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2016 newcomers guide

KilleenChamber.com

featuring The Relevance of Public Policy page 04 More Than Just a Sticker PAGE 06 Young Professionals energize community Development

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come Here And

livE A little

Upcoming Events / Business Spotlights / Community Resources


PREPARE for a new career or to transfer to a university. LEARN in the classroom in Killeen and on Fort Hood or online. GET A HEAD START with dual credit in local high schools. VISIT US ON THE WEB AT

WWW.CTCD.EDU

LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE WITH A BACHELOR’S OR MASTER’S DEGREE FROM AN ACCREDITED REGIONAL UNIVERSITY COMMITTED TO YOUR SUCCESS


Message from the president

These Changing Times Chris Mead, writing in The Magicians of Main Street, America and its Chambers of Commerce, 1768-1945, described chambers of commerce as follows: “Chambers in the United States stand at the crossroads of business and politics. These institutions came into existence primarily to safeguard and extend opportunities for business. Their specific missions vary according to their community, leadership and laws. Moreover, especially in the past century, many chambers’ roles have been broadened from precisely targeting of business needs to community-wide initiatives that only have an indirect, although sometimes powerful, impact on business: K-12 education improvement, job training, attracting talented young people to town or promoting affordable housing. The chamber of commerce has morphed, to A successful catalyst some extent, into a chamber of community, although the has the ability to business watchdog vs. community benefactor dichotomy has existed spark significant and in some form since the very sustainable changes, beginning of this institution.”

inspire possibilities and accelerate results.

So it is with the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce. Our mission is to provide vision, -Vishwas Chavan leadership and support to community and business leaders to create economic vitality. Our job is to facilitate the shaping of this community’s future. To be sure, many are involved in creating this community’s future. It remains to the chamber to be the catalyst, the convener, the facilitator where the public and private sectors come together to make great things happen for us all. It is a responsibility that we take very seriously here. We want to be a “chamber of community.” Challenges lie ahead. The world has changed. Specialization and consolidation continue to transform in the market. The large are getting larger. The small are getting smaller. We will expand and compete in a global economy. Technology will continue to develop to move information more quickly. Generational values will continue to evolve. But that does not mean opportunity will cease. On the contrary, opportunity will beat a path to our door if we are willing to set the status quo aside and become uncomfortable on behalf of the future. Our plan of work includes programs in Investor Services, Business Development, Military Relations, Public Policy, Communications, Talent Development and Place Design. All are focused on helping this community reach our full economic potential. And, what potential it is. With Interstate 14 on the way, a new education model being created through the collaboration of Killeen Independent School District, Central Texas College and Texas A&M UniversityCentral Texas, an enduring military installation, a great location in a business-friendly state and an abundance of available talent, we have a bright future. We hope that you will get involved with our Chamber of Commerce. Through that involvement, we hope you will lead, transform and strengthen your business and our community. When you do, we will all be better off — in these changing times.

Chamber Leadership Chairman of the Board Sonja Havens First National Bank

Sector Chair Communications TaNeika DriverMoultrie City of Killeen

GKCC President/CEO John Crutchfield, III

Guest Contributers IVAN Geter

MTCI

BARBARA MERLO

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE

Editor Jennifer Hetzel

Art Director Lesley Rocque

Printing integ

For more information on the Killeen area or the Killeen

Chamber of Commerce:

KilleenChamber.com KilleenTexas.gov Facebook.com/ KilleenChamber For Advertising, Contact Nichole Anderson, nichole@killeenchamber.com © 2016 Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce 1 Santa Fe Plaza, P.O. Box 548 Killeen, Texas 76540 Main (254) 526-9551 Fax (254) 526-6090

Author john crutchfield President, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

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Title,Company


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Contents Special Features

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Message from the President These Changing Times

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The Relevance of Public Policy

How the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce advocates on behalf of our investors in the public policy arena

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More Than Just a Sticker

What sets OUR Chamber apart from others?

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Young Professionals energize community Development Smart communities know that young professionals play a key role in retaining talent

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Community Colleges Uniquely Positioned to Address Worker Skills Gap

A look at the economic implications of the skills gap and how to close it

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MTCI is Building Strong Warriors

MTCI is helping Soldiers recover and grow in the face of pressure and changing demands

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Business Spotlights First National Bank Chick-fil-A Killeen

Killeen Chamber

2016 Newcomers Guide

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Calendar of Events

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Bell County Overview

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Ribbon Cutting Photos

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Welcome to Killeen

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Member Profiles

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City Services

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Killeen Chamber Event Photos

Employment

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Business

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Education

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Health care

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Nonprofits

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Shopping & Dining

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Housing

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Arts & Culture

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Recreation

On the cover Airborne Operations U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Javier Orona

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Special Feature | Public Policy

Survival of any member-based organization depends on their relevance to their members. Members judge relevance by the value they get from the organization in exchange for their investment. Survey after survey from around the country indicates that investors in chambers of commerce expect the organization to advocate on their behalf especially in the public policy arena.

The RELEVANCE of

PUBLIC POLICY John Crutchfield III President/CEO Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

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Special Feature | Public Policy

Chambers of commerce in the United States operate almost exclusively as non-profit entities under Section 501 (c) (6) of the IRS Tax Code. Unlike charities, organized under Section 501 (c) (3) of the IRS Tax Code, chambers of commerce have the authority under state and federal tax rules to represent their stakeholders in public policy issues. They may lobby and take positions on actual or proposed legislation, subject to local, state and federal laws.

If Fort Hood and the region offer an effective and efficient investment for the U.S. Army, those investments should increase. On the other hand, if the installation or region is deficient in some regard so that Fort Hood is not a good investment choice for the Army, it falls to regional leaders, working in concert with those who run the installation, to resolve the deficiency. All the Chamber seeks is a level playing field.

It is through this organization’s public policy efforts that leaders work with others to facilitate the creation of a public education system that works in partnership with the business community to prepare students to be successful in the workplace. Public policy interests of the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce are focused on the economy and achieving specific chamber goals. Chief among the economic interest include support for the free enterprise system. Dr. Milton Friedman once said, “The great virtue of a free market system is that it does not care what color people are; it does not care what their religion is; it only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy. It is the most effective system we have discovered to enable people who hate one another to deal with one another and help one another.” It is the greatest wealth producer in the history of mankind and, when unencumbered by excessive regulation, produces a higher standard of living and more economic equality for people than any other economic system. This is because free markets reward people for making decisions that produce value for themselves and others. The challenge is that government planners make their living, for the most part, by creating regulations that, they believe, serve to protect people from themselves. The Greater Killeen Chamber believes that most people are capable of making decisions in their own personal interest. In other words, most individuals should be free to protect themselves. The free market system is the economic backbone of our nation. And, it is the economic backbone of local businesses that drive stability and prosperity. Chamber investors expect this organization to help safeguard their businesses by confronting bad laws and regulations and supporting good laws and regulations. So, it falls to this chamber of commerce, and others around the country, to intervene on behalf of free markets on an almost constant basis. Accomplishment of many chamber goals, which are embodied in the Plan of Work, are dependent, in many cases, on successful public policy efforts. The Chamber cannot protect and grow Fort Hood, for example, without engaging those responsible for this nation’s defense. The Chamber needs access to those who make decisions affecting Fort Hood. It falls to the Chamber to make the case effectively to them, based on facts, so that Fort Hood thrives.

It is through this organization’s public policy efforts that leaders work with others to facilitate the creation of a public education system that works in partnership with the business community to prepare students to be successful in the workplace. This is in everyone’s interest. In fact, it is imperative if we are to compete in a global economy. Nor can we produce collaborative, cost-effective solutions to regional infrastructure challenges without robust public policy programs. As our state and region continues to grow, many of the challenges and opportunities of the future will come in the area of infrastructure— things like highways and water. It is through the relationships created in public policy that large local and regional infrastructure projects can be accomplished. The creation of Interstate 14, which will attract private investment and grow jobs, comes to mind. Effective public policy will lead to productive public-private partnerships. This will lead to sustained economic growth and economic vitality over the long haul. A critical element to all of this, and a by-product of good public policy, is the election of business-minded individuals to office who are knowledgeable of the community’s needs. Well-qualified elected officials at all levels can develop equitable tax and fee structures, regulations and administrative procedures that serve to promote positive economic growth in the region. Weather the issues are national, state or regional, the trend among those aiming to influence and change policy is unquestionably toward greater reliance on effective grass roots lobbying, built around networks of motivated, local, allied organization. Former U.S. House Majority Leader Tip O’Neill was right. “All politics is local.” Selling ideas on Main Street is at least as important as selling them in Austin or Washington DC.

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B u s i n e ss S e r v i c e s

More than just a R E B M E M Sticker Chambers of commerce across the country come in a variety of forms. Some are tourist-oriented focusing on attracting visitors who travel to a destination city to shop, stay and play. Other chambers support community causes such as scholarships and fundraisers through golf tournaments and chili cook-offs. The Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce is an economic development-driven organization with a mission to “provide vision, leadership and support business and community leaders to create economic prosperity.” In other words, we are more than just a sticker. The previous Chamber model had a one-size-fits-all structure where members “joined” based on the fair share system.

Flat-rate membership dues were modified for businesses with more employees, but most everyone received the same benefits across the board no matter the amount of their dues. The shift in the Chamber world has been toward a trend to redefine their role based on their community’s unique qualities. This is important because as technology has transformed industries across the globe, it

Sponsored by

Centex Technologies centextech.com 254-213-4740 6

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

LESLY RASCOE Vice President Investor Services Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

has also transformed how we do business and how Chambers can effectively meet the needs of members. Like any business, Chambers must be willing to evolve in the marketplace in order to remain relevant. We want to expand beyond that at the Greater Killeen Chamber with a determined program of work developed with a keen awareness of what our investors require to grow and prosper.


Special Feature | Business Services

A year from now you will wish you had started today. -Author, Karen Lamb

Creating value through programs, connections and councils, a volunteerpowered Chamber of Commerce provides synergy and purpose for members of all sizes and genres. The Chamber board identified Military Relations, Public Policy, Community Development and Economic Development as the four key areas where investors can engage with each other and the community at large: Community Development When we think regionally and act locally, we collaboratively create a place where people want to live. Military Relations When we promote the importance of Fort Hood, we can take advantage of opportunities to expand its footprint. Economic Development When we attract new retail and conduct aggressive business recruitment and expansion programs, we develop a future that is primed for business. Public Policy

When we nurture relationships with elected officials and develop legislative agendas advantageous to our community, we have a more powerful voice before lawmakers. That’s the distinctive benefit of investing time and resources in an economic-driven Chamber. By design, our investor-leaders have developed councils where these focus points can constantly be at the forefront of our Plan of Work. The Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce Leadership Councils bring leaders together to address the issues that impact the community. The Lead and Killeen 2.0 investment structure opens the door for investors to have a seat at the table and be part of the conversation. These higher-level efforts are what we mean we say this Chamber is “More than just a sticker!” We are future-focused and forwardthinking. We embrace change and project what we can do to be effective now and in the coming years.

Military Relations Council

Non-Profit Council

Chair: TaNeika Driver-Moultrie City of Killeen Shared knowledge, training and access for more effective non-profits.

Public Education Council

Chair: Becky Holcomb First Texas Bank Cause business to collaborate with Killeen Independent School District, Central Texas College and Texas A&M University-Central Texas to improve the student product and support schools.

Retail Council

Chair: Jay Early Owner, Chick-fil-A (Killeen) Network and share ideas among similar businesses.

at the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce John Crutchfield III President and CEO Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce

Serves as the chief of staff for the Killeen Economic Development Corporation and the Killeen Industrial Foundation.

Phyllis Gogue Vice President Economic Development Heather Nusbaum, CMA Vice President Finance and Administration Military Relations Council Public Policy Council Public Education Council

Lesly Rascoe Vice President Investor Services IT Council

Rebekah Moon Director of Investor Services

Welcome Council | Retail Council Non-Profit Council

Nichole Anderson Membership Relations Manager Memberships | Sponsorships Advertising

Leadership Councils Chair: Mark Chockran Collaborate with others to ensure that Fort Hood is fully utilized.

Who’s Who

Public Policy Council

Dr. Marc Nigliazzo Texas A&M University-Central Texas Become the voice of business and cultivate legislative support for the successful implementation of each of our priorities.

Welcome Council

Chair: Tanida Mullen Killeen Civic & Conference Center Facilitate the transition of new members into active participants in the Chamber and business community.

IT Council

Chair: Greg Burress First Community Services Provide unique value to investors with technology components to their business and position the Chamber as regional leader in technology.

Jennifer Hetzel Director of Strategic Communications Advertising/Publicity Annual Membership Banquet Greater Killeen Young Professionals

Marty Janczak Business Resource Center Business Counselor Alysia Perkins Business Resource Center Business Counselor Daniel Han Accounting Assistant Katherine Rutecki Project Manager

Greater Killeen Young Professionals Social Media

Shashawnah Smith Program Manager Military Relations Council Public Policy Council Public Education Council

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Special Feature | Place Design

Young Professionals energize Community Development April 2016 “Meet the Candidates” Social at Killeen Power Sports.

Young professional (YP) groups have been emerging in cities across the country at an increasing rate during the past two decades. These groups meet a social need for those who participate, anchoring people to their community by providing a sense of belonging. They also fulfill a greater purpose for the communities in which they exist and prove invaluable to community development. Communities that recognize the economic benefits of an engaged young professional population will ultimately be more successful in the long run.

The Economics In her book “Live First, Work Second,” futurist and founder of Next Generation Consulting Rebecca Ryan writes about an economic model that focuses on improving communities in order to attract young talent rather than jobs. She explains, “Cities are for people. Not cars. Not interstates. Not parking lots…the next generation sees and values cities differently than previous generations did. To attract and retain the next generation of knowledge workers to your community, you must see your city through their eyes.” Previous economic development strategies focused on making cities attractive to businesses by providing incentives and infrastructure. This, she argues, is an outdated strategy—instead, cities should

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focus on making themselves attractive to talent, and the companies that want that talent will follow. So how do communities make themselves more appealing? One way is by encouraging the development of unique third spaces and stroll districts. Third spaces are places that aren’t home or work, where people spend their free time. Stroll districts are people-friendly areas with a high concentration of third spaces. YPs value diverse entertainment, dining and recreational options, so communities that encourage the creation of these spots will be more likely to have young talent relocate or stay. Another effective tactic for cities is fostering an inclusive environment. Diversity and low barriers to entry, or the ability to make a

difference without having to cut through a lot of red tape or break through an established power structure, are important to YPs. Communities that are unwelcoming of outsiders or that do not offer opportunities for new people to get involved will run off talent, and as a result, opportunities for growth.

Young Professionals Organizations Perhaps one of the most effective ways to attract young talent is to engage them. YPs want to be involved in the community, but they think and see the world differently than previous generations. Traditional service organizations often do not appeal to YPs, so new organizations are emerging specifically


Special Feature | Place Design

GKYP

CONCEPT STATEMENT The mission of the GKYP is to connect young professionals in a way that grows individuals, the organization and the community. through...

SOCIALS Building relationships and sharing ideas so that we achieve growth as an organization and as individuals while having a good time.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The GKYP strives to make Killeen a place where young professionals want to live, work and play. to cater to this demographic. YPs want to be involved, but they don’t join groups just to be on a membership roster. They want to be part of a group that aligns with their beliefs, and that allows them to feel they are making a difference. Effective YP groups focus their programming on issues that are important to their members, such as career development, volunteer opportunities and networking. Often, these groups are started by chambers of commerce that recognize the importance of an engaged young workforce. They understand that traditional chamber programs may not appeal to this demographic. Many YPs are just beginning

their careers, so their needs and priorities are different from established businesses leaders. YP groups allow members to enjoy and learn from their peers while also connecting them to members of the business community they may not otherwise have access to. Chambers are uniquely suited to this task, offering access to key information and individuals. These groups also enjoy the credibility of an established, well-respected organization and an experienced staff. Chambers, in turn, benefit from an increase in active, qualified leaders who can potentially serve on their boards and committees.

Inspiring and educating young professionals by connecting them with community leaders.

COMMUNITY SERVICE Connecting young professionals in service opportunities that create a community in which they want to live, work and play.

MEMBERSHIP Engaging and integrating young professionals in a way that benefits the organization, the individual and the community. so that... The GKYP can demonstrate the transformational potential of a community where young professionals thrive where they choose to live.

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Special Feature | Article

The Greater Killeen Young Professionals are engaged in the community through the Rock the Foundation Casino Night (top photos) that raises scholarship money for Central Texas College (bottom right) and Texas A&M University-Central Texas and through park clean ups (bottom left) that make the community a better place to live and play.

Greater Killeen Young Professionals In our own community, the Greater Killeen Young Professionals (GKYP) offers area residents a myriad of opportunities to meet others and make a positive, lasting impact. The group is composed primarily of 20 to 40 somethings but welcomes anyone who is young at heart with a passion for community and individual development. President Ashley Whitworth explains, “The GKYP strives to make Killeen a place where young professionals want to live, work and play. I think the organization does a great job of bringing area young professionals together to highlight what a vibrant community we live in. As a leader in this organization, I take great pride in putting together programs that benefit our members and our community, such as our annual scholarship fundraiser Rock the Foundation Casino Night. We couldn’t hold this event without the support of our community, both businesses and individuals.” 10

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

GKYP was formed in 2008 to give young professionals access to events and programs that would allow them to grow professionally and help grow the community. Currently, GKYP offers its members monthly and quarterly opportunities for networking, professional development, and community service. GKYP has made its presence known in the community through its premier annual event Rock the Foundation, a fundraiser that has helped raise more than $90,000 for scholarships since 2010. In 2016 alone, the group donated more than $16,000 to Central Texas College and Texas A&M UniversityCentral Texas. The organization has had a lasting impact on its members and the local community. Recently elected At-Large City Council Member Gregory Johnson states, “The Greater Killeen Young Professionals are key to mentoring, preparing, and equipping emerging leaders with the tools and resources they need to lead Killeen into its future. I have benefited both personally and

professionally from this organization through its many professional development and network building opportunities.” Young Professionals organizations like this are flourishing nationwide, and the communities that host them are better for it. Intentional community development that includes a strategy making their community appealing to young professionals and engaging them will go a long way in recruiting and retaining talent. For more information about the greater killeen young professionals, visit gkyp.org or contact info@gkyp.org.

JENNIFER HETZEL Director of Strategic Communications, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce


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Special Feature | Article

Ec o n o m i c D e v e l o pm e n t

SKILLS GAP

Community Colleges uniquely positioned to address worker skills gap

report by the Texas State Comptroller’s office in 2014 points to a skills gap but not necessarily where it might be expected. Interestingly, the gap appears to be greatest for “middle skill” jobs that may require certification but not necessarily a bachelor’s degree. Local community colleges, including Central Texas College, play a key role in filling the need for skilled workers for today’s technical jobs.1 Vacant jobs can cost companies hundreds of dollars a day in lost profits, research shows, and ultimately the job skills gap hurts America’s economic growth.

Fewer Americans have the experience or qualifications for these “middle skills” types of jobs. Chris Tilly, an economics professor at U.C.L.A. argues that too many Americans are going to college, fixated on the idea that a four-year college degree is the only way to make big bucks.

About 20 percent of all American jobs are now in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, with half of those open to workers who don’t have a four-year college degree ... The demand is there—especially in high tech fields. About 20 percent of all American jobs are now in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, with half of those open to workers who don’t have a four-year college degree, according to recent analysis by the Brookings Institution. Many of these “middle skill” stem jobs are in construction, installation, manufacturing and health care. They include registered nurses mechanics, carpenters, welders and electricians. STEM jobs that don’t require a four-year degree pay about $53,000 on average, about 10 percent higher than non-STEM jobs available to people with similar education backgrounds.

“I can’t solve the problems that my plumber and my electrician can solve,” said Tilly. In those jobs, “you can make a fair amount of money.” According to the Boston Consulting Group, San Antonio was one of five U.S. metro areas to have significant or severe worker shortages in 2012. The highest-need occupations were welders, machinists and industrial-machinery mechanics—many of which pay above Texas’ median annual salary and require certificates, apprenticeships or associate (two-year) degrees.

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Special Feature | Economic Development

Workers in existing jobs also must invest in additional training and education as technology evolves and as workforce needs expand and contract. Many mid-career adults are faced with choosing a new field requiring additional study or risk being underemployed. Fortunately, community colleges specialize in the type of short-term training and education that can quickly improve marketability for a job.

Education and Training as a Solution The Comptroller’s report focuses on the need for ongoing skills training of workers and emphasizes that the gap will continue until Texas increases overall educational attainment. The report outlines four paths to address the skills gap in Texas, including college degrees, career and technical education, industry-based certifications and apprenticeships. Three out of four can be found at Central Texas College.

A College Degree Eleven of the 15 highest-demand jobs require an associate or bachelor’s degree. Unfortunately, most high school students do not graduate “college ready” and only one third of those who start college finish with a degree. A 2014 report from the American Institutes for Research found that students who attend an Early College High School program (ECHS) are more likely to enroll in college and earn a degree. Central Texas College and the Killeen Independent School District began just such a partnership this year with 150 carefully selected ninth graders and will expand the program next year to include 300 freshmen and an additional 150 sophomores, bringing the total enrolled to 600. As these students progress, the focus is on collegereadiness and completion of up to 60 college credit hours while in high school.

Two-year degrees in medical and technology fields should not be overlooked as a path to a successful career. In fact, nursing positions requiring an associate degree are not only among the fastest growing but also rank among the highest paying in Texas. Community colleges, including Central Texas College, focus on these two-year degrees designed to provide immediate entry into the workforce in addition to providing an affordable alternative for the first two years of academic work toward a bachelor’s degree.

Career and Technical Education Thanks to the passage of House Bill 5 in 2013, high schools can now place a renewed emphasis on career and technical education and build connections from high school to college. Through Career and Technical Education (CTE) in high school students may earn marketable skills and certifications prior to graduation for immediate entry into the workforce. The Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program also gives high school students a chance to receive credit at Central Texas College for taking certain enhanced technical courses during high school. This saves time and money towards additional certifications or a degree. Many exiting veterans and adults who want to advance or retrain find themselves at a community college in a CTE program. Demand is so strong in some fields that CTC has industry partners who are willing to hire students upon completion of their academic programs as well as pay for the cost of the coursework. To date, the college has programs for veterans with industry partners in truck driving, welding and pipe-fitting and Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Many programs of study offer “stackable” certificate programs designed to build employability quickly and then continue to build skills through multiple certificates and eventually an associate degree.

Dual enrollment programs, offered in local high schools through Central Texas College, also provide an opportunity for students to build confidence in their ability to succeed in college.

Two-year degrees in technology and medical fields can be easily attainable through local colleges and even earned while a student is still in high school making them employable immediately upon graduation.

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Special Feature | Economic Development

6200 West Central Texas Expwy Killeen, TX 76549 1-800-792-3348 (Outside of Texas) 1-800-223-4760 (Within Texas) ctcd.edu

Industry-Based Certifications Central Texas College offers several options for this type of shortterm technical training. Through CTC’s Continuing Education department, non-credit career training options include computer and medical certifications and licensure preparation programs. The Licensed Massage Therapy (LMT) program can be completed in seven months and jobs are waiting for students starting at $20 per hour and up. CTC credit coursework also focuses on certifications, including CISCO certification preparation through the Electronics Department, preparation for multiple industry certifications though the Computer Science Department, and licensure programs for nursing, Emergency Medical Technology and Medical Lab Technician.

With entry-level jobs increasingly hard to come by for a graduate from a four-year degree program in a non-technical field, industry certifications and licensures are increasingly important to landing a job. The majority of nursing students at Central Texas College are returning students with a college degree in another field of study. Community colleges also work closely with employers and with the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) to stay focused on instruction leading to high demand careers. Small businesses with fewer than 100 employees have access to free workforce training at CTC through the Texas Workforce Commission’s Skills for Small Business program. Through the Veteran and Industry Partnership (VIP), veterans receive free training to land jobs in the state’s most high-demand industries. The initiative, which brings together industry associations, local Workforce Solutions partners and community colleges to develop training in key industry occupations for veterans throughout Texas.

Barbara Merlo Director of Marketing & Outreach Central Texas College

Workforce: Capitalizing on our Human Assets (Tx State Comptroller rpt 2014). comptrollertexas.gov/specialrpt/workforce/96-1756.pdf

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Special Feature | Article

M i l i ta r y R e l at i o n s

MTCI is

Building Warriors Strong

Life can be unbelievably difficult at times, particularly for our military families forced to handle unique demands such as pre-deployment anxiety, deployment separations, post-deployment adjustments and frequent moves. Building resilience is key to managing these challenges. One Killeen Chamber member, Management and Training Consultants, Inc. (MTCI), is making significant strides in providing specialized training to the Soldiers at Fort Hood on withstanding, recovering and growing in the face of pressure and changing demands.

Headquartered in Manassas, Virginia, the MTCI Lone Star Branch is located in downtown Killeen Texas. It is a satellite location that is part of the company’s training division. The primary mission of the Lone Star office is to coordinate and provide Resiliency training to the Soldiers assigned to Fort Hood. It has been providing this training since 2011 through Central Texas College starting out through the Warrior Transition Brigade. This training was helping Soldiers who were on profile for medical reasons and could not perform their daily duties. During this time, 113 Soldiers were trained during four half-day workshops. As the population at the Warrior Transition Brigade decreased, MTCI looked to create a workshop that could help all Soldiers on Fort Hood deal with stress by providing resiliency techniques. In 2013, MTCI formed a partnership with Variety, the Children’s Charity of Texas, to

introduce a new training workshop called Building a Strong Warrior (BSW). BSW is a one-day workshop designed to give Soldiers essential tools for dealing with stress. Since its introduction, MTCI has conducted nine Building a Strong Warrior workshops that have resulted in the training of more than 200 Soldiers. One battalion has been using the workshop as part of their mentorship program for junior enlisted Soldiers. Another battalion has used the BSW workshop as part of its team-building exercises in platoonsized elements. These workshops have helped Soldiers with emotion regulation and reduced serious incident reports within the units. The workshops have received tremendous reviews, and some Soldiers have attended more than one course because they enjoyed the class and asked to come a second time. Due to the overwhelming success of the Building a Strong Warrior workshop, Soldiers frequently asked if their spouses or

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MTCI Lone Star Regional Office 205 East Avenue D Killeen, Texas 76541 (254) 213-5948 mtci.us

family members could attend the training. They felt that their spouses could benefit from what they were learning during the class. Due to the many requests made by the Soldiers in early 2015, MTCI introduced the Building a Strong Family workshop


Special Feature | Military Relations

to the 2nd Battalion 20th Field Artillery. This workshop is designed to give family members essential tools for dealing with the stress put on military families. The first two classes conducted with 12 couples received outstanding reviews. Some of the comments made were, “I loved it, the ropes course was amazing, great bonding experience, and this class created trust.” MTCI and Variety continue to provide the Building a Strong Warrior and Building a Strong Family workshops for units on Fort Hood. In 2016, MTCI’s goal is to bring as many workshops as possible to the 1st Cavalry Division Soldiers and provide essential tools for dealing with stress to Soldiers while they continue to provide their great service to this nation. MTCI is an ISO 9001:2008, woman-owned small business, specializing in federal and military recruiting, retention and human resources personnel management, analysis, assessment and design. It delivers innovative and value-added solutions to assist its clients to reach their maximum performance and potential for excellence. MTCI has deep military roots and is comprised of more than 73% military veterans, 27% combat veterans, 38% disabled veterans, 18% spouses of military veterans and 59% of associates completed full military careers. It embodies its founding principle

Retired Army Sergeant Major Sam Kanouse founded MTCI to provide Soldiers the tools to handle the stress of military life.

of Maximizing Human Potential® that was echoed in the life of MTCI Visionary retired Army Sergeant Major Sam Kanouse who served in the Army National Guard. Sgt. Maj. Kanouse entered the service as a member of the United States Army after graduating from Killeen High School in 1975. He served his country faithfully as a non-commissioned officer for 25 years. He retired in 2000 as the Sergeant Major of the Recruiting and Retention Division at the National Guard Bureau in Washington, D.C. During his military career he touched

many lives through his sterling and caring leadership. After retiring from the Army, he founded MTCI. Sgt. Maj. Kanouse was a dreamer, but more importantly, he put his energy and talents behind his visions making them a reality. MTCI is now led by his wife, Dalena Kanouse.

Ivan Geter Training Developer, Management and Training Consultants, Inc (MTCI)

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Special Feature | BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

Business Spotlight

First National Bank Texas

Financial Service Center

First National Bank Texas was founded in 1901 in Killeen, only 19 years after the city was established. From our humble beginnings, the bank has grown to more than $1.4 billion in assets and operates in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona at more than 300 locations as First National Bank Texas (FNBT), First Convenience Bank (FCB) or First Community Mortgage (FCM). In addition to 11 banking centers in the Killeen area, FNBT operates one of the largest VA/FHA Mortgage lenders in the Greater Killeen market as First Community Mortgage. FCM has served the area for more than 20 years, helping thousands of customers realize the American dream of homeownership. As a market leader in VA/ FHA loan origination, FCM has assisted thousands of military families, veterans and other community members with their homebuying needs. As FNBT continues to grow and serve customers across our multi-state footprint, we are committed to providing a combination of modern banking conveniences and old-fashioned service. In support of this commitment, FNBT deployed its first-ever Financial Service Center (FSC) in Killeen. “We are always looking for ways to better serve our customers,” said Bobby Hoxworth, President and CEO of FNBT. “We are so excited that the first of our Financial Service Centers opened here in Killeen where our

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

company was founded more than a century ago.” Convenience is the backbone of our business model, and our customers count on FNBT to deliver the most efficient and costeffective tools and services to assist them in managing their financial matters. The iTM, or Interactive Teller Machine and Online Self Service Kiosks at our new Financial Service Center provide customers the flexibility to bank around their schedule. With just a tap of the screen, a highly skilled virtual banker is available to assist customers with their banking and account service needs. The Killeen market has experienced significant growth in recent years that has precipitated the demand for consumer lending. With the increasing population in the area, auto, mortgage, home equity and home improvement loan needs are continuing to increase. The Financial Service Counselors at our FSC are available to support the consumer credit needs of our customers in

First National Bank Texas Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender NMLS# 402924 1stnb.com

the Killeen market. Whether it is an auto loan or a mortgage loan, our counselors are equipped to fully support those seeking competitively priced consumer loan products. The FSC is equipped to handle not only the complex financial services our customers demand but also the basic day-to-day account transactions such as making deposits and withdrawing funds in a fully automated environment. An onsite service concierge is available six days a week to direct customers to an onsite counselor or automated support system to assist them. Hoxworth shared, “As we approach the one-year anniversary of our first FSC, we look forward to serving our customers in new and innovative ways for years to come all across our multi-state footprint.”


Business Spotlight

Chick-fil-A Killeen

1400 E Central Texas Expy, Killeen, TX 76541 (254) 680-5473 cfarestaurant.com/killeen

At Chick-fil-A at Killeen, we believe in providing our guests with the best restaurant experience we can. Our team prides itself on providing great tasting food and a friendly environment in which to enjoy it. Our restaurant is complete with comfortable dining areas, a great outdoor patio and an indoor playhouse for kids to enjoy. We’re also committed to providing Second Mile Service, and we strive to exceed your expectations. Whether it’s the friendly greeting as you walk in, the hot food or the clean dining environment, we hope you will have a great experience at our Restaurant. Chick-fil-A Killeen was opened in November 2010 by our operator, James “Jay” Early. Jay is a Texas native but much like many others in our community he traveled frequently due to his service in the Army National Guard. After his retirement, Jay became an Operator for Chick-fil-A. His employees describe him as fair, fun and motivating. Through Jay’s coaching leadership style, Chick-fil-A Killeen has been on track to become the best Chickfil-A period! When asked, Jay said that he was drawn to Chick-fil-A because of their strong values, successful business model and devoted community involvement. He enjoyed serving this country and also enjoys serving this community. Community is important to us, and it is our hope that we can enrich the lives of all of our customers. We enjoy getting to know our guests and look forward to opportunities to give back to this community who has so graciously supported us. The next time you’re in our restaurant, please introduce yourself. It would be our pleasure to meet you.

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Newcomers guide

Newcomer’s Guide Bell County Overview • Welcome to Killeen

Housing • Education • Arts & Culture • Employment Business • City Services • Shopping & Dining Healthcare • Nonprofits • GKYP

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly


Newcomers guide

Bell County Courthouse

Bell County Expo Center

Bell County Overview Located in the heart of Central Texas, Bell County offers a little bit of everything: big city amenities in Killeen, famous live music in Belton, eclectic offerings in Salado and various outdoor activities throughout the region. Bell County has something for everyone! Of the 254 Texas counties, Bell County is 16th largest with a population of more than 326,000 and is home to 12 communities. Killeen is the county’s largest city, followed by Temple, while Belton serves as the county seat. Bell County comprises some 1,051 square miles of land and 36.9 square miles of water. The area comprising Bell County has been the site of human habitation since at least 6000 B.C. and early settlers found a rich wildlife population of deer, wild turkeys, wolves, bear, buffalo, antelope, wild horses, ducks, geese, wild hogs and an occasional alligator. While the buffalo, bear, and hogs were hunted to extinction in the county in the 19th century and the last alligator was killed in 1908, Bell County still provides habitat for many wild species, including deer, antelope and numerous species of birds. The area was first settled in 1834, and the county was officially formed in 1850. By 1870, the county had a population of nearly 10,000.

The growth of the Fort Hood-Killeen area was matched by developments in the rest of the county. Bell County’s population shot up to 73,824 in 1950 and increased by 27 to 32 percent every decade thereafter to reach more than 310,000 in 2014. Belton, home to an estimated 19,000 people, is the county seat. New residents continue to be drawn to Belton by outstanding schools, great parks and the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, also located in Belton. Chartered by the Republic of Texas in 1845, the historic college campus provides both students and area residents with educational, cultural and recreational opportunities. Providing a natural backdrop to historic Belton are more than 160 acres of parkland throughout the city. Situated along Belton Lake, Belton is a city abounding with parks and recreational opportunities. Beautiful Nolan Creek meanders through central Belton where residents and visitors can enjoy a walk along the Nolan Creek Hike and Bike Trail.

Bell County is a truly amazing place. Temple boasts the county’s second largest population at more than 70,000. Like Killeen, Temple was also founded as a railroad town in the 1800s but has grown to become so much more than that. Today, Temple is known as one of the nation’s outstanding medical communities, boasting the only health and bioscience institute in Texas. Through the years, many members of the community have worked together to welcome visitors, attract conventions and market Temple as a central meeting point. While the village of Salado may be small, it has character the size of Texas. The city was an original stop for the stage lines and was home to the first coeducational college in the state. Today, this small community is the art hub of Bell County. The Main Street vicinity is a lively marketplace with more than 60 shops and galleries. Whether you’re looking for for fine art, antiques, pottery, crafts, collectibles, Americana, Southwestern or south-of-theborder decor, handcrafted furniture, trendy or exclusive fashions, gourmet foods and wines or a weekend get-a-way, you’ll find that special something in Salado. Bell County is a truly amazing place. With the recreational opportunities, strong economy, arts and culture and the wonderful people, this is a place you’ll want to call home!

Data source: The County Information Program, Texas Association of Counties; US Census Bureau

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Newcomers guide

Welcome to Killeen Downtown Killeen

Whether you are moving to the area or just passing through, we are excited to welcome you to our community. Killeen and the surrounding area is a unique place where you’ll find all the amenities of a large city but with small town Texas charm and plenty of Southern hospitality. Killeen was founded in 1882 as a shipping point for agricultural products grown in about a 20-mile radius. The town was platted by the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railroad and named for railroad official Frank P. Killeen. The town established all of the necessary services to serve a large rural area along with its own residents. Merchants, doctors, lawyers and other professionals came to town. Schools were established, a

government was put in place, and a chamber of commerce was organized to undertake the task of building an infrastructure for the busy agricultural center. By 1940, the population had climbed to 1,265. Then in 1942, the boom hit with the establishment of Camp Hood, a military post serving as a tank destroyer center. After the United States became involved in World

Lemonade Day is a popular community event that teaches youth how to operate their own business.

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

War II, a need developed for a military post to train Soldiers in tank destroyer tactics, and the area west and north of Killeen was chosen by the U.S. Army. The initial installation covered 160,000 acres and consumed most of the best farming country around Killeen so the economic base quickly shifted from agriculture to military. By 1950, the population had jumped to 7,045, and the Department of the Army declared the Killeen military installation as a permanent post, officially establishing Fort Hood. From that day forward, it was the city’s mission to make this area the best place for military families and civilians to live. With tremendous economic growth, Killeen spread its trade area to cover a 100Fort Hood Family Day


Newcomers guide

... the city’s mission is to make this area the best place for military families and civilians to live. mile stretch of Central Texas and continues to sustain heavy growth and development. During the decade of 2000 to 2010, the population grew by 45% and was estimated at more than 138,000 in 2015. Since its inception, Killeen has always strived to make this community the type of place residents and newcomers want to call home. We know what makes us unique. We are a proud military community. It has been said that the strength of our nation is the Army. The strength of the Army is the Soldier. The strength of the Soldier is the Family. And, the strength of the Family is the community. Here, members of the military and their families are not only defenders of our freedom, they are neighbors, friends and active participants in all that we do. We learn much from our military neighbors. We learn about loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity and personal courage. During the past decade, we have also learned much about resiliency—the ability to handle setbacks and still reach our full potential. This is a place where you can build a future. Killeen is located in one of the fastestgrowing economic corridors in the nation— an hour’s drive from Austin and just three hours from San Antonio, Houston and Dallas. This community boasts a growing, Zumba class for breast cancer awareness.

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Newcomers guide

Killeen is a place for people who appreciate strong American values and worldly connections where the character of the American Soldier permeates the community so that freedom has a face and pride is personal. diverse population that is younger and bettereducated than the state average, living in a tolerant community with low barriers to entry. We have a strong talent pool, especially the group of skilled veterans separating from the U.S. Army at Fort Hood and good public education through an established independent school district; accessible userfriendly community colleges and an upperlevel, stand-alone, state-supported university. This community also offers a robust transportation system consisting of excellent highways and rail and the Killeen-Fort Hood Regional Airport. While Killeen has many wonderful attributes, it is clear that the people are who make this place truly special. Because of Killeen’s close relationship and proximity to Fort Hood, we enjoy a diverse and unique population of talented individuals ready to welcome newcomers and visitors alike. Killeen is a place for people who appreciate strong American values and worldly connections where the character of the American Soldier permeates the community so that freedom has a face and pride is personal. Whether you are looking to make this your home or if you are just passing through, we are glad you are here. Thank you for reading our story in the pages of this magazine. For additional information about our community, visit KilleenChamber.com.

gkyp.org | info@gkyp.org

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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City Hall

Killeen-Fort Hood Regional Airport

City Services The city of Killeen was established May 15, 1882 and incorporated with the adoption of the City Charter in 1949. The charter established the council-manager form of government that the City of Killeen still operates under today. The mayor is the city’s chief elected officer and presides over a seven-member City Council, which sets policy. The city manager oversees all operations of city services. flights and provides hangar space. The city elects the mayor and three The Fly Killeen campaign reminds of its council members at large, travelers to always check Killeen meaning that every registered voter flights when booking travel for within the city limits may vote for convenience and competitive fares. these seats. Four council members represent specific geographical Recreation abounds at the city’s areas or districts of the city and are 18 parks, two recreation centers, elected exclusively by the registered the Tommie Harris Fitness center, voters in each respective district. two senior centers, two hike and Terms for the mayor and all council Mayor bike trails and Mickey’s Dog Park. members are two years, with a Jose Segarra For water enthusiasts, Killeen three-consecutive-term limitation offers the Family Aquatics Center and a spray for each office. The city holds nonpartisan pad. Golfers can enjoy Stonetree Golf Club, elections each May with staggered terms. which features 18 holes, practice facilities, a The mayor and at-large council members are pro shop and clubhouse. Killeen Civic and elected in even-numbered years, while the Conference Center and the Killeen Arts and four district council members are elected in Activities Center offer space for many types odd-numbered years. of events. Readers will find a large selection of printed and multimedia materials at two The City of Killeen has more than 1,200 public libraries. For those wanting to get employees focused on one mission: dedicated involved, volunteer services offers training, service—every day, for everyone. Under activities and volunteer matching throughout the leadership of the city manager, city the year. employees carry out the daily work of providing municipal services to Killeen’s Revitalization of the city’s historic downtown residents, businesses and visitors. has renovated seven blocks and brought new beauty and energy to the oldest part of Essential city services include police and fire Killeen. The first phase of the revitalization forces, water, sewer, street maintenance and effort replaced sidewalks and roadways and garbage and recycling services. The city also added new decorative crosswalks, lighting provides animal services including an animal and landscaping. New event plazas have shelter, city planning, code enforcement, brought first-time events into downtown and building inspections, human resources and a made annual events feel new again. Through municipal court. façade improvement grants, sign grants, tax Killeen-Fort Hood Regional Airport offers abatement opportunities and more, new and three commercial carriers and 11 departures existing businesses are investing. Downtown daily. Skylark Field accommodates private is bustling and ready for visitors. City Hall is at 101 N. College St. For more information, call (254) 501-7600 or visit KilleenTexas.gov and Facebook.com/KilleenTexas.

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Newcomers guide

Employment the Greater Killeen area achieved several state and national rankings for its strong economy and job opportunities:

61st in the nation and 7th in Texas on the POLICOM Corporation’s 2016 Economic Strength Rankings

Workforce Solutions of Central Texas Job seekers in the Killeen area have an excellent resource in Workforce Solutions of Central Texas, which offers career and job search assistance at no charge. They are staffed with job search professionals equipped with the latest technology, who can assist in all phases of job search, provide workrelated resources and assist in finding suitable employment. Labor market information is available in electronic and print format so job seekers can research in-demand occupations, pay scales, hot jobs for the future, company information, and other data on local, national and international labor markets. Workforce Solutions’ career center offers interest inventory software, as well as written material to assist in researching career options and explore the various careers of interest to job seekers. Workforce staff provides assistance in the preparation of essential tools such as resumes and cover letters, and they can assist with career searches to help job seekers form expectations about pay, working conditions,

135th in the nation in the Area Development 2015 “Strongest Prime Workforce Growth” category

6th in the nation in Wallethub.com’s 2015 Fastest Growing Cities

future employment demands, and needed skills. The information gained through a comprehensive search is also used to match job seekers with current job openings. Additionally, Workforce Solutions provides interactive workshops at no cost to assist with every aspect of the job search. Topics include: • Employers Hiring Immediately: Using WorkInTexas.com to connect with Jobs • How Do You Look on Paper: Perfecting Your Application • Ace the Interview and Land The Job

Workforce Solutions of Central Texas Grant-Funded Programs Offer Special Services and Training Options for:

• Soft Skills - The New Tie Breaker

• Veterans and exiting military

• Don’t Let Your Background Hold You Down

• Military spouses

• Social Media....Building Your Brand and Building Your Worth

• Laid-off Fort Hood contractor employees

• Resumes Guaranteed to Get Interviews

• Straight Talk From the Hiring Managers For assistance with a job search, visit the Workforce Solutions of Central Texas at 300 Cheyenne Drive in Killeen or online at WorkforceLink.com, or call (254) 200-2000.

• Workers laid-off in Bell, Coryell, Hamilton, Lampasas, Milam, Mills and San Saba Counties • Small businesses with fewer than 100 employees

Top 10 Major Employers in Greater Killeen Area

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III Corps & Fort Hood

39,067

Metroplex Health System

1,200

Military Defense Contractors & Others*

15,745

City of Killeen

1,100

Civilian Personnel Office

5,472

Teleperformance

1,700

KISD

6,000

ESP Incorporated

420

Central Texas College

1,487

Scott & White Clinic

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly


Newcomers guide

So you want to open your own business? The Central Texas Business Resource Center has won awards for Best community program & Exceptional Quality of Life Partnerships. The Central Texas Business Resource Center (BRC) is a collaboration of the Workforce Solutions of Central Texas, Central Texas College and the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce. The BRC provides highquality individual counseling, administrative assistance to potential and existing small business owners and free notary services. As a non-membership, non-profit program, the BRC is dedicated to providing services to all individuals requesting assistance in Central Texas. The BRC creates relationships with various businesses, organizations and government entities for support and recognition of our programs and activities. The BRC also establishes projects that can be co-sponsored with other resources to better serve the small business community such as the Central Texas College Enactus Program. Confidential counseling is available by walk in or appointment during business hours from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The BRC also partners with the Fort Hood Soldier for Life Transition Assistance Program (TAP) to offer workshops free of charge to soldiers transitioning out of the military. A similar program exists with the Carl R. Darnall Warrior in Transition Unit (WIT), which provides an additional career option once separated. Additional workshops are offered at the Killeen Workforce Center. Most workshops are no charge; however

some may have a fee of $5 to $10 with materials provided. Visit CentexBRC.com for additional information regarding workshop topics, dates and times.

The BRC counselors offer a variety of diverse experience and knowledge to assist businesses of different industries with growth. Examples of the diverse operating businesses assisted by the BRC include:

The BRC would like to highlight a local business that has grown using the services at the BRC from just a concept to reality and growing with amazing momentum.

Centex Landscaping Services: providing unique landscaping and prices to Central Texas.

Emerging Nexus Solutions

Tech Savvy: an electronic repair store in Gatesville servicing PC and mobile needs.

Founder Larry Suggs came to the BRC as a business owner in the computer industry. However, the computer industry proved to be very competitive and although he was getting business, it was not the amount of business he envisioned for Emerging Nexus. Seeking guidance at the BRC, an idea of starting a concierge service was born in November 2015. Through hard work and business counseling at the BRC, Suggs broke into a new market and business has increased tremendously. Emerging Nexus is provides a wide range of services for their customers, both corporations and individuals. These include personal maintenance taks such as daycare and dry cleaning drop off and pickup, grocery shopping and house sitting. The mission of the company is to provide the customer with whatever type of legitimate service they desire. For more information, visit EmergingNexus. com or follow on Facebook.

Bella Belly: offering an all-natural product line for postpartum mothers. Cathy’s Cleaning: A local cleaning service to better the look of any business or residence. MWP Training & Nutrition: A local fitness business ready to get customers in shape. The BRC is ready to serve you and your business. Let us help you get started. Facebook.com/centexbrc Twitter.com/centexbrc Workforce Solutions of Central Texas 300 Cheyenne Drive Room 101 Killeen Texas (254) 200-2001

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Newcomers guide

Education Killeen offers plentiful education opportunities from grade school through the graduate level. Young students have the opportunity to attend the Killeen Independent School District (KISD), and upon high school graduation, students can continue their education at the University of Mary Hardin Baylor (UMHB) in Belton or Central Texas College (CTC) in Killeen, which has partnered with Texas A&M University-Central Texas (TAMUCT) to provide a seamless path to earning an affordable bachelor’s degree. Both UMHB and TAMUCT also offer graduate level programs in several areas of study.

Killeen Independent School District Killeen Independent School District’s (KISD) achievements and purpose make it truly one of a kind in Texas and the nation. KISD serves Killeen, Fort Hood, Harker Heights, Nolanville and the surrounding rural areas. Approximately 45% of all KISD students are military-connected, and through targeted support programs, KISD helps meet the students’ social and emotional needs before, during and after deployments. KISD is the 26th largest school district in Texas with an enrollment of approximately 43,000 students. Students attend 32 elementary campuses (grades Pre-K–5), 11 middle schools (grades 6–8), four high schools (grades 9–12), two alternative schools, one career and technology center and several specialized campuses. Additionally, in 2015, Killeen ISD, in partnership with Central Texas College, opened an Early College High School that provides students the opportunity

to earn a high school diploma and an associate degree upon graduation. The district has again received the highest designation under the Financial Integrity Rating System of Texas (FIRST). Furthermore, under the state’s accountability system, the district continues to meet all required performance index targets. KISD employs 6,353 staff, including 2,873 classroom teachers and 739 administrative employees.

Central Texas College Central Texas College (CTC) opened its doors in Killeen 50 years ago. Since then, the public two-year community college has grown from serving 1,800 students locally to more than 50,000 students at more than 140 locations worldwide. CTC has evolved into a unique institution with sites on most U.S. military installations across the continental United States, Europe, the Pacific Far East and deployed locations across southwest Asia. CTC also offers classes to U.S. Navy personnel on ships at sea, at correctional

Central Texas College Campus Center

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

institutions and online to civilians and the military. CTC is accredited to offer more than 100 associate degrees and certificates of completion in a variety of academic, professional and vocational/technical fields. In addition to classroom courses, CTC also offers 27 degree and certificate programs that can be achieved solely online. CTC’s articulation agreements with most four-year universities in Texas allow for easy transfer of credits. In partnership with area high schools, CTC’s dual credit program provides an opportunity for high school juniors and seniors to begin their college careers while still in high school. CTC also offers degree programs through its new Evening/Weekend College program that includes classroom courses, online courses and blended courses (both online and classroom work). Students are able to complete a degree or certificate program through classes offered in the evening and on weekends.

Killeen Independent School District Career Center


Newcomers guide

Texas A&M University-Central Texas

With a strong history of providing affordable higher education opportunities for the military, CTC is a Yellow Ribbon School and a Purple Heart College and is continually ranked among the top Military Friendly® schools, top schools for military members using Tuition Assistance and a Best for Vets school. CTC is also a founding member of the College Credit for Heroes program, which offers current and retired military students college credit for their military training. The school’s nursing program is among the top five in the state for nurses passing the licensing exam. The CTC aviation program features an award-winning Flight Team. Business students on the award-winning Enactus team are involved in numerous community entrepreneur projects. Students can participate in various academic and community activities including the CTC Jazz Band and CTC Chorus, the speech team, Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and more.

Texas A&M UniversityCentral Texas Texas A&M University-Central Texas (TAMUCT) was born in the spirit of community cooperation in 2009 as a member of the Texas A&M University System, one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation. A&M-Central Texas is an affordable upper-level institution offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees for life’s next chapter. The student population at A&M-Central Texas is diverse and growing, currently serving more than 2,500 students.  

As a GoArmyEd partner, the university provides a virtual gateway for active-duty soldiers seeking tuition assistance for both face-to-face and distance learning courses. In addition, A&M-Central Texas is one of only a few universities in the country to offer the VetSuccess on Campus program, which provides assistance to veteran-students during their transition into college life. TAMUCT has been designated as a Purple Heart University, honorably recognizing the service, sacrifice and unwavering allegiance to our nation of those members of the student body who are Purple Heart recipients. Classes are offered at the beautiful new campus, online and at several convenient sites, including Fort Hood and Hutto, to accommodate both full-time and part-time students. The Warrior Corps program at A&M-Central Texas is a unique partnership between area community colleges and the University that allows students to make a seamless transfer of course credits to obtain a high-quality bachelor’s degree for less than $20,000. The University serves the entire Central Texas region, providing a wide range of distinguished academic programs that foster excellence and achievement through lifelong learning and civic engagement. The innovative campus recently expanded with the edition of Warrior Hall, a state-of-theart facility that houses the University’s first science laboratories, College of Education, University Library, and Counseling Center. A&M-Central Texas also received funding for a third multiuse building, which is scheduled to break ground by the end of the year.

University of Mary Hardin-Baylor

University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Chartered in 1845 by the Republic of Texas, the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor (UMHB) in Belton is a private Christian university affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas. The mission of UMHB is to prepare students for leadership, service and faith-informed discernment in a global society. UMHB offers undergraduate degrees in 47 undergraduate majors and graduate degrees in six master’s programs. The university’s Doctor of Education program offers doctorate degrees in P-12, Higher Education and Leadership in Nursing Education. UMHB also launched a Doctor of Physical Therapy program in fall 2015, and the university is accepting applications for its new Doctor of Nursing Practice program, which will begin in the fall 2016 semester. UMHB is also a recognized leader in NCAA Division III athletics. Its “Crusader” teams win American Southwest Conference honors each year and regularly participate in postseason playoffs for national titles. Last year, McKenzie Ralston became the university’s first NCAA Division III Individual National Champion when she won the 2015 NCAA Division III Women’s Golf Individual National Championship. For the seventh consecutive year, student enrollment has set a new university record with nearly 3,900 calling UMHB home. This marks UMHB’s 25th record enrollment in the last 30 years. Despite this consistent growth, the university remains committed to offering the personal attention that has always been a cornerstone of the UMHB experience with a current student-to-faculty ratio of just 17:1.

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Newcomers guide

Health care Killeen residents are fortunate to have world-class health care services right at their fingertips. The new Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center opened in 2016 to serve 175,000 military beneficiaries. Photo credit: Fort Hood

Most military residents are serviced through Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center on Fort Hood. A new stateof-the art facility opened this spring to serve eligible beneficiaries of TRICARE, the military health plan. The 947,000-square-foot facility, which is approximately 60 percent larger than the previous 50-year old hospital, specifically addresses Fort Hood’s most pressing needs in the areas of behavioral health, medical/surgical specialty clinics and pediatric primary care. The medical center has multiple portals of care with a six-story hospital tower, two two-story outpatient clinics, one three-story outpatient clinic and three four-level parking garages all connected by an easy-to-navigate concourse.

Metroplex Health System 2201 S. Clear Creek Road Killeen TX 76549 (254) 526-7523 mplex.org

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center

Family Care Clinics on Fort Hood and in the surrounding communities.

36000 Darnall Loop Fort Hood, TX 76544 (254) 288-8888 crdamc.amedd.army.mil/Default.aspx

Darnall employs almost 3,300 personnel, including active-duty military, Federal Civil Service employees and contractors. All health care is provided on an appointment basis by calling the Patient Appointment Service at (254) 288-8888 or via the TRICARE online appointment system at TricareOnline.com.

Metroplex Health System is a long-standing health care provider for Greater Killeen and provides a wide array of medical and wellness services to patients in west Bell, Coryell and Lampasas counties. Metroplex is a not-forprofit Christian organization operated as a community service by the Adventist Health System and a partnership with Baylor Scott & White Healthcare.

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center is committed to providing Service Members,

Focused on their mission of Extending the Healing Ministry of Christ, Metroplex

Darnall serves approximately 175,000 military beneficiaries within a 40-mile radius. About 103,000 people are enrolled in Darnall’s system for health through TRICARE. The system is comprised of a main hospital of

Metroplex Hospital - Killeen

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Families and Veterans quality, patientcentered care. Because of this commitment, a team of the best-educated, most professional health care physicians, nurses, therapists, technicians, dieticians, other medical providers and administrative staff work around the clock to ensure medical care of the highest quality.

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

Seton Medical Center - Harker Heights


provides the Central Texas community with more than $30,000 per day in free or low-cost wellness initiatives, while also providing the highest quality health care using state-of-the-art technology. Seton Medical Center 850 W. Central Texas ExPwy Harker heights TX 76548 (254) 690-0900 Setonharkerheights.net

Seton Medical Center Harker Heights opened in June 2012 with 192,400 square feet and a third floor ready for expansion. Since then the medical staff has grown to more than 400 all board-certified physicians and employs more than 450 associates. The hospital is recognized with a four-star rating for excellence in patient care. Seton Harker Heights is Joint Commission Accredited and is currently working toward Chest Pain Accreditation. The 83-bed Catholic hospital offers a full-service emergency department with a Level IV Trauma designation. It includes a full array of women’s services, surgical services, acute care, cardiology, family practice, gastroenterology, general medicine, internal medicine, imaging and diagnostics and intensive and critical care. Scott & White Memorial Hospital - Temple 2401 S. 31st St. Temple TX 76508 (254) 724-2111 sw.org

Scott & White Memorial Hospital is a 636-bed specialty care and teaching hospital and Level I Trauma Center. All major insurance plans accepted. Scott & White offers advanced imaging and the da VinciÂŽ Surgical System. The Scott & White NICU ranks among the top in survival of these fragile newborns. In 2013, Baylor Health Care System and Scott & White Healthcare became combined the strengths of the two health systems and create a new model system able to meet the demands of health care reform, the changing needs of patients and recent advances in clinical care.

Newcomers guide

Non-Profits

of Central Texas

The Killeen area is home to a variety of non-profit organizations that provide tremendous services to local residents. Those interested in volunteering in our community have a great number of opportunities to search for using Killeen Volunteers, Inc. and Volunteer Match.

Killeen Volunteers, Inc. The Killeen Volunteers, Inc. (KVI) board is organized for charitable, educational and scientific purposes benefiting and accomplishing a public purpose of the City of Killeen. The duties of the KVI board are to mobilize people and resources to address community needs and enhance quality of life through volunteerism. It is also the duty of this board to oversee its five program committees, which are comprised of Keep Killeen Beautiful, Celebrate Killeen, Killeen Volunteers, Inc., Killeen Volunteer Corps and Youth Advisory Commission. A list of local organizations that need volunteers on a regular basis can be found at KilleenTexas.gov. For more information, contact Volunteer Services at (254) 501-7878 or visit City Hall at 101 N. College St., Killeen.

Volunteer Match The City of Killeen partners with VolunteerMatch.org, a national organization that strengthens communities by making it easier for good people and good causes to connect. The organization offers a variety of online services to support a community of non-profit, volunteer and business leaders committed to civic engagement. Their website welcomes millions of visitors a year and has become the preferred internet recruiting tool for more than 100,000 non-profit organizations. Volunteers can search by interest and location to find non-profits in their area that are in need of assistance. Non-profits can register their group for free to recruit, engage and manage volunteers.

Non-Profit Council The Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce Non-Profit Council meets monthly to serve the needs of non-profit members. The Council hosts workshops and special events quarterly to equip non-profit members with training and opportunities to grow their organization. The Non-Profit Expo is a free annual event that provides opportunities to learn about the various non-profit organizations serving the Killeen and Fort Hood area. This event allows attendees to learn what participating non-profits are doing and how to make a difference with them. This year, the event was held in partnership with Celebrate Killeen and KISD’s Wellness Fair.

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Newcomers guide

Housing

Shopping & Dinning Killeen offers many options for shopping from large chain retailers to smaller, locally owned boutiques and shops. The Killeen Mall is located centrally along Highway 190 and features more than 90 stores with many national retailers including large department stores. The Market Heights outdoor shopping center also sits off Highway 190 and features many national and local retailers as well as dining options and bank locations. Neighboring town Copperas Cove also features a state of the art movie theatre, Cinergy Cinemas. The Killeen area has been featured in magazine and newspaper articles for its delicious and authentic dining options. Because of the many cultures brought to the area by the military, area residents are fortunate to have access to diverse restaurant choices to fulfill their cravings. Along with many national chain options, Killeen has a variety of locally owned restaurants specializing in cultural cuisines including Hawaiian, Italian, Thai, American, European, Jamaican, Korean, Mexican, Vietnamese, Caribbean, Indian and staying true to Texas, several options for delicious BBQ are served. And for residents with a sweet tooth, the Killeen area offers bakeries, dessert shops and ice cream parlors. Check our Restaurant & Catering Guide for a full list of member restauants and caterers.

Killeen Mall

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Even with continued growth and a booming economy, Killeen continues to be one of most affordable places to live in the country. The cost of living in Killeen is almost 17% lower than the national average, meaning home buyers get more house for their money here. At $105,000, Killeen’s median home price is about 53% lower than the state average of $195,000, offering our residents plenty of options for quality, affordable housing. If upscale living is what you are looking for, then Killeen has beautiful homes with plenty of space to stretch out. Some of the more luxurious homes in Killeen range from the low $300,000s to the low $500,000s. Most of these beauties feature acreage and an abundance of luxurious upgrades, pools and even guest houses all within minutes to the center of town. Buyers may need to add a few more zeros to the prices to get these amenities in a larger city. The area also continues to develop more quality apartment living communities with full feature amenities like workout rooms, pool and sauna areas, entertainment areas and private parking areas. Meet some of your neighbors or just relax after a hard day’s work without worrying about lawn care. The average rental prices are from about $600 to $1,000 a month, depending on the number of bedrooms.


Newcomers guide

Residents and visitor also will find highway expansion projects that easily connect to other parts of the city, the Killeen airport and some of the neighboring cities, including the Georgetown and Austin areas. Texas A&M University-Central Texas has attracted a host of developments in the south part of the city, not only in new homes but in new dining and entertainment areas. Residents and visitors will also find highway expansion projects that easily connect to other parts of the city, the Killeen airport and neighboring cities, including Georgetown and Austin. For more information about residential living in the Killeen area, visit KilleenChamber.com for a list of real estate companies.

Individual counseling Training for small business owners Low cost workshops Free Notary services

Photo courtesy of Linnemann Realty

Workforce Solutions of Central Texas 300 Cheyenne Dr. Killeen, Room 101 Monday-Friday 8 am-5 pm centexbrc.com | 254-200-2001

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Newcomers guide

National Mounted Warfare Foundation

Arts & Culture The Nov. 5, 2009 Fort Hood Memorial Committee hosted a dedication ceremony and unveiling of the Nov. 5, 2009 Fort Hood Memorial on March 11 at the Killeen Civic and Conference Center. Governor Greg Abbott presented the keynote speaker address and Texas Purple Hearts to the families of the fallen and to the wounded. State and federal officials participated in the program to honor the victims of the Fort Hood tragedy. The memorial, located next to the conference center, pays tribute to the 13 killed and 32 injured during the attack. Coins commemorating the memorial can be purchased at Volunteer Services in City Hall for $10. The City of Killeen purchased the First Baptist Church downtown and renovated and renamed it the Killeen Arts and Activities Center. The Killeen Civic Art Guild is housed within the Arts and Activities Center and has been instrumental in promoting art in Killeen and the surrounding areas. As a nonprofit organization, their goal is to foster a fellowship of like-minded artists and craftsmen by meeting and sharing knowledge and talents. The Farmer’s Market is located adjacent to the Arts and Activities complex. It features a large pavilion with stalls for trucks, public restrooms, a community garden and plenty of space for outdoor events. In Summer 2014, the City started Food Truck Fridays in the Farmer’s Market pavilion parking lot. Each Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., food trucks fill the parking

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

lot and patrons enjoy a unique dining experience. This event has transformed downtown Killeen into a lunch destination spot on Fridays. Killeen is also home to Vive Les Arts Theatre, a full-time arts organization that produces several Main Stage and Children’s Theatre shows each year. This community theatre relies on local talent and contributions to produce its high-quality productions from Broadway classics to ballets to Shakespearian favorites. Take 190 West is an annual week-long celebration to the arts in our area. This year’s event included an artists’ preview party, book signings by local, state and nationally-known authors, a sculpture contest and a KISD student art show. Planning for next year’s celebration has already begun. For more information, contact the Killeen Civic & Conference Center at 254-501-3888. At nearby Fort Hood, two outstanding museums are available to visitors. The museums offer displays of weapons, uniforms and other artifacts, and trace the histories of the storied units, the 3rd Calvary Regiment and the 1st Cavalry Division, through peace and wars. Funds are currently being raised to build the National Mounted Warrior Museum, which will be located just outside the Fort Hood main gate. This museum will be the most technologically advanced military museum west of the Mississippi and is expected to attract visitors from all over the country.

The 8th Annual Flavors of Central Texas will be Aug. 18. Last year’s event hosted more than 850 guests and 46 local vendors. This event is designed to please the palates of all who attend. Restaurants, caterers and bakers set up beautifully decorated booths and offer samples of their finest foods. Many other nonfood vendors also participate by setting up booths to showcase their business. Cooking demonstrations, a top chef competition and the new Chopped for Kids are planned. A regular booth space is included in the membership of restaurants and caterers. Tickets can be purchased at FlavorsofCentralTexas.com.


Newcomers guide

Greater Killeen Young Professionals Kickball Tournament at Killeen Atheletic Fields

Killeen Recreation Center

Recreation Killeen and its surrounding areas offer a plethora of opportunities for indoor and outdoor recreation and fun. From facilities to programs, kids and kids at heart can always find a way to play.

Splash Bash in August, Barktoberfest in October and the Christmas Parade in December. Other events include an Easter egg hunt, mother daughter sleepover, daddy daughter dance, movies in the park series and the Halloween Carnival.

Eighteen public parks offer acres of open green space and a variety of amenities like pavilions, playgrounds, multi-purpose fields and picnic areas. The city’s trail system includes the 1.4-mile Lions Club Park Hike and Bike Trail and the 2.5-mile Andy K. Wells Hike and Bike Trail. Additionally, two skate parks, tennis, basketball and volleyball courts and soccer fields are located throughout the city. The newest attraction is the Mickey’s Convenience Stores Dog Park catering to the four-legged crowd.

The Cen-Tex Race Series hosts 16 races each year from Copperas Cove to Temple. Road and trail courses, 5Ks and 10Ks, runners of all skill levels can enjoy the camaraderie and competition. The full schedule of races and online registration is available at KilleenTexas.gov/CenTex.

Parks and Recreation athletics programs provide sports for the entire family throughout the year. Annual programs include adult and youth flag football, basketball, volleyball and softball. Additional programs for youth are baseball and soccer leagues and instructional sports camps. For spectators, Killeen hosts numerous invitational softball, basketball and baseball tournaments. The City-operated Family Recreation Center at 1700 E. Stan Schlueter Loop is a 41,000-square-foot facility featuring two fullsize gymnasiums, an indoor walking track, aerobics room, game room and playground. The Tommie Harris Fitness Center is located on the second floor and offers a full range of cardio and weight training equipment. Members have access to a variety of traditional fitness classes like strength training and spin and contemporary classes like Zumba and Bokwa.

Four huge slides, deep and shallow pool areas, a lap pool with diving boards, a climbing wall and spray features make the Family Aquatic Center at Lions Club Park the best waterpark around. The aquatic center is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day and offers daily and season passes and can be rented for private events. Swim lessons for all skill levels are offered throughout the summer. The city’s water amenities also include the Junior Service League of Killeen Spray Pad at Long Branch Park open March through September.

Just outside of Killeen, two man-made lakes are nestled among beautiful hills and bluffs. Both provide excellent fishing, boating, sailing, skiing and swimming opportunities.

Parks and Recreation athletics programs provide sports for the entire family throughout the year. Stonetree Golf Club is the city’s beautiful 18hole, par-72 course. Men’s tees play at 7,113, surpassing standards found at many private courses. Open every day except Christmas, golfers can select from daily, semi-annual and annual green fees. The course hosts dozens of local and regional tournaments each year and offers a number of golf programs for local youth. The clubhouse, which can be rented for private events, features a fully stocked pro shop and Billy Bob’s Burgers, a local favorite. Killeen hosts events for the whole family throughout the year. Annual favorites include the Celebrate Killeen Festival in April, the Killeen Rodeo in June, the Back-to-School

They also offer hiking trails, campsites and picnic areas. Stillhouse Hollow Reservoir is located southeast of Killeen while Belton Lake is located northeast. Visitors to Stillhouse Hollow Reservoir can enjoy exploring hiking trails and Chalk Ridge Falls. Miller Springs Nature Center is located below Belton Lake Dam and has 11 miles of hiking trails, bird watching and native plants. Belton Lake Outdoor Recreation Area (BLORA) features waterslides, paddle boats, horseback riding, jet ski rentals and a beach for swimming. It is also home to the annual Nature in Lights, an incredible holiday lights display open Thanksgiving through New Year’s.

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Killeen Chamber | Calendar of Events

Calendar of Events

June

July

August

1 Wednesday

4 Monday

3 Wednesday

2 Thursday

6 Wednesday

Networking Power Hour at Sam’s Club Young Professionals Monthly Social

7 Tuesday

Non-Profit Social Media Workshop

10 Friday

Army Birthday Celebration

16 Thursday

Third Thursday Mixer at Central Texas College

16 Thursday

Young Professionals Monthly Business Luncheon

23 Thursday

Young Professionals Table for Ten

Chamber Closed for Independence Day Networking Power Hour at McAlister’s Deli

7 Thursday

Young Professionals Monthly Social

14 Thursday

MRC Luncheon-1st Cav. Division Update

21 Thursday

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

Young Professionals Monthly Social

9-10 Tuesday-Wednesday New Teacher’s Showcase

12 Friday

Leadership Killeen Application Deadline

12 Friday

Command Team Welcome

18 Thursday

21 Thursday

18 Thursday

Young Professionals Monthly Business Luncheon

29 Friday

Stay tuned for upcoming events:

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4 Thursday

Third Thursday Mixer at Texas Land & Cattle

Young Professionals Morning AMbitions Program

Public Education Council Luncheon

Networking Power Hour

Military Relations Council GO/CSM Social

Flavors of Central Texas Third Thursday Mixer at Flavors of Central Texas, Hosted by the City of Killeen

18 Thursday

Young Professionals Monthly Business Luncheon

Save the date: 83rd Annual Chamber Membership Banquet Thursday Sept. 22, 2016


ADVERTISE WITH US

CALL 254.526.9551 ///// Contact Nichole Anderson nichole@killeenchamber.com for advertising options Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Contact the Killeen Chamber at 254.526.9551 to schedule your own ribbon cutting.

Killeen Chamber

RIBBON CUTTINGS

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A+ Federal Credit Union

Cicis

400 W Central Texas Expy. | Harker Heights, TX 76548 (800) 252-8148 | aplusfcu.org

832 South Fort Hood St. | Killeen, TX 76541 (254) 242-3400 | cicis.com

Fit for Life PT

The Front Door

3921 E. Stan Schlueter Lp. Ste.105 | Killeen, TX 76542 (337) 322-6062 | fit4lifept.org

1103 N. Gray St. | Killeen, TX 76540 (254) 213-7657 | thefrontdoorkilleen.org

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly


Business Holiday Inn Express

Business International Collision

2603 Gateway Dr. | Killeen, TX 76542 Address (254) 526-2022 | forthoodhotel.com Phone | website

2803 E. Veterans Memorial Blvd. | Killeen, TX 76543 Address (254) 432-5065 | internanionalcollision.com Phone | website

Nutree Fitness Business

Second Chance Auto Business

503 N. 38th St. | Killeen, TX 76543 Address (254) 200-9998 Phone | website| nutreefitness.com

Walmart Neighborhood Market # 3449

Business 3801 East Stan Schlueter Lp.

| Killeen, TX 76542 (254) 669-6134 | facebook.com/walmart3449 Address Phone | website

1106 W. Veterans Memorial Blvd. | Killeen, TX 76541 Address (254) 213-3772 | 2ndchancekilleen.com Phone | website

For membership information or to schedule your own ribbon cutting, call the chamber at

(254) 526-9551

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Killeen Chamber | Member Profile

Member Profile

Carter BloodCare

Carter BloodCare is a not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) organization that operates on behalf of patients in 50+ Texas counties, 14 of those in Central Texas. With the support of volunteer blood donors, Carter BloodCare is the primary provider of blood and transfusion services to more than 13 hospitals and healthcare facilities in Central Texas, including Metroplex Health System, Seton Medical Center and Olin E. Teague Veteran’s Medical Center. They also provide blood products to Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center. The blood center is licensed by the Food and Drug Administration, accredited by AABB and is a member of America’s Blood Centers. One in seven hospital patients is in need of a blood transfusion, and the summer months are times of the greatest need for the community blood center and hospitals. As your community blood center, Carter BloodCare understands the importance of maintaining a steady community blood supply. This is only possible through continuous blood drives throughout the community. Hosting a blood drive allows employees and the community to participate in a vital part of saving the lives of patients at our local hospitals. Each unit collected at a drive can save three lives. Without consistent donations coming in, there is no way to provide life-saving blood transfusions. Are you ready to #GiveForLife? Carter BloodCare is asking local businesses, churches and organizations to give life to our community by hosting a blood drive this summer. Your support will make a difference by giving someone’s loved one a chance to enjoy that next special life moment. Visit carterbloodcare.org/givelife to see inspirational stories from blood donors and recipients. To schedule your summer blood drive to #GiveForLife and impact countless lives all over our community, call Clinton McCoy, 254366-9822, or Vickie Carpenter, 254-855-7244. To learn more about Carter BloodCare visit carterbloodcare.org.

Member Profile

Truly Texas

Truly Texas Killeen is a locally owned and operated business, featuring Texas food products, Texas and Western decor and souvenirs. Terri Baumann and her husband, Marc, have owned Truly Texas since April 1, 1993 and are delighted to be in Killeen and Fort Hood. After retiring in Killeen, they knew this was a great place to do business and be involved in their community. Truly Texas saw a large amount of growth in 2014. In March, they opened a second location on Fort Hood, and in December, Terri had the opportunity to move her main location to a larger store just outside the mall. Since the new PX opened in 2015, customers will find the Fort Hood location of Truly Texas tucked inside the new building and offering the perfect Texas gifts with just the right amount of Western flare. “This new location is great. AAFES is wonderful to work with and we give back to the Military all the time,” said Terri. Keep an eye out for Truly Texas in the community. They can be found staying involved with their local Chambers of Commerce, AUSA, United Way and many different Fort Hood organizations to help make a difference. Visit them Mon-Sat 10 am-8 pm or Sun 12-6 pm at 1801 E. Centex Expy #4 in Killeen, or give them a call at 254-690-0084

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Killeen Chamber 1

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1. January - Young Professionals Luncheon; 2. January - Young Professionals Social; 3. January - PEC Mentor Program Kickoff; 4. January - Walmart Neighborhood Center Check Presentation; 5. January - Young Professionals Morning AMbitions at Courtyard Marriott; 6. January - Mixer at Grace Christian Center 7. FebRuary - BRC Booth at TAMUCT Career Fair; 8-9 February - 8th Grade Career Day

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Killeen Chamber

E v e n t P h o t o s

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10-12. February - Fort Hood Procurement Conference; 13-14. February - High School Career Day; 15-18. February - Rock the Foundation Casino Night

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Killeen Chamber 19

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19. February - Young Professionals Social at Wright Class Financial Professionals; 20. February - Mixer at Tyku; 21. February - Young Professionals Luncheon; 22. February - Young Professionals Industry Tour at Mayborn Science Theater; 23. March- Leadership Killeen Austin Day; 24. March - BRC Soldier for Life TAP Class; 25. MARCH - Networking Power Hour at The Park at MTM; 26. MARCH - Mixer at Metroplex

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Killeen Chamber

E v e n t P h o t o s

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27. MARCH - Young Professionals Table for Ten at Texas Land & Cattle; 28. MARCH - Staff Dress Up for St. Patrick’s Day; 29. MARCH - Young Professionals Luncheon; 30-31 MARCH - MRC III Corps Update; 32. MARCH - Young Professionals Social; 33. MARCH -Young Professionals Book Club

Greater Killeen Business Quarterly

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Greater Killeen Business Quarterly


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2016 Newcomer's Guide  

The 2016 Newcomer's Guide is a collection of community resources and amenities. This issue features "The Relevance of Public Policy," "Young...

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