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Relocation, Lifestyle & Living in Atlanta

April/May 2013

Top Atlanta Neighborhoods Your Guide to the City’s Best Communities

Plus!

Choosing a School How to Find the Best Fit

Navigating Atlanta What You Need to Know

Gourmet to Go

Atlanta’s Food Truck Scene

AT E GRODS 0 10 HO f o OR 7 t s li HB p.2 r Ou EIG N


April/May CONTENTS FEATURES Navigating Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Metro Atlanta’s Top 100 Neighborhoods . . . . . . 20

Finding your way around the metro area can be intimidating. Get your bearings with our guide to some of the major roads and publictransportation options you’ll need to know.

The metro area offers a wealth of education options. We walk you through the process of choosing the best one for your child.

Our annual guide to the metro area’s best cities, towns and suburbs showcases top-notch communities with great education options, recreation spots and other amenities.

Finding the Right School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Five Georgia State Parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 There’s no better way to unwind after a big move than by getting back to nature. Whether you crave a day trip or an overnight stay, adventure awaits.

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In Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

RRelocation elocation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

The inside scoop on news, events and happenings around Atlanta, including a couple of must-see musicals, a high-speed bicycle race, a museum’s birthday celebration and a folktale brought to life with colorful puppets.

A comprehensive guide to help you find your way before, during and after your move, including counties, neighborhoods, relocation tips, a map to metro Atlanta and much more.

School Spotlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Upcoming Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

High Meadows School places a strong emphasis on active learners, with a global perspective and a strong connection to the environment.

Get caught up on the best exhibitions, theatrical productions, special events and live music across the metro area.

Dining Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Hidden Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Atlanta’s mobile food movement has diners flocking to colorful trucks and push carts serving high-quality fare at affordable prices.

Lake Lanier Islands Resort offers an oasis of sun, sand and family-friendly fun just an hour from Atlanta.

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PHOTOS: (Middle) Provided by Decatur Downtown Development Authority; (Right) Rachael Mason

DEPARTMENTS


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inFOCUS n e w s b i tes fr om a ro un d AT LANTA

Award-Winning

Suwanee

PHOTO: Jeremy Daniel

It’s official—events in the City of Suwanee are winners. The city’s Super Incredible Race and Suwanee Day festival took home a total of six awards from the Southeast Festival and Events Association in February. As if that weren’t reason enough to celebrate, Suwanee citizens recently rated their city highly in the National Citizen Survey, which assesses how residents of different communities feel about their local services and amenities. Suwanee ranked No. 1 in land use, planning and zoning, preservation of natural areas, city parks and availability of affordable, quality child care. For more information, visit www.suwanee.com.

Super Nanny

Based on the classic Disney movie and the book series by P.L. Travers, Mary Poppins tells the story of a magical caretaker who swoops into the lives of the troubled Banks family and ensures nothing will ever be the same. Brimming with unforgettable songs (including “Spoonful of Sugar”), magnificent dance numbers and eye-popping effects, it’s a Broadway spectacle for all ages. For tickets and other information, call 855-285-8499 or visit www.foxtheatre.org.

PHOTO: Courtesy of Sandy Springs Hospitality and Tourism

Everything’s Peachy in Peachtree City

Riding High Whether you’re a bicycling enthusiast looking to test your mettle against other riders or you simply enjoy a good time outdoors, the sixth annual Global Sandy Springs Cycling Challenge offers a day of fun and festivities you won’t want to pass up. Participating riders receive a t-shirt and free sandwiches and drinks at the finish line. And all proceeds go to Sandy Springs’ Police and Fire departments and the charities they support. May 5 in Sandy Springs. For more information, visit www.sandyspringschallenge.org. 8 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Peachtree City has long been known for its high quality of life, and now others are taking note. The city recently made NeighborhoodScout.com’s list of the 100 safest cities in the country, after being proclaimed the “Best Place to Raise Kids in Georgia” by Bloomberg Businessweek in December 2012. With a major biotech facility scheduled to open next year and plans for metro Atlanta’s largest film-production complex to be built nearby, the city’s profile has never been higher.


infocus PHOTO: Courtesy of the Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum

Get in the Habit What happens when a wannabe disco diva witnesses a crime and the police stash her in a convent for safekeeping? The answer is Sister Act, the hit musical based on the Whoopi Goldberg movie of the same name. This high-energy romp was first staged in Pasadena and at Atlanta’s own Alliance Theatre before moving on to London and then Broadway, where it was nominated for five Tony Awards. April 23 through 28 at the Fox Theatre. For tickets, call 855-285-8499 or visit www.foxtheatre.org.

“Gone” But Not Forgotten PHOTO: Joan Marcus

The days of Rhett, Scarlett and Ashley may be “Gone With the Wind,” but Margaret Mitchell’s 1936 novel and its classic 1939 film adaptation live on at the Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum. The Marietta Square landmark commemorates its 10th anniversary April 19 through 21 with the celebration Actors, Authors and Artifacts. Among the special guests are author Anne Edwards and actress Anne Jeffreys, who will discuss her career and her friendship with late cast member Ann Rutherford. For more information, call 770-794-5576 or visit www.gwtwmarietta.com.

That Rascally Rabbit!

The Saturday Evening Post is the nation’s oldest magazine, dating all the way back to Benjamin Franklin. Experience some of its rich history firsthand as the Booth Western Art Museum presents Covering America: The Saturday Evening Post in the 1950’s and early 1960’s, an exhibit showcasing 30 original paintings that graced the cover of the magazine during its mid-20th century heyday, created by such renowned artists as Norman Rockwell and Richard Sargent. The exhibit runs through Sept. 29. For more information, call 770-387-1300 or visit www.boothmuseum.org.

Photo: Courtesy of Bill Jones

Photo: John Clymer, Autumn on the Mountain, 1958, 30 x 27.5”, ©SEPS

Cover Stories

One hundred years ago, the Wren’s Nest, the home of “Uncle Remus” author Joel Chandler Harris, officially became a museum honoring Harris’ contributions to modern folklore. To mark that milestone anniversary, the Center for Puppetry Arts brings the timeless tale of Brer Rabbit & Friends to vivid life with colorful, expressive puppets. Enjoy the family fun as mischievous Brer Rabbit and his pals compete to see who’s the fastest, strongest and smartest, and end up in a briar patch of trouble. April 11 through May 26. For tickets, call 404-873-3391 or visit www.puppet.org.

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NAVIGATING ALTANTA Your Guide to Local Roads and Public Transit For a new resident, finding your way around Atlanta can be intimidating. It’s a big place, after all, with different neighborhoods and landmarks spread out across a metropolitan area that stretches across several counties. And then there are all those highways criss-crossing the city to keep track of. To help you get your bearings, we’ve broken down some of the major streets, interstates and public-transportation options you’ll need to know. 10 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

PHOTO: © 2013, James Duckworth/AtlantaPhotos.com

By Muriel Vega


Main Roads and Highways

PHOTOS: Top: © 2013, James Duckworth/AtlantaPhotos.com; Bottom: © 2013, Kevin C. Rose/AtlantaPhotos.com

Peachtree Street begins downtown (top) and runs through Midtown (bottom).

There are dozens of streets in Atlanta with a “Peachtree” in the name, but there’s really only one Peachtree Street. Atlanta’s Main Street begins in the Five Points area of downtown, passing such landmarks as the Georgia-Pacific Tower and the Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel before crossing into Midtown, where you’ll encounter the Fox Theatre, the Margaret Mitchell House and the Woodruff Arts Center (home of the High Museum of Art). Continuing north toward Buckhead, the district famous for its shopping and hotels, the street becomes Peachtree Road and passes on through Brookhaven. Other prominent roads to know are West Peachtree Street, which runs parallel to Peachtree in downtown and Midtown; Ponce de Leon Avenue, which begins in Midtown and travels to Decatur; and Buford Highway, the area’s center of international culture and cuisine, located primarily in DeKalb County. The Downtown Connector is the unofficial name of the approximately 7.5-mile stretch of highway where Interstates 75 and 85 merge as they pass through downtown Atlanta. Also known as 75/85, the Connector begins near Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport at the Langford Parkway exit, and runs north past Turner Field, passing the campuses of Georgia State University and Georgia Tech. The Connector ends in Midtown at an interchange known as the Brookwood Split. A good deal of metro Atlanta is accessible via Interstate 85. Heading south from the Connector, I-85 leads to East Point, College Park and the airport; its northward stretch passes Chamblee, Doraville, Duluth and Suwanee on its way out of the state. Just after Suwanee, it splits off into Interstate 985, which leads to Buford, Flowery Branch and Gainesville. After splitting with I-85, Interstate 75 heads northwest, climbing through Smyrna, Marietta and Kennesaw on its way toward Chattanooga, Tenn. Its southern stretch heads southeast toward Macon and, eventually, Florida. Interstate 20, meanwhile, passes Six Flags Over Georgia on its way into Atlanta, crossing the Connector and Interstate 285 on its way east. Approximately 64 miles long, Interstate 285 is also known as “the Perimeter” because it forms a circle around the city. From East Point, it travels north toward Smyrna, arcing east past Sandy Springs and then south through Doraville, Tucker and Stone Mountain, looping Newcomer Magazine | 11


A good deal of metro Atlanta is accessible via Interstate 85. westward toward the airport and College Park. Two major landmarks along this route are Spaghetti Junction, where it merges with I-85 near Tucker, and the Cobb Cloverleaf, where it connects with I-75 northwest of the city. Georgia State Route 400, also known as Georgia 400, is a toll road that splits off from I-85 and cuts through Buckhead, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Alpharetta and Cumming, after which it downgrades from a freeway to a surface road near North Georgia Premium Outlets in Dawsonville. The major landmarks along this road are the King and Queen buildings, a pair of distinctive office towers. The toll plaza collects fares for both north- and southbound drivers near Buckhead. The tolls are currently slated to cease at the end of 2013.

Public Transportation

The MARTA rail station near Lenox Square Mall in Buckhead.

cated throughout metro Atlanta with affordable fares and reliable schedules. MARTA also offers a free shuttle to Midtown’s Atlantic Station development and IKEA store. The shuttle departs from the Arts Center Station on the Red and Gold lines. Other public transportation options include Cobb Community Transit, which provides bus service throughout Cobb County and to downtown Atlanta; Gwinnett County Transit, which serves Gwinnett County; and the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority, which operates the Xpress commuter bus service, offering 33 routes across a dozen metro Atlanta counties. Now that you’re familiar with Atlanta’s major thoroughfares and transit options, you’re well on your way to getting around like a native. Bon voyage!

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FOR MORE INFORMATION Georgia Department of Transportation

404-631-1990 www.dot.ga.gov MARTA

404-848-5000 www.itsmarta.com Cobb Community Transit

770-427-2222 www.cobbcountyga.gov/cct Gwinnett County Transit

770-822-5010 www.gctransit.com XPRESS

404-463-4782 www.xpressga.com

PHOTO: © 2013, Kevin C. Rose/AtlantaPhotos.com

The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) provides rail and bus service to the metro Atlanta area, with four rail lines operating primarily in Fulton and DeKalb counties. All four rail lines connect, offering transfers at the Five Points station located off Peachtree Street. The fee for traveling one way is $2.50 including transfers, and payment is easy with prepaid MARTA Breeze cards, which can be purchased at train stations. The Gold and Red lines travel a north-south trajectory, while the Blue and Green lines take an east-west route that runs mostly through the city of Atlanta. The Gold line goes from the airport through downtown and the business district, past Lenox Square Mall and Chamblee to end in Doraville. The Red line makes the same trek from the airport through the downtown area but splits after the Lindbergh station and heads toward Buckhead and Dunwoody, ending near Sandy Springs. The Blue line is the longest route, covering Decatur, Candler Park, Inman Park, Grant Park and Cabbagetown. To the west, it stops at several landmarks, including the CNN Center, Centennial Olympic Park and the Georgia Dome. The Green line starts at Edgewood and splits from the Blue line after the Vine City neighborhood, terminating in Bankhead to the west of the city. To complement the rail service, MARTA offers bus and shuttle service. Bus stops are lo-


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EDU C ATIO N

IN SIG H T

Finding the

PERFECT FIT

Choosing the Right School for Your Child By Daniel Beauregard

E

nrolling in a new school is one of the most important moments of a child’s life. Whether you’re considering a public, private or parochial school, whether your child is entering first grade or finishing high school, it’s crucial to place him or her in just the right institution—one that will provide a nurturing and challenging experience and will sculpt him or her into an informed and independent thinker.

The Atlanta area offers a wealth of options, from college-preparatory academies and cultural-immersion schools to experiential-learning centers and charter schools. That means parents need to know what type of school they’re looking for and the options available to them. “The process is far easier when families know what they are looking for in a school,” says Brian Uitvlugt, vice president and director of admissions at Eaton Academy in Roswell.

MAKING A LIST Fortunately, moving to a new city provides an excellent opportunity for families to find the school that precisely meets their child’s needs. Before visiting any schools in the area, make a list of the qualities you most want in a new school. Does it feature a strong focus on athletics or a quality arts program? Does the campus seem clean? Do the teachers seem confident, the students cheerful and engaged? X

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In addition, create a list of your child’s academic, social and emotional strengths and needs. Then compare and contrast the offerings of different schools and how they match up with your list. “Factors such as student-toteacher ratio, extracurricular offerings, availability of before-and-after care, quality of the curriculum and the variety of programs offered will vary significantly from school to school,” Uitvlugt says. Of course, the best way to ensure that a school meets your child’s needs is to include your child in the selection process. “If the entire family gets involved, then the process becomes an opportunity for positive growth and can lead to success,” says Wendy Williams, an educational consultant. Ask your children about the subjects they are passionate about or find difficult, their hobbies, sports and outdoor activities they enjoy and, if they’re older, career goals and post-secondary plans. Families living an area with a quality public school system may wish to explore that option.

Remember that your child is interviewing the school to determine if it will meet his or her needs.

The first step is to find out which school serves their neighborhood by checking the local district’s website, says Courtney Burnett, spokeswoman for City Schools of Decatur, a charter school system. Parents can also visit the Georgia Department of Education’s website (see sidebar) to compare schools in the district they’re looking at and other districts in the state. However, the site only compares public schools. If you want to explore independent schools that may be a good fit, the websites for the Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools and the Georgia Independent School Association are good places to start.

PAYING A VISIT After doing your homework, visit each prospective school on your list. Spend time with the staff and students, and make sure to speak with parents of children attending the school. “Often, schools have special potential-parent tours,” says Burnett. “These tours are a great tool to see the school, meet the administration and see classrooms in action.”

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Familiarize yourself with a school’s mission and values and try to get a feel for how the students and adults interact as a whole. “I highly recommend that families attend sporting events, plays or musicals to learn about a school’s community and athletic or artistic talents,” Williams says. Ask questions and encourage your child to do the same. It’s important that your child understand that they are interviewing the school to determine if it will meet his or her needs. Parents can also request an opportunity to allow the child to spend some time in each prospective school and shadow another student. “It is very important for the parents and the student to get their own feel of the school’s ‘vibe,’” Uitvlugt says. After each visit, sit down with your child and create a list of each school’s strengths and weaknesses. Along with academic and extracurricular offerings, be sure to factor in travel time to and from the school, classroom and school size and, if you’re reviewing an independent school, the costs associated with attending the school. Review your finances to determine what financial commitment your family can reasonably make and whether you may need to seek scholarship support.

Educational consultant groups offer services ranging from school assessments to student needs assessments and test preparation. The Independent Educational Consultants Association’s website offers an exhaustive list of educational consultants both nationally and statewide, as well as resources for parents. In the end, says Burnett, choosing a school is a personal decision, and parents must do what they think is best for their child and their family. By taking the time to make sure you know what kind of school you’re looking for, and knowing the right questions to ask of teachers, staffers and parents, you’ll be well on the way to making the right choice for everyone involved.

HELPFUL RESOURCES

SEEKING OUTSIDE HELP There are so many factors to weigh when choosing a school that you may consider hiring an educational consultant, either to help review your options or simply to give you another perspective. Wendy Williams says it’s her goal to make the process of choosing a school easier. She takes the time to visit local schools in person so she can better understand an institution’s academic rigor and social personality.

Georgia Department of Education www.doe.k12.ga.us

Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools www.aaais.org

Georgia Independent School Association www.gisaschools.org

Independent Educational Consultants Association www.iecaonline.com

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schoolSPOTLIGHT

High Meadows School

Engaging Students with the Natural World By Susan Meadows

W

hen prospective students and their parents visit Roswell’s High Meadows School, they won’t see as many textbooks as they might expect. But they will see a variety of farm animals, including goats, chickens, bunnies and ponies. Serving 390 students from preschool through eighth grade, High Meadows was founded on the tenet that nature is the best teacher. “Our founders believed, as we do today, that engagement with the natural world promotes inquiry and, ultimately, stewardship,” says Head of School Jay Underwood. “At High Meadows, we are surrounded by 42 beautiful acres, where our children can explore and learn the values of the natural world.” This focus on the environment, which starts with nature classes in preschool and continues through outdoor living classes in the middle-school grades, is in keeping with the school’s goal of producing active learners. Students at this International Baccalaureate World School are taught how to ask questions and how to take action with what they have learned. Teachers work to draw out each child’s strengths and innate qualities as a learner by posing provocative questions and working with children to help them answer questions themselves. As part of that approach, High Meadows does not use standard textbooks in grades 1 through 5, employing real-world texts and media to help present a diverse, global perspective on each subject. This philosophy also involves developing not just the academic potential of each child but the social/emotional and physical potential as well. “We believe there should be a balance between these three areas for children to be learning at their best,” says Grace Shickler, principal for High Meadows’ preschool and primary grades.

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High Meadows’ academics are also rooted in the inquiry model and hands-on learning experiences, Shickler says. In guiding students’ social and emotional development, the school utilizes the practices laid out in the “Positive Discipline” series of books by Dr. Jane Nelsen. This philosophy touts that when children feel better, they act better. “We do not use rewards or time-outs with children,” says Shickler. “We solve problems as a community and use mistakes as opportunities to learn.” And in the physical realm, she says, “We expect children to move, drink, eat, play [and] interact all day.” The school employs two lead teachers in every classroom from preschool through fifth grade. It also boasts a diverse array of extracurricular activities in its permanent, play-based after-school program. During the summer, students can continue their education at the nationally accredited High Meadows Summer Camp, a rigorous day camp that focuses on the outdoors and experiential learning. The school is accredited by SACS and SAICS, and is a member of NAIS, GISA and AAAIS. Guided by a mission to celebrate students’ sense of wonder and quest for knowledge, High Meadows produces balanced, responsible global citizens who are ready to interact with and make an impact on the outside world. n

The Specifics Grades: Pre-K-8 Student/Teacher Ratio: 11:1 Tuition: $5,400-$16,510 Location: Roswell

Contact: 1055 Willeo Road, Roswell, GA 30075 770-993-2940 Web: www.highmeadows.org


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A Place to Call

HOME

Discover Metro Atlanta’s Top Neighborhoods By Kevin Forest Moreau

Se list of e our Atlant a

’s T O P Neig 100

hbor

on p.2hoods 7

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Downtown Decatur.

College Park regularly hosts arts festivals and other outdoor events.

TOP RIGHT PHOTO: Provided by Decatur Downtown Development Authority

One of College Park’s many historic homes.

Relocating to a new city is an exciting and terrifying time. After all, there’s nothing more important (or nerve-wracking) than finding the perfect place to live. Well, good news! Whether you’re searching for great schools, accessible transportation or a happening restaurant or entertainment scene, metro Atlanta is overflowing with vibrant communities that have plenty to offer. We’ve spotlighted a dozen areas—thriving cities, charming towns and distinctive neighborhoods—well worth a look for their atmosphere, recreational activities, education options, convenience and quality of life. And our list of metro Atlanta’s top 100 neighborhoods features many more places to explore. One of them just might be your new home. COLLEGE PARK Why: An appealing blend of history, convenience and small-town ambiance makes this South Fulton city an increasingly desirable destination. College Park boasts the fourth-largest urban historic district in Georgia, with more than 850 structures on the National Register of Historic Places, including homes, schools, churches and monuments. The world’s busiest airport sits

partially inside the city limits, and the Georgia International Convention Center—the state’s second-largest convention facility—makes the city a prime destination for business travelers. College Park is also home to Woodward Academy, the largest independent college-preparatory school in the continental United States. Perfect For: Families, Young Professionals For More Info: www.collegeparkga.com.

DECATUR Why: Just east of Atlanta, Decatur is anchored by a pedestrian-friendly downtown filled with charming shops and boutiques, a historic courthouse and square and a centrally located MARTA station. Decatur also exudes a hip, literary air, thanks to a large influx of students from nearby Emory University and Agnes Scott College (the annual Decatur Book Festival doesn’t

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Duluth’s Town Green.

hurt). A strong restaurant and bar scene attracts young professionals. City Schools of Decatur, a charter school system, is one of the top-ranking school systems in the state. Perfect For: Families, Empty Nesters, Young Professionals For More Info: www.decaturga.com.

DULUTH

East Point

Why: This prosperous Gwinnett County city is home to many family-friendly attractions, including a walkable downtown filled with historic buildings and humming restaurants and businesses. The Southeastern Railway Museum allows visitors to ride in and tour historic railroad cars and cabooses. The Hudgens Center for the Arts offers classes for adults and children year-round. The Duluth Fall Festival draws more than 100,000 guests each September. The Red Clay Theatre presents first-rate musical talent, and the nearby Arena at Gwinnett Center hosts concerts, circuses and the Gwinnett Gladiators hockey team. Perfect For: Families, Empty Nesters For More Info: www.duluthga.net.

EAST POINT

There’s plenty to do in peaceful Fayetteville.

Why: Affordable homes, a wealth of parks and convenient access to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and downtown Atlanta all make East Point an increasingly viable alternative to city living. Residents peruse locally grown goods at the East Point Farmers Market and flock to outdoor festivals including Taste of East Point. Aaron’s Amphitheatre at Lakewood hosts big-name concerts every summer. The Georgia Soccer Park provides natural-grass playing fields for youth and adult recreation leagues, while the Dick Lane Velodrome is one of the premier bicycle-racing facilities in the United States. Perfect For: Families, Young Professionals For More Info: www.eastpointcity.org.

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BOTTOM PHOTO: Courtesy of the City of Fayetteville

FAYETTEVILLE Why: Close to downtown Atlanta and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Fayetteville manages to preserve a peaceful, smalltown feel. Its historic downtown is home to the state’s oldest courthouse. The Southern Ground Amphitheater hosts national musical acts. The Holliday-Dorsey-Fife Museum is one of Georgia’s premier historical attractions. Fayetteville also boasts one of the best school systems in the state, and has been recognized as a top 10 suburb for retirement by Forbes. Perfect For: Families, Empty Nesters For More Info: www.fayetteville-ga.gov. X continued on page 24


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Take a pleasant stroll along Gainesville’s downtown square.

Midtown Atlanta’s Piedmont Park.

Why: Known as the chicken capital of the world for its poultry industry, Gainesville offers close proximity to the Blue Ridge Mountains and Lake Lanier. The Quinlan Visual Arts Center exhibits local artists and offers art classes. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids is a hands-on children’s museum where young learners can role-play different careers and climb aboard a real 1927 fire truck. Recreation options include Rock Creek Greenway, a 2-mile tree-canopied trail,and River Forks Park, which features a 40,000 square-foot beach. In 2011, Gainesville was named one of the top 10 affordable places to retire by AARP Magazine and a top 15 “most fun and affordable city” by Bloomberg Businessweek. Perfect For: Families, Empty Nesters For More Info: www.gainesville.org.

LAWRENCEVILLE Why: The second-oldest city in the metro Atlanta area, Lawrenceville trades on its history with-

out staying mired in the past. The revitalized historic downtown area, home to the Gwinnett Historic Courthouse and the Lawrenceville Female Seminary (both popular event spots), radiates a live-work-play feel, with new residences and an array of shops and restaurants. Entertainment options include the Aurora Theatre, Gwinnett County’s only professional theater; the Gwinnett Braves, the Atlanta Braves’ tripleA minor-league team; and Lawrenceville Ghost Tours, which conducts 90-minute walking tours of downtown, highlighting local lore. Perfect For: Families, Empty Nesters For More Info: www.lawrencevillega.org.

MIDTOWN Why:Lots of green space, walkable streets and historic homes give this bustling neighborhood a family-friendly appeal, and there’s plenty of big-city allure as well, thanks to towering highrises and mixed-use developments like Atlantic Station. Midtown is home to some of the city’s

24 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

best clubs and restaurants, as well as the Woodruff Arts Center, the Fox Theatre, the Goat Farm and other attractions. And don’t forget Piedmont Park, the city’s sprawling recreational oasis. Perfect For: Families, Young Professionals For More Info: www.midtownatlanta.org.

PEACHTREE CITY Why: Peachtree City has made Money’s list of the best places to live four times in the last eight years, twice ranking in the top 10. The city feels like a relaxing resort, with two lakes for canoeing, fishing and sailing, three golf courses and abundant nature areas and playgrounds. Golf carts are a frequent means of transportation along the 90 miles of multi-use paths, adding to the vacation-time aura. The Frederick Brown Jr. Amphitheater hosts outdoor concerts by pop, rock and country acts. Perfect For: Families, Empty Nesters For More Info: www.peachtree-city.org. X continued on page 26

PHOTOS: (Top) Gainesville Tourism and Trade; (Bottom Left) © 2013, Kevin C. Rose/AtlantaPhotos.com

GAINESVILLE

Peachtree City’s Frederick Brown Jr. Amphitheater.


Patrick Killam, Publisher pkillam@bellsouth.net 770.992.0273 OfямБce 770.649.7463 Fax

Ad Size: Issue: December/January 08

PROOF SH

FULL PAGE 8.375"x 10.875" HALF PAGE HORIZONTAL 7.375"x 4.812" HALF PAGE VERTICAL 3.5625"x 9.875" THIRD PAGE VERTICAL 2.375"x 9.875"

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www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 25


Suwanee residents participate in the Suwanee Day 5K race.

SMYRNA Why: Some residents call this Cobb County suburb the “Jonquil City” for the flowers that bloom along its streets each spring, but it’s more widely known for its Village Green town center, which features Smyrna’s city hall, community center and residential, retail and office space. The airy Market Village mixed-use development often hosts outdoor events. The Silver Comet Trail, a free, public, non-motorized trail, starts in Smyrna and runs to the Alabama state line. The city also boasts 33 acres of park space within a mile of downtown. Perfect For: Families, Young Professionals For More Info: www.smyrnacity.com.

SUWANEE Why: Roughly 30 miles from Atlanta, Suwanee is one of metro Atlanta’s best-kept secrets, though it’s not likely to stay below the radar for long. The heart of this growing community is its mixed-use Town Center, brimming with residential, retail and office space. It’s also home to the 10-acre Town Center Park, complete with an interactive fountain and a 1,000-seat amphi26 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Downtown Woodstock hosts festivals and events year-round.

theater. In addition, Suwanee features 500 acres of parkland and miles of trails. In 2012, it was rated the third-best city to raise a family by Kiplinger magazine. Perfect For: Families, Empty Nesters, Young Professionals For More Info: www.suwanee.com.

WOODSTOCK Why: Woodstock, located northwest of Atlanta in Cherokee County, is one of the most familyfriendly suburbs in the metro area. Its historic downtown showcases locally owned shops and restaurants, which contribute to a cozy, smalltown vibe. The Elm Street Cultural Arts Village presents plays, concerts, workshops and exhibits, while the Dixie Speedway hosts stock car races May through October. Woodstock is also known for its proximity to Lake Allatoona, 13 public beaches, four city parks and an ongoing campaign to highlight the area’s natural resources and develop a network of multi-use trails and green space. Perfect For: Families For More Info: www.woodstockga.gov.

PHOTOS: (Bottom Left) City of Smyrna; (Bottom Right) Courtesy of the City of Woodstock

Smyrna’s Market Village.


ATLANTA’S MOST POPULAR NEIGHBORHOODS

Once again, Newcomer presents our annual list of the most popular neighborhoods in metro Atlanta. Popularity is based on a number of factors, including but not limited to home sales.* Note that home sales include single family as well as condos/townhomes, where those are available. KEY TO NEIGHBORHOODS’ DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS

Neighborhood

Acworth

County

Families/Kid-Friendly (F) Young Professionals (YP)

Homes Avg. days sold 2012 on market

Empty Nesters (EN) New Construction/Newer Homes (NC)

Sale price vs. list price

Average sale price

Classic Architecture/Historic Appeal (HA) Walking Distance to Shopping/Dining (W)

International Draw (I)

Website

Distinguishing Characteristics

F, YP, NC

Cobb

848

68

96%

$168,138

www.acworth.org

Adairsville

Bartow

101

86

94%

$83,861

www.adairsvillega.net

F, EN

Alpharetta Downtown Atlanta

Fulton Fulton

1747

71

96%

$310,944

t

t

t

t

www.alpharetta.ga.us www.downtownatlanta.com

F, YP, NC YP, W

East Atlanta

Fulton

705

63

96%

$222,676

www.eaca.net

F, YP

Northwest Atlanta

Fulton

841

70

95%

$133,435

www.atlantaga.gov

F, YP

South Atlanta

Fulton

807

95

97%

$113,106

www.atlantaga.gov

F, YP

Southeast Atlanta

Fulton

545

73

97%

$122,529

www.southeastatlanta.org

F, YP

Auburn

Barrow

134

67

97%

$71,783

www.cityofauburn-ga.org

F, W

Austell

Cobb

492

71

98%

$62,703

www.austellga.gov

F, EN

DeKalb

83

87

96%

$183,972

www.avondaleestates.org

F, EN, HA, W

Ball Ground

Avondale Estates

Cherokee

118

89

96%

$179,020

ww.cityofballground.com

F, EN

Bethlehem

Barrow

110

78

97%

$83,800

www.bethlehemga.org

F, HA

Braselton

Gwinnett

77

97

94%

$387,348

www.braselton.net

F, EN, NC, HA

Brookhaven

DeKalb

t

t

t

t

www.brookhavenga.gov

F, EN, NC, YP, W

Buckhead

Fulton

1912

40

93%

$467,311

www.buckhead.net

YP, EN, NC, HA, W F, EN, NC, HA

Buford

Gwinnett

947

69

97%

$168,141

www.cityofbuford.com

Canton

Cherokee

1262

108

95%

$192,560

www.canton-georgia.com

F, HA

Carroll

501

90

94%

$93,642

www.carrollton-ga.gov

F, HA

Carrollton Cartersville

Bartow

668

92

94%

$100,192

www.cityofcartersville.org

F, HA

Chamblee

DeKalb

953

47

96%

$237,326

www.chambleega.com

F, YP, NC

Clarkston

DeKalb

62

53

99%

$53,971

www.cityofclarkston.com

I

Clermont

Hall

31

72

95%

$133,787

www.clermontga.com

F, EN

College Park

Fulton

411

103

96%

$68,317

www.collegeparkga.com

F, YP, HA, NC

Rockdale

1037

84

95%

$91,387

www.conyersga.com

F, EN, NC

Covington

Newton

1312

82

96%

$73,159

www.cityofcovington.org

F, EN, HA

Cumming

Forsyth

2293

93

95%

$235,026

www.cityofcumming.net

F, EN, NC, HA

Conyers

Dacula

Gwinnett

723

82

97%

$171,960

www.daculaga.gov

F, EN, NC

Dallas

Paulding

1093

71

97%

$100,525

www.cityofdallasga.com

F, EN, NC

Dawsonville

Dawson

247

86

95%

$178,842

www.dawsonville-ga.gov

F, NC

Decatur/Emory

DeKalb

2851

71

96%

$156,496

www.decaturga.com

F, YP, EN, HA, NC, W

Doraville

DeKalb

81

82

96%

$99,117

www.doravillega.us

F, I

Douglasville

Douglas

1304

80

97%

$96,629

www.ci.douglasville.ga.us

F, EN, NC

Duluth

F, EN, NC

Gwinnett

992

59

96%

$195,180

www.duluthga.net

Dunwoody

DeKalb

695

60

95%

$292,290

www.dunwoodyga.gov

F, YP, NC

East Point

Fulton

1214

79

95%

$48,374

www.eastpointcity.org

F, YP, HA, W

Ellenwood

Clayton

206

79

98%

$63,824

www.claytoncountyga.gov

F, NC

Euharlee

Bartow

61

97

98%

$99,894

www.euharlee.com

F, HA

Fairburn

Fulton

493

85

97%

$99,595

www.fairburn.com

F, EN, NC, HA

Fayetteville

Fayette

819

108

96%

$199,746

www.fayetteville-ga.gov

F, EN, H

Hall

439

85

96%

$162,353

www.flowerybranchga.org

F, NC

Forest Park

Clayton

265

67

98%

$28,510

www.forestparkga.org

F, EN

Gainesville

Hall

992

92

94%

$137,936

www.gainesville.org

F, EN, NC

Flowery Branch

Grant Park

Fulton

t

t

t

t

www.grantpark.org

YP, F, EN, HA, W

Grantville

Coweta

56

89

96%

$74,816

www.grantvillega.org

F, EN

t Data is not available for these neighborhoods/areas.

* Information provided by SmartNumbers (770-424-5128, www.smartnumbers.com).

Chart continued on page 28

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 27


KEY TO NEIGHBORHOODS’ DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS

Neighborhood

Families/Kid-Friendly (F) Young Professionals (YP)

County

Homes Avg. days sold 2012 on market

Empty Nesters (EN) New Construction/Newer Homes (NC)

Classic Architecture/Historic Appeal (HA) Walking Distance to Shopping/Dining (W)

International Draw (I)

Sale price vs. list price

Average sale price

Website

Distinguishing Characteristics

Grayson

Gwinnett

281

78

97%

$148,211

www.cityofgrayson.org

F, EN, NC

Griffin

Spalding

580

98

92%

$74,000

www.cityofgriffin.com

F, EN

Hampton

Henry

377

88

97%

$110,468

www.cityofhampton-ga.gov

F, HA

Hapeville

Fulton

30

59

91%

$67,993

www.hapeville.org

F, YP, W, HA

Hiram Jackson Johns Creek Jonesboro Kennesaw

Paulding

315

72

98%

$85,562

www.cityofhiramga.gov

F, EN

Butts

221

78

94%

$82,890

www.cityofjacksonga.com

F, EN, NC

Fulton

410

80

95%

$375,915

www.johnscreekga.gov

F, NC

Clayton

1036

74

97%

$53,175

www.jonesboroga.com

F, NC, HA

Cobb

1144

67

96%

$178,716

www.kennesaw-ga.gov

F, EN, NC, HA

Lawrenceville

Gwinnett

3301

64

98%

$114,634

www.lawrencevillega.org

F, EN, W, HA, NC

Lilburn

Gwinnett

749

84

97%

$133,549

www.cityoflilburn.com

F, HA, NC, I

Lithia Springs

Douglas

216

55

97%

$66,262

www.celebratedouglascounty.com

F, EN

Lithonia

DeKalb

1397

72

99%

$59,202

www.co.dekalb.ga.us

F,NC

Fulton, DeKalb

t

t

t

t

www.little5points.com

YP, W

Henry

417

77

96%

$112,726

www.locustgrove-ga.gov

F, HA, NC

Gwinnett

497

73

98%

$111,209

www.loganville-ga.gov

F, NC

Hall

60

100

96%

$84,501

www.hallcounty.org

F, EN

Little Five Points Locust Grove Loganville Lula Mableton

Cobb

605

71

96%

$157,046

www.cobbcounty.org

F, EN, NC

Marietta

Cobb

3895

75

96%

$203,009

www.mariettaga.gov

F, YP, HA, NC

McDonough

Henry

1321

79

96%

$121,970

www.mcdonoughga.org

F, HA, EN, NC

Midtown

Fulton

t

t

t

t

www.midtownatlanta.org

YP, F, W, HA

Milton

Fulton

202

100

96%

$507,402

www.cityofmiltonga.us

F, EN, NC

Monroe

Walton

482

89

95%

$101,600

www.monroega.us

F, EN

Morrow

Clayton

232

65

98%

$44,486

www.cityofmorrow.com

F, EN

Newnan

Coweta

1210

95

96%

$163,571

www.ci.newnan.ga.us

F, HA, EN, NC

Norcross

Gwinnett

976

41

97%

$120,522

www.norcrossga.net

F, NC, HA

Oakwood

Hall

105

53

95%

$106,143

www.cityofoakwood.net

F, EN

Newton

126

80

95%

$117,202

www.oxfordgeorgia.org

F, EN, HA

Oxford Palmetto

Fulton

81

72

99%

$63,875

www.citypalmetto.com

F, EN

Peachtree City

Fayette

531

88

96%

$260,192

www.peachtree-city.org

F, EN, W, NC F, EN, HA, NC

Powder Springs

Cobb

812

83

96%

$131,755

www.cityofpowdersprings.org

Rex

Clayton

253

59

97%

$45,449

www.claytoncountyga.gov

F, EN

Riverdale

Clayton

670

65

99%

$38,269

www.riverdalega.gov

YP, EN, HA

Roswell

Fulton

1191

40

95%

$277,608

www.roswellgov.com

F, YP, EN, HA, NC

Sandy Springs North

Fulton

731

115

93%

$257,278

www.sandyspringsga.org

F, YP, NC

Sandy Springs South

Fulton

406

61

94%

$501,155

www.sandyspringsga.org

F, YP, NC F, HA, NC

Senoia

Coweta

266

85

97%

$176,976

www.senoia.com

Sharpsburg

Coweta

284

90

97%

$194,907

www.coweta.ga.us

F, EN

Smyrna

Cobb

1117

62

96%

$194,094

www.smyrnacity.com

F, YP, NC

Snellville

F, NC

Gwinnett

1161

84

97%

$109,654

www.snellville.org

Stockbridge

Henry

744

76

97%

$77,975

www.cityofstockbridge.com

F, NC

Stone Mountain

DeKalb

1211

75

97%

$65,611

www.stonemountaincity.org

F, HA, NC

Sugar Hill

Gwinnett

383

70

98%

$148,940

www.cityofsugarhill.com

F, NC

Suwanee

F, EN, YP, NC, W

Gwinnett

788

76

95%

$236,579

www.suwanee.com

Temple

Carroll

182

62

95%

$66,045

www.templega.us

F

Tucker

DeKalb

303

69

96%

$125,025

www.tuckerga.com

F, NC, HA

Tyrone

Fayette

102

109

95%

$237,935

www.tyrone.org

F, EN, HA

Union City

Fulton

307

83

98%

$58,902

www.unioncityga.org

F, EN

Villa Rica

Carroll

421

82

95%

$76,603

www.villarica.org

F, EN, NC

Vinings

Cobb

306

23

96%

$282,892

www.viningsga.org

F, YP, EN, HA

Virginia Highland

Fulton

1499

27

96%

$276,740

www.virginiahighland.com

YP, HA, W

Cherokee

110

135

94%

$167,013

www.cityofwaleska.com

F, HA

Barrow

548

73

96%

$84,330

www.cityofwinder.com

F, EN, HA

Douglas

101

85

96%

$134,929

www.celebratedouglascounty.com

F, EN

Cherokee

1508

72

97%

$168,246

www.woodstockga.gov

F, NC

Waleska Winder Winston Woodstock

28 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 29


Gourmet TO GO

Food Trucks Serve Up Quick, Creative Meals Once upon a time, the term “mobile food” brought to mind images of sandwich trucks parked outside construction sites, or perhaps ice cream trucks or hot dog carts. But that’s no longer the case. Mobile food has experienced a resurgence lately. Diners are flocking to gourmet food trucks serving high-quality fare at affordable prices. 30 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

PHOTO: (Top Left) Rachael Mason

By Rachael Mason


PHOTOS: (Top Top Left, Bottom Left and Bottom Right) Rachael Mason

TOP: (Left) Sweet Auburn Barbecue; (Center) diners line up for the Yumbii food truck. ABOVE: (Left) Champion Cheesesteaks; (Right) the food truck for Decatur Irish Pub the Marlay House.

T

he movement has taken hold in Atlanta over the past couple of years, with colorful trucks and push carts making regular stops around town. These inexpensive, often-inventive meals offer an alternative to fast-food chains and sandwich shops, and allow those in search of a quick bite to sample items from several different vendors and to enjoy a sense of community with their servers and fellow customers.

What’s Cooking Atlanta’s food trucks offer every type of cuisine you might expect, from sandwiches to meatballs, with names like Tex’s Tacos, Sweet Au-

burn Barbecue, Nana G’s Chicken and Waffles and even Yum Yum Cupcakes. But they also steer into more inventive territory. The Blaxican, for example, combines Mexican fare with classic Southern soul food. The Grilldabeast’s menu includes smoke-fried wings with a seasonal glaze (think cranberry-orange chipotle) and an avocado BLT made with a panko-crusted and fried avocado. The Mac the Cheese food truck serves comfort food that includes meatloaf and customizable macaroni and cheese (you choose the kind of noodles, a cheese and toppings). Among the more popular purveyors on Atlanta’s street-food scene are Yumbii, known for

tasty Korean barbecue tacos and sesame fries, and the Good Food Truck, whose menu includes savory waffle cones with Thai or curry fillings and the Poodle, a hot dog wrapped in a French toast bun and then topped with applemaple slaw. There are even trucks and carts devoted to frozen treats—hardly surprising, given Atlanta’s warm temperatures—including Honeysuckle Gelato and Vintage Frozen Custard. The King of Pops began as a frozen pop business with one cart but quickly expanded into a small empire. Signature pops like the chocolate sea salt, raspberry lime and pineapple habanero can be purchased from carts on side-

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 31


However, food truck devotees in the mood for a quick bite don’t have to follow their favorite vehicles around the city. They can simply stop by the Atlanta Food Truck Park and Market, which opened in April 2012. Located on Howell Mill Road, the park includes space for food trucks, picnic tables and lots of parking. As many as 15 trucks can be found at any one time. The park is open for lunch and dinner and hosts a weekend farmers’ market. Hours vary depending on the season. Before you go, be aware that the park may be closed during rainy or inclement weather. Whether you’re in the mood to experiment or craving an old favorite, there’s sure to be a food truck or cart serving up exactly what you’re looking for.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Atlanta Food Truck Park & Market

1850 Howell Mill Road www.atlantafoodtruckpark.com Atlanta Street Food Coalition

www.atlantastreetfood.com Blaxican

www.blaxicanfood.com Good Food Truck

www.goodfoodtruckatl.com Grilldabeast

www.grilldabeast.com Honeysuckle Gelato

Grab a bench at the Atlanta Food Truck Park and Market.

www.honeysucklegelato.com

Almost all mobile food vendors are active on social media, posting updates on Facebook and Twitter about where they’ll be and what they’ll be serving.

King of Pops

www.kingofpops.net Mac the Cheese

www.macthecheesetruck.com Nana G.’s Chicken and Waffles

www.nanagchik-n-waffles.com Sweet Auburn Barbecue

Where and When During spring, summer and fall, you can find a number of mobile-food vendors at weekly foodtruck events. Those looking to mix up their midday routines can choose from lunchtime events at Underground Atlanta and the Stove Works office lofts on Wednesdays and regular Thursday lunch hours at 12th and Peachtree streets in Midtown.

Evening events are also common during warmer weather. Keeping track of these trucks is easier than you might think. Most mobile food vendors have websites, and almost all of them are active on social media, posting updates about where they’ll be and what they’ll be serving on Facebook and Twitter. Another way to keep track of this growing scene is through the Atlanta Street Food Coalition, a nonprofit organization that maintains a comprehensive list of vendors and a calendar of the city’s mobile food happenings.

32 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Tex’s Tacos

www.texstacos.com Vintage Frozen Custard

www.tastevintage.com Yumbii

www.yumbii.com Yum Yum Cupcakes

www.yumyumcupcake.com

PHOTO: The Atlanta Food Truck Park and Market

walks throughout the city, as well as at festivals, farmers’ markets and retail outlets.

www.sweetauburnbbq.com


OU TS ID E

ATL A NTA

Outdoor

ADVENTURES

Get Back to Nature at Five Great State Parks By Hope S. Philbrick

PHOTO: Georgia Dept. of Natural Resources

There’s no better way to offset the stress of a big move than by getting back to nature. Push those yet-to-be-unpacked boxes to the back of your mind and get to know your new home state with a visit to a state park in the North Georgia Mountains. The drive from Atlanta isn’t far (and the view along the way is typically aweinspiring). What’s more, a state park weekend getaway can cost cents on the dollar compared to other vacation options. Best of all, there are several parks to choose from, each with multiple recreational and lodging options. Whether you crave a day trip or an overnight stay, an adrenaline boost or a romantic jolt, adventure awaits. X

Surround yourself with nature at the 829-acre Amicalola Falls State Park. www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 33


AMICALOLA FALLS STATE PARK The main attraction at Amicalola Falls is the 729-foot waterfall that lends the park its name; the tallest cascading waterfall in the Southeast tumbles down rocks nearly five times the height of Niagara Falls. View the spectacle from a flat, 1,250-foot path made of recycled tires—an easy stroll that’s also wheelchair accessible—or join the Canyon Climbers Club and ascend steep staircases from the base to the top of the falls. Either way, be sure to bring a camera. Twelve miles of trails weave through the park’s 829 acres, providing for varied hiking routes. During a recent visit, my husband and I set a challenging goal: Hike to the summit of Springer Mountain, the southern end of the famous 2,175-mile Appalachian Trail. There are a number of different routes to reach that pinnacle. But for a weekend trip for infrequent hikers, two options are most amenable. You might opt for the challenging 8.5-mile trail from the park to Springer Mountain. At the summit, snap a few photos by the commemorative plaque. You can start back down right away, camp overnight and descend the next day, or hike 4.4 miles to the Len Foote Hike Inn and tackle the final five miles out the following day. Alternately, you can hike five miles from the park to the Hike Inn, spend the night and tackle the 4.4-mile Approach Trail to the top of Springer Mountain. Camp at the summit or head back to the Hike Inn. (It’s a long haul, but

my husband and I, both non-athletes, managed to complete the 8.8-mile round trip in one day.) Hiking isn’t your only option at Amicalola Falls State Park. Other activities include geocaching (a treasure-hunting game utilizing GPS), trout fishing (in season), bicycling, participating in ranger-led workshops, playing Frisbee or just enjoying a relaxing picnic.

TOP: The Len Foote Hike Inn. BOTTOM: The Lodge at Amicalola Falls.

34 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

PHOTOS: Georgia Dept. of Natural Resources

One visit is all you’ll need to understand why Amicalola Falls is one of Georgia’s most popular state parks.


hike through Amicalola Falls State Park and the Chattahoochee National Forest to reach the inn. The hike, which is rated “moderate,” weaves through trees and over creeks and takes an average of three hours to complete—but can take longer if you grow enamored with the native plants, wild flowers and colorful mushrooms growing along the stony path. One visit is all you’ll need to understand why Amicalola Falls is one of Georgia’s most popular state parks.

FOUR MORE GREAT OPTIONS Black Rock Mountain State Park is Georgia’s highest state park. At an altitude of 3,640 feet, it boasts spectacular 80-mile vistas from roadside overlooks and four hiking trails. Fish the small lake, sniff wildflowers and photograph small waterfalls. Campsites and cottages are available to overnight guests. Straddling a deep gorge on the western edge of Lookout Mountain, Cloudland Canyon State Park boasts two waterfalls, several caves and exceptional hiking. Mountain bikers and equestrians can also explore several miles of the Cloudland Con-

PHOTO: Georgia Dept. of Natural Resources

Day trips to the park from Atlanta are feasible, but maximize the visit with an overnight stay or two. Lodging options include campsites, cottages and the Lodge & Conference Center at Amicalola Falls State Park. Perched at the top of the mountains, the Lodge offers breathtaking views and hotel comforts—everything you really need from a hotel, without such extras as pretention and fussiness. Operated by Coral Hospitality, the 56-room facility is also home to the Maple Restaurant, which offers convenient, all-American buffet meals at reasonable prices. Another option is the rustic Len Foote Hike Inn. This true backcountry experience offers such amenities as a bathhouse with hot showers, a dining room for breakfasts and dinners served family-style, a game room and guest rooms outfitted with bunk beds. “Some people think that our inn is just for hardcore hikers, but that’s not the Cloundland Canyon State Park. case,” says Hike Inn Executive Director Eric Graves. “We’ve had visitors as young as 3 and as old as 84. The trail isn’t particularly difficult, and visitors can take their time hiking.” For an authentic taste of the Appalachian Trail, opt for the five-mile

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 35


Unicoi State Park Lodge.

nector Trail. Spend the night in new yurts, cottages or one of the walk-in tent campsites. One of the most spectacular canyons in the Eastern United States, Tallulah Gorge State Park’s eponymous ravine is two miles long and nearly 1,000 feet deep. For breathtaking views of the river and waterfalls, brave the suspension bridge swaying 80 feet above the rocky bottom. Mountain bikers can challenge their skills on a rugged 10-mile trail. Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Unicoi State Park and Lodge offers several scenic hiking and mountain-bike trails. The park borders U.S. Forest Service land, and you can walk a short, paved path to the base of the spectacular Anna Ruby Falls. The hotel-style lodge at Unicoi is undergoing renovations and will re-open in fall 2013; all other park facilities remain available.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Amicalola Falls State Park and Lodge 706-265-4703, www.gastateparks.org/amicalolafalls Lodge and Cottages: 800-573-9656 Camping and Shelters: 800-864-7275

Len Foote Hike Inn

Black Rock Mountain State Park 706-746-2141, www.gastateparks.org/blackrockmountain

Cloudland Canyon State Park 706-657-4050, www.gastateparks.org/cloudlandcanyon

Tallulah Gorge State Park 706-754-7981, www.gastateparks.org/tallulahgorge

Unicoi State Park and Lodge 706-878-2201, www.gastateparks.org/unicoi

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PHOTO: Georgia Dept. of Natural Resources

706-867-6203, www.hike-inn.com Advance reservations strongly recommended for overnight accommodations.


38 40 47


GETTING STARTED

HERE MARTA

TO

THERE Driver’s License

Out-of-state drivers are required to obtain a Georgia driver’s license within 30 days. To obtain your license, you will need to provide the following: 1) Previous driver’s license; 2) Two pieces of identification; 3) An eye exam at the time of issue; 4) A $20 fee (in cash) for a five-year license, or a $35 fee for a 10-year license. Licenses are issued through the Georgia Department of Driver Services at several sites across Atlanta. Call 678-413-8400 or visit www.dds.ga.gov.

Mass Transit

One way to avoid long commutes is to take advantage of the city’s local transit system, Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA). Offering both train and bus service, MARTA is a convenient way to travel to downtown or the airport. The fee for traveling one way is $2.00 including transfers, and payment is even easier now with the Breeze limited-use and extendeduse cards. Weekly and monthly passes can be obtained at discounted rates. For fares, schedule and route information call 404848-5000 or visit www.itsmarta.com.

38 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Car Tag

MARTA Rail Service

You must register your car within 30 days of residency. Bring with you the following information: 1) Car title, name and address of lienholder, or copy of lease agreement; 2) Current tag registration; 3) Mileage reading of vehicle; 4) Proof of insurance; 5) Emission certificate (if applicable). There is an approximate $20 fee for your tag. In January 2006, the state began charging sales tax on vehicles. Your tag office will


GETTING STARTED provide the amount of sales tax on your vehicle. vehicle. For information on a specific county, contact the the appropriate county’s Tax Commissioner’s Office.

Vehicle Emission Inspection

Vehicles dating from 1985 through 2006 model year must be checked each year for emission standard compliance. Visit a statedesignated inspection station for the service. Call 800-449-2471 or visit www.cleanairforce.com.

Driving Tips

Georgia 400 is the only toll road in Atlanta. If you travel it daily, obtaining a Cruise Card is is recommended. Purchased in advance, the Cruise Card allows drivers to bypass the tollbooth and and avoid long lines. Call 404-893-6161 or visit www. www. georgiatolls.com to purchase a card. The Georgia DOT provides daily updates of road work, road closings and traffic delays, which are are helpful when commuting. Updates can be obtained obtained by calling calling(toll (tollfree) free) 1-877-694-2511, by dialing 1-877-694-2511, by dialing 511, 511, or by visiting www.georgia-navigator.com. or by visiting www.georgia-navigator.com.

NEED TO KNOW Voter Registration

Registration applies to U.S. citizens citizens at at least least 18 18 years of age. You have up to 30 days before to 30 days before an an election to register. Register at at your your local local Voter Voter Registration Office and most public public libraries. libraries. Refer Refer to the AT&T directory directory for forlocations, locations,orordownload downloada aregistration registrationform formatatwww.sos.georgia.gov. www.sos.georgia.gov.

Making a Phone Call All phone numbers in the metro Atlanta area include the area code plus the sevendigit number. To make a phone call, dial one of the four area codes (404, (404, 770, 770, 678 678 and and 470) 470) and the seven-digit number. In general, In general, 404 404 isis designated for intown areas and and 770 770 for for suburbs; suburbs; the 678 and 470 area codes overlay codes overlay both both areas. areas. Cell phone subscribers can choose choose from from any any area area code when signing up for service.

Registering for School By law, children must be 5 years old on or before September 1 to enter kindergarten and 6 years old on or before September 1 to enter the first grade. To enroll your child in either kindergarten or first grade, you will need to provide the child’s social security number; a vision, hearing, and dental screening from a family practitioner or local health clinic; and immunization records on Georgia State Form 3231.

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COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION public schools Cherokee County Schools Board of Education 770-479-1871

Cherokee County QUICK INFO

Elementary Schools 22 Middle Schools 7 Intermediate Schools 1 High Schools 6 Alternative 1 Evening 1 Per-pupil expenditures $8,578 School & bus information: 770-720-2112 Avg. SAT Scores Cherokee Co. Georgia National

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 Electricity Amicalola EMC 706-276-2362 Cobb EMC 770-429-2100 Georgia Power 888-660-5890 770-887-2363

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T 888-436-8638 ETC Communications 678-454-1212 TDS Telecom-Nelson Ball Ground 770-735-2000 Windstream

800-501-1754

Water Cherokee County Water Authority City of Ball Ground City of Canton City of Waleska

770-479-1813 770-735-2123 770-704-1500 770-479-2912

City of Woodstock

770-926-8852

Cable TV Charter Communications 888-438-2427 Comcast

404-266-2278

ETC Communications

678-454-1212

Hospitals Northside Hospital-Cherokee 770-720-5100 Wellstar Kennestone Hospital

770-793-5000

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

1560 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

Sawnee EMC

County Neighborhoods Schools

www.cherokeega.com www.canton-georgia.com www.woodstockga.gov www.cityofballground.com www.hollyspringsga.us www.cityofwaleska.com www.cherokee.k12.ga.us

Median household income: $63,518 Median age of residents: 34 Population: 210,529 Sales tax: 6% Chamber of Commerce Cherokee County 770-345-0400, www.cherokeechamber.com Property Taxes Per $1,000 of assessed value is: Unincorporated Cherokee County, $26.80; Incorporated Cherokee County, $24.06. Tax Commissioner: 678-493-6400

Cagle Dairy Farm, Canton

Located northwest of Atlanta, Cherokee County gets its name from the original inhabitants of the area, the Cherokee Indians. The county seat, then called Etowah, was established in 1833 and renamed Canton in 1834. Today, the city is enjoying its greatest economic boom in its history since more than $60 million was invested in residential and commercial development in 1998. Despite developing its own industrial base, Cherokee County remains idyllic and serene. Farming, especially poultry processing, remains a leading industry. Canton and the neighboring community of Woodstock have seen tremendous growth as subdivisions crop up to accommodate newcomers. In fact, nearly 60 percent of the county’s population are commuters. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median value of homes in 2006 was $194,900. Homes for well over $1 million can be purchased in such neighborhoods as Bradshaw Farms, Bridge Mill and Town Lake Hills. Interstate 575 and Ga. Highway 92 traverse the county, affording residents easy access to Atlanta and the nearby attractions of Town Center Mall, Lake Allatoona and the North Georgia Mountains. Other great places to live,

40 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Ridge Mountains and along the banks of the Etowah River, Canton is prime location for development.

Woodstock

work and play in Cherokee County include the cities of Ball Ground, Holly Springs and Waleska.

Neighborhoods

Canton Canton was incorporated in 1833 and renamed in 1834 at the request of two founding fathers who had visions that the town might become a silk center similar to what existed in Canton, China. Canton did become famous for its “Canton Denim,” known worldwide for the high-quality denim produced by Canton Cotton Mills. Today, Canton is attracting new industry and residents. As a result, the city is re-investing in its downtown. As part of its “Streetscapes” program, downtown Canton will be restored to its historic look and features a newly designed theater on Main Street. Located at the foothills of the Blue

Twelve miles south of Canton, Woodstock is the fastest-growing city in Cherokee County. With a growth rate of 70 percent over the past 10 years, the city has doubled in size. Residents enjoy easy access to Interstate 575 and Ga. Highway 92, allowing short commutes to Cobb and Fulton counties. While affording convenience to big-city attractions, Woodstock still maintains its small-town appeal. Buildings dating back to 1879 characterize the downtown, where antique and other specialty shops are located. Various golf courses are located in Woodstock, including Arnold Palmer’s Eagle Watch, a course with wooded countryside views that is considered to be one of the top places to play in Atlanta. The 11,860-acre Lake Allatoona provides additional recreation. Woodstock is also convenient to more than 13 state parks. N For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION

pUBLIC schools Cobb County Schools Board of Education 770-426-3300 Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Magnet Charter Special Per-pupil expenditures

Cobb County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

White Water

Neighborhoods

Kennesaw

One of Family Circle magaCobb County came zine’s “Ten Best Towns for Famiinto being in 1832 when lies,” Kennesaw takes pride in its the state redistributed land small-town atmosphere and boasts County www.cobbcountyga.gov once part of the Cherokee abundant parks and green space, Neighborhoods www.austellga.org Nation. Named after Thomas exceptional recreational programs www.mariettaga.gov Welch Cobb, the county and top-notch schools, includ www.ci.smyrna.ga.us experienced a devastating ing Kennesaw State University. www.kennesaw-ga.gov setback during the Civil www.cityofpowdersprings.org Kennesaw’s Historic Downtown War when most of it was features shopping, dining and atSchools www.cobb.k12.ga.us destroyed during the Battle tractions such as the Smithsonian www.marietta-city.org at Kennesaw Mountain. affiliated Southern Museum of Median household income: $65,123 Today, Cobb County, Civil War and Locomotive History, Median age of residents: 35 located north of Fulton the Smith-Gilbert Arboretum and Population: 698,158 County, is one of the fastnearby Kennesaw Mountain NaSales tax: 6% est-growing counties in the tional Battlefield Park. Chamber of Commerce nation. With a diverse ecoCobb County nomic base that includes 770-980-2000, www.cobbchamber.org Rapidly defining what’s new jobs in the service, retail, Property Taxes and progressive in quality of life aerospace and technology The property tax is $28.75 per $1,000 of assessed and citizen services, Smyrna sectors, Cobb County offers value. Tax Commissioner: 770-980-2000 delivers an amazing sense of style a quality of life unsurpassed and love of life. The new Market in the Southeast. More than $770 million has been spent on apartments and condos near Cum- Village, home to fabulous restaurants, transportation improvements in re- berland Mall, secluded subdivisions bars and upscale shops and services, cent years, allowing residents easy in East Cobb and horse ranches in is the final piece of a master plan for access to Atlanta and the commer- the northwest corner of the county. success. Call it “Main Street USA” or cial districts of Vinings Overlook, The small towns of Marietta, Vin- “Disneyland,” but don’t overlook its Cumberland Parkway and the pres- ings, Smyrna and Austell still retain charm and ability to offer the best in tigious “Platinum Triangle” in the their Southern charm amidst urban fresh, trendy lifestyle options. N Galleria area. settings. According to the Census For more counties and neighborhood A variety of housing options ex- Bureau, the median value of homes information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com ist in Cobb County, including luxury in 2006 was $205,200.

QUICK INFO

Smyrna

Marietta City Schools Board of Education

71 25 16 6 6 4 $8,816 770-422-3500

Elementary Schools 7 Middle Schools 1 High Schools 1 Sixth-Grade 1 Magnet 1 Per-pupil expenditures $9,061 School and bus information 678-594-8000 Avg. SAT Scores

Cobb Co. Marietta City Georgia National

1534 1514 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 ELECTRICITY Acworth Power 770-974-5233 Cobb EMC 770-429-2100 Georgia Power 888-660-5890 GreyStone Power Corp. 770-942-6576 Marietta Power/ Columbia Energy 770-794-5100 GAS Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T 888-436-8638 Comcast 404-266-2278 MCI Worldcom 770-541-7235 Outside Georgia 800-356-3094 WATER Austell Water Cobb County Water Systems Marietta Water Powder Springs Water Smyrna Water

770-944-4300 770-423-1000 770-794-5100 770-943-8000 770-319-5338

CABLE TV Bellsouth Multimedia 770-360-5000 Charter Communications 888-438-2427 Comcast 404-266-2278 HOSPITALS Emory Adventist Hospital 770-434-0710 WellStar Cobb Hospital 770-732-4000 WellStar Kennestone Hospital 770-793-5000 WellStar Windy Hill Hospital 770-644-1000

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COUNTY INFORMATION

Coweta County

EDUCATION pUBLIC schools Coweta County Board of Education 770-254-2800 19 6 3 3 3 $8,219 770-252-2820

Avg. SAT Score Coweta Co. Georgia National

1476 1452 1498

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity Georgia Power Company

770-253-2263

Coweta-Fayette EMC

770-502-0226

Photo: Courtesy of the Georgia Department of Economic Development

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Charter Alternative Per-pupil expenditures School & bus information

Downtown Newnan

Telephone AT&T Residential 866-271-9724 Water Coweta County Water and Sewer Authority

770-254-3710

Cable TV AT&T 770-599-2000 Charter Communications 770-253-8328 Hospitals Piedmont Newnan Hospital 770-400-1000

Newnan

Newnan, the county seat, is steeped in history. The city survived the Civil War largely intact, due to its status as a hospital city for Confederate troops, and retains much of its original architecture. The city is known as the “City of Homes,” and boasts six historic districts. Attractions include Dunaway Gardens, a rock and floral garden that hosts weddings and special events, and the Ashley Park shopping development. The city is also home to the Heritage School, an independent college-preparatory school for children from age 4 through high school. Notable natives include country singer Alan Jackson, NFL wide receiver Calvin Johnson and former Georgia Gov. Ellis Arnall.

Coweta County, the 64th county in Sharpsburg, Turin, Raymond the state of Georgia, covers 443 square and Roscoe. The town of Haralson is miles in the west central part of the state. split between Coweta and Meriwether The land on which Coweta County Counties. Attractions in Coweta County now sits was originally part of the Creek Nation, which chief William McIntosh Jr. ceded to the United States government in the Treaty of County www.coweta.ga.us Indian Springs in 1825. The land Neighborhoods www.ci.newnan.ga.us Founded in 1860, Sewas divided into five counties. www.senoia.com The settlement of Bullsboro noia is filled with historic Schools wwww.cowetaschools.org architecture from the early became the first county seat in 1826, but the seat of government 1900s and dating all the Median household income: $61,015 soon moved to Newnan, named way back to the 1840s. Median age of residents: 36.6 for Georgia Secretary of State The Senoia Historic DisPopulation: 129,629 Daniel Newnan. This new city, the trict, comprising much of Sales tax: 7% county’s largest, soon became the the city, is on the National Chamber of Commerce center of economic activity. During Register of Historic Places. Coweta County the Civil War, it was chosen to host The city has twice hosted 770-253-2270, www.newnancowetachamber.org a hospital for wounded soldiers, the Southern Living Idea Property Taxes due to its location on two major House. Senoia is a popular The property tax rate per $1,000 of assessed railroad lines. location for film producvalue is: Coweta County is filled with tions and has been seen Unincorporated Coweta County, $28.41; historic homes and buildings, in such pictures as “DrivNewnan: $43.90, Senoia, $35.53. some predating the Civil War, with ing Miss Daisy” and “Fried Tax Commissioner: 770-254-2670 more than two dozen landmarks Green Tomatoes” and televithroughout the county listed sion shows including “The on the National Register of Historic include the historic courthouse in Walking Dead.” The city is also Newnan’s town square; Oak Grove home to Raleigh Studios Atlanta Places. In addition to Newnan, Coweta Plantation; the Lewis Grizzard (formerly Riverwood Studios), a County is home to the cities of Museum and Erskine Caldwell production facility. N Grantville and Senoia. Part of the Museum, both in Moreland; and city of Palmetto is located in Coweta Oak Hill Cemetery. In recent years, County, with the majority residing in Coweta County’s growth has placed it For more counties and neighborhood Fulton County. Coweta is also home among the top 100 growth counties in information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com to the towns of Moreland, Sargent, the nation.

QUICK INFO

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com.

Neighborhoods

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Senoia


COUNTY INFORMATION

DeKalb County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

Located east of Fulton County, DeKalb County is the second largest county in the state with a population of about 705,000. DeKalb County contributes to Atlanta’s status as an “ international city” with its businesses and residences representing more than 30 different countries and 120 languages.

Neighborhoods

Decatur The county seat of DeKalb, Decatur is a charming historic city known for its recreation and pedestrian-friendly streets. Its beating heart

The square is also home to some beautiful public art, and hosts numerous festivals, town celebrations and neighborhood events. Decatur is home to a diverse population, attracting young professionals, families, retirees and bright young college students—the city is home to the prestigious women’s university Agnes Scott College, and world-renowned Emory University is just outside the city limits. Older brick homes, smaller bungalows and cottage homes distinguish the community and the surrounding neighborhoods of Avondale Estates, Oakhurst and Candler Park.

Dunwoody

Emory University

QUICK INFO County

www.co.dekalb.ga.us

DeKalb County prosNeighborhoods www.decaturga.com pers in part due to its ex- www.druidhills.org cellent transportation sys- www.dunwoodyga.org tem. Five major road ar- www.candlerpark.org teries traverse the county: www.stonemountaincity.org Interstates 20, 85, 285, Schools www.dekalb.k12.ga.us 675 and US Highway 78. www.csdecatur.net Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport is only six Median household income: $51,753 miles from DeKalb’s south- Median age of residents: 35 Population: 739,956 ern border and the DeKalb Sales tax: 7% Peachtree Airport, a general aviation field, is report- Chamber of Commerce DeKalb County ed to be the second busiest 404-378-8000, www.dekalbchamber.org airport in Georgia. DeKalb County is also a leader in Property Taxes the biomedical commu- The property tax rate is $41.50 per $1,000 for unincorporated DeKalb County. Tax Commissioner: nity with The Center for 404-298-4000 Disease Control headquaris the Courthouse Square, which tered there. The median value of homes in features an eclectic mix of store2006, according to the Census Bu- front boutiques and shops, restaurants and entertainment options. reau, was $190,100.

In the northern corner of the county is Dunwoody, a popular neighborhood among established professionals and young, upwardly mobile professionals raising families. It is often referred to as the “tennis set” neighborhood because of its numerous recreational outlets that include Lynwood Park and Recreation Center, as well as Blackburn Park and Tennis Center. Cultural attractions include the Dunwoody Nature Center and the Spruill Gallery. A variety of housing is available in Dunwoody, including apartments, townhomes, ranch-style homes, bungalows and mini-mansions with manicured lawns. Nearby Perimeter Mall provides shopping, dining and family entertainment. With its proximity to all major expressways and North Fulton’s booming business opportunities, Dunwoody is a hot-spot for families. N For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com

EDUCATION pUBLIC schools DeKalb County Schools Board of Education 678-676-1200 Elementary Schools 83 Middle Schools 20 High Schools 20 Per-pupil expenditures $9,896 School & bus information 678-676-1300 City Schools of Decatur Board of Education

404-370-4400

Early Learning 1 Elementary Schools 4 Middle Schools 1 High Schools 1 Per-pupil expenditures $13,444 School & bus information 404-370-8737 Avg. SAT Scores DeKalb Co. City of Decatur Georgia National

1334 1577 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity Georgia Power

404-395-7611

Snapping Shoals EMC

770-786-3484

Walton EMC

770-972-2917

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T

888-436-8638

Bellsouth

404-780-2355 Water

DeKalb County Water System 770-621-7200 Cable TV Charter Communication

877-728-3121

Comcast Cablevision

404-266-2278

Hospitals Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston

404-785-6000

DeKalb Medical Center

404-501-1000

Emory University Hospital

404-712-2000

Piedmont Hospital and Medical Care Center

404-605-5000

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COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION

PUBLIC SCHOOLS Fayette County Schools Board of Education 770-460-3535

Avg. SAT Scores

Fayette Co. Georgia National

1550 1431 1483

PRIVATE SCHOOLS Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES ELECTRICITY Georgia Power Company 888-660-5890 Coweta-Fayette EMC 770-253-5626 GAS Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T Residential

888-757-6500

WATER Fayette County Water 770-461-1146 Comcast

CABLE TV 404-266-2278

HOSPITALS Fayette Care Clinic 770-719-4620 Piedmont Fayette Hospital 770-719-7000

Fayetteville

Old-fashioned community pride mingles with a progressive sensibility on the streets of historic downtown Fayetteville, where antique stores and boutiques sit side by side in refurbished buildings. Boasting a population of approximately 16,000 residents, Fayetteville is home to the Fayette County Historic Society, Research Center and Museum. A haven for family fun, Dixieland Fun Park offers an assortment of activities for young and old alike. The HollidayDorsey-Fife Museum provides a fascinating link to the past thanks to its association with several historical figures, including Margaret Mitchell and "Doc" Holliday. The 1,500-seat Southern Ground Amphitheater attracts national touring acts with its annual summer concert series.

17 6 5 1 1 $8,359 770-460-3520 Photo: Courtesy of the City of Fayetteville

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Alternative Open Campus Per-pupil expenditures School & bus information

Fayette County

Neighborhoods

Starr's Mill in Fayetteville

Located southwest of Atlanta, the land comprising Fayette County was ceded from the Creek Indian Nation in 1821, thus creating Georgia’s 49th county. The county seat, the city of Fayetteville, was established in 1823 and contains the oldest courthouse in the County www.fayettecounty.ga.gov state, built in 1825 and located Neighborhoods www.fayetteville-ga.gov The area now known as on Fayetteville’s historic town www.peachtree-city.org Peachtree City was originally square. Both the county and city Schools www.fcboe.org settled by Woodland Era were named for the Marquis de Indians several thousand LaFayette, who fought alongside Median household income: $82,216 Median age of residents: 42.4 years ago, and ceded to George Washington in the Population: 107,104 the Federal government Revolutionary War. Sales tax: 6% in 1821 by Chief William Author Margaret Mitchell Chamber of Commerce McIntosh, Jr. spent many summers at her 770-461-9983, www.fayettechamber.org Comprising some grandfather’s home in Fayette 12,000 acres, Peachtree County, which helped to inspire Property Taxes Per $1,000 of assessed value is: City was chartered in the locations in her novel Gone With Unincorporated Fayette County, $30.70; 1950s as a masterplanned the Wind. Fayetteville, $31.64; community of five separate Today, the 199-square mile Peachtree City, $34.54. villages. Today, the area area is renowned as a thriving Tax Commissioner: 770-461-3611 is linked by a 90- mile economic center that features network of trails and golf numerous attractive incentives for businesses, including the 2,200From 1984 to 1994, Fayette cart paths connecting homes, acre Peachtree City Industrial Park, County was the fifth-fastest growing businesses, schools and parks. Gol carts, bicycles and walking are the which features its own Foreign Trade county in the U.S. Zone, which allows merchandise to Fayette County boasts several preferred modes of transportation enter from or exit to foreign countries golf courses and two amphitheaters, among its 35,000 residents, who without a formal U.S. Customs entry among other attractions serving a enjoy its wooded scenery and or payment of duties. In addition, family-oriented population of more wealth of parks, playgrounds and Fayette County maintains a rural, than 106,000 residents. Single-family recreational areas. N . small-town allure, and has been housing in Fayette County ranges For more counties and neighborhood recognized as one of the nation’s from the $50,000s in moderateinformation, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com most attractive communities for income areas to more than $2 million corporate family relocation. in affluent neighborhoods.

44 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

QUICK INFO

Peachtree City


COUNTY INFORMATION

Fulton County

PUBLIC SCHOOLS Fulton County Schools Board of Education 404-768-3600

Buckhead is also the epicenter for the city’s entertainment and dining industries. With more than 200 restaurants, luxury hotels and nightspots, it has long been a young professional’s paradise. The area also offers numerous antique stores, art galleries and mall shopping at Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza.

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Charter Per-pupil expenditures

Downtown Atlanta skyline

QUICK INFO

Neighborhoods

Buckhead

Considered Atlanta’s “silk stocking district,” Buckhead is “where old money lives and new money parties,” according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. With its one-of-a-kind Georgian and Neoclassical mansions and uniquely styled homes from the 1950s and 1960s, Buckhead is a favorite locale among architecture and history buffs. It is home to the Governor’s Mansion, the historic Swan House and the Atlanta History Center.

County www.co.fulton.ga.us Neighborhoods www.alpharetta.ga.us www.buckhead.net www.virginiahighland.com www.eastpointcity.org www.collegeparkga.com www.hapeville.org www.ci.roswell.ga.us www.sandyspringsga.org Schools www.fultonschools.org www.atlanta.k12.ga.us Median household income: $57,586 Median age of residents: 35 Population: 963,676 Sales tax: 7%, Atlanta City: 8% Chamber of Commerce Greater North Fulton 770-993-8806, www.gnfcc.com Metro Atlanta 404-880-9000, www.metroatlantachamber.com South Fulton 770-964-1984, www.sfcoc.org Property Taxes The property tax rate per $1,000 is: $30.49 for the City of Atlanta; $28.03 for incorporated Fulton County; $33.69 for unincorporated South Fulton and $31.90 for unincorporated North Fulton County County. Tax Commissioner: 404-730-6100

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development.

At the center of the Metro Atlanta area is Fulton County. Bordered on the west by the Chattahoochee River and encompassing Interstates 85, 75, 285 and Ga. 400, Fulton County is at the hub of the area’s financial, transportation, retail, communications and cultural services. Most Fortune 500 corporations maintain national or regional facilities in the area; many are headquartered here, including Coca-Cola, Equifax, United Parcel Service, Home Depot, Delta Airlines and Turner Broadcasting System. More than 3 million live and work in Fulton County. Older, innercity neighborhoods, such as Inman Park, Candler Park and trendy Virginia-Highland offer eclectic living amidst unique boutiques and restaurants. Midtown is at the heart of the city’s cultural life, home to the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, High Museum of Art, Alliance Theatre and the historic Fox Theatre. Many outdoor festivals are held at Piedmont Park. According to the Census Bureau, the median value of homes in 2006 was $270,000. Homes in the millions can be found in such affluent neighborhoods as Buckhead, Sandy Springs and Alpharetta.

EDUCATION

one of Atlanta’s most affluent neighborhoods. Homes range from elegant subdivisions to those with acreage. The Country Club of the South is a planned community home to several sports stars, high profile executives and celebrities. A successful combination of old and new, Alpharetta has become a haven for singles, families and professionals wanting a bit of country living with all the amenities that city dwelling offers. While many residents shop at nearby Northpoint Mall and Gwinnett Mall, many still enjoy the old stores on Main Street— a visit to the Alpharetta Soda Shoppe is a special treat. N

Alpharetta

Once a small farming community, Alpharetta has greatly boomed within the last 20 years to become

For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com

58 19 16 6 $9,746

Atlanta City Schools

404-802-3500

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Charter Non-Traditional Per-pupil expenditures: School & bus information:

55 16 22 7 2 $13,710 404-753-9815

Avg. SAT Scores Atlanta (City) 1285 Fulton Co. 1584 Georgia 1460 National 1509 PRIVATE SCHOOLS Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 ELECTRICITY City of College Park 404-669-3772 City of East Point 404-270-7093 City of Fairburn 770-964-2244 City of Palmetto 770-463-3377 Georgia Power Company 404-395-7611 GreyStone Power Corp. 770-942-6576 Sawnee EMC 770-887-2363 GAS Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T 888-436-8638 Outside Georgia 800-356-3094

Fulton County

WATER

404-730-6830

CABLE TV Charter Communications 877-728-3121 Comcast 404-266-2278 HOSPITALS Atlanta Medical Center 404-265-4000 Center for the Visually Impaired 404-875-9011 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Hughes Spalding 404-785-9500 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite 404-785-5252 Emory Crawford Long Hospital 404-686-2513 Fulton County Health Dept. 404-730-1211 Grady Memorial Hospital 404-616-4307 North Fulton Regional Hospital 770-751-2500 Northside Hospital 404-851-8000 Piedmont Hospital 404-605-5000 Shepherd Center 404-352-2020 South Fulton Medical Center 404-466-1170 St. Joseph’s Hospital 404-851-7001

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 45


COUNTY INFORMATION pUBLIC schools Gwinnett County Schools Board of Education: 678-301-6000 Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Alternative Open Campus Per-pupil expenditures: City Schools of Buford Board of Education:

72 24 20 6 1 $8,338 770-945-5035

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Academy Per-pupil expenditures

1 1 1 1 $10,198

Avg. SAT Scores Gwinnett Co. City of Buford Georgia National

1526 1455 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity City of Buford 770-945-6761 City of Lawrenceville 770-963-2414 City of Norcross 770-448-2122 Georgia Power 404-395-7611 Jackson EMC 770-963-6166 Sawnee EMC 770-887-2363 Walton EMC 770-972-2917 Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com.

AT&T

Telephone 888-436-8638

Water Buford Dacula Gwinnett City Water Lawrenceville Norcross

770-889-4600 770-963-7451 678-376-6800 770-963-2414 770-448-2122

Cable TV Bellsouth Multimedia 770-360-5000 Charter Communications

888-438-2427

Comcast

404-266-2278 Hospitals

Emory Eastside Medical Center

770-736-2400

Joan Glancy Memorial Hospital 678-584-6800 Gwinnett Medical Center

678-312-4321

Gwinnett Women’s Pavilion 678-312-4770 Summit Ridge Center for Behavorial Health 770-822-2200

Gwinnett County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

EDUCATION

Some of Duluth’s neighborhoods include Edgewater Estates, Sweet Bottom Plantation, and Riverbrooke. Affluent estates with antebellum architecture can be found as well as apartment communities, older brick, ranch-style homes and subdivisions. Duluth still retains some of its original small-town businesses, along with chain businesses, many accessible by Ga. 400 and I-85.

Suwanee

Suwanee is named after the Shawnee Indians who settled here Mall of Georgia in the latter part of the 18th century. Following the official founding of Originally part of Georgia’s the city in 1837, Suwanee became Native American territory, Gwinnett a railroad stop along the Southern County was created by the State Railroad route. It remained a small Legislature in 1818 and named after country town well into the ’70s when Button Gwinnett, the third signer of construction of I-85 and U.S. 23 the Declaration of Independence and brought easy access to the region. a former state governor. Since then, Suwanee has exWhile the county was perienced tremendous once largely rural with small growth, from 2,000 resiCounty www.co.gwinnett.ga.us towns, country stores, farms dents in 1990 to more Neighborhoods www.cityofbuford.com and forests, today it is home to than 10,000 today. To www.duluthga.net more than 245 international help manage growth, www.snellville.org companies and 450 high-tech the city has developed www.suwanee.com firms. With an average of 260 a comprehensive developSchools www.bufordcityschools.org new professional and industrial ment plan that promotes www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us companies relocating to the pedestrian-oriented deMedian household income: $64,005 county each year, attracting more velopment and mixedMedian age of residents: 33 than 6,000 new jobs, Gwinnett use zoning. Designated Population: 789,499 County remains in the top 10 a Tree City USA for more Sales tax: 6% ranking for growth nationwide. than 10 years, the city Chamber of Commerce The county supports many is committed to preserving Gwinnett County cultural events, restaurants 27 percent of its land as 770-232-3000, www.gwinnettchamber.org and shopping opportunities, green space. Property Taxes including the Mall of Georgia. Such foresight has The property tax in unincorporated Gwinnett Gwinnett County remains allowed Suwanee to retain County is $31.77 per $1,000 of assessed value. affordable for renters and first-time its old-fashioned charm Tax Commissioner: 770-822-8800. home buyers, many of whom find while providing contemhomes in the communities of Doraville, in Metro Atlanta and is home to porary convenience. Only 35 miles Lawrenceville and Snellville. The median some of the best golf courses and from downtown Atlanta, Suwanee is value of homes in 2006, according to private tennis clubs. There are close to big-city attractions, business numerous parks for recreation and districts and shopping. Many anthe Census Bureau, was $193,100. participatory sports, including tique shops and historic structures, Bunten Road Park and “Shorty” including several Victorian and reHowell Park. Two major malls, gional farm-style homes, are located Gwinnett Place and Northpoint, near downtown Suwanee. N are located near Duluth. The Southeastern Railway Museum, Amidst the pristine setting of which preserves and operates old For more counties and neighborhood Gwinnett County, Duluth has some railroad equipment, is a must-see information, visit our Web site at of the most exclusive neighborhoods for any railroad aficionado. www.newcomeratlanta.com

QUICK INFO

Neighborhoods

Duluth

46 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


METRO ATLANTA

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www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 47


upcomingEVENTS

Exhibits & Events Braves Career Fair, Turner Field Ever wanted to turn your passion for sports into a career? A $26 ticket includes a networking event, the chance to talk with top sports executives and an upper box ticket to watch the Atlanta Braves take on the Chicago Cubs. April 6, 800-745-3000, www.braves.com/careerfair.

Envisioning Emancipation, Atlanta Cyclorama

Ethel, Ferst Center for the Arts

An Evening With Ira Glass, Ferst Center for the Arts

bring your favorite Disney moments to life. Thrill to the antics of Lightning McQueen and Tow Mater from “Cars,” the Little Mermaid, Tinker Bell and the Disney fairies, and Woody, Jessie, Buzz Lightyear and the gang from “Toy Story.”

The host of National Public Radio’s “This American Life” talks about the acclaimed show and the elements of a good story. April 6, 404-894-9600,

May 1-5, 800-745-3000, www.gwinnettcenter.com.

www.ferstcenter.gatech.edu.

Enjoy an evening of live music and local artists on the first Friday of each month from May through September. These free events take place from 5 to 10 p.m. on the square in downtown Gainesville. May 4, www.gainesville.org.

Atlanta Ballet’s Carmina Burana, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre A staging of the classic ballet, choreographed by David Bintley and set to the original score by Carl Orff, as performed by the Atlanta Ballet Orchestra and the Georgia State University Singers. April 12-14, 800-745-3000, www.atlantaballet.com.

Ethel, Ferst Center for the Arts This ensemble, one of ARTech’s resident artists for 2012-2013, is recognized as America’s premier post-classical string quartet for its energetic performances and use of amplification and improvisation. April 20, 404-894-9600, www.ferstcenter.

Atlanta Jazz Festival, Piedmont Park

National Astronomy Day and Family Science Night, Tellus Science Museum

www.atlantafestivals.com. Frida and Diego: Passion, Politics, and Painting, High Museum of Art

The May 2013 Blue Sky Concert series kicks off on May 1 and takes place each Wednesday in May on the square in downtown Gainesville. These free, one-hour family-friendly concerts begin at noon. May 1-29, www.gainesville.org.

Disney on Ice Presents Worlds of Fantasy, Arena at Gwinnett Center Get ready for non-stop fun as classic characters 48 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

This bi-annual event attracts more than 6,000 attendees to Newnan’s historic downtown to sample the best food the city has to offer, with more than 60 vendors offering everything from barbecue pork sliders to artisan pizza and much more. April 19, www.cityofnewnan.org.

www.alexsanderacademy.org.

Atlanta’s premier jazz music celebration marks its 36th year with three days of music in Piedmont Park. Featured acts include Gretchen Parlato, Tia Fuller, José James, the Dominick Farinacci Group and Meshell Ndegeocello. May 25-27,

Blue Sky Concerts, Gainesville Square

Spring Taste of Newnan, Downtown Newnan

Enjoy great food, fun and games, participate in a silent auction and purchase amazing artwork from professional artists and Alexsander Academy students at this annual fundraising event. Proceeds will go toward the art and music programs at Alexsander Academy, a small not-forprofit school for students with learning differences and special needs. April 20, 404-839-5910,

First Fridays, Gainesville Square

gatech.edu.

404-658-7625, www.atlantacyclorama.org.

Alexsander Academy Art Show, Alexsander Academy

PHOTO: © Banco de Mexico Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, México, D.F./ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Theater & Concerts

PHOTO: James Ewing

Historian Dr. Deborah Willis discusses her book, “Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery.” April 19,

Meet Geoff Notkin and Steve Arnold, the Science Channel’s “Meteorite Men,” as they present a lecture and attend a book-signing event in the afternoon, and kick off Family Science Night the same evening. This all-day affair also includes “star walks” by astronomer David Dundee and sky viewings in the observatory. April 20, 770-606-5700, www.tellusmuseum.org.

Suwanee’s Super Incredible Race, Town Center Park Participate in a mind-bending race in which teams of two or more receive a series of clues that require them to complete high-energy mental and physical challenges. A free concert featuring the Journey tribute band Departure follows the event. Registration deadline is April 5. April 20, www.suwanee.com.

Frida and Diego: Passion, Politics, and Painting, High Museum of Art


Earth Day, Tellus Science Museum Celebrate Earth Day with unique educational adventures for students, home schoolers and lifelong learners. Selected exhibits from the Georgia Science and Engineering Fair will be on display. Learn about recycling, make a frog visor and participate in other fun activities. April 22, 770-606-5700, www.tellusmuseum.org.

Encourage a Young Writer Craft Week, Interactive Neighborhood for Kids Aspiring young writers are invited to create their very own books and write down all of their creative thoughts and ideas at this fun, hands-on interactive museum. April 22-26, 770-536-1900, www.inkfun.org.

Spring Chicken Festival, Downtown Gainesville The 2013 Spring Chicken Festival features a parade, live entertainment, a children’s zone, a quilt show, a “re-hatched” art market featuring creations made from recycled or repurposed materials, and a chicken cook-off. April 27, www.gainesville.org.

Taste of East Point, Downtown East Point Enjoy great music, food and drinks from across the south metro area while taking in the quaint, small-town atmosphere of downtown East Point. April 27, www.downtowneastpoint.com.

Bark in the Park, Turner Field Buy a special ticket for man’s best friend to attend a Sunday game between the Atlanta Braves and the New York Mets. May 5, 800-745-3000, www.braves.com/bark.

Mother’s Day Craft Week, Interactive Neighborhood for Kids Show your mom how much you love her by creating a beautiful card for Mother’s Day. May 6-10, 770-536-1900, www.inkfun.org.

Frida and Diego: Passion, Politics, and Painting, High Museum of Art This exhibit features more than 75 works by the late Mexican painter Frida Kahlo and her husband, painter and muralist Diego Rivera, exploring their work within the political and artistic contexts of their time. Through May 12, 404-7335000, www.high.org.

Mother’s Day Brunch, The Ritz-Carlton Buckhead This time-honored Mother’s Day tradition offers more than 100 items, all beautifully prepared and artfully displayed. Price is $99 for adults and

$49 for children ages 5-12. Reservations are required. May 12, 404-240-7035, www.opentable.com.

East Point Farmers Market, Downtown East Point East Point’s monthly farmers market returns with locally grown produce and handcrafted goods. This event also features the city’s first Food Truck Alley, featuring a number of food trucks offering quality, inexpensive fare. May 18, www.downtowneastpoint.com.

17th Annual Butterfly Release, Wilshire Trails Park

The Place Where Learning Is Fun!

Enjoy an afternoon of food, drinks and fun from 1 to 4 p.m.. At 3 p.m., rain or shine, each child will receive an envelope with a butterfly to release. May 19, www.gainesville.org.

Taste of Fayette, Downtown Fayetteville Sample offerings from Fayetteville restaurants and enjoy live entertainment, a kid’s corner and a fine art show. May 19, 770-719-4173, www.fayetteville-ga.gov.

Paint-Your-Own Pottery Studio Ĵ Over 20 Exhibits Ĵ Great Gift Shop Ĵ Free Parking Ĵ The Featherbone Center 999 Chestnut Street, SE #11 Gainesville, GA

www.inkfun.org 770-536-1900

Atlanta Ballet Summer Day Camp, Cobb Centre Keep your child engaged during the summer and let them explore their creative side! The Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education hosts a day camp for beginning and intermediate dancers ages 8 and up at its Cobb Centre studio in Marietta. June 10-28, 678-213-5000,

Open 7 days a week Short drive from Atlanta. Exit 22 off I9-85

GONE WITH THE WIND COLLECTION

www.centre.atlantaballet.com.

Native Expressions: Dave McGary’s Bronze Realism, Booth Western Art Museum View sculptures by one of the living legends of contemporary artists of the American West. Dave McGary is known for his realistic and colorful depictions of Native Americans, drawn from his many years of interacting with native peoples. This exhibit features approximately 30 sculptures of varying scale, representing the best of his career. Through June 30, 770-387-1300,

MARIETTA

www.boothmuseum.org.

Inside CNN Studio Tour, CNN Center Get a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the world’s first and most famous 24-hour news network and have your picture taken reading the day’s news. Ongoing, 404-827-2300, www.cnn.com/tour.

Southern Quilt Trail, Powder Springs Tour this series of quilt patterns painted on the sides of historic barns and other buildings. Ongoing, 770-439-1780, www.southernquilttrail.com.

MONDAY-SATURDAY

10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Closed Sunday

GONE WITH THE WIND M U S E U M

Scarlett on the Square Original Gone With the Wind memorabilia on display from the private collection of Dr. Christopher Sullivan. GIFT SHOP, FACILITY RENTALS ANNUAL EVENTS

770-794-5576 www.gwtwmarietta.com www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 49


hiddenATLANTA

LEFT: The water park at LanierWorld. RIGHT: Enjoy special event celebrations on the lake.

Lake Lanier L Islands Resort

ocated about an hour outside of Atlanta, Lake Lanier Islands Resort is a perfect destination for families on vacation, couples seeking a romantic retreat and even business meetings. Stretching out over 1,500 acres, this luxurious resort offers a state-of-the-art conference center, lodgings including gorgeous lake houses and villas, a wealth of outdoor activities, great restaurants and a family-friendly amusement park—all of it situated on beautiful Lake Sidney Lanier in Buford, Ga. “We’re the only beach on the lake,” says Kate Davis, a spokeswoman for the resort. “That brings By Cady Schulman a lot of value and kind of sets us apart from other resorts in the area.” The centerpiece of the resort, of course, is Lake Sidney Lanier, which spans 38,000 acres and touches five counties. Visitors can set off from Harbor Landing to explore this vast expanse in boats ranging from pontoons to yachts, or charter a sailboat tour. Guests of all ages can also take in the cool lakeside breezes while enjoying LanierWorld, which features such attractions as the Family Fun Park water park, the sparkling sands of Big Beach and the volleyball courts, miniature golf and dining options at Sunset Cove. In addition, the resort features concerts at the new Peachtree Point Amphitheater, zip lining with Lake Lanier Canopy Tours, horseback riding at the Equestrian Center, hiking and walking trails, pampering at the Lake Lanier Islands Spa, 11 tennis courts, kayaking and paddleboarding, and rustic campgrounds for tents and recreational vehicles. Visitors flock to Lake Lanier Islands Resort for both weekend getaways and family day trips. Although summer is the resort’s most active season—“It gets really busy in May and June and throughout the summer,” Davis says—accommodations and dining are open year-round, and there are plenty of events throughout the year, including the resort’s Magical Night of Lights holiday display, which runs mid-November through December. Upcoming events include an arts and crafts festival and boat show April 13 and 14, the second annual Music and Beer Fest on April 27 and the 10th annual La Raza Cinco de Mayo Festival on May 5. Lake Lanier Islands Resort is located at 7000 Lanier Islands Parkway in Buford. For reservations or additional information, call 770-945-8787 or visit www.lakelanierislands.com.

50 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

PHOTOS: Lake Lanier Islands Resort

Luxury Retreat Offers Something for Everyone


Newcomer Magazine Atlanta | April/May 2013  

Newcomer magazine is Atlanta’s leading relocation and new-resident guide, providing an invaluable resource for businesses, executives and fa...

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