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Relocation, Lifestyle & Living in Atlanta

October/November 2012

PLUS

Carefree Carrabelle

Paradise on the Forgotten Coast

2012

Education Guide Your Resource for Atlanta’s Schools and Education Options Family-Friendly Living

Prime Pampering Spots

Roswell Ghost Tour

Finding the Right Neighborhood

The City’s Most Relaxing Spas

Exploring Historic ‘Haunts’


October/November CONTENTS FEATURES Prime Pampering Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Newcomer’s 2012 Annual Education Guide . . . . 21

Whether you’re recovering from the stress of moving or simply looking for an indulgent afternoon, Atlanta is filled with relaxing day spas offering luxurious massages, facials, pedicures and other procedures.

Choosing where your family will live is one of the most important decisions of your move. Here are some tips to help make the process easier, including great neighborhoods worth a look.

Your guide to metro Atlanta’s education options, including tips on helping your child adjust to a new school, navigating the admissions interview process and much more.

Neighborhoods for Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Carefree Carrabelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Just 325 miles from Atlanta, the small town of Carrabelle—the boating and fishing capital of Florida’s Emerald Coast—is an oasis of white, sandy beaches and unspoiled beauty.

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34

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DEPARTMENTS

In Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Relocation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

The inside scoop on news, events and happenings around Atlanta.

A comprehensive guide to help you find your way before, during and after your move, including counties, neighborhoods, relocation tips, a map to metro Atlanta and much more.

Neighborhood Spotlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 The Virginia-Highland area is a tree-lined haven of historic homes, trendy boutiques, friendly watering holes, live music venues and a diverse mix of creative, casual restaurants.

Upcoming Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Special Advertising Section: Atlanta School Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hidden Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

. . . . 27 Atlanta is home to many excellent schools and learning resources. Learn more about some of the metro area’s exceptional independent schools and education centers.

4 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Get caught up on the best exhibitions, theatrical productions, special events and fall festivities across the metro area.

The Roswell Ghost Tour seeks to educate residents and visitors about the area’s historical hauntings, unexplained sightings and other possible signs of the supernatural.


www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 5


Arlington

Christian School

Changing the world for Christ…one child at a time.

We wish to thank all the people who made this publication possible through their valuable time and dedication. We graciously thank our advertisers for their support of Newcomer magazine. ­—PK publisher/president

Patrick Killam

pkillam@killampublishing.com editor

Kevin Forest Moreau

Taking learning to new heights! • SACS Accredited, K5-12th Grade • Now Offering Forensic Science • College Preparatory Curriculum

editor@killampublishing.com marketing & promotions

Jeff Thompson copy editor

• Championship GISA Athletic Program • Extended Learning Day Programs • Classroom SMART Boards & Computer • 9 Advanced Placement Courses Offered

4500 Ridge Road, Fairburn, GA 30213 770.964.9871 www.arlingtonchristian.org Fully Accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and “with quality” by the Georgia Accreditation Commission.

Lindsay Oberst contributing writers

Daniel Beauregard, Susan Flowers, Rachael Mason, Lindsay Oberst, Hope S. Philbrick, Cady Schulman, Carrie Whitney director of sales & marketing

Patrick Killam

pkillam@killampublishing.com account director

Lacey James

advertising@killampublishing.com

TO ADVERTISE CALL 770-992-0273 font: mawns handwriting

Scan this code to check out past issues of Newcomer.

Newcomer magazine, October/November 2012 Volume 16, Issue 4. Submissions, photography or ideas may be sent to Killam Publishing, Inc., 200 Market Place, Suite 230, Roswell, GA 30075. Submissions will not be returned unless otherwise requested and accompanied by a stamped, selfaddressed envelope. Newcomer magazine reserves the right to revise any necessary submissions. Reproduction in whole or in part of any elements of this publication are strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. © 2012 Killam Publishing, Inc.

For additional copies, further information, advertising or suggestions, please contact:

KILLAM PUBLISHING, INC. P: 770-992-0273 • F: 770-649-7463 editor@killampublishing.com www.newcomeratlanta.com

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inFOCUS n e w s b i tes fr om a ro un d AT LANTA

Halloween

PHOTO: Courtesy of the Atlanta Botanical Garden

Harvest

Throughout the month of October, visitors to the Atlanta Botanical Garden can reap a harvest of Halloween-themed celebrations. Scarecrows in the Garden features more than 100 lifesize scarecrows designed by local residents, artists, businesses, schools and other organizations. There’s also the Fest of Ale beer festival on Thursday evenings, the fourth annual Great Chefs of Atlanta Pumpkin Carving Contest on Oct. 25 and Goblins in the Garden, a daylong costume party for the kids on Oct. 28. For some additional information, please call 404-876-5859 or visit www.atlanta botanicalgarden.org.

Evolutionary Adventure

Inspired by origin myths from across the globe, Totem explores man’s evolutionary progress, from his humble amphibian beginnings to his nonstop yearning to fly. Filled with amazing visuals like a glittering man covered in small mirrors and crystals, Cirque du Soleil’s extravaganza of acrobatics, music and imagination visits Atlanta for a limited run under the blue and yellow big top at Atlantic Station, starting Oct. 26. For tickets and other information, visit www.cirquedusoleil.com.

PHOTO: Taken from EMI Music Publicity Download Website

An Early Start

Georgia On His Mind You’d be hard-pressed to find a contemporary music star more rooted in Georgia than Alan Jackson, who was born in Newnan and wrote a hit song about growing up along the Chattahoochee River. So it’s fitting that Jackson headlines the Kicks 101.5 Country Fair, a country music concert presented by local radio station WKHX. Kix Brooks of chart-topping duo Brooks & Dunn hosts the event at Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre. Other special guests to be announced. For tickets, call 800-745-3000 or visit www.vzwamp.com. 8 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

In an increasingly global workplace, proficiency in multiple languages has never been more important to our children’s futures. With that in mind, Atlanta International School in Buckhead opened its new Early Learning Center in August. The center’s full-immersion preschool program will give 3- and 4-year-old students a head start in French, German and Spanish—with the added bonus of increasing their critical thinking skills, creativity and mental flexibility. For more information, visit www.aischool.org.


infocus A Night of Dazzling Dance

PHOTO: Jonah Hooper

PHOTO: Courtesy of Taste of Atlanta

See dance in a whole new way courtesy of Wabi Sabi, a contemporary group dedicated to performing in unconventional settings and showcasing the talents of the next generation of choreographers. The group performs as part of Moon Dance, a benefit for the Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education’s scholarship program. The event also includes live music, a raffle and a live auction. Oct. 6 at the Michael C. Carlos Dance Center. For more information, call 404-873-5811 or visit www.atlantaballet.com.

What’s Cooking? Atlanta’s leading food festival enters its second decade in style as Taste of Atlanta unveils a mouthwatering menu of participating restaurants, including Jim N Nicks, Bhojanic, Ocean Prime, the Optimist and dozens more. Savor gourmet fare, live cooking demonstrations, family-friendly entertainment, craft beers and much more. Oct. 5-7 at Technology Square in Midtown. For more information, visit www.tasteofatlanta.com.

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AT L A N TA

PAMPERING GUIDE

Whether you’re recovering from the stress of moving to a new city or simply looking for an indulgent afternoon, Atlanta is filled with day spas offering luxurious massages, facials, pedicures and body treatments. From spas in some of the city’s top hotels to a getaway on a sprawling resort, here are some of our favorite spots for relaxation and enrichment. BLUE MedSpa At this relaxing Midtown destination, patrons enjoy such services as facials, massage therapy, face and body waxes, aromatherapy treatments, body wraps, detoxifying mud wraps and seasonal body scrubs. Teeth whitening and makeup application also are on the menu. In addition, BLUE offers Botox injections, hormone replacement therapy, laser hair and vein removal and laser face lifts. Check the website for specials and a list of upcoming events. www.bluemedspa.com.

Buckhead Grand Spa

Spoil Yourself at One of These Relaxing Retreats by Cady Schulman

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Located in the Buckhead Grand condominium building, this spa radiates a luxurious, European feel. Along with such treatments as facials, massages, waxing and shaping, wraps and other body treatments, Buckhead Grand offers various peels, including blueberry smoothie and pomegranate. Light therapy and microdermabrasion are also on the menu. Spa packages include It’s a Girl Thing, a great choice for parties and groups, and for gentlemen, the TimeOut, which features a deep tissue massage, a facial and peel and a conditioning treatment for hands or feet. www.buckheadgrandspa.com.


TOP: A treatment room for couples at the Spa at Chateau Elan. BOTTOM: (left) A pedicure at the Ritz-Carlton Spa, Buckhead; (right) The Spa at Four Seasons Midtown.

PHOTO: (Bottom right) Four Seasons Hotel Atlanta

Four Seasons Midtown The Spa at Four Seasons Midtown offers a relaxing getaway, with 10 soundproofed treatment rooms and a soothing color scheme. Among the treatment packages are the Exotic (a Thai massage, bamboo clarifying buff and hot stone pedicure) and Essential Man (a high-performance facial, detox massage and manicure). Other offerings include aromatherapy and reflexology massages and a vanilla and coffee body scrub. www.fourseasons.com/atlanta/spa.

Key Lime Pie Salon and Wellness Spa This Virginia-Highland spot opened by acclaimed stylist DJ Freed houses both a tranquil day spa and an airy, welcoming hair salon. Known as a destination for local and visiting celebrities, Key Lime Pie offers a sumptu-

ous experience and an easygoing, professional staff. Menu items range from deluxe sea salt manicures to whirlpool pedicure treatments, aqua-therapy tub and body massages and partner massages for two. Salon offerings include one-process color treatments, highlights, color cosmetic services and a complimentary stressrelieving treatment. www.keylimepie.net.

weed wrap or lemongrass mimosa scrub. There are also special services for men, like the Men’s Club Retreat package with organic signature massage, signature face therapy and a choice of hand detail or manicure. Patrons can receive a 10 percent discount when purchasing a set of select services. www.naturalbody.com.

Natural Body Spa and Shop

At Radiance Medspa Atlanta, guests can choose from a wide menu, such as Botox treatments, chemical peels, hot stone massage, deep tissue massage, microdermabrasion, Swedish massage and acne and wrinkle treatments. Check the website for specials, such as 30 percent off three or more laser hair removal sessions, or an introductory offer of 15 percent off any service except Botox. www.radiancemedspaatlanta.com. X

At each of Natural Body’s 10 Atlanta-area locations, you’ll find a comforting environment and a “green spa” dedication to preserving our natural resources through organic products and recycled or environmentally friendly materials. You’ll also find a full menu of services including massages to alleviate muscle tension and sinus issues, facials and body therapies such as a sea-

Radiance Medspa Atlanta

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The Spa at Chateau Elan

Natural Body Spa and Shop.

The Ritz-Carlton Spa, Buckhead This spa on the ninth floor of the Ritz-Carlton Buckhead offers a variety of treatments, therapies and packages for those seeking a respite from the daily grind. The Return to Paradise package includes a full-body massage with natural coconut oil, hot stone massage, paraffin hand treatment and scalp massage. Other offer-

ings include an organic cocktail peel with natural fruit enzymes and a Georgia red clay body wrap. The spa also offers packages for men, couples and bridal parties. Book a deluxe guest room or suite on the spa level of the hotel to extend that luxurious feeling overnight. There’s also a spa lounge serving healthy beverages and snacks. www.ritzcarlton.com/buckhead.

12 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

This peaceful retreat boasts an amenity no other local spa can match: its location. Housed in a country mansion bordered by a lush forest and verdant lawns on the grounds of the Chateau Elan resort about 40 minutes outside of Atlanta, the spa comes complete with 14 luxury guest suites and its own restaurant, Fleur-de-Lis, which serves gourmet breakfast and lunch options as well as afternoon tea. Guests enjoy use of a coed whirlpool, sauna and steam in both the men’s and women’s locker rooms, and fitness classes and equipment. Services include hot stone, reflexology and deep tissue massage, hydrotherapy and treatments such as the Chateau Winery Ritual with wine bath, body scrub and mud wrap. Special packages include the His & Her’s, Gentlemen’s Journey, Decadent Duet, the Chateau Spa Journey, Mums Make My Day and Mother & Daughter. There are also eight overnight Euphoria packages, ranging in price from $499 to $4,999. The spa also offers day passes for hotel guests, a Spa Loyalty Program for frequent guests and spa parties for corporate events, bridal showers and other special gatherings. www.chateauelan.com.


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HOMES

AND

COMMUNITIES

NEIGHBORHOODS for Families

Finding the Right Fit for Your Children by Susan Flowers

Relocating to a new city is always challenging. For families with children, that’s even more true. The process involves much more than finding a new home close to your new place of employment. Schools, the makeup of the neighborhood, leisure activities and many other factors need to be taken into account when choosing a place to call home. 14 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


TOP: (Left) See tigers and other exotic animals at Grant Park’s Zoo Atlanta; (right) the Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre in Alpharetta. BOTTOM RIGHT: East Point’s charming downtown. CENTER: Atlanta has many family-friendly neighborhoods to choose from.

PHOTOS: Courtesy of (top left) Zoo Atlanta and (top right) Chris Lee.

Y

ou really have to have a game plan,” says real estate agent Rhonda Duffy, who owns Duffy Realty of Atlanta and has been rated as the No. 1 agent in Georgia for eight consecutive years. That plan begins with identifying specific areas of interest to families with children. If you already know you want to live within the Atlanta city limits, you’ve narrowed your search considerably. Atlanta neighborhoods have much to offer, like Virginia-Highland’s leafy, tree-lined streets, Midtown’s Piedmont Park and Woodruff Arts Center (which includes the High Museum of Art), and Grant Park’s historic homes, park and Zoo Atlanta.

Suburbs and Mixed-Use Communities If you’re not tied to a particular section of town, your options increase dramatically. Many of Atlanta’s suburbs boast features of interest to families with children. Cities like Alpharetta, Marietta, Decatur, Duluth and Lawrenceville abound with green space, walkable downtown centers and other amenities. Alpharetta, located in north Fulton County, is home to an historic downtown district, several parks, a weekly farmer’s market and Verizon

Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park, which hosts outdoor summer concerts by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. In addition to a beautiful city square, Marietta’s attractions include the Gone With the Wind Museum and Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, a Civil War site with 16 miles of hiking trails. Decatur likewise radiates a cozy, small-town charm, especially around its historic courthouse and town square. Public transportation is easily accessible, and recreational activities are plentiful at its many parks and playing fields.

Just north of Atlanta in Gwinnett County, Lawrenceville features such attractions as the Gwinnett Braves minor-league baseball team and Medieval Times, while Duluth boasts the 35-acre Southeastern Railway Museum and the Arena at Gwinnett Center, home of the Georgia Force arena football team and the Gwinnett Gladiators hockey team. Both cities are served by Gwinnett County Public Schools, recognized as one of the best school systems in the state. Other family-friendly suburbs worth considering include East Point, home to the Georgia Soccer Park and the Dick Lane Velodrome, one of the leading bicycle-racing facilities in the country; Roswell, which features the Roswell Cultural Arts Center and the Chattahoochee Nature Center; and Sandy Springs, which boasts Heritage Green, a four-acre park that hosts free concerts and events. There are many, many more suburbs worth a look, as well. Visit Newcomer’s website (www. newcomeratlanta.com) and search for our annual list of Atlanta’s top 100 neighborhoods

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for more information on suitable locations and communities for your family. Mixed-use neighborhoods, which allow residents to live, work and play within the same area, are also worth considering, especially for families used to living in larger metropolitan areas. “A lot of mixed-use developments are attractive to younger families,” says Robin Lemon of Atlanta Communities, a prominent Atlanta-area real estate brokerage. “They want their children to experience more of a neighborhood feeling,” she says. Suwanee’s Town Center development features single-family homes, townhomes and condos, as well as retail and office space and the 10-acre Town Center Park. With abundant green space, an interactive fountain and a 1,000-seat amphitheater, Town Center Park is referred to as Suwanee’s front yard. Smyrna’s pedestrian-friendly Market Village sports an airy, open feel, with plentiful green space, a public square and fountain, as well as charming townhomes, restaurants and retail and

office space. Atlantic Station, in Atlanta’s Midtown area, is a 138-acre development offering an array of condos, lofts, townhomes, apartments and single-family homes, as well as a two-acre lake and plenty of green space, in addition to a mix of restaurants and shops.

Ask Questions and Investigate Once you’ve settled on a neighborhood, ask your potential new neighbors about the area.

Duffy recommends seeking out three sets of neighbors and asking them all the same questions. For families with children, those include: How social is the neighborhood? Are there many parties or events? How many kids live in the area, versus how many adults? It’s important to establish whether a particular neighborhood provides a wealth of opportunities to make friends with children of similar age. It’s also a good idea to visit local shopping areas to ensure that there are child-friendly establishments and other retail outlets that fit your family’s lifestyle. A distance of only two or three miles can make a difference. And be sure to investigate any family-friendly amenities in the neighborhood. The fact that a subdivision has a pool, for example, doesn’t mean that the facility has room for all the residents to enjoy it on a regular basis, that there’s adequate seating around the pool or sufficient safety measures in place. And there are other factors to consider, such as neighborhood schools. The Atlanta School

PHOTO: City of Smyrna

continued on page 18

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continued from page 16

Suwanee’s Town Center is a major family-friendly draw.

Guide, Atlanta’s leading education resource for parents and educators, is a great place to start (www.atlantaschoolguide.com). Available for free at more than 1,050 locations across the metro area, this twice-yearly publication offers features on educational trends, as well as important dates, helpful tips and terminology and detailed, up-to-date information on public and private schools, summer camps, early education centers and many other educational programs and resources. Your search should also be guided in part by the needs and interests of the children in your family. “Are they a computer family? What kind of sports do they play?” asks Robin

Lemon. “If the kids are really involved in certain things, I can start gearing a search toward the family’s needs. There are some families that will come in and say, ‘My children are very interested in volleyball or very into karate.’” Most importantly, when scouting a new neighborhood and a new home, remember to take your time. “The key to buying a house is to ask a lot of questions and slow down the process,” Duffy advises. By having a detailed strategy, asking questions and placing special emphasis on neighborhoods and the amenities they offer, you’re much more likely to settle on the perfect home for yourself and your children.

Decatur This walkable city just east of Atlanta radiates a cozy, small-town charm, especially around its historic square. Public transportation is easily accessible, and recreational activities are plentiful. Duluth Among this city’s draws are the 35-acre Southeastern Railway Museum, the Arena at Gwinnett Center and a walkable downtown filled with historic buildings.

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Lawrenceville Metro Atlanta’s second-oldest city features such familyfriendly attractions as the Aurora Theatre, the Gwinnett Braves minor-league baseball team and Medieval Times.

Smyrna This suburban city 15 miles northwest of Atlanta boasts the Village Green, a charming town center, as well as 33 acres of park space and the Silver Comet Trail.

Marietta This Cobb County hub offers affordable housing, a strong school system and attractions like the Gone With the Wind Museum, the Earl Smith Strand Theatre and the historic downtown square.

Suwanee Green areas like the 10-acre Town Center Park, with its amphitheater and special events, are part of this city’s appeal, and the Gwinnett County school system is widely considered the best in the state.

PHOTO: Courtesy City of Suwanee

6 FAMILY-FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOODS WORTH A CLOSER LOOK


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neighborhood

spotlight Virginia-Highland by Lindsay Oberst

A Murphy’s

pedestrian-friendly neighborhood just east of Midtown’s Piedmont Park, the Virginia-Highland area attracts a mix of young professionals and families who stroll its tree-lined sidewalks, enjoying a charming array of casual restaurants, friendly watering holes and trendy shops.

Housing

Culinary Treats

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Virginia-Highland is known for its bungalows, Tudors and homes from the early 1900s. Prices range from around $325,000 for a fixer-upper to $900,000 for a fully restored historic home. Each of the Highland View Apartments (404881-6680) feature huge, open kitchens and large balconies with double French doors, while the Greenwood Lofts (404-876-6432) offer loftstyle studios and one- and two-bedroom condominium homes with 10- to 20-foot ceilings, stainless steel appliances, granite countertops, garden tubs and separate showers.

Some of the city’s best food can be found here. Murphy’s (404-872-0904) is a popular destination for weekend brunch. The Warren City Club (404-475-1991) is also a prized brunch spot and offers one of the best burgers in town. D.B.A. Barbecue (404-249-5000) serves up great ribs, sandwiches and burgers. Atkins Park Tavern (404-876-7249) is a neighborhood institution praised for its modern comfort food. Doc Chey’s Noodle House (404-8880777) is a favorite spot for noodle bowls and stir-fry. The Highland Tap (404-875-3673) is known for prime rib, seafood and steaks. Noche (404-815-9155) offers creative small plates and tasty margaritas. Alon’s Bakery (404-872-6000) offers delectable baked goods and a gourmet market. Try Paolo’s Gelato (404-607-0055) for homemade gelato, marzipan and other delicious dessert treats.

PHOTO: Jimmy Maynard

The Indie-Pendent

PHOTO: Beth Lord

Local Treasures The area is known for its diverse shopping. Mitzi’s Corner (404-876-7228) showcases women’s clothing and accessories. Festivity (404-7244883) specializes in jewelry, clothing and home goods. The Indie-Pendent (404-313-0004) is a fun boutique and artist studio featuring handmade home decor and gifts. Orme Park is a small gem of green space dotted with play areas for kids. Aurora Coffee (404-607-1300) is an independent coffeehouse with friendly staff and a down-home vibe. At Belly General Store (404-872-1003), which puts a delightful spin on the general store concept with fresh goods, produce and sandwiches, locals love the homemade bagels and cupcakes.

Arts and Entertainment The neighborhood’s annual Summerfest (www. vahi.org/summerfest) is an arts and music festival staged each June. Blind Willie’s (404-8732583) is home to some of the city’s finest blues artists. Limerick Junction (404-874-7147) is the city’s oldest Irish pub and a haven for local folk musicians. For live rock-band karaoke, head to 10 High, which is located below Dark Horse Tavern (404-873-3607). n Greenwood Lofts

Blind Willie’s

The Inside Track In 2011, readers of Creative Loafing voted Virginia-Highland to be the “Best Overall Neighborhood.” The area was also named “Favorite Neighborhood Overall” by Atlanta Magazine.

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2012

Education Guide Your Resource for Making Informed Decisions About Your Children’s Education Adjusting to a New School ..........................................................................................22 Acing the Admissions Interview...............................................................................25 Atlanta Independent School Directory ................................................................27

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2012 EDUCATION GUIDE

Adjusting to a New School Helping Your Child Cope with Change

Relocating to a new school can be one of the most traumatic parts of moving to a different city. Children are forced to leave behind their friends, routines and surroundings and start all over in a new setting. But whether your child is entering a new school just a few miles away or across the country, there are steps parents can take to ensure a smooth transition. And that process can begin long before the student sets foot in a new classroom. by Daniel Beauregard

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T

he first thing a parent can do is to think about the right time to move. Adults who are relocating for job-related reasons don’t always have a choice in this area. But those who do should consider moving over the summer or a long break, which can be less stressful for the child than switching schools in the middle of a session. This can also place your child on a more even footing with other students. “Schools take on new students at the beginning of the school year,� says Belinda McIntosh, a psychologist for the Student Health Services department at Emory University. “Therefore, your child is less likely to be the only new kid in the class.� Parents can also ease the transition by looking at particular schools in the area to which they’re moving. “Try to choose a school that is somewhat similar to the one where they were,� McIntosh says. It’s also important, she notes, that the child have a chance to say goodbye to their friends before the move.

A New Environment Once you’ve arrived at your new home, listen to your child and be attentive to what they’re going through. To help alleviate the pain of feeling alone, encourage and facilitate communication between the child and the friends who’ve been left behind. Teenagers are already likely to stay in touch via email, text and social media.

But younger children often need a little help. “It can be very exciting for them to sit down with a parent and send a postcard or a letter with a picture of them in their new home,� McIntosh says. Before your child’s first day at a new school, visit the campus with him or her. Speak with teachers and administrators and take a tour to give the student the lay of the land. “You’d be surprised at how many kids are afraid to go to a new school because they don’t know where the bathroom is,� says Merridee Michelsen, assistant headmaster and director of academics for Brandon Hall School. Keeping the lines of communication open is crucial during such a transition. At Brandon Hall, which has both day and boarding school students, that can mean having the school facilitate times for the student to call or have a video chat with parents. Michelsen adds that there are things the school can do to make the process easier, as well. During the child’s introductory tour of the school, administrators and teachers should make themselves available to answer questions and discuss particular situations unique to the child’s academics, such as whether he or she requires more time on tests. A teacher’s curriculum can even be a tool in helping to ease the transition. Michelsen recommends that the first few days of class be spent on activities like team-building exercises,

      

           

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which develop a spirit of cooperation among the students. When possible, parents and administrators should work to tailor a child’s schedule to their specific needs, in some cases even discussing the best time of day to take a certain class. “I’ll say, ‘Some people like to do math in the morning and some people feel that their brain works better after lunch. When would you like to have math?’” Michelsen says.

Making Connections Although each student is different, some of the common feelings a child will have on his or her first day of school can range from anxiety about making new friends to feelings of sadness or shyness as the student encounters new groups of friends. The transition into a new classroom is usually easier for younger children such as elementary and middle school students, McIntosh says, because they’re still very eager to please their teachers. “The teacher really has a lot of power to be able to guide the integration of that new student into the class,” she says. “The teacher can introduce them and tell the class something about where the student is from to make that student

feel special and that they’re bringing something unique to the class.” In some cases, a child will have a more difficult time getting through the transition and may appear sad or withdrawn. One of the best ways

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU DO? Pay Attention: Changes in behavior and body language can provide clues that your child is having problems adjusting, even if he or she says everything is fine. Open Up Your Home: Be willing to host a party or sleepover to help your child develop new friendships. Volunteer: Pitching in as a teacher’s aide or even a crossing guard tells your child that you’re invested in his or her school. Stay Connected: Communicate with your child’s teacher. Join or start an online community for parents at the school, and seek out the advice of other parents. Seek Help: If things don’t improve, don’t be afraid to see the school counselor or school psychologist with your child, or schedule an appointment with an outside therapist.

24 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

to work through this is to encourage involvement in extracurricular activities and things outside of the classroom. “We have buddies for the kids and we try to connect the families to other families that have been at our school for a while,” says Sandy Ferko, head counselor at the Atlanta International School. “We encourage the children to get involved in activities such as basketball, theatre production or the model United Nations.” During those first months, “Parents need to be checking in with the child to see how they’re feeling and accept their concerns,” Michelsen says. “But also to talk about the new school and the positive things about it.” As the student adjusts, however, it’s just as important that parents connect with the school as well, since they are also leaving family and friends behind. “We encourage them to get involved,” says Ferko. “We have a very active parent organization, and I think if the kids see their parents getting involved, it becomes easier for the kids.” That communication sends a statement to the student, Michelsen says. “The child will think, ‘My parents communicate with the school and my parents trust the school, therefore I’m going to be okay.’”


2012 EDUCATION GUIDE

Acing the Admissions Interview How to Make Your Visit Stress-Free

For parents and students alike, applying to a new school can be nerve-wracking. And no aspect of the process is more likely to produce butterflies than the admissions interview. Many, but not all, independent schools want to meet face-to-face with prospective students and their parents, to get a sense of the student as a person and gauge how he or she might fit with the school. This can be an intimidating prospect for many, but much of the anxiety that accompanies this get-to-know-you conversation can be easily avoided. by Susan Flowers

T

he first step is to take the mystery out of the process. The interview is simply a chance for the school and the child to get to know each other, says Reid Preston Mizell, director of admissions at the Atlanta International School. “Interviews give students a good opportunity to tell their story, to tell us about their passions and are a good opportunity for us to know them in a way we couldn’t from an application form,” she says. You should also view this as a time to ask questions of the school, she adds. One key cause of stress is the idea that getting into a good school means beating out your competition. Jockeying for a few coveted slots with throngs of other parents and children can distract from the fact that another school might be a better fit. “Parents start feeling badly if their children aren’t at a particular school, when the child might be better served by being somewhere else,” says Marjorie Mitchell, director of admissions and financial aid at the Westminster Schools.

Preparing for your interview is crucial but over-preparing is a common mistake. Over-preparing is a common mistake. Sitting a child down at your kitchen table and urging them to brag about themselves is unlikely to lead to a good result. But letting them chat with someone outside the family, such as a fellow church member, can be good practice.

No Right Answers Likewise, striving to produce just the right answer to expected questions can be counter-productive. “The only thing we’re looking for is an authentic sense of who the child is,” Mitchell says. “What you really want is to make sure the child ends up at what I call a jumpout-of-the-car-happy school. If this is not a good fit, you want to find out then [during the interview], not after you’ve been there for several months.” The admissions process is “not like math class, where everybody’s got to have the same answers,” says Russell Slider, vice president and dean of admissions at

Letting your child chat with someone outside the family, such as a fellow church member, can be good practice.

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 25


Remember that your goal isn’t necessarily to get into one particular school, but to find the right school. Approaching the admissions interview with the right attitude can go a long way toward ensuring a successful fit.

It comes out too quickly and is way beyond the kid’s years. This should simply be a conversation that flows genuinely and naturally and doesn’t appear to be a script.�

Be Prepared

Woodward Academy. “It’s about the child giving a correct answer for them, and that helps the school understand the probability or likelihood of happiness [for the child]. “The trick here,� he adds, “is to make sure that you’re practicing the interview process and not the answers. I think people who have done interviews can detect a canned response.

DO’S AND DON’TS

Both Slider and Mitchell stress the importance of learning a school’s interview format beforehand. While some schools conduct interviews one-on-one, others use a group process, with one interviewer for three or four children. Some schools interview children alone, while at others, parents sit in on the conversation. Knowing what to expect will allow both parent and child to feel more at ease. Debbie Lange, director of admission and financial aid at the Lovett School, says that parents shouldn’t try to take over. “During an interview, let the child be the applicant,� she says. “The child should show self-confidence, be able to speak and show genuine interest. There is a give and take involved in the interview process. The child should be a discerning customer and ask the questions that are important to the child. Ultimately, schools are looking for students and families who want to be there, who show interest and have good questions about the school.�

DO:  t -FBSOUIFTDIPPMTJOUFSWJFXGPSNBU beforehand. Knowing what to expect will help your child feel more at ease.  t *ORVJSFBCPVUUIFTDIPPMTESFTTDPEF and dress appropriately.  t "TLRVFTUJPOT5IJTJTZPVSDIBODFUP learn about the school, as well. DON’T:  t 1VUBMMZPVSIPQFTJOUPPOFTDIPPM Realizing that Atlanta has a wealth of great schools can take some of the tension out of the interview process.  t "UUFNQUUPHJWFUIFQFSGFDUBOTXFST Encourage your child to be open, be interested, and above all, be him or herself.  t 4DIFEVMFUIFJOUFSWJFXGPSUIFDIJMET first visit to the school. Let him or her get comfortable with the campus ahead of time.

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26 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


2012 EDUCATION GUIDE

Atlanta School Directory It’s no secret that Atlanta is home to many excellent schools and learning resources. The following profiles represent a selection of independent schools in the metro Atlanta area. For additional information about the schools listed below, including location, class size and open house dates, turn to “Beyond the Basics” on page 32.

ATLANTA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

ALEXSANDER ACADEMY

PHOTO: Billy Howard

Atlanta International School (AIS) offers all three International Baccalaureate (IB) programs to 1,100 U.S. and international students from grades K3 through 12. By delivering a rigorous academic program combined with world-class standards in language acquisition within an open-minded, intercultural environment, AIS prepares students to succeed in a globally connected world. Today, AIS is the only school in Georgia, and one of only a handful of schools in the U.S., to offer an International Baccalaureate education in grades K through 12. The prestigious IB program, the fastest-growing curriculum in the world, is a rigorous, inquiry-based curriculum recognized by the world’s most renowned universities and colleges. AIS graduates pursue higher education at top-100 ranked U.S. schools and universities around the globe. The school is widely considered to be a major asset to the city of Atlanta in attracting foreign investment and business. AIS is accredited by AdvancEd and the Council of International Schools (CIS) and is authorized to offer IB programs by the International Baccalaureate organization. With the opening of the school’s new Early Learning Center this fall, AIS now has main entry points to the school at K3, K4, K5, grade six and grade nine; admission for other grades may be available dependent upon space. For more information on applying to AIS, please attend the open house event on Dec. 1, 2012, call 404-841-3840, visit www.aischool.org or contact the admission team at admission@ aischool.org. The school is located in the heart of Buckhead at 2890 North Fulton Drive.

Alexsander Academy, located in Alpharetta, serves students who need a small, academically focused but flexible learning environment to be successful. The school focuses on academics, independence skills and classroom and social skills. Alexsander Academy believes all children are capable when taught the way they need to learn. We build our students’ self-esteem by fostering an environment where they are successful but also challenged, where expectations are high but realistic, and where they are able to form true friendships with their peers. For more information, contact Stefanie Smith at 404-8395910 or at smith@alexsanderacademy.org, or visit www.alexsanderacademy.org.

ARLINGTON CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Arlington Christian School is celebrating more than 50 years in quality education, preparing students for college and beyond. ACS offers a K-5 through grade 12 college preparatory program that incorporates a Christian atmosphere into the learning experience. ACS offers strong spiritual, academic, fine arts and athletic programs designed to educate and develop the whole child. Recent ACT and SAT scores show that ACS students perform well SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONwww.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 27


above national averages. ACS is accredited with quality by the Georgia Accrediting Commission, and is also accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. For more information, call 770-964-9871 or visit www.arlingtonchristian.org.

ATLANTA GIRLS’ SCHOOL

velop foundations for success; this is accomplished through small classes, a structured, multisensory approach and a dedicated staff. The school’s Squirrel Hollow Camp summer program offers academic tutoring in a recreational environment. Call Betsy Box, director, at 770-774-8001 or visit www.thebedfordschool.org for more information.

CUMBERLAND ACADEMY OF GEORGIA

Cumberland Academy of Georgia specializes in the needs of students with Asperger’s,

Atlanta Girls’ School offers girls in grades six through 12 a college-preparatory curriculum of the highest standards. According to the U.S. Department of Education, single-sex education for girls yields superior academic accomplishment. Graduates attend Ivy League schools, prestigious liberal arts colleges, leading Southeastern universities and respected research institutes. Girls learn to take appropriate risks, be courageous leaders, give back to their communities and project personal confidence and competence in all they do. Atlanta Girls’ School instills in its graduates the knowledge, skills and strengths of character needed for success in the 21st century. For more information, call 404-845-0900 or visit www.atlantagirlsschool.org.

THE BEDFORD SCHOOL

The Bedford School offers a fresh start to students who have been frustrated in a traditional setting due to learning differences. The school serves children who have been professionally diagnosed as having specific learning disabilities and related disorders. Bedford is located on a 45-acre campus in Fairburn, Ga., 15 minutes south of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Its mission is to maximize the potential of children with learning differences and to de-

ADD, ADHD and LD. Fully accredited with both the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement and the Georgia Accrediting Commission, Cumberland serves grades four through 12 and offers a post-graduate year as well. Students are challenged academically in small class sizes and encouraged with a strong emphasis on social and life skills. Competitive sports and enrichment classes are offered throughout the year. For more information, call 404-835-9000, email admissions@cumberlandacademy.org or visit www. cumberlandacademy.org. Tours are by appointment, and there is an open house on Sunday, Oct. 28 from 2 to 4 p.m. Cumberland Academy of Georgia operates on a rolling admissions basis.

BRANDON HALL SCHOOL Founded in 1959, Brandon Hall School is located on a 27-acre campus on the Chattahoochee River in Sandy Springs. Brandon Hall is a coeducational, nonprofit, college preparatory day and boarding school for students in sixth through 12th grade. A national model in research-based education, the school offers small classes and learning methodologies to fit every child—all within the framework of rigorous academic studies, active sports and arts programs and a caring, international campus community. With approximately 140 students and more than 70% of the faculty and administration holding advanced degrees, Brandon Hall is a community of involved and passionate people that embody the school’s mission and an overall desire to affect positive change in the world. Brandon Hall’s students are economically, socially and ethnically diverse, with a wide array of interests and abilities. These students thrive in a creative, supportive learning environment. Brandon Hall believes that a student’s education is immensely enhanced when parents, teachers, and administrators work cooperatively as partners in education. The result is a personalized education program that continually evolves to stimulate students through teaching methods, technology and curricular content. This approach to education stimulates an appreciation and understanding of a “living” education via a multisensory instructional approach, engagement with technology, the development of leadership and life skills and learning experientially. Brandon Hall’s personalized approach is designed to develop a high degree of information retention, motivation and direction in each student. Accredited by SAIS, SACS, and GAC, Brandon Hall operates on a rolling admissions basis. Tours are by appointment. For more information, call 770-394-8177 or visit www.brandonhall.org.

28 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.comSPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


THE CHILDREN’S SCHOOL The Children’s School, founded in 1970, is an institution of educators devoted to teaching young children. The curriculum is a rich and academically rigorous one, centered on experiential learning and building critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students at TCS benefit from a formal character education program, Building Character & Community, and a unique outdoor education component of the curriculum. The Children’s School offers a number of after-school programs that serve day-school students and elementaryaged children in the greater community. Its 10-building Midtown campus across from Piedmont Park allows for freedom within boundaries—a hallmark of its educational philosophy. The Children’s School serves a diverse group of students age 3 years old through the sixth grade. TCS graduates go on to attend and excel at a number of schools throughout Atlanta. For more information, call 404-873-6985 or visit their website at www.thechildrensschool.com.

EASTSIDE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

FIRST MONTESSORI SCHOOL

When Larry Page and Sergey Brin, co-founders of Google, were asked whether they credited their success to having college professors as parents, they said no. Page and Brin attribute their success to a Montessori education—because Montessori works! First Montessori School of Atlanta, the oldest Montessori school in the Southeast, provides an environment that balances academic preparation with building social, emotional and physical abilities. First Montessori is located on a wooded, seven-acre campus in Sandy Springs. This hands-on, discovery-based education serves children ages 1 1/2 to 14. First Montessori provides students with a foundation and appreciation for learning that will support problem-solving and collaborative skills needed for future challenges in life. For more information, call 404-2523910 or visit www.firstmontessori.org.

FAITH LUTHERAN SCHOOL Eastside Christian School provides quality academics from a biblical perspective in a loving environment, equipping students to be strong in spirit and pure in character as they impact the world for Christ. Since 1983, the goal at ECS has been to give students the best educational experience possible and help them develop high expectations for themselves. Eastside Christian School provides grades K-5 through eight with a prefirst grade option as well as an extended-day program. Providing education to a second generation, ECS has earned a reputation for providing outstanding academics enriched by fine arts and athletic programs and preparing students for excellent placement in secondary schools—including magnet programs—with continued success in colleges. Located in the heart of east Cobb County, the school is accredited with quality by the Georgia Accrediting Commission and is a member of the Association of Christian Schools International. For information, call 770-971-2332 or visit www.eastsidechristianschool.com.

The success of Faith Lutheran School is built on challenging academics offered in a Christcentered environment. The curriculum promotes individual achievement, fosters selfesteem, encourages creativity and social skills, and is bolstered by arts and sports programs, including band, choir, track, basketball and more. Students benefit from small classes, experienced, innovative educators and a safe, nurturing environment. Programs are offered for kindergarten through eighth grade, along with preschool for children ages 2 to 4. Founded in 1958, Faith Lutheran School is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. For more information, call 770-973-8921, email faithls@faithlcms.org or visit www.faithmarietta.com/FLS.

THE HERITAGE SCHOOL The Heritage School was founded in 1970 to create an outstanding educational opportunity for the families of Coweta, Fayette and surrounding counties. As an independent, coeducational, college-preparatory, non-sec-

HEBRON CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Two Campuses One Mission Making a difference in the lives of students

HC 570 Dacula Rd. (High School Campus) 2975 Old Peachtree Rd. (Elementary Campus)  2)ķ ċĈĈĉđĴďďĈŖđĎċŖđĊčĈ

www.hebronlions.org

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 29


tarian day school, Heritage serves a student population of approximately 435, from four years of age through graduation from high school. The mission of The Heritage School is to develop the mind in preparation for college and later life, develop the body through competition and teamwork, develop the spirit through self-awareness and growth, and develop camaraderie through shared experience. Heritage recognizes the unique strengths and needs of every child and works with those assets to create enthusiasm for learning and a path for each child’s personal growth and development. The school values family, an intimate learning environment and self-respect. Heritage regards itself as a steward of human potential and takes great pride in the ethos of its graduates. For more information, call 678-423-5393 or visit www.heritagehawks.org.

HIGH MEADOWS SCHOOL

ogy, band and debate. The school’s mission statement is: The High Meadows community celebrates and perpetuates each individual’s quest for knowledge and skill, sense of wonder and connection to the natural environment. High Meadows School empowers each student to be a compassionate, responsible, and active global citizen. For more information, call 770-993-2940 or visit the website at www.highmeadows.org

sponsored sport, as well as a fine arts activity. While students are offered the opportunity to excel at a higher level, an academic support program is offered at all grade levels when extra help is needed. The Class of 2012, which comprises 34 students, was offered more than $2.38 million in non-HOPE scholarships and had 100 percent college placement. For more information, call 770- 532-4383 or visit www. lakeviewacademy.com.

HEBRON CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

MILL SPRINGS ACADEMY

Hebron Christian Academy has two campuses, but only one mission: to help parents prepare their students spiritually, academically, physically and socially to become disciples of Jesus Christ. HCA is a private Christian school currently serving 953 students from kindergarten through grade 12. HCA offers an academically challenging program, including AP and honors classes, with students scoring far above national averages. The school also offers award-winning fine arts programs and leadership development. In addition, HCA offers a broad range of sports; students participate competitively in Georgia High School Association Region 8A. For more information, call 770-963-9250 or visit www.hebronlions.org.

LAKEVIEW ACADEMY

Mill Springs Academy, located on an 85acre campus in Alpharetta, is an accredited college-preparatory school for students who have not realized their full potential in a traditional classroom setting. Mill Springs helps students of average to superior ability in grades one through 12 reach their potential by raising expectations, facilitating self-motivation, promoting values and providing the skills they need to succeed in life. Small classes, laptops and an individualized curriculum enable students to capitalize on their strengths while learning compensatory strategies. A range of fine arts, athletics and extended-day activities is offered. For more information, contact 770-360-1336 or visit www.millsprings.org.

MONTESSORI UNLIMITED High Meadows School offers an innovative, inquiry-based curriculum, emphasizing love of learning, creativity, meaningful connections and global perspective for preschool through eighth grade. Founded in 1973, the nonprofit day-school is coeducational, independent and non-sectarian, and located on more than 40 wooded acres in Roswell, Ga. High Meadows School is an International Baccalaureate World School highly respected and consistently recognized for best practices, innovation and excellence. A wide variety of cocurricular enrichment programs are provided, including visual arts, theater, music, environmental studies, Spanish, technol-

Lakeview Academy is an independent, coeducational college preparatory school for grades K-3 through 12, accredited by SAISSACS. Situated just miles from Lake Lanier in Gainesville, Lakeview is conveniently located off I-985 and provides transportation options for its student body, which draws from 11 counties and 40 ZIP codes. Lakeview has families representing 30 countries, and foreign language is taught in every grade. Technology is integrated into each discipline, with sixth through 12th grade students using their own laptops. Students choose from a variety of elective opportunities, including awardwinning drama and arts programs. More than 75 percent of middle and upper school students participate in at least one school-

30 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.comSPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

All Montessori Unlimited schools follow authentic Montessori methods pioneered by Dr. Maria Montessori more than a century ago, based on the understanding that the first few years of a child’s life are crucial to both intellect and personality. Educationally, they “Follow the Child”—which is the basic theory


behind Dr. Montessori’s methods, and where the uniqueness of each child is emphasized and celebrated. The Montessori approach fosters a child’s independence, self-motivation, decisionmaking skills and respect, while nurturing a lifelong love of learning. Within mixed-age classrooms, Montessorians help children build strong academic, social, emotional, physical and moral foundations. Children are encouraged to learn from and to help one another while reaching their full potential, resulting in confident and happy children. In addition to serving 2 ½- to 6-yearolds, three schools also serve toddlers; Nesbit Ferry Montessori provides a lower elementary program as well. For more information, visit www.montessori.com or call the schools directly: Brookstone Montessori (770-426-5245), Medlock Bridge Montessori (770-623-1965), Nesbit Ferry Montessori (770-552-8454), Preston Ridge Montessori (770-751-9510) or Sugarloaf Montessori (678-473-0079).

PROVIDENCE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

fine art achievements and spiritual growth have been the hallmarks of Providence for more than 20 years. For more information, visit www.providencechristianacademy.org or call 770-279-7200.

SOPHIA ACADEMY

Providence Christian Academy is a unique mid-sized K-12 interdenominational Christian school in the Atlanta area, offering an accredited program that rivals larger schools while providing more personal attention and the comfortable fit of a smaller student body. As a parent-sponsored school, Providence Christian Academy is more than an academic institution, but a community of believers, consisting of Christian parents in partnership with Christian educators to help young people develop their God-given gifts and abilities. High standards in academic, athletic and

As a Marist-sponsored school pursuing Catholic status, Sophia Academy sees each child as an individual with unlimited potential if given the opportunities and tailored instruction for different learning styles. Small classes and innovative multisensory instruction, combined with weekly teacher training, produce results for all children. Ninety percent of Sophia Academy students master their personalized goals, and 80 percent participate in extracurricular activities. The curriculum includes International Orton-Gillingham language learning and Common Core standards. Award-winning theater and sports teams, fine arts and religious education broaden students’ interests, promote leadership, develop talents and shape character. Your child will be known and valued. Sophia Academy serves pre-K through high school and is located at 2880 Dresden Drive in Atlanta. For more information, call 404-303-8722 or visit their website at www.sophiaacademy.org.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC SCHOOL

MCGINNIS WOODS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL McGinnis Woods Country Day School is a private, non-parochial school offering a challenging preschool, elementary and middle grades education. The school is located on the border of Forsyth and North Fulton counties in Northeast Alpharetta. The school accepts children as young as 6 weeks through 14 years of age. McGinnis Woods Country Day has top accreditations, including GAC, SACS and NAEYC, and is a member of the Georgia Independent School Association. Class sizes are small, with low student-teacher ratios, allowing frequent one-on-one learning. The excellent curriculum, which includes enrichment instruction in Spanish, band, chorus, art, physical education, health, library, computer skills and character education, provides children with a strong framework on which to develop academically, socially and emotionally. Guest speakers and frequent community service also add to each student’s overall experience. A full schedule of afterschool activities is also available to McGinnis Woods students and public school students. Please contact the school by calling 770-664-7764 or visit www.mcginniswoods.org. SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

In its 60th year as a K-8 school within the Archdiocese of Atlanta, St. Joseph Catholic School is a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence. Dually accredited by SACS and SAIS, St. Joseph offers an academically challenging curriculum and a focus on characterbuilding that fosters the development of the whole child. The standard curriculum is enhanced with weekly school mass, art, music, computer lab and Spanish. Extracurricular opportunities include drama, robotics, basketball, volleyball and more. Located at 81 Lacy Street in Marietta, Ga. Call 770-428-3328 or visit www.stjosephschool.org for more information about this remarkable school. X Newcomer Magazine | 31


Beyond The Basics School

Phone

County

Neighborhood

Annual Tuition Range

Avg. Class Size

Religious Affiliation

Accreditations or Affiliations

Open House Dates*

Alexsander Academy

404-839-5910

Fulton

Alpharetta

$13,000 $18,000

5

N/A

GAC, GAPSEC

Call for Appointment

18

C

SACS, GAC

Call for Tour

Arlington Christian School

770-964-9871

Fulton

Fairburn

$6,650 $10,200

Atlanta Girls’ School

404-845-0900

Fulton

Buckhead

$19,800

12

N/A

GAC. SAIS, SACS

11/11

Atlanta International School

404-841-3840

Fulton

Buckhead/ Garden Hills

$19,080$21,780

16

N/A

CIS, IB, AdvanceEd

12/1

The Bedford School

770-774-8001

Fulton

Fairburn

$16,350

10

N/A

GAC, SACS

1/27, 3/13, 4/28

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

Fulton

Sandy Springs

$26,095 $49,995

6

N/A

SAIS, SACS, GAC, NAIS, GISA, TABS

N/A

The Children’s School

404-873-6985

Fulton

Midtown

$17,250

22

N/A

SACS, SAIS, AAAIS, SACS-CASI, NAIS, CASE

Tues & Thurs, Nov.- Mar.

Cumberland Academy of Georgia

404-835-9000

Fulton

Sandy Springs

$21,500

8-10

N/A

SACS-CASI, GAC, GISA, AAAIS, GAPSEC, AAC, APAC

10/28, 1/27

Eastside Christian School

770-971-2332

Cobb

East Cobb

$5,046 $8,282

14

ND

GAC, ACSI

11/15, 1/16, 2/6

Faith Lutheran Church and School

770-973-8921

Cobb

East Cobb

$3,600 $6,675

15

L

SACS, NLSA

12/2, 1/27, 2/12, 3/3

Varies

N/A

AMI, AAAIS, GISA, SAIS, SACS

10/25, 11/15, 12/7, 1/13, 2/7

Atlanta’s Education Options Some Terms to Know

CHARTER SCHOOL A tax-supported public school that is independently run, allowing for greater educational choice for a school community.

First Montessori School of Atlanta

404-252-3910

Fulton

Sandy Springs

$10,260 $17,750

Hebron Christian Academy

770-963-9250

Gwinnett

Dacula

$5,891 $7,580

20-25

ND

SACS, ACSI

Contact School

The Heritage School

678-423-5393

Coweta

Newnan

$6,960 $13,175

16

N/A

SACS, SAIS

Visits by Appt.

An educational approach using applied, hands-on methods of learning.

High Meadows School

770-993-2940

Fulton

Roswell

$5,240 $16,030

18

N/A

IB, NAEYC, SAIS, SACS

11/11, 1/27 Visits by Appt.

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB)

Lakeview Academy

770-532-4383

Hall

Gainesville

$6,120 $15,345

15

N/A

AAAIS, GHSA, GISA, NAIS, SAIS, SACS

Contact School

McGinnis Woods Country Day School

770-664-7764

Forsyth

Alpharetta

$8,875 $11,575

18-22

ND

SACS, GAC, NAEYC, GISA

1/12

Mill Springs Academy

404-839-5910

North Fulton

Milton

$20,570 $21,860

9

N/A

SACS, SAIS

10/10, 11/14, 1/23, 2/13, 3/13, 4/10, 5/15

Montessori Unlimited

See School Listing for Contact Information

Cobb, Fulton, Gwinnett

Varies

$7,000 $14,500

21-26

N/A

AMI, AMS

Contact Individual Schools for Information

Providence Christian Academy

770-279-7200

Gwinnett

Lilburn

$8,940 $13,260

15

ND

SACS-CASI, GAC, ACSI

Contact School

Sophia Academy

404-839-5910

DeKalb

Chamblee/ Tucker

$4,600 $20,500

10

CC

SAIS-SACS, AAAIS, LDA, LDAG, IDAG, CASE, GISA

11/9, 1/23

St. Joseph Catholic School

770-428-3328

Cobb

Marietta

$5,878 $7,641

27

CC

SACS, SAIS

1/26

C - Christian

CC - Catholic

L - Lutheran

N/A - Does not Apply

ND - Non-denominational

* Open house dates may be specific to a grade level or day of the week. Please contact each school for details.

32 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

A specifically designed, comprehensive academic program emphasizing traditional disciplines while encouraging an international perspective.

MAGNET SCHOOL A public school that offers a specific or enhanced curriculum designed for students of special interest or ability.

MONTESSORI A school following the principles developed by Dr. Maria Montessori focusing on the unique individuality, self-reliance and independence of children.

SPECIAL NEEDS A school or program for children with mild-tomoderate learning differences. It usually features smaller class sizes, individualized attention and multi-sensory learning methods.


www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 33


A Natural Paradise on the Forgotten Coast

Florida

Carrabelle, By Hope S. Philbrick

If the word Florida brings to mind costumed characters skipping merrily through themed attractions, long lines of sweaty folks waiting to board thrill rides, sticky-sweet snacks and retail shelves packed with logoed merchandise, it’s time to visit Florida’s panhandle. Also known as the Emerald Coast and the Forgotten Coast, the region boasts soft, white-sand beaches, rolling waves of greenish-turquoise water and a simple approach to life that may feel nostalgic and retro. This is authentic Florida, where the sights and sounds of nature dominate. And there’s no more perfect example than the small town of Carrabelle.

Carrabelle, Fla., offers a perfect escape with rolling waves and soft, white-sand beaches.

34 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


ABOVE: An aerial view of Carrabelle. CENTER: Even wedding parties can’t resist the allure of the St. James Bay Golf Resort.

C

arrabelle, Florida, population 11,000, approximately 325 miles from Atlanta, is the boating and fishing capital of the Forgotten Coast. Three rivers converge here and connect with the Gulf of Mexico, providing access to salt- and fresh-water fishing grounds—grouper, tarpon, redfish, snapper, amberjack, trout, cobia, shrimp and oysters are just a few common species.

Exploring the Great Outdoors Of course, local menus serve up plenty of freshcatch options that melt in your mouth with bright, just-reeled-in flavor. But perhaps you’d prefer to hook your own? Captain Chester Reese hosts sport-fishing excursions under the banner of Natural World Charters. From his 24foot boat named Eagle—and, yes, you may spot a bald eagle or two swooping overhead some days—you can cast or troll in deep or shallow waters as suits your preference and, of course, seasonal weather and water conditions. Captain Reese, a certified Florida Master Naturalist with 25 years’ experience working on the water, is the sort of person you might instantly consider a friend. Gregarious and chatty, he is eager to guide novice or experienced fishermen and shares many local stories while pointing out key sites en route to the best fishing spots. Reese’s anecdotes entertain while also

revealing the character of the folks who live in the area, such as the sailor who abandoned a sinking ship only after realizing that even the scallops he’d netted were jumping overboard, or Adam Warwick, who rescued a 375-pound black bear from drowning in the Gulf of Mexico off Alligator Point. For folks like me who prefer to leave fish (and bears) swimming peacefully undisturbed, Captain Reese also hosts ecotourism adventures. Explore the complex ecosystem linking the network of marsh, rivers, estuaries, sounds and the Gulf of Mexico on a custom boating tour where your itinerary might include stops to wiggle your toes in the sand while collecting shells on Dog Island, photograph birds and other wildlife, or whatever piques your interest. The waters support dolphins, sea turtles, alligators and dozens of birds including pelicans, egrets, roseate spoonbills, osprey and more. Each incoming and outgoing tide churns the water and alters the scenery. Sunrises and sunsets are spectacular. Don’t forget your digital camera!

Dog Island, a sandy, seven-mile stretch of land just three and a half miles offshore from Carrabelle, is accessible only by boat or small plane. Part of a chain of barrier islands, it’s a popular destination with Franklin County locals who anchor nearby and swim, snorkel or scramble ashore to picnic, hike, get some sun and play in the sand. While a few private homes and the rustic, eight-room Pelican Inn are located on Dog Island, most of this tranquil, 1,800-acre island is owned by the Nature Conservancy.

Unspoiled Paradise Dog Island is just one unspoiled haven near Carrabelle, since more than 80 percent of Franklin County has been designated as state or federal parks. Nearly 750,000 acres of public forest are available for hiking, trail-riding, birding or watching for wildlife. Encountering crowds is unlikely; odds are you won’t cross another person in the swampy forest. According to local legend, a farmer named Cebe Tate ventured into the woods in 1875 to hunt down a panther that was killing his livestock. Lost for days, he was bitten by a snake and made it out alive just long enough to utter the words, “My name is Tate and I’ve been through hell!” The area now known as Tate’s

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 35


Visitors can sail or kayak the St. James Bay, or charter a sport-fishing excursion.

Hell State Forest contains various ecosystems including coastal scrub, wet prairie, swamp and forest. The forest houses creatures like the bald eagle, swallow-tailed kite, fox, black bear, gopher tortoise, red-shouldered hawk and red-cockaded woodpecker, as well as rare plants including orchids and dwarf cypress. Explore it all without the risk of getting lost with Lesley Cox, a certified green guide, Florida Master Naturalist and current president of the Carrabelle Lighthouse Association. Along a custom-guided trek or drive, she’ll point out flowers so tiny they might otherwise be overlooked. Her genial, upbeat approach makes learning fun. If your idea of time in the great outdoors is a little less rustic, perhaps an afternoon spent at a local pub listening to live music while gazing at boats that drift in and out of view is more enticing. Or perhaps you’d prefer to play a round of golf at St. James Bay Golf Resort, the area’s only Audubon Signature Sanctuary golf course. Designed to challenge golfers of any ability level, the 18-hole championship course has an eco-friendly layout with wetlands and water hazards on every hole. The facility features a full driving range, chipping green, bunker, two putting greens and golf carts equipped with GPS systems. Drive along U.S. Highway 98 between St. James Golf Resort and Carrabelle’s public beach, and you’ll see the ocean on one side and trees on the other—there are no high-rise hotels, casinos or condominiums blocking the view. This is genuine Florida, a place to relax and breathe deep the salt-tinged air. One visit will redefine what Florida means to you. And you’ll be grateful for the reality check.

PLANNING YOUR VISIT Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce tXXXDBSSBCFMMFPSH

Carrabelle-Thompson Airport 850-251-3454

WHERE TO STAY

WHAT TO DO

Carrabelle Beach

Les Hassel Excursions with Lesley Cox

850-697-2638 XXXSWDPVUEPPSTDPN

St. James Bay Golf Resort -BVHIJOH(VMM-BOF 850-697-9606 XXXTUKBNFTCBZDPN

The Pelican Inn 800-451-5294 XXXUIFQFMJDBOJOODPN

36 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

850-697-5555

Natural World Charters with Captain Chester Reese 850-228-9060 XXXOBUVSBMXPSMEDIBSUFSTDPN

Kayak Tours 850-697-9507


Atlanta Falcons at the Georgia Dome.

Atlanta’s majestic skyline.

Suwanee’s Town Center.

PHOTOS: (Top and second from bottom) © 2010, Kevin C. Rose/AtlantaPhotos.com

SHARPSBURG

What you need to know before, during and after your move INDEX 38 42 Tips on Getting Started 40 44

Counties, Neighborhoods, Utilities, Hospitals, Education

51 Metro Atlanta Region Map 47


GETTING STARTED

HERE MARTA

TO

THERE Driver’s License

Out-of-state drivers are required to obtain a Georgia driver’s license within 30 days. To obtain your license, you will need to provide the following: 1) Previous driver’s license; 2) Two pieces of identification; 3) An eye exam at the time of issue; 4) A $20 fee (in cash) for a five-year license, or a $35 fee for a 10-year license. Licenses are issued through the Georgia Department of Driver Services at several sites across Atlanta. Call 678-413-8400 or visit www.dds.ga.gov.

Mass Transit

One way to avoid long commutes is to take advantage of the city’s local transit system, Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA). Offering both train and bus service, MARTA is a convenient way to travel to downtown or the airport. The fee for traveling one way is $2.00 including transfers, and payment is even easier now with the Breeze limited-use and extendeduse cards. Weekly and monthly passes can be obtained at discounted rates. For fares, schedule and route information call 404848-5000 or visit www.itsmarta.com.

38 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Car Tag

MARTA Rail Service

You must register your car within 30 days of residency. Bring with you the following information: 1) Car title, name and address of lienholder, or copy of lease agreement; 2) Current tag registration; 3) Mileage reading of vehicle; 4) Proof of insurance; 5) Emission certificate (if applicable). There is an approximate $20 fee for your tag. In January 2006, the state began charging sales tax on vehicles. Your tag office will


GETTING STARTED provide the amount of sales tax on your vehicle. For information on a specific county, contact the appropriate county’s Tax Commissioner’s Office.

Vehicle Emission Inspection

Vehicles dating from 1985 through 2006 model year must be checked each year for emission standard compliance. Visit a statedesignated inspection station for the service. Call 800-449-2471 or visit www.cleanairforce.com.

Driving Tips

Georgia 400 is the only toll road in Atlanta. If you travel it daily, obtaining a Cruise Card is recommended. Purchased in advance, the Cruise Card allows drivers to bypass the tollbooth and avoid long lines. Call 404-893-6161 or visit www. georgiatolls.com to purchase a card. The Georgia DOT provides daily updates of road work, road closings and traffic delays, which are helpful when commuting. Updates can be obtained by calling (toll free) 1-877-694-2511, by dialing 511, or by visiting www.georgia-navigator.com.

NEED TO KNOW Voter Registration

Registration applies to U.S. citizens at least 18 years of age. You have up to 30 days before an election to register. Register at your local Voter Registration Office and most public libraries. Refer to the AT&T directory for locations, or download a registration form at www.sos.georgia.gov.

Making a Phone Call All phone numbers in the metro Atlanta area include the area code plus the sevendigit number. To make a phone call, dial one of the four area codes (404, 770, 678 and 470) and the seven-digit number. In general, 404 is designated for intown areas and 770 for suburbs; the 678 and 470 area codes overlay both areas. Cell phone subscribers can choose from any area code when signing up for service.

Registering for School By law, children must be 5 years old on or before September 1 to enter kindergarten and 6 years old on or before September 1 to enter the first grade. To enroll your child in either kindergarten or first grade, you will need to provide the child’s social security number; a vision, hearing, and dental screening from a family practitioner or local health clinic; and immunization records on Georgia State Form 3231.

GONE WITH THE WIND COLLECTION

MONDAY-SATURDAY

10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Closed Sunday

MARIETTA

GONE WITH THE WIND M U S E U M

Scarlett on the Square Original Gone With the Wind memorabilia on display from the private collection of Dr. Christopher Sullivan. GIFT SHOP, FACILITY RENTALS ANNUAL EVENTS

770-794-5576 www.gwtwmarietta.com www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 39


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION public schools Cherokee County Schools Board of Education 770-479-1871

Cherokee County QUICK INFO

Elementary Schools 22 Middle Schools 7 Intermediate Schools 1 High Schools 6 Alternative 1 Evening 1 Per-pupil expenditures $8,578 School & bus information: 770-720-2112 Avg. SAT Scores Cherokee Co. Georgia National

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 Electricity Amicalola EMC 706-276-2362 Cobb EMC 770-429-2100 Georgia Power 888-660-5890 770-887-2363

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T 888-436-8638 ETC Communications 678-454-1212 TDS Telecom-Nelson Ball Ground 770-735-2000 Windstream

800-501-1754

Water Cherokee County Water Authority City of Ball Ground City of Canton City of Waleska

770-479-1813 770-735-2123 770-704-1500 770-479-2912

City of Woodstock

770-926-8852

Cable TV Charter Communications 888-438-2427 Comcast

404-266-2278

ETC Communications

678-454-1212

Hospitals Northside Hospital-Cherokee 770-720-5100 Wellstar Kennestone Hospital

770-793-5000

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

1560 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

Sawnee EMC

County Neighborhoods Schools

www.cherokeega.com www.canton-georgia.com www.woodstockga.gov www.cityofballground.com www.hollyspringsga.us www.cityofwaleska.com www.cherokee.k12.ga.us

Median household income: $63,518 Median age of residents: 34 Population: 210,529 Sales tax: 6% Chamber of Commerce Cherokee County 770-345-0400, www.cherokeechamber.com Property Taxes Per $1,000 of assessed value is: Unincorporated Cherokee County, $26.80; Incorporated Cherokee County, $24.06. Tax Commissioner: 678-493-6400

Cagle Dairy Farm, Canton

Located northwest of Atlanta, Cherokee County gets its name from the original inhabitants of the area, the Cherokee Indians. The county seat, then called Etowah, was established in 1833 and renamed Canton in 1834. Today, the city is enjoying its greatest economic boom in its history since more than $60 million was invested in residential and commercial development in 1998. Despite developing its own industrial base, Cherokee County remains idyllic and serene. Farming, especially poultry processing, remains a leading industry. Canton and the neighboring community of Woodstock have seen tremendous growth as subdivisions crop up to accommodate newcomers. In fact, nearly 60 percent of the county’s population are commuters. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median value of homes in 2006 was $194,900. Homes for well over $1 million can be purchased in such neighborhoods as Bradshaw Farms, Bridge Mill and Town Lake Hills. Interstate 575 and Ga. Highway 92 traverse the county, affording residents easy access to Atlanta and the nearby attractions of Town Center Mall, Lake Allatoona and the North Georgia Mountains. Other great places to live,

40 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Ridge Mountains and along the banks of the Etowah River, Canton is prime location for development.

Woodstock

work and play in Cherokee County include the cities of Ball Ground, Holly Springs and Waleska.

Neighborhoods

Canton Canton was incorporated in 1833 and renamed in 1834 at the request of two founding fathers who had visions that the town might become a silk center similar to what existed in Canton, China. Canton did become famous for its “Canton Denim,” known worldwide for the high-quality denim produced by Canton Cotton Mills. Today, Canton is attracting new industry and residents. As a result, the city is re-investing in its downtown. As part of its “Streetscapes” program, downtown Canton will be restored to its historic look and features a newly designed theater on Main Street. Located at the foothills of the Blue

Twelve miles south of Canton, Woodstock is the fastest-growing city in Cherokee County. With a growth rate of 70 percent over the past 10 years, the city has doubled in size. Residents enjoy easy access to Interstate 575 and Ga. Highway 92, allowing short commutes to Cobb and Fulton counties. While affording convenience to big-city attractions, Woodstock still maintains its small-town appeal. Buildings dating back to 1879 characterize the downtown, where antique and other specialty shops are located. Various golf courses are located in Woodstock, including Arnold Palmer’s Eagle Watch, a course with wooded countryside views that is considered to be one of the top places to play in Atlanta. The 11,860-acre Lake Allatoona provides additional recreation. Woodstock is also convenient to more than 13 state parks. N For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com


Patrick Killam, Publisher pkillam@bellsouth.net 770.992.0273 OfямБce 770.649.7463 Fax

Ad Size: Issue: December/January 08

PROOF SH

FULL PAGE 8.375"x 10.875" HALF PAGE HORIZONTAL 7.375"x 4.812" HALF PAGE VERTICAL 3.5625"x 9.875" THIRD PAGE VERTICAL 2.375"x 9.875"

THIRD PAGE HORIZONTAL 4.75"x 4.812"

FOURTH PAGE VERTICAL 3.5625"x 4.812"

SIXTH PAGE VERTICAL 2.375"x 4.812"

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 41


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION

pUBLIC schools Cobb County Schools Board of Education 770-426-3300 Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Magnet Charter Special Per-pupil expenditures

770-422-3500

Elementary Schools 7 Middle Schools 1 High Schools 1 Sixth-Grade 1 Magnet 1 Per-pupil expenditures $9,061 School and bus information 678-594-8000 Avg. SAT Scores

Cobb Co. Marietta City Georgia National

1534 1514 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 ELECTRICITY Acworth Power 770-974-5233 Cobb EMC 770-429-2100 Georgia Power 888-660-5890 GreyStone Power Corp. 770-942-6576 Marietta Power/ Columbia Energy 770-794-5100 GAS Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T 888-436-8638 Comcast 404-266-2278 MCI Worldcom 770-541-7235 Outside Georgia 800-356-3094 WATER Austell Water Cobb County Water Systems Marietta Water Powder Springs Water Smyrna Water

770-944-4300 770-423-1000 770-794-5100 770-943-8000 770-319-5338

CABLE TV Bellsouth Multimedia 770-360-5000 Charter Communications 888-438-2427 Comcast 404-266-2278 HOSPITALS Emory Adventist Hospital 770-434-0710 WellStar Cobb Hospital 770-732-4000 WellStar Kennestone Hospital 770-793-5000 WellStar Windy Hill Hospital 770-644-1000

White Water

Cobb County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

Marietta City Schools Board of Education

71 25 16 6 6 4 $8,816

Neighborhoods

Kennesaw

One of Family Circle magaCobb County came zine’s “Ten Best Towns for Famiinto being in 1832 when lies,” Kennesaw takes pride in its the state redistributed land small-town atmosphere and boasts County www.cobbcountyga.gov once part of the Cherokee abundant parks and green space, Neighborhoods www.austellga.org Nation. Named after Thomas exceptional recreational programs www.mariettaga.gov Welch Cobb, the county and top-notch schools, includ www.ci.smyrna.ga.us experienced a devastating ing Kennesaw State University. www.kennesaw-ga.gov setback during the Civil www.cityofpowdersprings.org Kennesaw’s Historic Downtown War when most of it was features shopping, dining and atSchools www.cobb.k12.ga.us destroyed during the Battle tractions such as the Smithsonian www.marietta-city.org at Kennesaw Mountain. affiliated Southern Museum of Median household income: $65,123 Today, Cobb County, Civil War and Locomotive History, Median age of residents: 35 located north of Fulton the Smith-Gilbert Arboretum and Population: 698,158 County, is one of the fastnearby Kennesaw Mountain NaSales tax: 6% est-growing counties in the tional Battlefield Park. Chamber of Commerce nation. With a diverse ecoCobb County nomic base that includes 770-980-2000, www.cobbchamber.org Rapidly defining what’s new jobs in the service, retail, Property Taxes and progressive in quality of life aerospace and technology The property tax is $28.75 per $1,000 of assessed and citizen services, Smyrna sectors, Cobb County offers value. Tax Commissioner: 770-980-2000 delivers an amazing sense of style a quality of life unsurpassed and love of life. The new Market in the Southeast. More than $770 million has been spent on apartments and condos near Cum- Village, home to fabulous restaurants, transportation improvements in re- berland Mall, secluded subdivisions bars and upscale shops and services, cent years, allowing residents easy in East Cobb and horse ranches in is the final piece of a master plan for access to Atlanta and the commer- the northwest corner of the county. success. Call it “Main Street USA” or cial districts of Vinings Overlook, The small towns of Marietta, Vin- “Disneyland,” but don’t overlook its Cumberland Parkway and the pres- ings, Smyrna and Austell still retain charm and ability to offer the best in tigious “Platinum Triangle” in the their Southern charm amidst urban fresh, trendy lifestyle options. N Galleria area. settings. According to the Census For more counties and neighborhood A variety of housing options ex- Bureau, the median value of homes information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com ist in Cobb County, including luxury in 2006 was $205,200.

42 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

QUICK INFO

Smyrna


COUNTY INFORMATION

DeKalb County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

Located east of Fulton County, DeKalb County is the second largest county in the state with a population of about 705,000. DeKalb County contributes to Atlanta’s status as an “ international city” with its businesses and residences representing more than 30 different countries and 120 languages.

Neighborhoods

Decatur As the county seat, Decatur revolves around the Courthouse Square. In recent years, the square has undergone a renaissance as small storefront mo-

shed and Supper Club. The square also plays host to numerous festivals, town celebrations and neighborhood parties. Decatur is home to a diverse population, attracting young professionals, families and retirees. With Agnes Scott College, a prestigious women’s college, and just outside the city limits, Emory University, Decatur is a college town amidst a big city. Older brick homes, smaller bungalows and cottage homes distinguish the community and the surrounding neighborhoods of Avondale Estates, Oakhurst and Candler Park.

Dunwoody

Emory University

QUICK INFO County

www.co.dekalb.ga.us

DeKalb County prosNeighborhoods www.decaturga.com pers in part due to its ex- www.druidhills.org cellent transportation sys- www.dunwoodyga.org tem. Five major road ar- www.candlerpark.org teries traverse the county: www.stonemountaincity.org Interstates 20, 85, 285, Schools www.dekalb.k12.ga.us 675 and US Highway 78. www.csdecatur.net Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport is only six Median household income: $51,753 miles from DeKalb’s south- Median age of residents: 35 Population: 739,956 ern border and the DeKalb Sales tax: 7% Peachtree Airport, a general aviation field, is report- Chamber of Commerce DeKalb County ed to be the second busiest 404-378-8000, www.dekalbchamber.org airport in Georgia. DeKalb County is also a leader in Property Taxes the biomedical commu- The property tax rate is $41.50 per $1,000 for unincorporated DeKalb County. Tax Commissioner: nity with The Center for 404-298-4000 Disease Control headquartifs have been preserved, attracting tered there. The median value of homes in unique shopping, entertainment and 2006, according to the Census Bu- dining that includes By Hand South, Square Roots, Eddie’s Attic, Waterreau, was $190,100.

In the northern corner of the county is Dunwoody, a popular neighborhood among established professionals and young, upwardly mobile professionals raising families. It is often referred to as the “tennis set” neighborhood because of its numerous recreational outlets that include Lynwood Park and Recreation Center, as well as Blackburn Park and Tennis Center. Cultural attractions include the Dunwoody Nature Center and the Spruill Gallery. A variety of housing is available in Dunwoody, including apartments, townhomes, ranch-style homes, bungalows and mini-mansions with manicured lawns. Nearby Perimeter Mall provides shopping, dining and family entertainment. With its proximity to all major expressways and North Fulton’s booming business opportunities, Dunwoody is a hot-spot for families. N For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com

EDUCATION pUBLIC schools DeKalb County Schools Board of Education 678-676-1200 Elementary Schools 83 Middle Schools 20 High Schools 20 Per-pupil expenditures $9,896 School & bus information 678-676-1300 City Schools of Decatur Board of Education

404-370-4400

Early Learning 1 Elementary Schools 4 Middle Schools 1 High Schools 1 Per-pupil expenditures $13,444 School & bus information 404-370-8737 Avg. SAT Scores DeKalb Co. City of Decatur Georgia National

1334 1577 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity Georgia Power

404-395-7611

Snapping Shoals EMC

770-786-3484

Walton EMC

770-972-2917

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T

888-436-8638

Bellsouth

404-780-2355 Water

DeKalb County Water System 770-621-7200 Cable TV Charter Communication

877-728-3121

Comcast Cablevision

404-266-2278

Hospitals Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston

404-785-6000

DeKalb Medical Center

404-501-1000

Emory University Hospital

404-712-2000

Piedmont Hospital and Medical Care Center

404-605-5000

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 43


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION

PUBLIC SCHOOLS Fayette County Schools Board of Education 770-460-3535

Avg. SAT Scores

Fayette Co. Georgia National

1550 1431 1483

PRIVATE SCHOOLS Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES ELECTRICITY Georgia Power Company 888-660-5890 Coweta-Fayette EMC 770-253-5626 GAS Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T Residential

888-757-6500

WATER Fayette County Water 770-461-1146 Comcast

CABLE TV 404-266-2278

HOSPITALS Fayette Care Clinic 770-719-4620 Piedmont Fayette Hospital 770-719-7000

Fayetteville

Old-fashioned community pride mingles with a progressive sensibility on the streets of historic downtown Fayetteville, where antique stores and boutiques sit side by side in refurbished buildings. Boasting a population of approximately 16,000 residents, Fayetteville is home to the Fayette County Historic Society, Research Center and Museum. A haven for family fun, Dixieland Fun Park offers an assortment of activities for young and old alike. The HollidayDorsey-Fife Museum provides a fascinating link to the past thanks to its association with several historical figures, including Margaret Mitchell and "Doc" Holliday. The 1,500-seat Southern Ground Amphitheater attracts national touring acts with its annual summer concert series.

17 6 5 1 1 $8,359 770-460-3520 Photo: Courtesy of the City of Fayetteville

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Alternative Open Campus Per-pupil expenditures School & bus information

Fayette County

Neighborhoods

Starr's Mill in Fayetteville

Located southwest of Atlanta, the land comprising Fayette County was ceded from the Creek Indian Nation in 1821, thus creating Georgia’s 49th county. The county seat, the city of Fayetteville, was established in 1823 and contains the oldest courthouse in the County www.fayettecounty.ga.gov state, built in 1825 and located Neighborhoods www.fayetteville-ga.gov The area now known as on Fayetteville’s historic town www.peachtree-city.org Peachtree City was originally square. Both the county and city Schools www.fcboe.org settled by Woodland Era were named for the Marquis de Indians several thousand LaFayette, who fought alongside Median household income: $82,216 Median age of residents: 42.4 years ago, and ceded to George Washington in the Population: 107,104 the Federal government Revolutionary War. Sales tax: 6% in 1821 by Chief William Author Margaret Mitchell Chamber of Commerce McIntosh, Jr. spent many summers at her 770-461-9983, www.fayettechamber.org Comprising some grandfather’s home in Fayette 12,000 acres, Peachtree County, which helped to inspire Property Taxes Per $1,000 of assessed value is: City was chartered in the locations in her novel Gone With Unincorporated Fayette County, $30.70; 1950s as a masterplanned the Wind. Fayetteville, $31.64; community of five separate Today, the 199-square mile Peachtree City, $34.54. villages. Today, the area area is renowned as a thriving Tax Commissioner: 770-461-3611 is linked by a 90- mile economic center that features network of trails and golf numerous attractive incentives for businesses, including the 2,200From 1984 to 1994, Fayette cart paths connecting homes, acre Peachtree City Industrial Park, County was the fifth-fastest growing businesses, schools and parks. Gol carts, bicycles and walking are the which features its own Foreign Trade county in the U.S. Zone, which allows merchandise to Fayette County boasts several preferred modes of transportation enter from or exit to foreign countries golf courses and two amphitheaters, among its 35,000 residents, who without a formal U.S. Customs entry among other attractions serving a enjoy its wooded scenery and or payment of duties. In addition, family-oriented population of more wealth of parks, playgrounds and Fayette County maintains a rural, than 106,000 residents. Single-family recreational areas N . small-town allure, and has been housing in Fayette County ranges For more counties and neighborhood recognized as one of the nation’s from the $50,000s in moderateinformation, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com most attractive communities for income areas to more than $2 million corporate family relocation. in affluent neighborhoods.

44 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

QUICK INFO

Peachtree City


COUNTY INFORMATION

Fulton County

PUBLIC SCHOOLS Fulton County Schools Board of Education 404-768-3600

Buckhead is also the epicenter for the city’s entertainment and dining industries. With more than 200 restaurants, luxury hotels and nightspots, it has long been a young professional’s paradise. The area also offers numerous antique stores, art galleries and mall shopping at Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza.

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Charter Per-pupil expenditures

Downtown Atlanta skyline

QUICK INFO

Neighborhoods

Buckhead

Considered Atlanta’s “silk stocking district,” Buckhead is “where old money lives and new money parties,” according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. With its one-of-a-kind Georgian and Neoclassical mansions and uniquely styled homes from the 1950s and 1960s, Buckhead is a favorite locale among architecture and history buffs. It is home to the Governor’s Mansion, the historic Swan House and the Atlanta History Center.

County www.co.fulton.ga.us Neighborhoods www.alpharetta.ga.us www.buckhead.net www.virginiahighland.com www.eastpointcity.org www.collegeparkga.com www.hapeville.org www.ci.roswell.ga.us www.sandyspringsga.org Schools www.fultonschools.org www.atlanta.k12.ga.us Median household income: $57,586 Median age of residents: 35 Population: 963,676 Sales tax: 7%, Atlanta City: 8% Chamber of Commerce Greater North Fulton 770-993-8806, www.gnfcc.com Metro Atlanta 404-880-9000, www.metroatlantachamber.com South Fulton 770-964-1984, www.sfcoc.org Property Taxes The property tax rate per $1,000 is: $30.49 for the City of Atlanta; $28.03 for incorporated Fulton County; $33.69 for unincorporated South Fulton and $31.90 for unincorporated North Fulton County County. Tax Commissioner: 404-730-6100

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development.

At the center of the Metro Atlanta area is Fulton County. Bordered on the west by the Chattahoochee River and encompassing Interstates 85, 75, 285 and Ga. 400, Fulton County is at the hub of the area’s financial, transportation, retail, communications and cultural services. Most Fortune 500 corporations maintain national or regional facilities in the area; many are headquartered here, including Coca-Cola, Equifax, United Parcel Service, Home Depot, Delta Airlines and Turner Broadcasting System. More than 3 million live and work in Fulton County. Older, innercity neighborhoods, such as Inman Park, Candler Park and trendy Virginia-Highland offer eclectic living amidst unique boutiques and restaurants. Midtown is at the heart of the city’s cultural life, home to the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, High Museum of Art, Alliance Theatre and the historic Fox Theatre. Many outdoor festivals are held at Piedmont Park. According to the Census Bureau, the median value of homes in 2006 was $270,000. Homes in the millions can be found in such affluent neighborhoods as Buckhead, Sandy Springs and Alpharetta.

EDUCATION

one of Atlanta’s most affluent neighborhoods. Homes range from elegant subdivisions to those with acreage. The Country Club of the South is a planned community home to several sports stars, high profile executives and celebrities. A successful combination of old and new, Alpharetta has become a haven for singles, families and professionals wanting a bit of country living with all the amenities that city dwelling offers. While many residents shop at nearby Northpoint Mall and Gwinnett Mall, many still enjoy the old stores on Main Street— a visit to the Alpharetta Soda Shoppe is a special treat. N

Alpharetta

Once a small farming community, Alpharetta has greatly boomed within the last 20 years to become

For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com

58 19 16 6 $9,746

Atlanta City Schools

404-802-3500

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Charter Non-Traditional Per-pupil expenditures: School & bus information:

55 16 22 7 2 $13,710 404-753-9815

Avg. SAT Scores Atlanta (City) 1285 Fulton Co. 1584 Georgia 1460 National 1509 PRIVATE SCHOOLS Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 ELECTRICITY City of College Park 404-669-3772 City of East Point 404-270-7093 City of Fairburn 770-964-2244 City of Palmetto 770-463-3377 Georgia Power Company 404-395-7611 GreyStone Power Corp. 770-942-6576 Sawnee EMC 770-887-2363 GAS Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T 888-436-8638 Outside Georgia 800-356-3094

Fulton County

WATER

404-730-6830

CABLE TV Charter Communications 877-728-3121 Comcast 404-266-2278 HOSPITALS Atlanta Medical Center 404-265-4000 Center for the Visually Impaired 404-875-9011 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Hughes Spalding 404-785-9500 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite 404-785-5252 Emory Crawford Long Hospital 404-686-2513 Fulton County Health Dept. 404-730-1211 Grady Memorial Hospital 404-616-4307 North Fulton Regional Hospital 770-751-2500 Northside Hospital 404-851-8000 Piedmont Hospital 404-605-5000 Shepherd Center 404-352-2020 South Fulton Medical Center 404-466-1170 St. Joseph’s Hospital 404-851-7001

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 45


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION pUBLIC schools Henry County Schools Board of Education 770-957-6601 Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Alternative Per-pupil expenditures School & bus information

Neighborhoods

29 12 10 1 $7,910 770-957-2025

Avg. SAT Score Henry Co. Georgia National

McDonough

1410 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity Central Georgia EMC 770-775-7857 Georgia Power

770-395-7611

Snapping Shoals EMC

770-786-3484

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com.

McDonough’s town square

Henry County QUICK INFO

Incorporated in 1823, McDonough was named after Commodore McDonough of the War of 1812 and is the county seat. Many historic structures with architecture dating back to the 1800s can be seen in and around McDonough’s town square. McDonough, in an effort to bring its residents a sense of community, created its Main Street Program, which revitalized its Main Street. Today, the street is not only home to intimate boutiques and family-friendly restaurants, it is also home to a variety of free community events throughout the year on the town square, including Music on the Square summer concerts, Santa on the Square at Christmas, classic car shows and chili cook-offs.

Named after Patrick Henry, orator from the Revolutionary War, Henry County is one of 17 County www.co.henry.ga.us counties created from the Creek Neighborhoods www.cityofstockbridge.com Indian land secessions. The Schools www.henry.K12.ga.us county is known as the “Mother Median household income: $63,395 Host of the LPGA of Counties” because much of Median age of residents: 32 Chick-fil-A Charity Chamits land was taken to develop Population: 191,502 pionship each year in April, surrounding counties, including Sales tax: 7% Stockbridge is a golfer’s parFulton, DeKalb and Clayton. Chamber of Commerce adise. Eagle’s Landing, the Today Henry County is Henry County community surrounding made up of the cities of 770-957-5786, www.henrycounty.com the 18-hole Eagle’s LandMcDonough, Stockbridge, ing golf course, is home to Locust Grove and Hampton. Property Taxes some of the most beautiful It is one of the fastest-growing The property tax rate per $1,000 of assessed value is $37.51 for unincorporated Henry County. and exclusive neighborcounties in Metro Atlanta with Tax Commissioner: 770-288-8180 hoods south of Atlanta. The more than 198,000 residents. 51,000-square-foot, plantaThe county continues to flourish as a major industrial and retail hosts the LPGA Chick-fil-A Char- tion-style clubhouse on the property exemplifies Georgian charm. Home center. Tanger Outlet Center in ity Championship. Locust Grove is a favorite attraction With the county’s rich resources prices range from the hundredamong Atlanta’s shoppers. and convenience to I-75, housing thousands to the millions. Incorporated in 1920, StockHenry County is known best, has continued at a steady growth however, as the home of Atlanta Mo- with such planned developments bridge began as a settlement in tor Speedway and Eagle’s Landing as Heron Bay Golf & Country 1829 and celebrates its heriCountry Club. Located in the county Club and Crown Ridge cropping tage each May with Ole’ Stocksince 1959, the speedway attracts up everywhere. The median value bridge Days. N people from all over the state for of homes in 2008 was $150,189, For more counties and neighborhood its two annual NASCAR races. making Henry County a very information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com Eagle’s Landing in Stockbridge affordable place to live.

Stockbridge

AT&T

Telephone 888-436-8638 Water

City of Hampton

770-946-4306

City of Stockbridge

770-389-7900

Henry County Water System 770-957-6659 Locust Grove

770-957-5043

McDonough

770-957-3915 Cable TV

Charter Communications

888-728-8121

Comcast

404-266-2278 Hospitals

Henry Medical Center

678-604-1000

Southern Regional Medical Center

770-991-8000

Sylvan Grove Hospital

770-775-7861

46 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


METRO ATLANTA

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www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 47


upcomingEVENTS

The Magic School Bus Kicks Up A Storm, The Children’s Museum of Atlanta This Scholastic exhibit takes children into the world of weather with three interactive environments that explore how weather is created, experienced and measured. Oct. 6-Jan. 27, 2013, 404-659-5437, www.childrensmuseumatlanta.org.

Fall Celebration, Smithgall Woods State Park Enjoy the natural beauty of the season at this event in Helen, Ga., with hands-on pioneer-skills exhibits, hay rides, craft vendors, mountain music and more. Oct. 13, 706-878-3087,

Carmen, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

Theater & Concerts

Exhibits & Events

Chicago, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

Alpharetta Brew Moon Fest, Historic Downtown Alpharetta

Join Velma, Roxie and smooth-talking lawyer Billy Flynn in this production of the perennial musical sensation. Oct. 4-7, 770-916-2852, www.gas-southbroadwayseries.com.

Macbeth, Conant Performing Arts Center Georgia Shakespeare commemorates the 75th anniversary of Orson Welles’ 1936 production Voodoo Macbeth with a predominantly African-American cast. Oct. 4-28, 404-504-1473, www.gashakespeare.org.

The Who, Arena at Gwinnett Center The legendary rock band performs its iconic 1973 double-album Quadrophenia in its entirety, along with a selection of classic hits. Nov. 7,

Alpharetta’s downtown area becomes one big street party for this second annual beer festival featuring beer, wine and great food from some of Alpharetta’s best restaurants. Oct. 6, 404-402-5389, www.awesomealpharetta.com.

Foxfire Mountaineer Festival, Rabun County Civic Center Have an old-fashioned good time at this event filled with exhibits and demonstrations of different aspects of southern Appalachian culture, such as woodworking, broom-making, pottery, folk-art painting, stained glass and more. Oct. 6, 706-746-5828, www.foxfiremountaineer.org.

PHOTO: JD Scott

www.georgiastateparks.org/events.

Heavy Metal in Motion, Tellus Science Museum Observe and learn about helicopters, hovercraft, race cars and other vehicles at this third annual celebration of big machines, bringing the Tellus Museum’s Science in Motion transportation gallery to life. Oct. 13, 770-606-5700, www.tellussciencemuseum.org.

Terror on the Trail, Sims Lake Park The Aurora Theatre presents this haunted attraction, in which teenage zombies compel captive souls to share spine-tingling stories as visitors follow a trail that loops around Sims Lake. Recommended for ages 10 and up. Oct. 13-14, 20-21 and 27-28, 678-226-6222, www.scarystroll.com/tot.html

Atlanta Kosher BBQ Competition, Congregation B’nai Torah This event promises a fun-filled day of food, games, live entertainment and children’s activities, as well as a kosher barbecue competition. Categories include Best Brisket, Best Ribs and Most Original Team Name. The overall champion will receive a stipend to travel to the next competition on the Kosher BBQ Circuit. Oct. 14, 678-948-5227, www.atlantakosherbbq.com.

800-745-3000, www.gwinnettcenter.com.

Georgia Music Hall of Fame Awards, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

Carmen, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Music Director Robert Spano, Sugarland, .38 Special, songwriter Gary Rossington and music industry veteran Alex Hodges are among the inductees at this 34th annual event. Oct. 14, 770-916-2800,

The Atlanta Opera opens its 2012-2013 season with this classic tale of Don Jose’s ill-fated attraction to the alluring gypsy of the title. Nov. 10-18, 404.881.8885, www.atlantaopera.org.

www.cobbenergycentre.com.

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Fox Theatre

2012 Humane Event, Summerour Studio

The smash hit Broadway musical returns. Experience the romance and enchantment with all your favorite songs and characters. Nov. 27

This third annual fundraiser aims to raise awareness and funds to support the Society’s Howell Mill Wellness Clinic. Oct. 18,

-Dec. 2, 800-278-4447, www.broadwayinatlanta.com.

www.atlantahumane.org. Terror on the Trail, Sims Lake Park

48 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


Arts and Music Fall Festival, Historic Downtown Alpharetta This new fall arts and crafts show offers live jazz, blues and acoustic music on three stages. There is also a juried art event with 100 booths. This event will be held on Milton Avenue between Highway 9 and Old Roswell Road. Free and open to the public. Oct. 20-21, 678-296-2829, www.awesomealpharetta.com.

Boo at the Zoo, Zoo Atlanta Atlanta’s favorite family-friendly Halloween festival returns. Explore magical pathways, sample sweet treats, meet a whimsical cast of costumed characters and more over two weekends, surrounded by more than 1,500 animals from around the world. Costumes encouraged. Oct. 20-21 and 27-28, 404-624-9453, www.zooatlanta.org.

Harvest Balloon Festival, Flowery Branch This third annual event at the Village Green in the Sterling on the Lake community features balloon rides and a variety of family-friendly activities including pumpkin carving and painting, hay rides, games, face-painting, live music and food vendors. Proceeds will benefit local charities. Oct. 20, 770-967-9777, www.harvestballoonfestival.com.

National Geographic Greatest Photographs of the American West, Booth Western Art Museum Drawn from the National Geographic photography archives, this exhibition features approximately 75 Western images spanning more than 100 years of history. Subjects include westward expansion, Native Americans and conservation efforts. Oct. 27-March 3, 2013, 770-387-1300, www.boothmuseum.org.

Trek or Treat, Suwanee Creek Park The City of Suwanee’s annual free Halloween celebration for kids features games, a costume parade and a free hot dog lunch (while supplies last). Oct. 27, www.suwanee.com.

Garden Lights, Holiday Nights, Atlanta Botanical Garden

This exhibit showcases a selection of black-andwhite portraits of 33 iconic Southern visual artists by photographer Jerry Siegel. All of the artists photographed are represented by works in the Morris Museum’s collection. Through Dec. 2, 706724-7501, www.themorris.org.

Bedford Dasher, The Bedford School This fourth annual 5K run/walk and Elf Run begins and ends at the Bedford School in Fairburn, which strives to maximize the potential of students with learning differences. The 200m Elf Run, suggested for children 8 and under, starts at 8:45 a.m., followed by the 5K run/walk at 9 a.m. Registration begins at 7 a.m. Dec. 8, 770-7748001, www.thebedfordschool.org.

This second annual light show extravaganza transforms the Atlanta Botanical Garden into a giant kaleidoscope of color, with more than one million lights blanketing the garden’s 30 acres. Meet Lumina the Light Sprite and take in such spectacular sights as the “Starry Night Walk” and the Cascade Garden’s Liquid Lights display. Nov. 17-Jan. 5, 2013, 404-876-5859, www.atlantabotanicalgarden.org.

Portraits of Southern Artists by Jerry Siegel, Morris Museum of Art

Suwanee SculpTour, Suwanee Downtown Suwanee’s walkable public art exhibit of original sculptures in and around Town Center returns for a second year. The tour features 15 all-new sculptures, created by 11 artists representing Georgia and five other states. A free guided audio tour with insights from the artists is available for download as a podcast from iTunes. Through March 2013, www.suwanee.com.

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 49


hiddenATLANTA

LEFT: Roswell Ghost Tour guide Jonathan Crooks uses his flashlight to point out a window where a ghost has been seen. RIGHT: Bulloch Hall, one of the possibly haunted stops on the tour.

M

chael and Catherine are a well-known couple in the city of Roswell, despite the fact that few residents have ever seen them. The couple, a pair of star-crossed lovers said to have died during the Civil War, is believed to haunt J. Christopher’s on the downtown square. The story of the two lovers, who are believed to have been haunting the building for decades, is just one of several told during the Roswell Ghost Tour. This year-round walking tour, which lasts at least two and a half hours, visits local attractions that have experienced ghost sightings and other unexplained phenomena. Dianna Avena, who runs Roswell Ghost Tour with her husband, Joe, stresses that her guides don’t make up ghost stories to sell tickets. The goal is to educate residents and visitors about hauntings, including why by Cady Schulman certain areas might be haunted. At each stop, tour guides discuss which people are said to haunt that location and why. They also recount paranormal activity experienced by locals. “We’re not dressed up,” says Avena. “We’re not doing weird, fake accents. We do a lot of telling of our city’s history when it comes to why we feel a certain area is haunted.” At Bulloch Hall, a popular attraction, residents claim to have seen lights in the attic long after the building had been closed for the night, and a woman standing in front of the attic window. A mysterious old man with a cane has been spotted atop the staircase at Mimosa Hall, while three apparitions have been seen across the cobblestone driveway. In the tour’s 13 years, guides have seen their share of skeptics. Avena recalls two men who were brought by their wives. “The men had quite an attitude and were standing with their arms crossed,” she says. Halfway through the tour, the men began to soften and started talking about unexplained experiences from their own pasts. “We don’t try to convert anyone to anything,” Avena says. “We aren’t trying to convince them to believe in ghosts.” Roswell Ghost Tour runs year-round. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for children 12 and under. For reservations and other information, visit www.roswellghosttour.com.

Roswell Ghost Tour A Historical Look at What Haunts Roswell

50 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


Newcomer Magazine Atlanta | October/November 2012  

Newcomer magazine is Atlanta’s leading relocation and new-resident guide, providing an invaluable resource for businesses, executives and fa...

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