXLE FRONT DISC BRAKES 17


When I visited, the body had been set up on the chassis and the doors were swinging with the electric windows in and sorted. The fenders, running boards and bootlid have been moulded up and ready to be fitted. This particular body features a chopped roof, hidden hinges and a flat floor – perfect for those guys wanting to build a show car where smoothness is a priority. The boys also cut out the original style wheel tubs and installed new, smooth flat tubs, making them follow the chassis rails to give him some extra clearance for his tyres.

BODIES BEAUTIFUL

The ’32 body used here is just on e of the many bodies Bonneville Hot Rods have on off er. Specialising in ‘30’34 Fords, the body styles includ e 3 and 5 window coupes, Tudor, Closed Cab Pic kup, Tourer and the slammed ’34 Bonneville Coupe with its unique roof line.

Once the rolling body goes back to the owner, the 650hp, blown 383ci small block Chev and Turbo 350 transmission will make its way back onto the cross-members. 18

The boys were fortunate enou gh to purchase all of moulds from Rod Bods wh en Elvis decided to concentrate on Engineering an d chassis fabrication. All bodies are now finished in Bo nneville Blue. Check out the full range and prices at:

www.bonnevillehotrods.com.a

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The chassis features a four-bar, I-beam front end complete with disc brakes. Once the rolling body goes back to the owner, the 650hp, blown 383ci small block Chev and Turbo 350 transmission will make its way back onto the crossmembers. Down the back, the nine-inch diff is located with a four-link assembly with coil-over shocks, and like the front, features disc brakes. The wheels of choice will be 15x8 and 15x10 Welds. Ensuring you’ll certainly see this coupe coming, Ian intends to paint the body bright yellow! Once together, Ian plans to get the ’32 onto the dyno and then his main goal is to drive the wheels off it!

THE BOYS TOYS

Having grown up around the Hot Rod scene where their Dad, Greg Cooke had built a show-winning Roadster back in the day, their fate was pretty much sealed from that early age. There’s been all kinds of cool customs and rods pass through their hands over the years, and now they are concentrating on a pair of tough Ford Coupes. Steve has built himself a wild, pro-street ’34 Ford Coupe with its blown, injected Cleveland filling the exposed engine bay to capacity and making around 1000hp on E85 fuel. Yeah its cranky – probably too cranky for a street driven coupe, but he wouldn‘t have it any other way. The other coupe is Daniel’s ’32 three-window, also pro-street in its styling with the already widened rear guards, needing to be split and widened again to cover the massive rear tyres. The big block Chev will be built to challenge Steve’s pumped Clevo in the horsepower stakes.

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Every car featured in Issues #1 - #4 of Super Rod will be in the running to win the 1st Car of the Year award and it’s up to you to choose the winner for 2020! Voting starts when Issue #4 (Nov) goes live and issue No.4’s feature cars are revealed. Voting will stay open until Dec 31st, 2020. Voting can be made by SMS to 0432 795336; by email to paul@killerrides. com.au or via messenger on the Super Rod Facebook Page. Votes are to made in the format SR_Issue1_01. The Winner will be announced in Issue #5 of Super Rod.

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WHO IS YOUR CHOICE TO WIN THE INAUGURAL SUPER ROD CAR OF THE YEAR?


HAULIN’ s s a l C Tim Stewart 1932 Ford Pick Up

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After deciding he wanted to build a Hot Rod, Tim Stewart bought himself a ’32 Ford chassis. He had no idea where that purchase was going to lead him six years later…

Words - Paul Beck Pics - Jimmy Tee Photography 25


rusty relic was on its way to Fast Lane Speed h wit nce erie exp us vio pre any ing hav t No ple of days later, Tim dropped cou A p. Sho h wit ch tou in got Tim s, Rod building Hot off the already acquired chassis to Daniel so for p Sho ed Spe e Lan t Fas from sar Cas iel Dan up for the planned roof chop set ld cou he into y fora t firs his e sur ke ma some advice to and also channel the body over the chassis. as ss nle pai as s wa rld wo ng ddi t-Ro Ho the jobs done, the body and chassis se tho h Wit d nte wa Tim , set out the from possible. Right combo were returned to Tim so he could it see you y wa the not but , kup Pic ’32 a ds dirty. After completing the han his get g ldin bui in ted res inte re mo here, he was build on the driveline, Tim attempted to the put Tim d, min in t tha h Wit . Rod Rat a roof chop, but quickly realised the up ld we h, wit rt sta to y bod el ste a feelers out for his body working skills were nowhere near k tas a t cul diffi how just out nd fou n soo but rd they needed to be, so once nda sta the t fac the to ed ign Res be. to that was going again, the bare chassis and body took up ro rep a for tle set to e hav to ng goi s wa he at Fast Lane Speed Shop so that ncy ide res n, ede Sw of out pe cou dow steel three-win Daniel and his troop could get stuck into it. et Me ap Sw t lara Bal to out ed tur ven Tim this stage that the build went from at s wa It er. ord an g cin pla ore bef k loo for one last being a basic Rat Rod to something more el ste allan as re the it, e hav uld wo k luc As t would turn plenty of heads. tha cial spe el pan h eac ler, trai a on sale ’32 Pickup for a different colour showing it was pieced together from several cars. With Daniel set up in the very next row, Tim dragged Daniel over to check it out and an hour later, the

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Tim knew that black, red and orange was off limits. Instead, he had the reworked body covered in a slick pearl colour called Glacier.

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Ideas were thrown around between Tim and Daniel in regards to body mods and between the two of them, the aging sheet metal not only ended up straighter than a high-court Judge, but smoother than a second-hand car salesman. The roof chop is obvious, the bonnet and sides are now just a memory and the load area has been remanufactured to the high standard expect by Tim and delivered by the Fast Lane Speed Shop workers. With the metal shaping tools back on the rack, it was time for colour. Not wanting to blend in with anyone, Tim knew that black, red and orange was off limits. Instead, he had the reworked body covered in a slick

pearl colour called Glacier. Looks cool, huh? The same colour was added to that old chassis which now plays host of Rod Tech gear including the dropped I-Beam front axle, the triangular fourlink assembly locating the 9-inch diff and the shocks on the front end. The rear scored a set of coil-overs. The steering has been upgraded with a complete rack and pinion assembly. Whilst the Pickup appears to have drum brakes on each corner, the fronts are actually Commodore disc and calipers that have been concealed in finned covers. Keeping in trend with the build theme, the wheels of choice are oh-socool Halibrand SoCal.

Tim attempted to weld up the roof chop, but quickly realised his body working skills were nowhere near the standard they needed to be... 28

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Whilst the work was happening on the body and chassis, Tim was busy putting the driveline together in readiness to drop into place. Visually, the dominating feature on this 434ci small-block Chev is the Hilborn 8-stack injection that is controlled by a Holley ECU. Whilst it retains the traditional fuel injection look, the benefits of being EFI make cruising the pickup effortless. As cool as the engine looks, it’s what’s on the inside that gets the heart pumping when the accelerator pedal gets leaned on. Starting with a Dart Little M block, Tim added a forged steel crank and forged steel H-beam

rods, Wiseco pistons and a hydraulic cam and lifter kit from Comp Cams. Tim then prepped a pair of 23-degree Dart alloy heads adding Comp Cam valve springs before bolting them onto the tough bottom end. An MSD ignition system fire the injected small block into life for it to burn the 98-octane fuel and send the gases out via a pair of custom, block hugger headers. The engine produces around 500hp and delivers it smoothly through the semi-auto Turbo 400 auto (with 3500rpm Dominator converter), sending it rearward via the GJ Drivelines tailshaft to the 4.11-geared 9-inch.

Visually, the dominating feature on this 434ci small-block Chev is the Hilborn 8-stack injection that is controlled by a Holley ECU. 30

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It’s quite obvious the Cabin space is limited, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be stylish at the same time. The bench seat and door trims have been covered in Blue/Grey leather to contrast the body colour that also flows onto the dash and door frames. To keep Tim informed of what’s happening in and around the injected Chev, there’s no less than six classic instrument gauges added – three in the centre of the dash and three attached to the steering column just behind the rejuvenated ’48 Ford steering wheel. A custom centre console houses the Lokar shifter with the billet handbrake lever mounted right alongside. Moving into the load area, there’s now zero chance of anything being thrown into the Pickup’s tray with the floor lined with stencilled polished floorboards. The battery has been recessed into the floor as has the fuel filler.

Tim has sunk five-years of work and a considerable amount of money into the construction of the Pickup. 32

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Tim has sunk five-years of work and a considerable amount of money into the construction of the Pickup. And during that time, Tim once again found the passion for drag racing from his younger years, leading to the purchase of a front engine dragster that he ran in Modified for a few years and has now taken a back step to the Mustang Funny car he now campaigns in Supercharged Outlaws. His racing journey doesn’t end there though with a Nitro Funny car now being constructed!

NROEDW UCTS

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ELECTRIC & MANUAL BEAD ROLLERS

WORKSHOP TOOLS

The Pickup project wouldn’t have progressed to this point if it wasn’t for Daniel Cassar and the team at Fast Lane Speed Shop. Tim can’t thank them enough for the effort they put in to create the finished product. “All credit must go to the amazing skills and workmanship from Daniel and his team,” Tim explained. “When I said to Daniel one day why don’t we put a cage in it and I’ll drag it, he quickly replied with a hot rod is a hot rod, and a drag car is a drag car.” Great advice – and now Tim can enjoy both…

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cycling


PRIZED

n o i s es s s Po

Peter Zaccazan had been spying this ’37 Roadster parked in his mates’ garage for some time. Proving that persistence pays off, Peter’s constant badgering resulted in him owning his first Hot Rod. And what a Hot Rod it is…

Peter Zaccazan 1937 Ford Roadster Words / Pics - Paul Beck 38

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Originally built by Mark Sant, and owned by Brett Hewerdine (of the F*CKIT HT Monaro fame), this stunning ’37 Ford made its debut at MotorEx in Sydney in 2015 to much fanfare, and although the ’37 has been on the scene for five-years now, and driven regularly, it’s just as impressive as it was when first unveiled. With Brett having a couple of new builds on the go at the moment, he realised he will be needing some more space in the home garage soon, and reluctantly decided to sell the Roadster to Peter, who has been enjoying the ’37 ever since! As owner of Zac Homes, Peter is the first to admit he’s not really a hardcore car-guy, but does know what he likes – and he really likes this high-tech, ground-hugging Hot Rod. And why wouldn’t he, there’s just so many things to like about it. The colour combination, interior appointments and of course the powerplant are all unique to this build and really make a statement when combined in the finished car.

Peter is the first to admit he's not really a hardcore car-guy, but does know what he likes; and he really likes this high-tech, ground-hugging Hot Rod. 40

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The instant you lay eyes on this ’37, the colour grabs you. It’s almost hypnotising! Laid down over the restyled fibreglass roadster body and removable hardtop, the House of Kolor Jet Black over Lime Gold is an absolute standout feature. While most Rodders are happy to go with red, blue or black with flames, this Roadster went completely left of centre with spectacular results. To further enhance the colour combo, custom mouldings were hand-fabricated and then gold plated, as has the updated grille and headlight surrounds. Combine those touches with the shadow-chrome painted 18x6 and 20x10 Foose Nitrous wheels and you have one of the most unique looking hot rods built in Australia!

The faux-woodgrain treatment made to the dash and the tops of the door are actually formed in aluminium and then hydro-dipped to get the timber look. Inside, it’s just as amazing. The seating is, like the rest of the ’37, is completely hand-formed and one-offs. Made from timber and fibreglass then sculptured in foam before being covered in a few hides of German Nappa leather, as have the custom door trims. One cool feature of the seating arrangement are the lap-sash seatbelts that protrude through the bolstering of the seat surround for a clean, uncluttered look. The faux-woodgrain treatment made to the dash and the tops of the door are actually formed in aluminium and then hydro-dipped to get the timber look. With the doors closed, the timber strip flows from one door, across the dash panel and into the other door. The dash section also wraps around the Dakota Digital gauge cluster and the billet, air-conditioning vents. There’s more billet with the tilt steering column and wheel being a prominent feature with a small, but stylish centre console surrounding the shifter. With the hard top in place, Peter can flick a switch and raise the electric glass up to keep out the chill or wet weather if the need arises. The cool pedal assembly rises from the floor, again differing from most modern Hot Rod builds. Overall, the Roadster’s interior is a great place to spend a few hours in. 42

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The body sits over a custom Oze Rod Shop chassis that was shipped in from the US. Featuring an independent front end, four-link rear with a quartet of Airide-supplied Shockwave bags and VTTR six-piston calipers clamping over 370mm discs, the chassis gives the Hot Rod a very un-hot rod like drive, though Peter reckons when you nail it, the Roadster does move around a bit on the airbag’s suspension. But he is quick to add that “that’s compared to my old C63 Mercedes”, so we’ll take that as it still handles pretty well.

Driveline wise, a blown, injected big block just wouldn’t seem right hanging out of that swoopy Oze Rod body. Instead, there’s some late model mumbo under that sideopening bonnet in the form of a 427ci LS7 small block built by Sam’s Performance. Adding to the already impressive LS7 specs are a pair of Mast Motorsport heads, Callies crank and rod combo, Diamond pistons, Comp Cams hydraulic roller cam and a truly trick Harrop Hurricane injection system that sounds like hell erupting when all eight throttle-bodies a wide-open and the engine is in the red-zone! With Sam tinkering with the tune, the up-spec 427-cuber produced 735hp on the dyno! To say Peter is happy with the power output is a gross understatement. Suddenly, that old Merc isn’t as impressive – at least in the power stakes! A Tremec T56 manual gearbox backs the LS7 and uses a button clutch to deal with the power. Probably the only “typical” part of this build is the 3.5-geared 9-inch diff with a full spool and 31-spline axles.

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Some seven years were invested into the construction of the ’37 and after doing the show scene initially, it’s now time for Peter and his regular side-kick, son Cruz, to idle the Roadster out of the garage and out onto the open road as often as they can. Though this is the first custom car Peter has owned, you get the feeling from talking to him and Cruz that is may not be the last. Time will tell…

The colour combination, interior appointments and of course the powerplant are all unique to this build and really make a statement when combined in the finished car.

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PHOTO BY PAUL BECK

MAMIYA RZ67 PRO 11

BEN GATT’S LINCOLN ZEPHYR

Super Photo

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S E C U E D Wild

Chris Thomas wanted a tough Hot Rod. A full-tilt, one-off, Hemi-powered ’32 Coupe should do just fine, thanks.

Car builds like this don’t happen quickly, easily or without plenty of cash being thrown at them. And Chris was all too aware of what he was facing when taking on the challenge of piecing together a unique ’32 Ford three-window coupe – without doubt, one of the most popular models for Hot Rodders around the world to build.

Chris Thomas 1932 Ford Coupe Words / Pics - Paul Beck Video - Night Owl Productions 50

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Coming up with something a little different to everyone else wasn’t going to be an easy task, but Chris had a plan, and that included having Shane Rowe and the team at Southern Rod & Custom to look after the build process. Chris explains, “I’ve always wanted a tough Hot Rod, so I got the best in the business to build it!” Shane took the brand spankers Deuce Customs fibreglass body and set about making some subtle changes, giving Chris’ coupe a look all of its own. The body changes include a recessed fuel filler, custom flush-mount door poppers, a hand made roll pan and the rear guards have been shortened and widened. With the body work finished, the prepped body was rolled into the booth where the custom pearl Grey base colour was laid down with the black stripes coming later. The body and paint are as good as you’ll find on any high-end show car and even though it’s a fibreglass car, the panel gaps are spot on.

Chris has invested some ten years of his life into the construction of the '32 and during that time, he has experienced more than his fair share of hassles. 52

The body sits on a custom chassis that has been stretched two-inches and features a Rod Tech independent front suspension set-up with its stainless control arms, Rod Tech coil-over shocks and Flaming River rack and pinion steering assembly all contributing to helping the ’32 steer, stop and ride so much better. Down at the other end, there’s an alloy Currie 9-inch diff located with a four-link set-up and sprung using Rod Tech coil-over shocks. To deal with the huge amount of power from up front, the diff has been fitted with a Detroit Locker centre and Moser 35-spline axles. Hidden inside the custom painted, 17x6 and 17x13 Show Wheels V-Rod rims hides a quartet of Wilwood 4-piston calipers and discs. The rolling Hoosier rubber measures 7.5-inches in the front and a massive 31x16.5-inch filling the big rear guards perfectly. 53


With an open engine compartment, that wild blown injected Hemi is in full view and draws in crowds like a naked super model handing out $100 notes for free! Not only is the Hemi visually stunning, it makes Chris’ coupe so much more desirable, and when that engine fires up and sits there idling, the “want” factor is multiplied ten-fold. Not that you can tell, but that engine is full alloy version sourced from Indy Maxx and sports no less than 572 cubic inches. Externally, the 8/71 Hampton blower and EFIspec Hilborn ‘Shotgun’ injector hat dominate the view up front. Under the bolts is an engine chock full of only the best gear money can buy. The alloy Indy Maxx block is home to a tough as nails rotating system comprising of a Callies forged crank, Howards billet steel rods and forged Ross pistons wrapped in Total Seal rings. The wildly-idling roller cam from the Howards catalogue is matched with Crane Pro solid roller lifters.

With an open engine compartment, that wild blown injected Hemi is in full view and draws in crowds like a naked super model handing out $100 notes for free!

The alloy Indy Legend heads were filled with big stainless valves, Comp Cams springs and Indy pushrods before being bolted onto the finished block. The induction soon joined the party via a Hampton intake. After the MSD ignition fires the beast into life, the gases are shown the door via a pair of fabricated headers that flow into a dual 3-inch system that uses Magnaflow mufflers to tame the noise coming from the opposite end. Yeah, its loud, but would you have it any other way? It’s no surprise to know that the engine produces plenty of power, but Chris is quick to point out that the Hemi has been detuned to make it just a little more user friendly. A Reid-cased Powerglide trans is bolted to the Hemi via a TCI adapter, and thanks to some hard-core internals, handles the horsepower with ease. The box is fronted with a TCE Pro Race 3800rpm converter with gear changes made via a B&M shifter. When you also consider the strength of the rear end, the driveline in this ’32 Ford is just about as tough as they come. 54

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The elite-quality build continues on the inside. Opening up either door reveals an interior covered in a shade of leather called Ox-Blood. Set against the body colour, which makes an appearance in the interior as well, the interior is the perfect colour. The leather was laid down by master craftsman Mick Carter who covered the custom door trims, headlining, RCI race seats and the floor to the highest possible level. With black billet buttons added for contrast, and the armrests

and associated handles coated the same, the interior is a great accompaniment to the body and paint. The Billet Specialities steering wheel tops the billet column, with a gaggle of AutoMeter dials added to the body coloured dash. Forget a stereo – there’s not enough space for speakers to drown out the engine noise! The tight-fitting rollcage was fabricated at Southern Rod & Custom and keeps the ’32 from twisting itself inside out when that Hemi is given some throttle.

Coming up with something a little different to everyone else wasn't going to be an easy task, but Chris had a plan, and that included having Shane Rowe and the team at Southern Rod & Custom to look after the build process. 56

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Chris has invested some ten years of his life into the construction of the ’32 and during that time, he has experienced more than his fair share of hassles. Yes, it’s a long time to take to build a car, but Chris has a firm plan in place of what he wanted and was determined to make it happen. The build quality is what you’d expect from Shane and his crew and it’s taken plenty of cash to get the car finished – which also contributed to the time frame. Overall though, the Coupe has turned out just as he expected and wouldn’t change a thing to how it now appears.

Not that you can tell, but that engine is x ax M dy In om fr d ce ur so n io rs ve y lo al ll fu and sports no less than 572 cubic inches. 58

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Priorities change however, and Chris is at the point where he is ready to part company with his wild ’32. After being mucked around by a couple of people who thought they might roll the dice and low-ball Chris on the price of the Coupe, he has managed to find a legit buyer and just before this issue went live, Chris swapped the ‘32 for a rather large pile of cash! By the time you get to read this, the new owner will be cruising the streets of Melbourne, shaking windows and setting off car alarms everywhere...

CAN YOU SEE YOUR AD HERE?

Contact Paul Beck now for advertising rates and information. Click Here!

THANKS TO: Southern Rod & Custom. Mick Carter. 60

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COUPE D'Cool

After parting company with his ‘57 Chev sedan, Murray Nicholson went looking for something just a little different. He certainly found that with his ‘52 Studebaker Champion Starlight Coupe!

Murray Nicholson

1952 Studebaker Champion Starlight 62

WORDS / PICS - Paul Beck 63


Studebaker’s of the late 40’s, early 50’s are a love them or hate them kind of car. They are rarely seen at events (unless it’s a Studebaker only show), with most people considering them ugly. In the custom seen however, ugly is considered good. Done right, even the ugliest car can be sensational – it just takes the right person with the right skills and ideas to turn any car from beast to beauty. Murray Nicholson is that guy… The now retired panel beater knew he could turn this seldom seen model Stude into a custom masterpiece. “I like things that are different!” is how Murray justified purchasing the Coupe from Canberra mid-way through 1996. Back then, the Stude had been through a restoration

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of sorts, but as Murray soon found out, it was a rough and ready type of rebuild. Coming into Australia from LA, the ’52 was at least, rust free making the project a little more appealing. Now because Studebakers are such a unique car, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Murray restored the coupe’s body back to the original specs. That couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, you really wouldn’t know unless you parked a completely stock, ’52 Starlight coupe next to it, to see the changes made to the body. Being an expert panel man that has had a hand in many custom builds, Murray took to the sheet-metal himself, making the changes needed before getting the body ready for colour.

Whilst Murray did cruise the Stude with the original flathead six-pack still under the bonnet for more than five years, the lack of power was the catalyst for more cubic inches finding its way into the engine bay. 65


To get the body lines cleaner, Murray shaved the bonnet and bootlid removing the badges and mouldings giving both ends a much smoother look. Gone too is the fuel filler flap and vents from the front guards. Murray then fabricated the subtle bonnet scoop, fabricating the stainlesssteel trim filling the opening. Whilst in the mood to fabricate, Murray made the stainless trim for each front guard for the flames to flow from. The headlight surrounds have been dechromed and painted body colour. The overriders have been removed from each bumper

bar, and the front bar has been lowered two-inches. Those cool Lake Pipes aren’t off the shelf items! Murray meticulously hand made those pipes, shaping them to follow the Stude’s profile. Finishing off the exterior makeover are a pair of dummy spotlights. With the body work completed, Murray fire up the compressor and laid on the new colour, a custom mix Aqua, to the door jams, inside the boot and engine bay. He also laid down a base coat to the body for Rick McLachlan to flow coat before the slick flames were added by Mike Morris.

WHAT'S NOT STOCK!

SHAVED BONNET & BOOTLID OVERRIDERS REMOVED FUEL FILLER REMOVED '57 CADILLAC HUBCAPS CUSTOM BONNET SCOOP HAND MADE LAKE PIPES CUSTOM STAINLESS SIDE TRIM FRONT BAR LOWERED TWO INCHES DECHROMED HEADLIGHT SURROUNDS CUSTOM MIX AQUA PAINT ATTENTION TO DETAIL 66

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No less custom is the Starlight’s interior space. The first thing that grabs your attention when poking your head into either window, is the rear seat treatment – or lack thereof. Murray didn’t really need a rear seat as much as he needed space to mount the tank, valves and compressor for the air suspension as well as some tools – should the need for them ever arise, after all, the Studebaker was always built to drive. The cover now acts as a huge parcel shelf and suits the custom theme perfectly. The front bench seat is the original split bench fitted at the factory and like the door trims, have been retrimmed in the popular tuck and roll style in marine grade vinyl by John Viles. Murray added a row of gauges to the lower section of the dash showing the state of the airbag set up, but they were a bit of an eyesore, so he made up a cover

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to blend in with the carpet, completely hiding the gauges from sight. Again, the dash may look stock, but has in fact had plenty of work lavished onto it to make it a one-off. The sections of the dash that Murray no longer required have been shaved, proving the old adage, less is more! The stereo has been moved to the glovebox and the period correct tacho has been mounted to the steering column. Speaking of which, the column is a mix-match of Studebaker and XF Falcon – the latter being mounted inside the factory outer to provide a collapsible column. Topped with a XM Falcon wheel and custom bullet, the steering set up and dash were painted white to compliment the rest of the interior. Bob Mason spent plenty of time working on the Stude’s interior alongside Murray – his help proving invaluable.

Whilst Murray did cruise the Stude with the original flathead six-pack still under the bonnet for more than five years, the lack of power was the catalyst for more cubic inches finding its way into the engine bay. Built by Bob Mason, the small block Chev now sports 355 cubic inches and offers Murray not only all the power he needs, but also much needed reliability. Bob prepped the 4-bolt block before adding the Scat steel crank and rods, TRW forged flat top pistons with chrome-moly rings and a mild cam. A pair of Edelbrock Performer alloy heads were fitted with roller rockers and larger stainless valves before being bolted down to the bottom end. A single 750cfm Holley carb is mounted to an Edelbrock alloy intake and completes the long engine package. A complete MSD ignition system is employed to create the spark with a pair of custom headers ditching the gases through a dual system that finished through a single tailpipe. On 98-octane pump fuel, the engine produced 400hp. Visually though, the small block and its surrounds have been given the old-school look with a custom air cleaner (with handmade stainless trim accents) and painted, finned Edelbrock rocker covers. Everything left in the engine bay has been detailed… 69


A cruising-friendly four-speed Turbo 700 auto with 2500rpm converter backs the 355-cuber and sends the power rearward to the 9-inch diff via a two-piece Commodore wagon tailshaft. The diff houses 3.9-gears and billet axles. Suspension wise, the Studebaker has adjustable ride height thanks to the airbags, but that’s just the start of the upgrades made to the ’52 technology under the coupe. Up front, Murray has adapted HQ 2-inch drop stub axles combining with CF Bedford shocks and Nolathane bushes to improve the driveability. Stopping power is provided by a pair of Leyland P76 disc brakes and

HQ calipers. At the opposite end, the diff is located with link bars to the chassis and sits on a pair of reset leaf springs and four-wheel drive Ute shocks with helper bags. Ford drums have been retained on the diff. The brake master cylinder is hidden under the floor with the booster taking up residency under a front guard. Wheel choice is of upmost importance in a build like this. Forget about big diametre billets here, Murray insisted on a set of 15x6.5-inch Ford chaser rims covered with ’57 Caddy hubcaps fitted with custom bullets. I don’t think this car could wear a better set of shoes…

THANKS TO: Bob Mason. Mike Morris. Rick McLachlan. John Viles.

Done right, even the ugliest car can be sensational - it just takes the right person with the right skills and ideas to turn any car from beast to beauty. Murray Nicholson is that guy! 70

The Stude took four and a half years of Friday night and weekend work to complete with its first outing being the 2006 Custom Auto Expo / MotorEx in Sydney where the Stude was so new, it was still to be registered, putting it into the show class section. Built primarily as a driver, Murray was wrapped with a third in the Show Car class first time out! Since then, the Starlight coupe has scored plenty of awards including 1st Place King of Kustom, Top 10 at Bright, Top Custom at Wintersun and more. And the best part of those awards? The fact that Murray had driven to each event! And he’s been cruising the coupe ever since. 71


Pin-Up Chic’

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MODEL: INSTAGRAM: VEHICLE: OWNER: ENGINE: PHOTO BY: INSTAGRAM:

Rivz @long_live_rivz 1959 Lincoln Guy Ford 430ci Jimmy Tee Photography @jimmyteephotography

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s s e l e m i T

Glenn Potts wanted a traditional-styled Hot Rod that would never go out of fashion. He found exactly what he wanted with this ‘28 A Model Tudor...

Glenn Potts

1928 A Model Ford Tudor 74

Words/Pics – Paul Beck 75


Normally, when you hear of guys going through a mid-life crisis, the stories usually involve getting their ear pierced, growing their hair long and buying either a Harley or a Sports car – or both. Glenn though, went looking for a Hot Rod. His search led him to Queensland, and in particular, John and Paul Davies garage. The guys are well known for their ability in building Model A Fords with the right stance, right attitude and right style – everything Glenn was looking for in a car. When he saw this Tudor in all its glory, he knew he had to make it his. After the deal was done, the Tudor was on its way to its new home in NSW.Externally, the Tudor oozes style. The right colour, the

right wheel choice and of course, the right stance. The body is original Ford steel that was sourced from Bellflower in California and features a 3-inch roof chop and factory pop-out windscreen. The bonnet sides have been louvred and are now removeable via Zeus fasteners as does the bonnet itself. After smoothing out any imperfections, John and Paul called on Troy to lay on the PPG Midnight Black paint. The colour instantly giving the Tudor a timeless look. Complimenting the paint is a similarly coloured cloth roof covering and chromed grille shell. The headlights are ’32 Ford Commercial items and suit the build the perfectly.

The body is original Ford steel that was sourced from Bellflower in California and features a 3-inch roof chop and factory pop-out windscreen. 76

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The body sits over a TCI-built ’32 chassis, that has been coated in the same colour but not before being fitted with all of the necessary hardware – all of which have been detailed to the highest level. From the rear, the polished Dutchman Quick change rear-end is in full view and is mounted to the chassis via a parallel four-bar with a pan-hard bar. Coil-over shocks provide a nicer ride. Up front, the chassis plays host to a drilled and polished Superbell I-Beam front end with a transverse leaf-spring. A pair of SoCal shocks were added to help the Tudor handle better

and a HQ steering box takes care of that part of the build. The braking system may look old school, but in fact, inside those Buickstyle finned brake drums on the front are Wilwood discs and calipers, while the rears are Ford drum brakes. The whole system is controlled by a Corvette master cylinder with 7-inch booster providing more than enough power to pull up the Tudor from any speed. As for the wheels, would this ’28 look as good with anything but highly polished Halibrand wheels? Measuring 15x6 and 16x10, the rolling stock is period perfection…

As for the wheels, would this '28 look as good with anything but highly polished Halibrand wheels? Measuring 15x6 and 16x10, the rolling stock is period perfection! 78

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To finish off the chassis, John and Paul fitted up the engine and trans combo. Sticking with the tried and tested formula of fitting up a small block Chev and auto into the ’32 chassis rails. Built by Ian Woodward at Fat Az Racing, the small block build kicks off with a GM 4-bolt block that is filled with a Scat crank, Scat H-Beam rods, forged pistons and a Comp Cams cam and lifter kit. A Mellings pump circulates the oil from the custom fabricated sump. The Brodix alloy heads were soon to join the party along with an Edelbrock air-gap intake manifold playing host to a 750cfm Holley carb. Sanderson headers complete the engine package

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and send the spent gases out the rear of the Tudor via a pair of 2.5-inch pipes and Borla mufflers before finishing off with a single tail pipe. Running on a strict diet of 98-octane fuel, the stout 383ci small block pumped out 430hp on the dyno. Backing the engine is a built Turbo 350 auto, pieced together by Vince’s Automatics using a full manual valve body and 3000rpm converter to handle the power being pushed through it. Gear selections are made via a Lokar shifter. With the driveline and chassis complete, the body and associated panels were carefully lowered over the top and bolted into place.

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In stark contrast to the Midnight Black paint, the interior has been restitched in vibrant red leather, which covers the door trims, rear bench seat and reshaped Hyundai bucket seats. The original dash facia now holds more reliable and much more stylish VDO gauges with a tacho added to the stainless steering column. Speaking of which, the period perfect 4-spoke steering wheel finishes off the interior makeover which proves

that less is definitely more. The entire build consumed almost 7-years of work for both John and Paul Davies. Their meticulous attention to detail evident no matter where you look. For new owner Glenn and wife Carly, this Tudor is the perfect purchase for them. All that is left to do is to enjoy the Rod with other members of the Old Time Street Rod Club as often as they can. Bring on the good times‌

The body sits over a TCI-built '32 chassis, that has been coated in the same colour but not before being fitted with all of the necessary hardware - all of which have been detailed to the highest level.

THANKS TO: A big thanks to Paul and John Davies for building an outstanding car. Darren Abela for the continued maintenance and advice. Dave Hasgato at Everclear Window Tinting for detailing the car to perfection. Members at the Old Time Street Rod Club for all the fun times!

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N A ’ N I P P CO

Words / Pics - Paul Beck

E D U T I T T A

t shiny u o b a ys a lw a ’t n is g Hot Roddin ige Ward’s ‘34 ra C t! in a p y d n ca d n a ls whee ss is more! le s, e m ti e m so t a th s e v ro Coupe p

Craige Ward 1934 Ford Coupe 84

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Nasty. Bitchin’. Bad Arse. Call it what you will, but there’s no denying that Craige’s Hi-boy ’34 is pure Hot Rod in every sense of the word. This coupe could very easily slot into the leading role of any remake of American Graffiti and quickly gain a cult following. From the wildly chopped roof to the traditional wheel and tyre combo and that all-black Hemi power-plant, this is one killer coupe. And that’s exactly how Craige knew it would be. When Craige dragged home the body and chassis from Rod Bod’s, he had a firm idea on what he wanted to completed project to look like. Two years after getting stuck into the build, his dream had become a reality. That aggressive, restyled roofline really makes Craige’s coupe a standout amongst the many traditionally chopped ’33 and ’34 Ford coupes currently

on the scene. Now available from Bonneville Hot Rods, the slammed roof was relatively unique when Craige purchased his body. Not only does the body have the wild chop, it has also been extended by four-inches, offering a little more leg room. The raw fibreglass body, with its hanging panels, was dropped off to Joe and Charchie at Napps Customs where it was prepared in readiness for colour. Craige didn’t want anything too flashy – candy colours were out, as were any two-tone combinations. For him, it was all about a traditional, tough Hot Rod colour. He found just wanted he wanted with a mix called Washington Blue. With no fenders or running boards to worry about, the colour only extends to the grille shell and chassis.

ne gi en r he ot y an e er th is , is th e lik ild bu r lle ki a For ? is th as y tl ec rf pe as 4 '3 e th it su d ul wo that 86

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Speaking of the frame, with before the body could be mounted for the final time, Joe added the body colour to the already suspended chassis. Keeping the underside styling traditional, the front end features a four-bar I-Beam set-up with Commodore disc’s and calipers living inside the 5-inch, black steel wheels with small chrome hubcaps. Down the back, the wheel size increases by an inch and a half and hang off the nine-inch rear end located with a McDonald Bros four-link assembly using coil-over shocks to provide a firm ride. The diff holds 31-spline axles and uses the standard drum brakes to provide adequate braking power.

From the wildly chopped roof to the traditional wheel and tyre combo and that all-black Hemi power-plant, this is one killer coupe.

Whilst the interior could be considered plain but some, the quality is right up there with the best. Steve at All Trim is well versed in creating stunning interior spaces, and Craige’s ’34 is no exception. The relatively small confines of the interior is wall to wall black leather covering the restyled door trims, custom low back seats and headlining. The same theme continues into the boot area. Looking past the era-perfect steering wheel and chrome Flaming River steering column, the array of Dolphin gauges mounted into the dash facia. As there is no centre console to speak of, the B&M shifter is mounted high above the floor on a custom tube mount. It’s there where you’ll also find the all-important 5-inch AutoMeter tacho. 88

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That just leaves the hero of this entire build – that black, blown, bad-ass Hemi engine that dominates the view from any angle. For a killer build like this, is there any other engine that would suit the ’34 as perfectly as this? Built by Aaron at APM, the 57-spec 392ci Hemi retains the stock crank but has Scott rods and pistons hanging off it. Likewise, the cylinder heads have been cleaned up and kept as per factory specs. What’s not factory is that Weiand 6/71

blower and dual Carter AFB carbs. An MSD ignition system gets the beast firing while the custom Lake pipes not only look cool, but do a great job of expelling the gases whilst sounding so damn cool as well. On the dyno, the pumped Hemi made 630hp on 98-octane pump fuel. Power and reliability too… Making sure cruising the coupe is easy, there’s a Turbo 700, four-speed auto adapted to the Chrysler engine via a Hot Heads bellhousing.

THANKS TO: Joe & Charchie at Joe Napps Customs for going

above and beyond what they needed too. Nothing was too hard, and a family that understood my passion. Steve at All Trim for the awesome interior. Aaron at APM for the engine.

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After sending around two-years and plenty of the folding stuff to create a Hi-Boy Hot Rod like no other, Craige is more than happy with how the finished product has come together. In fact, there’s nothing he would change on it now it’s done. Craige now plans to cruise the coupe as much as possible before eventually handing over the keys to his son Jett.

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51st NSRA Street Rod Nationals AUGUST 6-9, 2020 - KENTUCKY EXPOSITION CENTRE, LOUISVILLE Pics - Gary Rosier Words - Paul Beck

AGAINST

ALL ODDS

With many events across the world cancelled or postponed due to the global Covid-19 pandemic, the NSRA was determined to host their 51st Nationals in Louisville. This was to be the 26th time the NSRA Street Rod Nationals were to be held in Louisville at the spectacular Kentucky Exposition Centre. Leading up to the event, it was expected there would be around 12,000 street rods, muscle cars, customs and street machines attending the event, but with restrictions in place, that number wasn’t achieved, though it did attract 7402 entrants – each heading into the venue for four days of fun with cars.

There's no denying the state of the world at the moment played havoc with the amount of people attending the 51st Nationals 94

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Usually attracting more than 75,000 spectators through the expansive grounds, there’s no denying the state of the world at the moment played havoc with the amount of people attending the 51st Nationals with around half of those not making the event this year. Still, with so many events not happening at all, those numbers can’t be considered poor and half is certainly better than not having any at all.

Still, with so many events not happening at all, those numbers can't be considered poor and half is certainly better than not having any at all. 96

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Aside from the many thousands of custom cars scattered throughout the venue, both inside and outside, the Street Rod Nationals also hosted many vendors as well as a large swap meet giving those currently building their projects the opportunity to find that elusive part or maybe even a new project to take on. The many vendors on hand for this years event were offering all kinds of gear from hot rod bodies to wheels, engine parts and memorabilia. Plenty of money was spent through the array of trade stands on offer – a great sign of support for those companies still wanting to be part of the Street Rod Nationals.

Hot Rodding is a family deal and the NSRA went to great lengths to make sure the young kids that came to the event with their parents had plenty to keep them occupied too.

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To compliment the huge amount of cars on display outside, the Builders Showcase was held inside the South Wing Lobby and it was here that you would find those high-end show car builds on display in all their glory, with Roger Burman awarded the Elite Builder of the Year.

To help make this event a reality, the NSRA committee had to abide by some strict social distancing regulations, including some buffer zones, with cleaning crews spending plenty of time making sure the internal areas of the Exposition Centre is spotlessly clean and safe for all concerned. The Association also provided plenty of social distancing signs and hand-sanitising stations around the venues for entrants and spectators alike. It’s the extra effort like this that was needed to get this event back on track.

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To compliment the huge amount of cars on display outside, the Builders Showcase was held inside the South Wing Lobby and it was here that you would find those high-end show car builds on display in all their glory, with Roger Burman awarded the Elite Builder of the Year. The Nationals isn’t just about cars though. Hot Rodding is a family deal and the NSRA went to great lengths to make sure the young kids that came to the event with their parents had plenty to keep them occupied too with games and live music on offer each day of the event. Saturday afternoon saw the drawing of the Giveaway Car – a 1932 Hi-Boy Roadster built by Show Me Rod & Custom. This years prize went to Louisville locals, Phillip and Wanda Hill.

At the close of the event on Sunday afternoon, the 51st NSRA Nationals had been run and won under very trying conditions.

At the close of the event on Sunday afternoon, the 51st NSRA Nationals had been run and won under very trying conditions. The event may not have broken any entrant or spectator records, but at least it was on as scheduled when so many others have been cancelled. A big congratulations to all concerned at the NSRA for taking the necessary steps to provide an event for all car enthusiasts to enjoy. Hopefully 2021 will be virus free and the numbers will once again go through the roof… For more information on the 2021 NSRA Street Rod Nationals in Louisville, go to www.nsra-usa.com 102

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STREET&Strip

Robert Killian 1928 A Model Sedan

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Words / Pics - Tommy Lee Byrd

There are only so many ways to build a Ford Model A, but it is great to see a guy with extreme imagination to take an old steel body and turn it into one of the wildest, street-driven drag cars you will ever see. 105


Canton, Georgia resident, Robert Killian is the proud owner of this 1928 Model A sedan, and he certainly played a big part in making this overthe-top hot rod a reality. “Uncle Jed” gets lots of attention at car shows and cruise nights, but it really turns heads when it hits the track and puts the 820ci Jon Kaase Ford Hemi to work. In all reality, Robert has yet to lean on the combination. He has struggled with traction, which is understandable with 2,000 horsepower on tap, but he has it figured out and plans to turn the big- inch Hemi loose in the near future. If his mid-7 second quarter mile passes at more than 180 miles per hour are an indicator, Robert should dip into the 6’s at 200-plus miles per hour. We should also mention that Robert can

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realistically get his car out and drive it on the street, as it is completely street legal. It definitely isn’t what you’d call fuel efficient, and it is a bit more complicated than hopping in your average street/strip car, but he has driven the car on the street on a few occasions. Despite its “rat rod” appearance, the car is a work of art, in terms of the chassis, suspension and roll cage. Steve Tucker of Southeast Race Cars is responsible for the chassis work, and did a masterful job mixing a double frame rail chrome moly chassis with traditional hot rod parts such as a Pete & Jakes I-beam front axle. He set up the fourlink rear suspension to have lots of adjustment, because they simply didn’t know what to expect with the old-style solid front axle.

We should also mention that Robert can realistically get his car out and drive it on the street, as it is completely street legal.

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Despite its rat rod appearance, the car is a work of art, in terms of the chassis, suspension and roll cage. Steve Tucker of Southeast Race Cars is responsible for the chassis work, and did a masterful job mixing a double frame rail chrome moly chassis with traditional hot rod parts such as a Pete & Jakes I-beam front axle. They have most of the bugs worked out of the suspension, so the car yanks the front tires, and carries them nicely. A fabricated Pro Mod-style rear end is packed with high end components, including a Mark Williams 9.5-inch centre section, a 3.90 gear set and bullet proof 40-spline axles. Disc brakes are visible between the spokes of the Billet Specialties Comp 5 wheels, which measure 15x3.5 inches up front and 16x16 out back. Traction is provided by a set of Mickey Thompson tires, measuring 27.5x4.5-15 and 33x10.5-16W respectively. It’s a killer combination that gives the car a crazy hot rod appearance, while also serving a great purpose on the track. Horsepower is in abundance with Robert’s wild ’28 Model A sedan, and we could write an entire book about the top-secret tricks inside this engine. Robert, being a former IHRA Pro Stock racer, had used one of Jon Kaase’s awesome Hemi creations, so he knew it was the perfect choice for this build. He basically had Jon build an IHRA Pro Stock mountain motor, but change a few small details to make the car drivable on the street. In the end, Jon didn’t make many changes, because it is hard to make one of these engines mild enough for regular street duty.

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Jon started with a Dart billet aluminium block, which features five-inch bore spacing, and stuffed it with Diamond pistons, BME connecting rods and a Sonny Bryant crankshaft. The 820ci displacement is a result of a 4.78-inch bore and a 5.75-inch stroke. The oiling system is a Moroso dry sump, which keeps the mountain motor lubricated properly. Jon Kaase is secretive when it comes to his cylinder head and camshaft specifications, and that’s understandable with an engine of this caliber. Jon’s crew undoubtedly spends many hours tweaking the cylinder heads, and the HRE sheet-metal intake manifold is a one-off piece to fit this particular engine. Up top is a pair of split Braswell carburetors, totaling 2,800cfm, which drinks a steady flow of VP C23 race fuel. The Ford Hemi breathes through a set of hand-fabricated stainless steel headers, fit with Burns mufflers, creating a unique sound. With 2,000 horsepower and 1,800 ft-lb of torque, the ATI SuperGlide transmission and eight-inch torque converter has quite the task to transfer all that energy to the rear wheels.
Without a doubt, the car gets lots of attention, thanks to its super low stance, long wheelbase and chopped top.

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The long wheelie bars, dual parachutes and a massive scoop that is higher than the roof line offers the cartoon-like appearance that everyone loves. So far, Robert’s best pass is a 7.40 at 184 miles per hour, but he plans to continue tweaking the combination until all of the issues are sorted out. For now, he enjoys showing it off, and testing when he gets the chance. It’s certainly an eye-catching hot rod with an amazing amount of craftsmanship in each and every component. Without a doubt, Uncle Jed is the World’s fastest ‘28 Ford, but he’s bound to go even faster as long as Cowboy Bob is driving!

In all reality, Robert has yet to lean on the combination. He's struggled with traction, which is understandable with 2,000 horsepower on tap, but he has it figured out and plans to turn the big- inch Hemi loose in the near future.

THANKS TO: Steve Tucker of Southeast Race Cars, Jon Kaase Racing Engines 112

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HALL OF

FLAME

Nothing screams hot rod more than a flamed paint job and over the years we’ve seen plenty of variation in the colours used and the style in which they are painted. Check out some of the more interesting ones we’ve found…

TRADITIONAL

Instigated by the hot rod and custom guys back in the 50’s, traditional style flames were always yellow to orange laid down over black paint. It’s a colour combo that worked well, and continues to, to this day. These days though, people are getting more and more courageous in the colours used to create a unique flame theme. There’s a myriad of combinations on offer with choices only limited by your imagination. 114

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TRU-FIRE

Made famous world-wide by the late, great Mike Lavallee, Tru-Fire flames changed the way the world looked at flamed paint work. Initially taking the same treatment queues as the traditional look, with yellow, red and orange over a black body, Tru-Fire was an instant hit with Mike adding his unmatched skills to lay his unique look onto everything from hot rods and customs, to muscle cars, Helicopters, Planes and any number of household items such as fridges and coffee machines‌

These days though, people are getting more and more courageous in the colours used to create a unique flame theme.

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Cruizin’ The Web TRIBAL

Tribal Flames are a spin-off of the traditional flame that has a harder edge to them and don’t flow like the original flames do. More often than not, people using tribal flames with add them to a more tougher, sinister style of car where it’s all about being downright nasty.

Instigated by the hot rod and custom guys back in the 50's, traditional style flames were always yellow to orange laid down over black paint. COMBINATIONS

We’ve seen combinations of flames used successfully on many cars and in many different colours. If you can think it up, it’s already been done. Traditional with Tru-fire is popular so too are traditional or Tru-fire with skulls, pin-striping etc.

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NEW ISSUE ONLINE NOW! ISSUE #27 - AUG 2020

600hp CORTINA STREETER

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