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2017 FORT HOOD GUIDE

KilleenChamber.com

Featuring INTERSTATE 14 WILL BRING LOCAL, STATE & NATIONAL PROGRESS PAGE 14 FORT HOODCENTRAL TEXAS REGION A GREAT AMERICAN DEFENSE COMMUNITY PAGE 22

UPCOMING EVENTS / BUSINESS SPOTLIGHTS / FORT HOOD FACT SHEET


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LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

These Changing Times In view of the recent national election and change in administration, it is appropriate in this issue that we take a look at the future of Fort Hood. Due to the process called sequestration, all branches of the military have been downsized. While numbers are fluid, Army Times reported in 2015 that the number of Soldiers on active duty had dropped to just under 480,000. The number today is around 475,000, the lowest number since World War II. There has been a similar effect on Fort Hood. The post was authorized, in the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) findings, an active duty population of around 44,000. Today, the active duty population on Fort Hood is approximately 36,000.

IT IS IN OUR INTEREST TO PROTECT WHAT WE HAVE AND TO GROW FORT HOOD SO THAT THE GREAT PLACE REMAINS GREAT, AND OUR ECONOMY CONTINUES TO FLOURISH IN CENTRAL TEXAS.

The annual economic impact of Fort Hood on the State of Texas is approximately $38 billion. The annual economic impact on the threecounty region surrounding the installation is about 60% of that, or $22.8 billion. Fort Hood remains the largest single-site employer in the State of Texas.

So, what are the prospects for the future? Actually, they are good for a number of reasons. First, the new administration has pledged to spend more on defense. It can logically be argued that the Army is too small for the missions it is given worldwide. That being the case, some of that spending should accrue to the Army and, eventually, to Fort Hood. Second, Fort Hood has always provided the Army with a high return on dollars invested. Military Value rankings in previous BRAC rounds support this fact. Third, due to its history as a two Division post, Fort Hood has demonstrated the ability to accommodate larger numbers. Post-BRAC 2005, when facility construction was running behind schedule at other installations, Fort Hood was able to accommodate in excess of 54,000 active duty Soldiers and their Families. Fourth, Fort Hood is one of the Army’s Power Projection Platforms – an installation that can strategically deploy one or more high priority active component brigade combat teams, or larger groups, by air, land or sea, as well as mobilize and deploy high priority Army reserve component units. There exists a documented, unique history of successfully accommodating, training and deploying a combination of active duty reserve units here, which is the way the Army will likely train and fight in the future. And, fifth, our area’s reputation for community support, quality of life and low cost of living is legendary in Army circles. All of this assumes that community leaders and elected officials will do the right things in the months and years ahead. Restructuring of the Army will continue with, or without, a future BRAC round. Military investment is coveted in communities around the U.S. because of its economic impact. This community has to make the resources available to effectively compete with those who will certainly seek to reduce military investment at Fort Hood and increase it elsewhere. It is in our interest to protect what we have and to grow Fort Hood so that the Great Place remains great, and our economy continues to flourish in Central Texas. That is the bottom line ... in these changing times. 

Chamber Leadership Chairman of the Board ABDUL SUBHANI Centex Technologies

Sector Chair Communications TANEIKA DRIVERMOULTRIE

Metroplex Health System

GKCC President/CEO JOHN CRUTCHFIELD, III

Guest Contributers VELISSA R. CHAPA

Legal Counsel to Ruth R. Hughes, Commissioner Representing Employers

MANDY SHELTON

Central Texas College

CHRISTINE LUCIANO

Fort Hood Directorate of Public Works Environmental

MARK CHOCKRAN

Sector Chair, GKCC Military Relations Council

STEPHANIE O’BANION

Central Texas/Fort Hood Chapter AUSA

Editor JENNIFER HETZEL

Design LESLEY ROCQUE

Printing INTEG

For more information on the Killeen area or the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce, please visit the following websites: KilleenChamber.com KilleenTexas.gov Facebook.com/ KilleenChamber For Advertising, Contact NICHOLE ANDERSON, nichole@killeenchamber.com

AUTHOR © 2017 Greater Killeen JOHN CRUTCHFIELD President/CEO, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

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Chamber of Commerce

Title,Company

1 Santa Fe Plaza, P.O. Box 548 Killeen, Texas 76540 MAIN (254) 526-9551 FAX (254) 526-6090


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Contents

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SPECIAL FEATURES

2017 FORT HOOD GUIDE

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20

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT These Changing Times

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PUBLIC POLICY

Players and Issues in the 85th Session of the Texas Legislature-Who and what will affect our region.

A by-the-numbers look at the post and its economic impact.

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Social Media: To Friend or Not to Friend? What you need to know to protect your business.

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From Camp Hood to Fort Hood: Killeen’s Rich Military History-A behind-the-scenes look at Downtown Killeen’s newest mural.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHTS Central Texas College Blackboard

FORT HOOD OPENS NEW SINGLESTREAM RECYCLING PROCESSING PLANT

KILLEEN CHAMBER

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MEMBER PROFILE: WINDOW GENIE

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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RIBBON CUTTING PHOTOS

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KILLEEN CHAMBER EVENT PHOTOS

The Great Place continues to lead the way in sustainability.

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Interstate 14 Designation Will Bring Local, State and National Progress-How I-14 will affect our local economy, state commerce and national military.

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FORT HOOD - CENTRAL TEXAS REGION NAMED A GREAT AMERICAN DEFENSE COMMUNITY Our community continues to provide unwavering support to service members and military families.

BUSINESS SERVICES

PLACE DESIGN

“THE GREAT PLACE,” AT A GLANCE

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NTC PROVIDES UNIQUE EXPERIENCES Our Military Relations Council provides one-of-a-kind insight to the military through this hands-on program.

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ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY – CENTRAL TEXAS/FORT HOOD CHAPTER

Supporting America’s Army and the men and women who serve.

ON THE COVER Dowtown Killeen’s newest mural, commissioned by the GKCC, “Camp Hood to Fort Hood: Killeen’s Rich Military History.” Painted by the Killeen Civic Art Guild.

GREATER KILLEEN BUSINESS QUARTERLY

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SPECIAL FEATURE | PUBLIC POLICY

Players Issues in the 85th Session of the Texas Legislature JOHN CRUTCHFIELD III President & CEO, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

he 85th Regular Session of the Texas Legislature convened on Tuesday, January 10, 2017. It will adjourn 140 days later on Monday, May 29. Between those dates, thousands of bills will be filed. A few will pass. Many will die. What happens during that session will affect us all – hopefully in positive ways. It is in the interest of the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce, and its members, to do all we can to make sure that is the case. In many ways, this will be a different session for Central Texans. How will we approach it? For starters, we will have new representation. Gone will be veteran Representative Jimmie Don Aycock and veteran Senator Troy Fraser. With them will leave knowledge and seniority built up over many years. In the legislative process, institutional knowledge and seniority are critical. Many of us enjoyed excellent and productive relationships with both Representative Aycock and Senator Fraser. Replacing Senator Fraser will be Senator Dawn Buckingham. Senator Buckingham has spent a considerable amount of time in Bell County. We have developed a good relationship with her. We will need to do the same with her new staff. 4

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Killeen has two state representatives. Representative Hugh Shine has been there before, having served in the legislature from November, 1986 to January, 1989. Those years of service will give him seniority over many members and position him strategically during the session. This will provide invaluable leverage. Representative Scott Cosper will not have the benefit of seniority. Collaboration and relationship building will be key. It is important that our members work well together to effectively advocate for our interests. That has been the case leading up to the session. All three members have committed to meet with our Public Policy Council on a regular basis during the session. While there will be many issues addressed during the Session in which we will have an interest, there are several unique issues that must be addressed.

DUAL ENROLLMENT All agree that if Texas is to compete in a knowledge-based, global economy, it must achieve two urgent educational objectives. One is to move more students to graduation quicker. Those students must be career and work ready. The second is to reduce, or at

A POLITICIAN SHOULD HAVE THREE HATS. ONE FOR THROWING INTO THE RING, ONE FOR TALKING THROUGH, AND ONE FOR PULLING RABBITS OUT OF IF ELECTED. - CARL SANDBURG

least control, the cost of a college education. We believe that dual enrollment is critical to achieving each of these objectives. Dual enrollment is the process of allowing high school students to take college level classes while still in high school. It has been demonstrated to work well in Central Texas, first at the Bioscience Institute at Temple College and now at the Early College High


SPECIAL FEATURE | PUBLIC POLICY

School at Central Texas College. Those who run our public schools, community colleges and universities understand the concept, and are dedicated to making it work. Our education leaders work well together to ensure that students are prepared to excel and that the system is efficient and effective. Despite the benefits, there has been push back. Both the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and the Texas Association of Business have expressed concerns. Those concerns have to do with rigor and standards. The implication is that high school students enrolled in dual credit courses are held to a lower standard than college students enrolled in those same courses. Our education administrators and, in fact, the Central Texas experience makes

Those military installations have an annual economic impact on the State of Texas of $148 billion. Fort Hood’s economic impact is close to 30% of the total. Military installations provide 255,000 direct jobs and provide 6% of the state’s economy. Military investment is competitive. States around the country are arming up to protect their existing military installations and grow them at someone else’s expense. Texas must meet that completion. During the last Session, the Legislature provided $30 million in DEAAG grant funding – an inadequate amount. That number has to go up. The return on the investment is substantial.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT OUR MEMBERS WORK WELL TOGETHER TO EFFECTIVELY ADVOCATE FOR OUR INTERESTS.

the case that students are held to the same standard. Some four year universities are pushing back. The reason is obvious. Some believe college level courses taken in high school represent revenue lost to their four year universities. We must not let push back derail the progress made by our educators and students locally. What has been achieved here can be a model for the rest of the state. The reality is that if we are to produce more college graduates and control cost, the education model must change. There is always resistance to change.

DEAAG GRANTS Defense Economic Adjustment Assistance Grants are state grants to improve military value at Texas’ fifteen military installations.

Senator Dawn Buckingham

HAZELWOOD ACT The act was originally approved in 1943 and has been amended several times since. Today, the act provides veterans, their survivors, or their children up to 150 free credit hours­­—in addition to federal educational benefits—at any of the state’s public universities or community colleges. Colleges and universities must absorb the cost. For the most part, those costs are not repaid by the state. Recent amendments to expand the program have driven the cost of the program out of sight. From 2009 to 2015, the amount of tuition lost rose by 621% from $25 million to $178 million. The Legislative Budget Board projects that by 2017, the amount of tuition lost will be $286 million, up 61% in two years.

Today, the program is limited to veterans who enlisted in Texas or had Texas as their home of record when they enlisted. There are court challenges to the residency requirement. While educational benefits are something that Texans want to make available to veterans, this program is unsustainable in its present form. Changes will have to be made.

VETERAN BENEFITS The Legislature has granted state-wide property tax exemptions to disabled veterans. This is appropriate. It is also an unfunded mandate on local political subdivisions. And, the benefit places a disproportionate burden on military communities because many military veterans tend to live in military

Scott Cosper

State Rep. Hugh Shine

communities to access their well-earned benefits. In the case of the City of Killeen, the cost of these exemptions is equivalent to $0.06 of the property tax rate. There are precedents for the state reimbursing those cost to political subdivisions on which the state’s actions have placed a disproportionate burden through unfunded mandates. That has been partially done in this instance. More needs to be done. It has been said that, “when everything is said and done, more gets said than done.” Most of us would agree the statement applies to life, in general, and the legislative session, in particular. It is important that whatever gets done in the upcoming legislative session impacts our community in a positive way – especially as those actions impact dual credits, DEAAG grants, the Hazelwood Act, and veteran’s benefits. 

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SPECIAL FEATURE | PUBLIC POLICY

Legislative Day If a picture is worth a thousand words, a hands-on experience is immeasurable. A key element in efforts to acquaint legislators with our priorities is Legislative Day. We started this event during the 80th Regular Session of the Texas Legislature in 2007. It always occurs at the beginning of each legislative session (on odd-numbered years) when members still have time to participate. Legislative Day works like this: Our senator and state representatives issue invitations to their colleagues and their staffs to visit our community. Typically, 130 legislators and staff members accept the invitation. On the day of the visit, chamber buses, along with our community hosts and our legislative members, pick up the delegation at the Capital early in the morning. The first stop is at Central Texas College or Texas A&M University-Central Texas to show off our educational institutions. At that stop, the delegation is provided a continental breakfast and an opportunity to meet community leaders. Participants hear two presentations, one on community needs, presented by an elected official or community leader, and one on education needs, presented by an education leader.

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Participants then board buses provided by Fort Hood. The first stop is the III Corps Headquarters, where they are greeted by, and have a group photo taken with, the Commanding General. They are then separated into three groups where they visit various locations around the post. They receive a command brief during lunch and have an opportunity to dine with Soldiers. The event concludes late in the afternoon with a bus ride back to the Capital. Our Public Policy Council follows up after the event with office calls in the Capital. A document explaining our Legislative Priorities and a copy of

the group photo is delivered to each participant. We always ask the group if anyone has been to Killeen or Fort Hood before. Even though we are located only an hour north of the Capital, most have never been here. Many have never been on a military installation. Working in concert with Fort Hood, our Legislative Day is unique and very popular. It occurred this year on Friday, February 3. The response from participants was overwhelmingly positive. ď Ź


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BUSINESS SERVICES

SOCIAL MEDIA: TO FRIEND OR NOT TO FRIEND? VELISSA R. CHAPA Legal Counsel to Ruth R. Hughs, Commissioner Representing Employers

HIRING THE RIGHT EMPLOYEE FOR A JOB CAN BE STRESSFUL. Employers may have no idea who they are hiring and must rely on the application and interview process to choose the right candidate. Unfortunately, these concerns don’t go away once the worker is hired. In many cases, employers feel even more pressure to make sure the employee is not doing anything that could hurt the company. One seemingly beneficial solution to this problem is to monitor an employee’s social media activity. What makes this option so appealing is hearing the stories of employers who have managed to prevent harm to their businesses after discovering their workers engaging in inappropriate, dishonest, or illegal activity via social media. However, before being seduced by these stories, employers should understand how the risks of such monitoring can easily outweigh the benefits. One of the biggest dangers is exposure to a lawsuit. Yes, social media activity can show inappropriate employee conduct, but it can also reveal information that employers should not know, such as medical conditions, disabilities, relationships, or religious beliefs. Mere employer access to this information is enough to open the door for employees to argue that they were discriminated against because the employer allegedly knew this information.

While employers may think that they are safe because they never actually used this knowledge in their decision-making, the fight against perception is a steep and costly uphill battle. Employers have spent significant time and money to defend their positions, and in many cases, have ended up settling for thousands or even millions of dollars. For that reason alone, anyone who is in the employer lane—owners, managers, and supervisors, for example—should avoid being friends on social media with workers over whom they have actual or perceived control. In fact, this concept should extend beyond that of a social media relationship. Employers should avoid being friends with their employees in general. The reality is that these relationships can create discord within the company, and employees can (and often do) use these friendships against the employer.

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If the threat of a lawsuit isn’t enough, employers run additional risks when monitoring employee social media activity. A social media friendship adds complexity to the relationship that can blur the boundaries in frustrating ways. The issues start with the friend request itself. Employers sending friend requests to their employees can place employees in a precarious position; they may want to keep their work and personal lives separate, and a friend request from their boss can place unwanted pressure on them. This can make employees feel uncomfortable if they decline the request. If the employee accepts the friend request, they may become wary of discussing work-


A StAffing PArtner thAt

Goes the Distance immediate that no amount of maintenance will completely shield employers from the risk of being connected to an inappropriate post, photograph, or video. For many employers, it is simply not worth it. related issues on social media, which many employers see as a benefit. However, this can cause a chilling effect on an employee’s federally protected right to discuss working conditions, resulting in a violation of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). For more information on the NLRA, see the following links: texasworkforce.org/ news/efte/salary_discussions.html, and texasworkforce.org/news/efte/social_media_ issues.html.

Despite this bad news, there is a silver lining. Co-workers are generally allowed to be friends both inside and outside of the office. If a co-worker brings inappropriate conduct to an employer’s attention, the employer may take disciplinary action. In these cases, the co-worker who revealed this information to the employer should write a statement of what happened. The statement should cover the basics: who, what, when, where, and why- the more detail, the better. Employers should also write a similar statement of their

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... EMPLOYERS SHOULD UNDERSTAND HOW THE RISKS OF SUCH MONITORING CAN EASILY OUTWEIGH THE BENEFITS. Employers should also realize that a social media relationship with their workforce could damage their own images. For one, adding that level of informality to the relationship can cause a decline in the manager’s authority. It can also open the door to favoritism and make it difficult to perform crucial tasks, such as providing feedback, enforcing policies, or disciplining workers. Such a relationship can also damage an employer’s image as a leader. The constant evolution of social media platforms makes it difficult to control what content is viewed by the public. Keeping up with these changes is an arduous task, and the changes can be so

involvement with the discovery, preserve the evidence, and place it in the employee’s file. This way, employers will have evidence of the social media post and can show that it was brought to their attention via a coworker instead of through an authority figure within the company. While this recommendation may be a disappointing one to hear, remember that the ultimate goal is to protect the business by closing off any roads that may lead to a lawsuit, decreased morale, or loss of credibility. If further clarification is desired, employers may contact the TWC Employer Hotline at 800-832-9394. 

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This article originally appeared in the First Quarter 2017 edition of Texas Business Today a quarterly publication of the Texas Workforce Commission devoted to a variety of topics of interest to Texas employers.

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SPECIAL FEATURE | PLACE DESIGN

Captain Jeremy A. Woodard, First Cavalry Horse Detachment

From Camp Hood KILLEEN’S to Fort Hood RICH MILITARY HISTORY

THE LANDSCAPE OF KILLEEN WAS FOREVER CHANGED IN 1942, WHEN THE U.S. WAR DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCED THE OPENING OF CAMP HOOD. An initial 108,000 acres of agricultural land was dedicated to training and testing the newly developed tank destroyers for combat in World War II. Fort Hood became a permanent military installation in 1950, ensuring that long after the war’s end, Killeen would continue to be influenced by the military. In addition to its impact on Killeen and the surrounding areas, World War II left another unexpected legacy. The paint industry, tasked with manufacturing a million buckets of Olive Drab and Aircraft Gray, sought to make paint more durable in outdoor conditions. The latex paint we use today is a by-product of the synthetic polymers and binders developed in World War II. In a way, the war led to billions of do-it-yourself home improvement projects.

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Improved exterior paint meant artists were also able to modernize an ancient medium that goes back at least 20,000 years. Humans first painted cave walls with ocher from the ground and wood ash from the fire pit. From those simple reds, yellows, and blacks smeared on walls, outdoor painting remained relatively unchanged through the modern era. “But here we are in the 21st century,” said Marty Stanek, Vice President of the Killeen Civic Art Guild, “and since World War II


SPECIAL FEATURE | PLACE DESIGN

THE MURAL FEATURES A PORTRAIT OF GENERAL JOHN BELL HOOD, FORT HOOD’S NAMESAKE, AND INCLUDES A SCENE OF THE FLAG-RAISING AT OPENING DAY OF FORT HOOD IN 1942. a lot of products were developed, which had by-products that were useful in creating different paints. So today, if you go to the store, you’ll just be dazzled by the myriad types of paints that are on the market.” Stanek offered this brief history lesson to a group gathered in an empty lot on the corner of Avenue D and Gray Street in downtown Killeen. The volunteer painters were there to help with the city’s newest work of public art, a mural celebrating “Camp Hood to Fort Hood: Killeen’s Rich Military History.” “I like to say, when you’re painting, have no fear,” Stanek told the novices who joined the effort. “Whatever you paint, we can paint over it.” Over three months in the fall of 2016, 46 volunteers participated in six community work days, meeting after work and on weekends to paint the military scenes that slowly filled the eastern exterior wall at 223 East Avenue D. “Either East- or West-facing art, you have to be especially careful for fading,” Stanek said. “This is going to get all morning sun till nearly noon, all year long.” He notes the mural will eventually show some signs of age, but with the careful application of two coats of paint, “it will fade evenly and gracefully.”

PAINT BY NUMBERS

48 VOLUNTEERS 3 VOLUNTEERS from Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce 1 VOLUNTEER from City of Killeen 9 VOLUNTEERS from Killeen Civic Art Guild 19 VOLUNTEERS from TAMUCT 6 VOLUNTEERS from SOLIX 10 VOLUNTEERS from the community

437 HOURS

OF PAINTING 40 HOURS to apply two coats of primer to the wall 60 HOURS of drawing and transferring the patterns to the wall 150 HOURS applying two coats of paint on the background of sky, landscape, and buildings 187 HOURS of detail painting on the unit crests and figures

Photo Credit: City of Killeen GREATER KILLEEN BUSINESS QUARTERLY

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SPECIAL FEATURE | PLACE DESIGN

WE’RE REALLY EXCITED TO BE PARTICIPATING IN AND CONTRIBUTING TO THE RESURGENCE OF DOWNTOWN. THIS IS OUR HOME.

IF THESE WALLS COULD TALK: PUBLIC ART IN KILLEEN Located across the street from the new mural, at 320 N. Gray St., the "Hack's Levi's Headquarters" sign has been a staple in Killeen since 1955. The Subway at 1100 Old FM 440 Rd. features an idyllic landscape on the back of the building. Several canine scenes brighten the back fence at Mickey's Dog Park, located within the Community Center Park at 2201 E. Veterans Memorial Blvd. Killeen Power Sports at 3701 E Central Texas Expy. commissioned artist Hope Overturf to paint racing scenes and local landmarks on the exterior of the building. Extraco Bank's branch at 1002 W Central Texas Expy. installed a 20 x 32 ft military-themed mural created by FastSigns in Waco. Several murals celebrating Killeen's 125th anniversary were painted in 2012 at 2407 E. Rancier Ave., 711 E. Rancier Ave., and 913 W. Veterans Memorial Blvd.

The side of the 24,000 ft2 building closest to the mural is currently occupied by the Light House Worship Center. Rev. Dr. B.E. Rosebur, who has led the 54-member congregation for the past two years, welcomed the volunteer painters to the neighborhood. “This is the best mural I’ve ever seen,” Rosebur said. “I’ve been all around the world and I’ve seen nothing like this.” The mural features a portrait of General John Bell Hood, Fort Hood’s namesake, and includes a scene of the flag-raising at Opening Day of Fort Hood in 1942. “If this wall was a thousand feet long we couldn’t cover half of the rich military history, but we tried to pick some symbols and emblems that were representative of what’s going on,” Stanek said. Norman Cole, also with the Killeen Civic Art Guild, focused on painting details, from tree lines to horse bridles to the faces of the cavalry members. “We will be diversifying a little bit, because we’re a diverse city,” Cole said. “We had a guy stop by yesterday, he said, ‘Hey, are you going to paint some of those guys buffalo soldiers?’ And I said, ‘We’re going to diversify, but the buffalo soldiers were never at Fort Hood.’” The mural now features African-American members of the cavalry. “Our detachment actually looks like that,” said Captain Jeremy A. Woodard, Commander of the First Cavalry Horse Detachment. In addition to Latino, Korean, and African-American troops, Woodard added that the detachment currently has four females. The mural resulted from a partnership between the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce and the City of Killeen. Heights Lumber & Supply and Walmart donated painting supplies. Solix, Inc., a customer care center located two blocks from the site of the mural, made a donation of $8,000 to be used toward the creation of several murals in the downtown revitalization project. Carolyn Flowers serves as the Operations Manager for Solix’s Killeen location, which opened in January 2014. “Helping people is what we do at our core,” said Flowers, a “born and raised” Killeen native. She and other members of the Killeen office assisted with painting the mural, making use of the company’s paid volunteer program. “It’s refreshing to be able to give,” Flowers said. “This is natural to us.” At the ribbon-cutting ceremony on Veterans Day 2016, Flowers told the crowd: “We’re really excited to be participating in and contributing to the resurgence of downtown. This is our home. This mural symbolizes one of the key reasons why Solix chose to open up its office here in Killeen, and it’s the people.” Killeen Mayor Jose Segarra recalled learning about art as a child, and growing up to see art’s influence. “It has an effect on connections, on relationships, on identity,” Segarra said at the Veterans Day event, adding that the mural also succeeds in telling a story. “When you look at it, it tells the story of who we are,” Segarra said. “It creates part of our identity as a city.”  MANDY SHELTON

Killeen Power Sports Mural

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Curriculum Coordinator, Central Texas College Online High School


SPECIAL FEATURE | PLACE DESIGN

TECHNIQUE PEOPLE OFTEN JUST LOOK AT IT AND WONDER, HOW DO THEY DO THAT?” SAID MARTY STANEK OF THE KILLEEN CIVIC ART GUILD. “WE USED A COUPLE DIFFERENT METHODS. BASE COAT

“Some of the common mistakes painters make are they don’t clean the surface,” Stanek said. “Your paint bonds to the dirt, not to the other surface. Time and weather, heat and contraction from the sun, and that paint just lifts off and flakes away.” “So what we’ve done here is we’ve taken this wall and had it power washed to clean the old surface and we applied two coats of a good exterior primersealer that gave us a new white surface to paint on.”

PROJECTION

“One night we came down with a projector,” Stanek said, recalling the overhead projectors used in the classroom. The Art Guild transferred a historical photo of the Fort Hood flag-raising ceremony to a transparent sheet. “We actually projected that image right on to the wall, took pencils, and quickly sketched out what was there,” Stanek said.

POUNCING

“The other method we use is called pouncing. We use a paper drawn pattern — I borrowed this from the sign trade — and we have a machine that electrically traces the picture.”

The top of the mural displays the words From Camp Hood to Fort Hood: Killeen’s Rich Military History, and the letters were situated through pouncing. “We projected that up on paper, drew it out on pencil, and then we perforated it,” Stanek said. “For a light surface, you rub charcoal on the lettering, and for a dark surface, like in his whiskers, you rub chalk on the picture of his beard,” he continued, pointing to General John Bell Hood’s facial hair. “It’s a very effective way to accurately lay out your wall as to what you want to paint,” Stanek said.

STIPPLING

The cement blocks that comprise the wall create their own issues. “It’s very porous, there are a lot bumps and holes in it. So you do a little bit of smooth painting and you do a lot of what we call stippling, or just pushing the paint with the end of the brush.” 

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Interstate

14

Designation Will Bring Local, State, National Progress JENNIFER HETZEL Director of Strategic Communications, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

I-14 Highway. Photo Credit: City of Killeen.

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SPECIAL FEATURE | ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

THE TEXAS TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION VOTED JANUARY 26, 2017 TO GIVE FINAL APPROVAL TO DESIGNATION OF 25 MILES OF US 190 FREEWAY IN BELL COUNTY AS INTERSTATE 14 (I-14). This is the first segment of I-14 to be designated in Texas, and will run jointly with US 190 from the intersection of US 190 and Business US 190 E in Copperas Cove to Interstate 35 in Belton. Signs will go up in the coming months.

SIGNIFICANCE State Representative Scott Cosper remarked of this historic event, “I am so proud of the joint efforts between the City of Killeen, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce, TxDOT regional staff, the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition and our elected officials at the federal level. Through the combined efforts of many, we were able to bring a long-term initiative to fruition that will not only improve safety and add future capacity to the roadway, but will also have a significant economic development impact on the region.” The decision to designate this section of I-14 will have far-reaching implications at the local, state and national level. Locally, economic benefits include new business expansion in the Central Texas region, as immediate access to an Interstate highway is a requirement of many investors and business prospects. The presence of an interstate will instantly increase the number of businesses that will consider locating in our community. Existing businesses will also benefit from increased traffic on this corridor. The State of Texas will benefit from this designation in many ways. With thousands of newcomers arriving in Texas each day, I-14 will help accommodate and increase mobility of the state’s growing population. Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce President John Crutchfield states, “Fort Hood is the largest single-site employer in the state. The Texas Comptroller has calculated that Fort Hood’s annual economic impact on the state is $35 billion. I-14 is more than a highway project, it is a way for the state to support one of the most important military facilities in the nation.”

THE ENTIRE INTERSTATE 14 SYSTEM ... WILL PROVIDE A TREMENDOUS CAPABILITY FOR MULTIPLE MILITARY INSTALLATIONS ALONG THE ROUTE TO FACILITATE THE MOVEMENT OF EQUIPMENT AND PERSONNEL TO THEIR LOCAL PORTS OF EMBARKATION/DEBARKATION. Local and state benefits alone are a not enough to obtain interstate designation, however. The driving force behind the push for Interstate 14 has always been that this roadway is critical to our nation’s ability to sustain a responsive, modern military. This designation and continued improvement of the high-speed road network will allow for increased power projection capabilities and capacity, and will play a vital role in enhancing the overall military value of Fort Hood to the U.S. Army. Military value is especially critical as we approach the next Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) event. Major General (Ret.) Ken Cox, Executive Director of the Heart of Texas Defense Alliance, explains, “the major improvements to the road network throughout Central Texas, and now especially with the addition of I-14, are in line with the national intent for a major highway that will support the “Fort to Port” concept and significantly enhance the ability for Fort Hood to move equipment by road to the Ports of Beaumont or Corpus Christi en route to future deployment sites.”

The entire Interstate 14 system, from Ft. Bliss/El Paso in the West to Ft Stewart/ Savannah in the East, will provide a tremendous capability for multiple military installations along the route to facilitate the movement of equipment and personnel to their local ports of embarkation/debarkation.

PROCESS The process to designate Interstate 14 originated with the Gulf Coast Strategic

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SPECIAL FEATURE | ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

L M

Photo Credit: Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition

Highway Coalition (GCSHC), made up of cities, counties, local authorities and economic development organizations in Texas and Louisiana. The organization has been working for more than a decade in support of highway upgrades that will improve access between major U.S. Army installations at Fort Bliss, Fort Hood and Fort Polk and the Texas strategic deployment seaports that support them – the Port of Corpus Christi and the Port of Beaumont. The Killeen Economic Development Corporation (KEDC) became a member of the I-14/GCSHC fifteen years ago under the leadership of former mayor Allen Cloud. The Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce currently serves as fiscal agent for the Coalition and has served on the board for the past twelve years. Several local leaders serve, or have served, on the board of the I-14/ GCSHC, including Former Killeen Mayor Allen Cloud, Gatesville City Manager Bill Parry, LTG Pete Taylor, Former Killeen City Manager Glenn Morrision, State Representative Scott Cosper, and Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce President

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HIGHWAY UPGRADES OF THIS SEGMENT HAVE BEEN UNDERWAY FOR THE PAST FEW YEARS AND MORE EXPANSION PROJECTS ARE PLANNED. John Crutchfield. On the national level, Senators John Cornyn and Congressmen Roger Williams, John Carter and Brian Babin all played a vital role in the project. The Texas Department of Transportation’s Waco District spent the past year working with the Federal Highway Administration to review elements of the existing highway to confirm they meet required interstate highway design standards. Highway upgrades of this segment have been underway for the past few years and more expansion projects are planned. Leading up to Thursday’s final decision, the I-14 designation was previously approved by the Killeen-Temple Metropolitan Planning Organization, the

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, and the Federal Highway Administration. John Thompson, former county judge of Polk County and board chairman of the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition, had high praise for the Transportation Commission’s swift action in making the first section of Interstate 14 a reality. He noted it took only a year to reach that milestone following the congressional designation of the Central Texas Corridor as future I-14 as part of the FAST Act in December 2015. Killeen Mayor Jose Segarra recognizes that the project required extensive collaboration and emphasizes the importance of this


SPECIAL FEATURE | ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

decision for our community. “Many past mayors shared this vision, and I am proud to stand among them as it becomes a reality. The designation of I-14 is truly the road to our city’s future. There are two groups that must receive significant credit for this accomplishment. First, Senator John Cornyn and Congressman Roger Williams introduced the federal legislation necessary to authorize this project from their respective committees in the Senate and House. Congressman John Carter helped gather support for that legislation. The Texas Department of Transportation has made tremendous contributions to this community and region. Those contributions brought us to today. I want to publicly thank these people and organizations for the consummate professionalism they have extended to us locally.”  Left to right: MG (Ret) Kendall Cox, Rep. Scott Cosper, John Crutchfield, City of Killeen Assistant City Manager Dennis Baldwin at the Texas Highway Commission meeting designatinig I-14.

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SPECIAL FEATURE | BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE

THRIVES IN OUR MILITARY COMMUNITY

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE (CTC) IS A PUBLIC, TWO-YEAR COMMUNITY COLLEGE WITH ITS CENTRAL CAMPUS LOCATED IN KILLEEN, ADJACENT TO FORT HOOD. Founded more than 50 years ago thanks to a committee of the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce, CTC provides affordable associate (two-year) degrees and certificates of completion in academic, career and technical fields designed to prepare students to transfer to a four-year school or enter the workforce. Thanks to support from the Killeen Chamber and Fort Hood leadership, initial enrollments exceeded expectations. And today, more than 60 percent of CTC’s students are active-duty military. CTC continues to add classroom and online programs leading to jobs for in-demand fields including cyber security, nursing and other allied health fields, computer technology and homeland security. In addition, the school’s Continuing Education department provides short-term career training and professional development classes. Seamless transfer between CTC and partners like Texas A&M

University-Central Texas helps keep college affordable for students in the area. In addition to its traditional college campus in Killeen, CTC has sites on many military locations across the continental United States, including Fort Hood, and sites in the Pacific Far East, Europe and deployed locations in Southwest Asia and Africa. CTC

• CTC is ranked as a top undergraduate school and the number one two-year college, based on the number of students attending and number of enrollments among service members using the Department of Defense Voluntary Education Tuition Assistance program. • CTC has been named to the list of Top Military Colleges and Universities by Military Advanced Education for eight consecutive years. CTC has also earned Top “MilitaryFriendly®” and “Veteran-Friendly” rankings from GI Jobs and was one of the “Best for Vets: Colleges” in the category of online and non-traditional schools as reported by Military Times. • CTC is the only college in the country to own multiple facilities on a military base. In January 2010, a 26,659

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To learn more about Central Texas College, log onto ctcd.edu or visit the beautiful campus located off U.S. Hwy 190 between the Clear Creek Dr. and Bell Tower Road exits. 6200 W. Central Texas Expy Killeen, TX 76549 254-526-7161 | ctcd.edu

also offers classes on ships at sea and online. The Fort Hood campus offers classes yearround which are available for active-duty, retired and military family members.

square foot college-owned classroom facility opened on Fort Hood. CTC also recently added a new culinary arts kitchen/ classroom to the new classroom and original student services building adjacent to the post library. • As a pioneer in offering credit for military training and experience, CTC was one of the first seven schools chosen to participate in the Texas College Credit for Heroes program. CTC developed a web-based application, collegecreditforheroes.org, to facilitate the evaluation of military education and training. The college expanded the program to develop a website, fastforward.ctcd.edu, allowing prospective military and veteran students not only to receive an instant estimate of evaluated credit, but also to research programs of study to see how that credit applies to CTC degrees. 


SPECIAL FEATURE | BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

BLACKBOARD

INTEGRITY, INNOVATION, AND EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION Teachers choose books for their classrooms donated by Blackboard via First Book

BLACKBOARD IS EDUCATION’S PARTNER IN CHANGE, HELPING LEARNERS, EDUCATORS, INSTITUTIONS, AND COMPANIES THRIVE IN A COMPLEX AND CHANGING ENVIRONMENT. With our sights set on the future, we help our clients see what’s possible by offering services that improve student engagement and accelerate learning. Our mission is to partner with the global education community and promote student and institutional success by leveraging innovative technologies and services. At Blackboard, we started out with a unique idea: if we are not learning something new every day, we are not moving forward. Right now, there is a great opportunity to reimagine education across the student experience, from pre-k through lifelong learning. In the next decade, we will see an incredible influx of new ideas that challenge the status quo and support learners in new ways. We are dedicated to fostering a culture of lifelong education and growth. Blackboard Student Services (formerly Presidium) moved to Somerset, KY in June 2006 and hired our first employees for Blackboard and Pearson Education on July 17, 2006. From January 2007—2010, the KY site grew from 34 to over 900 employees, and it became apparent that an additional location was necessary. Killeen was chosen after a nationwide search, and on July 12, 2010 we opened our doors and began taking calls July 19. The Killeen site was awarded Business of the Year in 2010 for creating and saving over 600 jobs in the Central Texas area. Between our three Contact Centers in the US (Killeen, TX, Greenville, SC,

and Somerset, KY) and headquarters in Washington, DC, our teams have the pivotal task of ensuring that Instructional Design, Training and Knowledge Base live up to the needs and expectations of our customers. Our Contact Center Advisors handle thousands of calls, chats, and web tickets daily and are available 24/7! We are the front line for handling concerns and we strive to provide a quick one-call resolution for students, parents, faculty, and learners. Guided by scripts, training, critical thinking and a drive to help, our advisors support students and institutions, improving the education experience from application through graduation. Blackboard’s partnership with First Book allowed the Killeen site to provide more than 4,000 free books to KISD students. We are committed to doing the right thing and have a shared sense of purpose with teachers, administrators, and leaders at all levels that are working to improve outcomes for learners. We’re shaping the future of education with ideas that challenge conventional thinking. Our goal is to make

blackboard.com

learning more desirable, accessible, and meaningful for learners. Ready to make an impact on the way the world is learning? Help us help others. We are always searching for qualified employees to join our team. Take the first step today by joining our talent community at Careers.Blackboard.com. At Blackboard, our mission is to reimagine education because every day brings new challenges, new ideas, and new ways to learn. Be part of changing the future of education. 

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FORT HOOD GUIDE

FORT HOOD GUIDE

Fort Hood At A Glance “THE GREAT PLACE”

Sgt. Jon Garcia (right), from Santa Cruz, Calif., and a rappel master at the Fort Hood Air Assault School, gives a student the sign to execute the rappel out of a UH-60 Black Hawk Helicopter . (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Richard Wrigley)

Fort Hood was established in 1941 as Camp Hood for training the Army’s Tank Destroyer battalions. Named for general John Bell Hood, Commander of the Texas Brigade in the Civil War, Fort hood became a permanent military installation in 1950. Today, Fort Hood is the largest active-duty armored post in the United States and home to the III Corps Command Group. Numbers change daily at a dynamic post like Ft. Hood, but as of March 2017, here are the stats:

WELL-BEING

Largest

IN THE ARMY!

EDUCATION

FITNESS

HOUSING

9 ON-POST SCHOOLS

9 GYMS COMPREHENSIVE SOLDIER FITNESS TRAINING FACILITY

97 BARRACKS (15,000 ROOMS)

760 TEACHERS (+ STAFF)

25,039 STUDENTS (ON/OFF POST)

(CSFTF)

First

6,730 FAMILY QUARTERS

IN THE ARMY!

SHOPPING 2 LARGE DEPARTMENT STORES 2 LARGE GROCERY STORES 121 EXCHANGE FACILITIES

PERSONNEL

13 CHAPELS

AIRFIELDS CURRENT AUTHORIZED MILITARY STRENGTH: 35,141

7 HANGARS-ROBERT GRAY ARMY

CURRENT ASSIGNED STRENGTH: ~ 35,577

AIRFIELD AT WEST FORT HOOD (JOINT USE WITH KILLEEN-FORT HOOD REGIONAL AIRPORT)

FAMILY MEMBERS: 48,180 (72.6% OFF-POST)

10 HANGARS-HOOD ARMY AIRFIELD

SOLDIERS & AIRMEN

CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES (APF & NAF): ~5,601

(+1,463 AAFES & COMMISSARIES)

CONTRACTORS/KISD/OTHERS: ~5,437 CURRENT DEPLOYMENTS: ~3,728

SPONSORED BY

UNION STATE BANK USBANKTEXAS.NET | 254-953-8181 (HARKER HEIGHTS) 254-634-8181 (KILLEEN) | 254-554-8181 (S. KILLEEN) 20

CARL R. DARNALL ARMY MEDICAL CENTER: 151 BEDS 947,000-SQUAREFOOT FACILITY

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ON EAST SIDE OF MAIN CANTONMENT LONGHORN AUXILIARY AIRSTRIP IN NORTH FORT HOOD SHORTHORN AUXILIARY AIRSTRIP IN NORTH FORT HOOD


FORT HOOD GUIDE

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF

FORT HOOD (SOURCE: TEXAS STATE COMPTROLLER’S OFFICE 2015)

ANNUAL ECONOMIC IMPACT OF FORT HOOD TO STATE ECONOMY:

LARGEST SINGLE-SITE EMPLOYER IN THE STATE OF

$35.4 BILLION

TEXAS

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT:

INVESTMENT IN SOLAR

$21 BILLION

DIRECT EMPLOYMENT:

60,159

DIRECT AND INDIRECT EMPLOYMENT: 201,538

& WIND ENERGY PRODUCTION EXPECTED TO SAVE THE POST $169 MILLION OVER

THE NEXT 30 YEARS BY PROVIDING MORE THAN HALF OF FORT HOOD’S DAILY NEED

The 1st Cavalry Division Soldiers trying out for the 2nd Battalion, 38th Cavalry Regiment, Long range Surveillance, Airborne unit at Fort Hood, Texas gut out the last mile of a two and a half mile buddy run. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Adam Turner)

REAL PROPERTY SUMMARY TOTAL ACREAGE:

218,823 ACRES (342 MI2/886KM2)

TRAINING LAND: MANEUVER AREA:

132,525 ACRES LIVE FIRE & RANGE AREA:

CANTONMENT:

22,026 ACRES 233 TANKS 355 BRADLEYS 72 ADA PATRIOTS

64,272 ACRES

258 STRYKERS

BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES:

329 AIRCRAFT

(37.3M FT2/3.5 M2 OF FLOOR SPACE)

FULLY INTEGRATED LIVE/VIRTUAL TRAINING CAPABILITY WITH JOINT CONNECTIVITY

5,988 ACRES

FAMILY QUARTERS:

5,849 ACRES IN 12

SEPARATE HOUSING AREAS; OCCUPANCY RATE 91%

SOLDIER BARRACKS:

99 TOTAL WITH 15,688 BEDS;

RANGES & TRAINING 75 SMALL ARMS RANGES 11 TANK/BRADLEY/STRYKER MULTI-PURPOSE RANGES

3 UNMANNED AIRCRAFT 1 UNIMPROVED LANDING STRIP 2 UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM LANDING STRIPS

2 AIRBORNE DROP ZONES 10 URBAN TRAINING AREAS 2 UNDERGROUND TRAINING FACILITIES

WESTERN TRAINING AREA FOR ROTARY WING TRAINING

18,150 MI2 AVAILABLE 

OCCUPANCY RATE 79%

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FORT HOOD GUIDE

FORT HOOD-CENTRAL TEXAS REGION NAMED

Great American Defense Community THE ASSOCIATION OF DEFENSE COMMUNITIES (ADC) HAS DESIGNATED EIGHT COMMUNITIES FROM ACROSS THE UNITED STATES AS “GREAT AMERICAN DEFENSE COMMUNITIES” FOR PROVIDING UNWAVERING SUPPORT TO SERVICE MEMBERS AND MILITARY FAMILIES. Among the many reasons the Fort Hood – Central Texas Region is being recognized as a Great American Defense Community is the tremendous success of the area’s educational partnership among the Killeen Independent School District, Central Texas College and Texas A&M University Central Texas. Joining Central Texas are the following seven communities: • • • • • • •

The Alamo – San Antonio Region, TX The Charleston Region, SC Christian County, KY Hampton Roads, VA Maricopa County, AZ Sierra Vista, AZ The Governments of Southeastern Connecticut

“All eight in the 2017 class of honorees truly embody the ideals this initiative was designed to celebrate — making host communities for our nation’s military installations ‘Great Places to Call Home,’” said ADC President Mike Cooper. This year’s honorees will join the 10 communities recognized last year with the prestigious distinction. Over the next six months, each community will host a local event recognizing its selection and celebrating the hard work and creativity of the individuals and organizations making their communities great places for

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service members and their Families to live. These events will culminate in a special reception and a congressional breakfast during the Defense Communities National Summit in Washington, DC, June 19-21, 2017. The Greater Killeen community will hold its designation ceremony in conjunction with the Interstate 14 Dedication ceremony on April 22, 2017.

Military Relations Council Update-LTG MacFarland

ALL EIGHT IN THE 2017 CLASS OF HONOREES TRULY EMBODY THE IDEALS THIS INITIATIVE WAS DESIGNED TO CELEBRATE ...


The Great American Defense Communities program, developed in conjunction with the House and Senate Defense Communities Caucuses, was designed to highlight the unique contributions of cities, counties and regions that host installations make to improve quality of life for service members, Veterans and their Families. This 2017 class of communities was selected by a panel of defense community advocates and experts from dozens of nominees based on the broad range of efforts each area carries out on behalf of military personnel and their families, considering factors such as education, job opportunities, housing, family support during deployments and community appreciation. This year’s program is made possible through generous support from USAA and the National Math + Science Initiative.

Article courtesy of the Association of Defense Communities.

For more information about the Great American Defense Communities program, visit the ADC website at defensecommunities.org.

May 5, 2017 | 8 a.m. Grace Christian Center

2017 Legislative Tour of Fort Hood

ADC is a national nonprofit organization that is the connection point for leaders from communities, states, the military and industry on community-military issues and installation management to enhance knowledge, information sharing and best practices. With nearly 300 communities, states, regions and affiliated industry organizations, ADC represents every major defense community/state in the nation. ď Ź

Contact Rebekah Moon for sponsorship information. Rebekah@killeenchamber.com 254-526-9551

Killeen Chamber

Advance registration required. Group tickets available now at event.leadercast.com/location/ killeenchamber

FORT HOOD GUIDE

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FORT HOOD GUIDE

Fort Hood Opens

Single-Stream Recycling Center CHRISTINE LUCIANO Outreach Coordinator, Fort Hood Directorate of Public Works Environmental

FORT HOOD CELEBRATED AMERICA RECYCLES DAY NOVEMBER 12, 2016 WITH A RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY TO EDUCATE THE COMMUNITY ABOUT THE INSTALLATION’S NEW SINGLE-STREAM RECYCLE CENTER. Spreading the word on how important it is to recycle and the economic and environmental benefits, ceremony attendees learned more about how Fort Hood is changing the way recycling is done. “The easier that we make recycling for customers, Soldiers and Families, the more we can recycle,” said Brian Dosa, Director, Fort Hood Directorate of Public Works. “Recyclable products like plastic bottles, cardboard, glass and paper can be put it into one container, without having to source segregate.” During the ceremony, Dosa explained how the installation began looking for opportunities to divert waste, when it was selected as a pilot for Net Zero Waste. “In 2011, the Army selected us as a pilot installation to see how much waste Fort Hood could minimize from going into the landfill,” Dosa said. “We examined the contributors and recognized that our housing areas generated about half of the installation’s waste.” The following year, a curbside single-stream recycling program was implemented in Family Housing and a 96-gallon recycle container was provided to each home. The amount of recyclables collected from 2012 to 2015 doubled in housing areas and the decision was made to implement a program for the rest of Fort Hood.

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FORT HOOD GUIDE The new single-stream system will increase the recycle center’s processing capacity to 8 tons an hour.

“Single-stream will help double our capacity at the recycle center, which leads to greater revenue and greater opportunity,” Col. Todd Fox, Fort Hood garrison commander, said at the ceremony. The new single-stream recycle center makes recycling simpler for Soldiers and Families, helping to have less material end up in the landfill and more products recycled. “It’s great for the environment, and has a secondary effect of raising revenue that goes back into our Family programs,” Fox said. “It’s about changing culture so that we can do the right thing.” Hector Nunez, supervisory logistics management specialist, Fort Hood Recycle, explained how the recycle program gives back to the community each year. “Fort Hood Recycle sponsors events like the fireworks for the 4th of July Independence Day celebration, music on the lawn series, UFC fights, Oktoberfest, Month of the Military Child and other Soldier and Family events,” Nunez said. “We average giving back over $100,000 per fiscal year to support these community events.” The new single-stream recycle center helps to streamline operations, processing up to 8 tons an hour.

THE EASIER THAT WE MAKE RECYCLING FOR CUSTOMERS, SOLDIERS AND FAMILIES, THE MORE WE CAN RECYCLE

“Single-stream has made it easier to handle material,” Kevin Davis, material handler and sorter, Fort Hood Recycle, said. “The equipment helps us to quickly move and separate recyclables, providing better quality products.” Eight drivers collect recyclables from more than 1,800 recycle containers across the installation. Once the material arrives at the recycle center, unacceptable materials, like trash and plastic bags, are pulled out before being pushed onto the belt for processing. “The material is then pre-sorted by a series of conveyors and machines that help route the material to specific sections for a final sort,” Michael Bush, recycle operations manager, Fort Hood Recycle, said. During a demonstration, Bush explained how the upgraded recycle center relies on machines to do most of the sorting, using vibrating screens, magnetic belts, and gravity to separate materials.

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FORT HOOD GUIDE

NET ZERO WASTE THE SINGLE-STREAM RECYCLE CENTER IS JUST ONE OF MANY WAYS FORT HOOD IS FULFILLING ITS GOAL OF NET ZERO WASTE, a holistic strategy to reduce and reuse waste while incorporating emerging best practices, such as single stream recycling and food waste composting, to manage waste at Army installations with a goal of reaching zero landfill by 2020. This ambitious goal was set in April 2011 when Fort Hood was selected as a Net Zero Waste Pilot. Since then, great strides have been made to change the culture at Fort Hood to achieve Net

DIVERSION EFFORTS

Zero Waste. To achieve this goal, Fort Hood has committed to: • Rethink and Reduce amount of resources used

INCLUDE

• Re-purpose and Reuse whenever possible

Recycling

• Recycle and Compost waste resources • Identify technologies and strategies to reach Net Zero • Employ aggressive strategic communications campaign through conservation education, incentives and training

Composting Donations

NET ZERO WASTE DIVERSION GLIDE PATH DIVERSION GOAL

ACTUAL DIVERSION

42%

45%

50%

55%

60%

65%

70%

75%

80%

85%

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

39%

44%

48%

49%

53%

46%

FORT HOOD CONTINUES TO LEAD THE WAY AND EXPLORE OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE RECYCLING EASY. Kevin Davis, material handler and sorter, Fort Hood Recycle, pushes recyclable material towards a pit for processing through the new single-stream system.

“Recycle employees do a final hand sort in order to take out products not captured in the automatic system and to reroute any recyclables that end up in the wrong place,” Bush said. “At the end of the process, recyclable materials are bundled up and sold to various markets to create new products.”

Exceptions to single-stream recycling include scrap metal, holiday lights, toner cartridges, pallets, small household appliances and civilian clothing and shoes. These miscellaneous recyclables will need to be taken to the recycle center. To prevent equipment damage, plastic bags, film and wrappers cannot be comingled with single-stream materials. “We had a couple of maintenance issues due to plastic bags, but we want to keep the program in place and change the culture to keep as much material out of our landfill as possible,” Bush said. “Plastic bags are accepted at the recycle center and can also be recycled at both commissaries.” Fort Hood continues to lead the way and explore opportunities to make recycling easy.

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SOLID WASTE TO FORT HOOD LANDFILL TONS 25,000

20,000

30%

23,400

REDUCTION

19,835

18,705

18,058

17,489

17,438

16,301

TONS

15,000

25%

Non-Recyclables

10,000

31%

5,000

0

2016 FORT HOOD LANDFILL COMPOSITION

2010

2011

2012

2014

2013

2015

2016

Recyclable Paper, Cardboard & Plastics

44% Compostable Waste

FORT HOOD PERFORMANCE

& Soiled Paper

140

75%

CONSUMPTION (KBTU/SF)

130 120

93.23 KBTU/ SF (-.59%) SEPT. ‘15

30% PER EO13423 JAN 07

110

of everything going into the landfill has the potential to be composted or recycled.

100

In Fiscal Year 2016, approximately

90 FORT HOOD’S ENERGY REDUCTION

80

4,861 TONS

of recyclables went into the Fort Hood landfill, which is $583,320 in lost funds for Soldiers.

ENERGY REDUCTION MANDATE

70 60 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

• UMCS: Basewide HVAC Controls • ESPC: Three (3) Delivery Orders • Rate Reduction: Secured lower electricity rate

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

ACTUAL

2014

2015 GOAL

NOTE: Revised based on new business rules

Spring 2017 Fort Hood received a

TEXAS ENVIRONMENTAL EXCELLENCE AWARD

from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) for leading the way in sustainability!

Recycle employees sort and separate white and mixed paper.

For more information about Net Zero Waste, contact Jennifer Rawlings at 254.535.8557 or jennifer.n.rawlings.civ@mail.mil.

“Single-stream is a win-win for the environment and the Army,” Bush said. “We are excited about new partnerships and the ability of the Army to create value for all its stakeholders.” The people behind the program add to its success. “Recycle is one of the strongest teams on Fort Hood and it shows,” said Timi Dutchuk, chief of environmental programs, Fort Hood Directorate of Public Works. “We are one team, single-stream.” If you are a Fort Hood unit, contractor, or civilian activity looking for an opportunity to be a part of the single-stream team, pick up desk-side containers and 35-gallon recycle containers, free of charge. Activities can come by the Fort Hood Recycle scrap yard, off of 72nd Street, and pick up containers for their footprint.  For information about recycling, call (254) 287-2336 or visit facebook.com/ FortHoodRecycle.

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FORT HOOD GUIDE

NTC

Provides Unique Experiences IT HAS LONG BEEN A FOCUS OF THE MILITARY RELATIONS COUNCIL OF THE GREATER KILLEEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE TO HELP FORT HOOD AND THE U.S. ARMY TELL ITS STORY TO COMMUNITY LEADERS HERE AND ELSEWHERE. In October 2015, we took a new step in that regard. That month, we took our first delegation to the National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California. Working with then Commanding General of the First Cavalry Division MG Mike Bills, then Commanding General of NTC MG Joe Martin, and the Heart of Texas Defense Alliance, and with the support of III Corps, we were able to put together a threeday event that has received rave reviews from participants. Trips are timed to coincide with war exercises in which elements of the First Cavalry Division is engaged, typically preparing for a deployment. NTC is where all the training that units have received at Fort Hood comes together in a collective, near peer, combative war exercise with a focus on learning. Four groups have travelled to NTC so far. Each group is limited to twelve participants, excluding members of Congress, some of whom attend with the group. Participants are nominated by alumni of previous trips and are solicited by invitation only. The focus is on recruiting influential community and state leaders from outside the immediate Fort Hood community. A few local community leaders participate to help build relationships. Top and Bottom: 2016 NTC trip participants

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ALL COME AWAY WITH A GREA FOR THE QUALITY OF THE AMERICA CAPABILITIES AND THE SACRIFICES In the box, observing the battle.


EAT SENSE OF RESPECT ICAN SOLDIER, THEIR CES THEY MAKE.

FORT HOOD GUIDE

A briefing is held prior to the trip at the First Cavalry Division Headquarters hosted by division commanders. Participants learn about the history of Fort Irwin, the nature of the training that occurs there and how it compliments other training that units receive. Much about the trip is predictable. That being said, Fort Irwin is located in the Mohave Desert. Weather conditions are not so predictable. A successful event requires a robust communications process, from beginning to end. The trip consists of an intense three days. The first day consists of air travel from Killeen to Ontario, California and then overland to Fort Irwin. The second day begins with a briefing by the NTC staff and time spent “in the box” observing the battle and after action exercises. Several stops are made during the day where participants get to engage NTC staff and First Cavalry Division Soldiers. There is an organized dinner each evening. The third day is a reversal of day one. Participants travel and stay together. The chamber makes all the arrangements. Each participants pays a package fee to the chamber. To date, we have had city managers, mayors, school superintendents, workforce commissioners, university regents, university system employees and business leaders from all over the state participate. Going in, we knew that this trip would produce more knowledgeable participants who, over time, could help us influence public opinion about the U.S. Army. And, they are. That influence extends to members of Congress, who many are encouraging to visit NTC. There are two other results that have exceeded our expectations. First, by design, many participants have limited exposure to the Army. All come away with a great sense of respect for the quality of the American Soldier, their capabilities and the sacrifices they make. Second, strong and enthusiastic relationships develop between participants. They share what many call a once in a lifetime event with people they did not know before. New networks are developed that will prove useful in the future. 

MARK CHOCKRAN Sector Chair, Military Relations Council, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

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FORT HOOD GUIDE

Association of the United States Army

Central Texas/Fort Hood Chapter SINCE 1950, THE ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY (AUSA), CREATED BY THE ARMY FOR THE ARMY, has worked to support all aspects of national security while advancing the interests of America’s Army and the men and women who serve. Our mission is Voice for the Army – Support for the Soldier. Central Texas Fort Hood (CTFH) AUSA Chapter is a private, non-profit educational organization that supports America’s Army - Regular Army, National Guard, Reserve, Retired Soldiers, Government Civilians, Wounded Warriors, Veterans, concerned citizens and Family members. There are 119 chapters world-wide and the CTFH chapter has been the largest of those for many years. 1st Calvary Division continues to be the largest active duty division for AUSA in the world.

The CTFH chapter has an aggressive program of work which develops programs and activities that provide community support for Fort Hood through individual and corporate members. We serve as the liaison between the Army and local civilian communities; as well as help educate the public about the needs for a strong national defense and the Army. CTFH AUSA is involved in a variety of programs to help support deployed and

Left to right: AUSA 2016 National Meeting; Vietnam Pinning Ceremony

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SUPPORTING AMERICA’S ARMY AND THE MEN AND WOMEN WHO SERVE.


FORT HOOD GUIDE

AUSA Scholarship Ceremony

mobilized soldiers and their families. Some of our activities include general membership meetings with high-profile guest speakers, community involvement events, special events honoring the Army and outstanding Soldiers, professional development forums, scholarships, and a strong Soldier support program; helping Soldiers and their Families in need. Whether you are interested in membership, making a donation, or want to participate in an AUSA event, there are a number of reasons why you should lend your support to AUSA. We are the only professional association for the entire Army. We advocate for the men and women in uniform who serve. We support the Soldiers and the Civilians and Families who work alongside them in the local community who support us. ď Ź For more information, please visit forthoodausa.org

STEPHANIE O’BANION President- Central Texas/Fort Hood Chapter AUSA

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KILLEEN CHAMBER | MEMBER PROFILE

MEMBER PROFILE

WINDOW GENIE

WINDOW GENIE IS COMMITTED TO CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AND PROFESSIONALISM IN KILLEEN AND THE SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES. We specialize in window cleaning, gutter cleaning, pressure washing and window film installation. With world class training and service standards, you will feel safe knowing our uniformed technicians will take great pride in caring for your home or office! The Window Genie of Killeen franchise is locally owned and operated. We are bonded, carry full insurance and only use the best equipment and materials on the market today. We proudly serve Killeen, Fort Hood, Harker Heights, Copperas Cove, Belton, Temple, Nolanville, Florence, Jarrell, Salado, Georgetown, Round Rock and portions of South Waco and North Austin. All employees go through a background check, wear ID badges and uniforms and arrive in an easily identifiable vehicle for your safety, security and piece of mind. Our employees treat each client’s home or business as if it were his or her own. Owner Eric Stewart, originally from Tennessee, is a 20-year honorably discharged Army veteran who proudly served throughout the United States and abroad. Upon retiring from the military, Eric pursued other passions but dreamed of one day owning his own business. After numerous hours of research on various franchises, he decided on Window Genie. He explains, “Window Genie was unique to me in that it has numerous revenue streams, never gets boring and is challenging.”

The company also promotes ‘Windows for Wishes (W4W),’ a charitable venue that allows us to give back to our community. We support a variety of causes and organizations by offering special discounts or free service, including The Fisher House, animal shelters, disabled veterans, active duty service members, veterans, senior citizens and special needs children. Window Genie is a family based business hinged on fairness, institutional training, respect for creativity and independent thinking. We feel these attributes are key to becoming a local service name you can trust. Our mission is to provide a unique, all-in-one professional service to our clients. We are sensitive to the privacy of your home and the profession of your business, and cater to the curb appeal and aesthetics of your most prized possession, one establishment at a time. Call today for a free estimate!  Window Genie | 254.526.4847 | killeen.windowgenie.com

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KILLEEN CHAMBER | CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Calendar of Events

May

June

July

August

3 WEDNESDAY

1 THURSDAY

6 THURSDAY

1 TUESDAY

Chamber Networking & News (CNN)

Young Professionals Monthly Social

Young Professionals Monthly Social

Flavors of Central Texas

4 THURSDAY

8 THURSDAY

20 THURSDAY

Young Professionals Monthly Social

Chamber Update

Third Thursday Mixer at Texas A&M University-Central Texas

5 FRIDAY

15 THURSDAY

Leadercast 2017

Third Thursday Mixer at First National Bank Texas

6 SATURDAY

15 THURSDAY

National Small Business Week

Young Professionals Monthly Business Luncheon

11 THURSDAY

28 WEDNESDAY

Second Thursday Rodeo Mixer at Killeen Special Events Center

Flash Networking

20 THURSDAY

18 THURSDAY Young Professionals Monthly Business Luncheon

24 WEDNESDAY Flash Networking

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Young Professionals Monthly Social

17 THURSDAY Third Thursday Mixer

Young Professionals Monthly Business Luncheon

17 THURSDAY

26 WEDNESDAY

Young Professionals Monthly Business Luncheon

Flash Networking

23 WEDNESDAY Flash Networking

17 WEDNESDAY Non-Profit Council Open House

3 THURSDAY

Save the Date! SEPTEMBER 21 2017 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP BANQUET


If you use different kinds of printing to reach your customers,

INTEG DOES provide more options than any other printer in Central Texas.

JOIN US Aug 1, 2017

2335 Industrial Blvd., Suite A | Temple, TX 76504 254.778.9148 | integdoes.com

The Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce provides vision, leadership and support to business and community leaders to create economic prosperity. Join Today!

killeenchamber.com 254-526-9551 info@killeenchamber.com

A showcase of area food sponsored by the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce.

Register today to be a vendor at Flavors of Central Texas! Contact Rebekah Moon, rebekah@killeenchamber.com or 254.526.9551. GREATER KILLEEN BUSINESS QUARTERLY

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Killeen Chamber

RIBBON CUTTINGS & GROUNDBREAKINGS

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ERIKA MATEUS, LMSW

FAST SIGNS OF KILLEEN

254.247.5266 erikamateus.com

507 Priest Dr. Killeen, TX 76541 254.290.5756 fastsigns.com/2146

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CONTACT THE KILLEEN CHAMBER AT 254.526.9551 TO SCHEDULE YOUR OWN RIBBON CUT TING OR GROUNDBREAKING.

GOU LAKAY

H&R BLOCK

810 N. WS Young Dr. Ste. 102 Killeen, TX 76543 254.307.7771 goulakay.com

1056 S. Fort Hood St. Killeen, TX 76541 254.526.4888 hrblock.com

LIFE MOVES YOGA

LUV 2 PLAY

2710 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 104 Killeen, TX 76549 254.702.5198 lifemovesyoga.com

1310 E. Stan Schleuter Lp. Killeen, TX 76542 254.213.1191 luv2play.com

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CONTACT THE KILLEEN CHAMBER AT 254.526.9551 TO SCHEDULE YOUR OWN RIBBON CUTTING OR GROUNDBREAKING.

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QUALITY PERSONAL CARE, INC.

TAMUCT HERITAGE HALL

2707 E. Stan Schueter Lp. Ste. 105 Killeen, TX 76542 254.432.6858 qpcare.com

1001 Leadership Place Killeen, TX 76549 254.519.5421 tamuct.org

WE DELIVER KILLEEN

ZAXBY’S RESTAURANT

254.383.9177 wedeliverkilleen.com

2150 Clear Creek Rd. Killeen, TX 76549 zaxbys.com

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Killeen Chamber

E V E N T P H O T O S

1

3

5

2

4

6

1-2. DECEMBER - Home for the Holidays Mixer, 3. DECEMBER - Staff Door Decorating Contest Winner, 4. DECEMBER - Young Professionals Social at Vive Les Arts, 5. DECEMBER - Staff Holiday Photo, 6. DECEMBER - Chamber Tree Decorated by Walmart Neighborhood Market Clear Creek

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Killeen Chamber 7

E V E N T P H O T O S

8

10

9

12 11

7. JANUARY - Business of the Month- Jersey Mike’s, 8. JANUARY - Casual Friday-H&R Block, 9. JANUARY - FOG Seminar, 10. JANUARY - Flash Networking at El Chico, 11-12. JANUARY - Jimmie Don Aycock Farewell Dinner

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Killeen Chamber

E V E N T P H O T O S

13

15

17

14

16

18

13. JANUARY - Leadership Killeen Education Day, 14. JANUARY - Young Professionals Luncheon, 15. FEBRUARY - 8th Grade Career Day, 16. FEBRUARY - Young Professionals Social, 17. FEBRUARY - Casual Friday, 18. FEBRUARY - Chamber Networking & News

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Killeen Chamber

E V E N T P H O T O S

19

21

23

20

22

24

19. FEBRUARY - Young Professionals Morning AMbitions at K-Town Coffee Bean, 20-22. FEBRUARY - Legislative Tour, 23-24. FEBRUARY - Mixer at Grace Christian Center

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Killeen Chamber

E V E N T P H O T O S

25

26

27

28

29

25-27. FEBRUARY - Regional High School Career Day, 28. FEBRUARY - Young Professionals Luncheon, 29. FEBRUARY - Business of the MonthCinergy Cinemas

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Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce PO Box 548 - Killeen, TX 76540 killeenchamber.com

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PA I D Killeen, TX Permit No. 16

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

May 5, 2017 8 am Grace Christian Center

Advance registration required. Group tickets available now at event.leadercast.com/location/killeenchamber Contact Rebekah Moon for sponsorship information Rebekah@killeenchamber.com | 254.526.9551

2017 Fort Hood Guide  

The 2017 Fort Hood Guide gives an in-depth look at the largest economic driver in the state of Texas, Fort Hood. This issue features "The Gr...

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