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Relocation, Lifestyle & Living in Atlanta

April/May 2012

SPRING ESCAPES

10 Exciting Seasonal Events in Georgia FESTIVALS BARBECUE MUSIC & MORE!

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TOP ATLANTA NEIGHBORHOODS T GREAAS ARE

The City’s Best Communities for Families, Professionals and More

Exploring Online Education Is Virtual Learning Right for Your Child?

Temporary Housing

Luxury Living for Rent

The Short-Term Solution

High-End Apartment Communities


April/May CONTENTS FEATURES Temporary Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Metro Atlanta’s Top 100 Neighborhoods . . . . . 26

From corporate lodging to extended-stay hotels, Atlanta offers plenty of choices for those in need of short-term accommodations.

Georgia’s online academies are providing a perfect fit for students who need help, have busy schedules or are being home-schooled.

Our yearly guide to the city’s greatest neighborhoods showcases perfect areas for families, empty nesters, young professionals and those looking for a true intown experience.

Virtual Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Spring Into Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 There’s lots to do and see throughout the state this season, from a real-life rodeo to magnificent tall ships and plenty of music, food and festival fun.

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PHOTO (FAR RIGHT): Scott Bryant, Statesboro Herald

DEPARTMENTS

In Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Relocation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

The inside scoop on news, events and happenings around Atlanta.

Homes and Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

A comprehensive guide to help you find your way before, during and after your move, including counties, neighborhoods, relocation tips, a map to metro Atlanta and much more.

More and more Atlantans are choosing apartment living over home ownership. These upscale communities allow you to rent in style.

Upcoming Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

School Spotlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Get caught up on the best exhibitions, theatrical productions, special events and live music across the metro area.

For almost half a century, First Montessori School of Atlanta has kept young minds absorbed and involved through the principles of “engaged learning.”

Hidden Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

The Braves Museum and Hall of Fame takes sports fans on a guided tour of Atlanta’s baseball history.

IN OUR NEXT ISSUE: Take a tour of some of Georgia’s best museums, get to know the city of East Point, and explore Callaway Gardens. All of this plus restaurants, fun summer doings and more in the June/July edition of Newcomer!

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So Many Schools… So Little Time Atlanta School Guide The one source that parents turn to for the best schools and educational resources.

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Newcomer magazine, April/May 2012 Volume 16, Issue 1. Submissions, photography or ideas may be sent to Killam Publishing, Inc., 200 Market Place, Suite 230, Roswell, GA 30075. Submissions will not be returned unless otherwise requested and accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Newcomer magazine reserves the right to revise any necessary submissions. Reproduction in whole or in part of any elements of this publication are strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. © 2012 Killam Publishing, Inc.

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inFOCUS n e w s b i tes fr om a ro un d AT LANTA

Mark Your Calendars

PHOTO: Joan Marcus

PHOTO: “Girl With A Pearl Earring” Johannes Vermeer

The High Museum of Art is one of only three U.S. museums to host Girl With a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis, an exhibit of Dutch masters coming next summer. Among the paintings on loan from the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis will be Vermeer’s legendary Girl With a Pearl Earring (pictured). June 22-Sept. 29, 2013. 404-733-5000. www.high.org.

Good Boys

Millions have heard such classic tunes as “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Walk Like a Man.” But until Jersey Boys, few knew the story behind those songs. The Tony and Grammy Award-winning Broadway musical recounts the remarkable rise of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, a group of blue-collar boys from the wrong side of the tracks who became global pop music sensations. May 22-June 10 at the Fox Theatre. For tickets, call 800-982-2787 or visit www.broadwayinatlanta.com.

Puppets in Flight Midtown’s world-renowned Center for Puppetry Arts is expanding—sort of. World on a String: Global Puppetry, currently on display at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, allows air travelers to track the history of puppetry and glimpse more than 50 puppets from around the world, including Belgium, China, Egypt, India and Nigeria. The exhibit is located along the walkway connecting the main security area and Concourse T. 8 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

PHOTO: Courtesy of the Morris Museum of Art

PHOTO: Courtesy of the Center for Puppetry Arts

An App for Art Lovers Now you don’t have to drive to downtown Augusta to enjoy a wealth of information on artwork and artists from the American South. With the Morris Museum of Art’s new iPhone app, users can take a virtual tour of the museum’s permanent and special exhibits, view its events calendar, find information such as admission, hours, and a map of the galleries, and even donate to the museum. They can also use it as a handheld audio guide while visiting the museum itself. The app is currently available only for the iPhone and iPod touch. The app is available for free at the iTunes App Store.


infocus Suwanee’s a Winner The City of Suwanee recently won awards from the Georgia Municipal Association and Artworks! Gwinnett for its public arts initiative, particularly its popular Suwanee SculpTour exhibit (pictured). In addition, in February the city won two awards at the annual Southeast Festivals and Events Association conference for its 2011 Sept. 11 commemorative event and a flash mob performance at last year’s Suwanee Day Festival.

Reliving History Experience the sights and sounds of a Civil War skirmish at the Battle of Resaca Reenactment. In observance of the 137th anniversary of the first major battle of the Atlanta Campaign, infantry, cavalry and other soldiers will take to the original battlefield in Resaca, Ga., an hour north of Atlanta, starting with a memorial service at the Resaca Confederate Cemetery. May 19-20. For more information, contact the Gordon County Convention and Visitors Bureau at 706-625-3200.

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 9


A PLACE TO CALL HOME Finding the Best Temporary Housing Solution by Wendy Dunham

Relocating to a new city is always exciting, but there’s a lot to think about, organize, prioritize and plan, not the least of which is where you’re going to live. Possibly, your move comes with little advance warning, and your family will join you later. You’ll need to find a place to stay during this transition. Finding temporary accommodation until you buy a house or until your new home is ready is key. 10 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


PHOTO: Courtesy of TP Corporate Lodging

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o where do you start? If your company is moving you, or if you’ve been hired by a company in Atlanta, your employer will probably be able to help. Following their advice is always a good idea, as they’ve done this before and have built good business-to-business relationships with preferred service providers in the area. These relocation specialists know all the pitfalls and all the best tips for making your move as seamless as possible. Individuals moving without the assistance of an employer can use them, too. “When a corporation transfers an employee to a new city, it is investing time and money into the venture,” says Kathy Connelly, senior vice president for corporate services for Prudential Georgia Realty. “In order to maximize that investment, they need their employees to have the least stressful transition possible, with the least distractions to the job and the family. It makes sense, therefore, to use a relocation agent who is a specialist in the field.” One option Connelly and her team offer is corporate lodgings: fully furnished apartments that come with all the basics, including linens, kitchenware and washer-dryers. Utilities are included in the lease price, and most have swimming pools, spas, fitness centers and business centers, as well. TP Corporate Lodging, based in Lawrenceville, also has plenty to offer the business professional. But president Tim Miller says his accommodations are also popular with home buyers who need short-term placement, temporarily misplaced families, project workers, those seeking medical treatment, single people who don’t want to furnish an apartment, and families who are on the move. “We provide everything that our customers need,” says Miller. “We provide a fully furnished apartment home, fully decorated, with a full-size kitchen and full-size appliances, and the biggest draw is a washer and dryer in the apartment—it’s not down the hall or on another floor. You’re also getting more square footage and living space than you would in a hotel. If you’re in a four-wall hotel for four weeks or longer, those walls start closing in on you.” TP Corporate Lodging also offers clients a choice in furniture arrangements. Customers can also choose from options that include maid service, premium movie channels, a larger TV, a VCR, DVD player, stereo and more. But one of the most important considerations when choosing a temporary home is its location. “I am very picky when it comes to finding property,” Miller says. “People who lease from us will not find themselves next to a Dumpster or in a bad neighborhood.”

A furnished corporate apartment provided by TP Corporate Lodging.

Relocation specialists know all the pitfalls and all the best tips for making your move as seamless as possible. Such accommodations can actually mean a savings over the cost of staying in a hotel. “You get all this extra space, and it costs less than the daily rate of a hotel,” Miller says, noting that his company’s typical daily rate averages between

$59 and $85, compared to between $65 and $149 or more for a hotel. Additional savings can be had by using your own kitchen to prepare meals as opposed to dining out or ordering room service. TP Corporate Lodging offers free, unlimited local calls, as well. But what if you’re relocating on your own, without the help of an employer? Hiring a specialist is a possibility. Another choice is to move into an extended-stay hotel. These look like hotels or motels and usually offer small, furnished suites where everything is done for you, except cooking. There will also usually be access to a pool, a spa, a gym and an office for faxing, copying, printing, etc. Some extended-stay hotels, such as the Marriott TownePlace Suites, even let you accrue loyalty points during your stay. X

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A one-bedroom suite in Atlanta, for one person, in a chain like ExtendedStay America, Homestead Studio Suites, or ExtendedStay Deluxe, can begin as low as $39.99 per night. Prices vary according to location, and you might qualify for discounts depending on your employer. If you have three children and two dogs, you may wish to consider renting a house. This will have to be organized well ahead of your move, but there are a lot of options to choose from, and in the current economy, rental prices are down. The best way to find a rental property is to go to a website such as Rentals.com. Just plug in everything you want, including the area you’d like and your price range. Renters can search the comprehensive database of thousands of properties for free until they find just what they need, even down to things like a fenced-in yard for their dog or a two-car garage. Contacting a Realtor is another option. The National Association of Realtors website lists a wide range of rental properties, and many real estate companies have sites that offer rental properties as well. Note that the average Realtor will be able to share their market knowledge but may not have an exhaustive knowledge of rental properties on the market beyond those listed with their own company and information available to the general public. They should be able to direct you to resources but most likely will not tour properties with you as they would if they were helping you buy a house. Whichever way you go, remember that figuring out where you’re going to live is often the hardest part of a transition. Once you’ve accomplished that, everything else should fall right into place.

CONTACT INFORMATION

12 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Prudential Georgia Realty 770-912-4100 www.prudentialgeorgia.com

Extended Stay Hotels 800-804-3724 www.extendedstayhotels.com

TP Corporate Lodging 678-442-9700 www.tpcorporatelodging.com

Rentals.com 888-501-7368 www.rentals.com

Marriott TownePlace Suites www.marriott.com/towneplace

National Association of Realtors www.realtor.com


www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 13


HOMES

AND

COMMUNITIES

Luxury Homes FOR RENT Exploring Upscale Apartment Communities in Atlanta by Rachael Mason

Moving to Atlanta means you’ve got a lot to think about—starting a new job, making new friends and, most importantly, finding a new place to live. And in today’s uncertain economy, you might be considering apartment living instead of home ownership.

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BELOW: 05 Buckhead, a high-rise luxury apartment development. TOP RIGHT: Living quarters at 05 Buckhead. BOTTOM RIGHT: An outdoor fireplace at Rockledge, a Greystar community.

PHOTOS: (Left and top right) courtesy of 05 Buckhead and (bottom right) courtesy of Greystar

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ou’re not alone. Apartment communities across Atlanta have seen an increase in rentals over the last few years, says Kellie Mendez, a director of real estate for Greystar, a property management, construction and investment company that runs more than 30 apartment communities in Atlanta. “The rental business for Atlanta is on an upward swing,” she says. “We are experiencing an increase in traffic from current and former homeowners, who are now turning into renters by choice due to the current financial foreclosure crisis as well as the desire to simplify their lifestyle.” More and more, new residents find themselves drawn to renting for the features and conveniences it offers. And just because you’re looking for an apartment doesn’t mean you have to settle for less. In fact, Atlanta is home to many apartment communities that provide the kind of creature comforts associated with upscale hotels. “People have become less certain that homes or condos are going to be a good invest-

ment, and they want the services and amenities available in a first-class apartment community,” says Aaron Goldman, president of Perennial Properties, a mixed-use commercial development firm. “They also want the flexibility for career or family relocations without the burden of needing to sell a home.”

The Right Location To begin finding the right apartment property or community, make a list of the things you need and are looking for in a home. Location is probably right at the top, whether you’re looking for proximity to work or a certain school district. Once you’ve settled on a part of town, you can narrow your focus to other matters, such as which type of apartment community you’re drawn to. Some prospective renters, like those with families, might prefer a traditional complex arrangement, with units spread out across several buildings in a sprawling development, perhaps with plenty of green space. These often host

other families, presenting opportunities for socialization, and you’re likely to find larger concentrations of such communities closer to schools, especially in the Atlanta suburbs. Younger professionals, meanwhile, are more apt to be attracted to lofts or high-rise communities, often with easy access to great food and entertainment options. Residents at 05 Buckhead, a high-rise apartment building in the heart of the Buckhead area, find themselves surrounded by number of quality restaurants, boutiques and businesses. They’re also only a mile or so away from premier shopping at Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza. “The fact that we’re right in the middle of Buckhead is very convenient,” says assistant manager Kaleigh Brooks. “You can walk to a lot of things.” Midtown Atlanta offers such communities as the 17th Street Lofts, a Perennial development located directly above the retail space at Atlantic Station. “Right at your fingertips, you’ve got grocery stores, restaurants and eateries, movie theaters and coffee shops,” says prop-

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Swimming pools and courtyard at 626 DeKalb, a Greystar property.

The Financial Advantage In today’s economy, renting offers numerous ways to stretch your housing budget. While utilities aren’t typically included in rental fees, tenants don’t have to pay property taxes or the homeowners’ association fees often required at condominium developments. Another financial benefit of renting is the

significant savings on upkeep and repairs. Apartment dwellers have far fewer maintenance concerns and yard work worries than homeowners. “They don’t have to worry about the little things,” says Brooks of 05 Buckhead. Amenities are another cost-cutting attraction of luxury apartment living. Most apartment communities offer access to fitness equipment,

PHOTO: Courtesy of Greystar

erty manager Dana Danner. “Once you come in and park, you can literally walk anywhere.” A couple of miles away, residents at Apex West Midtown can walk to a number of retail shops and restaurants in the live-work-play development, including Corner Tavern, Nova Nails Salon and Westside Pie. The Pencil Factory Flats and Shops, a Perennial property on Decatur Street close to downtown Atlanta, includes such spots as Hill Street Tavern, Marlee’s Coffee and Tea, Intown Market and Caramba Cafe. Residents can enjoy an evening of improv comedy at the Village Theatre, which recently relocated to the complex. What’s inside your new apartment home may be even more important to you than its surroundings. Among those seeking rental homes, top considerations include “controlled access, interior finishes and amenities,” says Greystar real estate director Barbara O’Steen. Residents at 05 Buckhead, for example, enjoy multi-level penthouses and one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments with floor-to-ceiling windows offering amazing views of the city, as well as washers and dryers. Apex West Midtown, meanwhile, boasts hardwood floors, garden tubs, walk-in closets and large patios and balconies, among other features.

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for example, saving residents the expense of a gym membership. Some Greystar properties, says O’Steen, provide “fitness clubs that include basketball courts, tennis courts, personal trainers, spin classes, yoga and Pilates.” The scope of a community’s amenities depends on the company and the clientele. Some apartment complexes offer bare-bones conveniences, but higher-end communities, like those run by Greystar or Post Properties, offer luxurious services. “Some of our communities offer petfriendly conveniences such as bark parks and pet grooming,” says O’Steen. “Some feature resort-style amenities, such as salt water pools with aqua lounges and Zen gardens.” Tenants at the Pencil Factory enjoy access to a gym, a swimming pool and a courtyard with grills and fountains. And at 05 Buckhead, residents can get help with even the smallest of tasks, thanks to an on-site 24-hour concierge. Services offered include wakeup calls, restaurant reservations, signing for deliveries, ordering food, finding tickets for shows and events, confirming flights and dry cleaning drop-off. The experience is “almost like living in a hotel,” Brooks says.

Likewise, many Greystar communities cater to busy professional lifestyles with cyber cafes, coffee bars and business centers. Bottom line, whichever part of Atlanta strikes your fancy, rest assured that there are likely plenty of luxury rental options available, with lots of money-saving amenities and convenient access to schools, work and entertainment.

START YOUR SEARCH 05 Buckhead 3242 Peachtree Road, Atlanta 404-446-0505 www.05buckhead.com 17th Street Lofts Atlantic Station 260 17 1/2 St., Atlanta 404-815-0224 www.atlanticstationapartments.com Greystar www.greystar.com Perennial Properties www.perennialproperties.net Post Properties www.postproperties.com

OPEN HOUSE Apr. 22, 2012, 2 - 4 p.m.

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+Grades 1-9 +Ability grouping +Beautiful 45-acre campus in Fairburn +Challenge course +Squirrel Hollow Camp

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770-774-8001 www.thebedfordschool.org 5665 Milam Road, Fairburn, GA 30213

18 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


Buckhead

Atlanta’s Address for Luxury Apartment Living

05

Buckhead, located in the heart of Buckhead, delivers high-rise luxury with all the comforts of a five-star hotel— but without the hassles of home ownership. Atlanta’s premier address for elegant apartment living, 05 Buckhead offers such conveniences as a rooftop pool and sun deck, an outdoor terrace, a theater, a club room with flat-screen TVs, a state-of-the-art fitness center and a cyber café. Ranging from one- and two-bedroom homes to multi-level penthouses, the accommodations at 05 Buckhead provide bright, open floor plans and expansive floor-to-ceiling windows that offer breathtaking views of the Atlanta skyline.

Each residence also comes with its own washer and dryer and assigned, covered parking. In addition, residents at 05 Buckhead enjoy a 24-hour concierge who provides such services as wake-up calls, dry cleaning, restaurant reservations, pet-sitting, auto detailing and more. If you’re looking for a personal trainer, technical support or a chef to come to your home and prepare a meal, the friendly concierge staff can help. There’s even a “welcome home” service that allows traveling residents to come home to a stocked fridge, fresh fruit and a turned-down bed with clean linens. In addition, on-site property management ensures that every need is

taken care of right away. This gleaming high-rise places residents in the center of the city’s most active neighborhood, a walkable community filled with quality restaurants, nightlife, boutiques, businesses and two of Atlanta’s biggest shopping centers, Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza. And with easy access to all major highways, those who call 05 Buckhead home are close to everything the metro area has to offer. Call 404-446-0505 for more information or to schedule an appointment to view Buckhead’s only luxury high-rise apartment community. You can also visit www.05buckhead.com.

SPECIAL PROMOTION www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 19


EDUC ATIO N

INS IG H T

VIRTUAL EDUCATION Online Programs Enhance Classroom Learning by Daniel Beauregard

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In today’s technology-driven world, the definition of what a school is, or can be, is quickly changing. School systems and independent schools are offering new options in addition to the traditional brick-and-mortar school setting. These programs provide an education no less demanding than conventional classrooms for students who travel a great deal, are student athletes or home-schooled, or are simply looking to supplement or speed up their current coursework.

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hat’s more, online learning can give students more attention than they might receive in the classroom. “In this environment, we are able to personalize instruction and we have a wealth of information about our students,” says Heather Robinson, principal of Georgia Connections Academy, a K-8 virtual school based in Duluth.

A Different Option Georgia Connections Academy is a charter school with a statewide attendance zone. The only requirement for admittance is that the student live in Georgia, or reside there most of the time. “We provide our families with the entire school program—we provide the curriculum and hard-copy textbooks to our younger students and e-books for older students,” Robinson says. Like any public school, Connections Academy is free. The difference is that students can work from home at their leisure, although they are required to work with a learning coach— usually a parent or guardian—on a daily basis, in addition to working with their teacher. As with a traditional school, students are required to log attendance hours each day, as well as on an hourly basis, but they can start and end whenever they want, as long as they log the number of hours required. “We have systems in place that collect information about how often a student is logging in, how much time a student is spending on a test or a subject area,” Robinson says. The only time students are required to be online is when they are scheduled to participate in a live session or meet with their teachers and fellow students in a virtual classroom. All of the teachers work at a teaching center in Duluth and are available by phone or email. “I can’t say that Connections Academy is better than a traditional school,” Robinson says. “I can just say it’s a different option.” Currently, the school has 750 students and its slated to offer high school classes next year. Robinson expects enrollment to grow to about 2,000.

Online learning can give students more attention than they might receive in the classroom. DeKalb County also has a K-12 virtual school, the DeKalb Online Learning Academy. The school works in the same fashion as Connections Academy, but is a branch of the DeKalb County system rather than a statewide charter. Enrollment is $250 per credit course and $50 for out-of-county students.

Another school that functions in a similar way is the Georgia Virtual School, which serves grades 6-12 and is run by the Georgia Department of Education (GDOE). Both Connections and the Virtual School are state-funded. The Georgia Virtual School uses the approved Georgia Performance Standards and

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 21


Common Core Georgia Performance Standards curriculum, ensuring that students receive the same education they would in a school setting. Georgia Virtual School currently serves 16,173 students and expects that number to increase by 2,500 for its summer program, which begins in June. Education Director Christina Clayton says the school’s numbers have increased by 22 to 25 percent each year. Decatur High School Assistant Principal Rochelle Lofstrand says her school uses Georgia Virtual School as an enrichment option for its students. “If we don’t offer courses or different levels here at the school, we don’t want that stopping a child in enriching their lives academically,” she says. According to testing data, Georgia Virtual School students scored nearly 30 percent higher on average than students enrolled in public schools throughout the state. The school’s students come from all types of backgrounds. Currently, 70 percent of its student population

Virtual learning programs can help students in rural areas get the same coursework as those in more populated regions. is taking a course to supplement their public school curriculum and 17 percent come from a home school environment. The rest are enrolled in private schools, which find Georgia Virtual School on the Internet or by word of mouth. Some independent schools, however, have developed their own virtual learning programs to meet student demands. Eaton Academy in Roswell, for example, recently developed a vir-

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tual learning component for grades 4-12 that branches off from its existing independent study program. Eaton’s virtual learning students complete their work and submit it online, where it is graded by a teacher, says Admissions Coordinator Margie Cohan. Although students have access to their teachers via phone and email, Cohan says there is no virtual classroom com-


ponent. Students enrolled in the program can take one class, which costs $250, up to a full course load for $1,900. There is also a $250 registration fee.

“A Lot of Flexibility” “Our program allows a student to come in at any point in time during the school year and finish it,” Cohan says. “For example, we can take a child who has been out and missed a great deal of school due to illness. The public schools would say he or she had to repeat the entire semester. There’s a lot of flexibility.” Families are interested in the program for a variety of reasons, Cohan says. Some might live out of state, while others might not be interested in a traditional school environment. Students looking to finish high school sooner also use the program. Virtual learning programs like those provided by Connections Academy and Georgia Virtual Schools, meanwhile, can help students in rural areas get the same coursework as those in more populated regions. Additionally, if a student excels in a given course and needs a more rigorous curriculum, virtual schools can provide that.

“Research is showing that students want a more rigorous and engaging learning environment,” says Clayton of Georgia Virtual Schools. Ideally, online learning neither supplements classroom learning nor replaces it, she says, but rather offers the best of both worlds. “I believe the best educational experience for a student is when an opportunity is provided for a blended environment—some faceto-face courses and some online,” she says. “However there are cases, like students who are homebound and need to take all of their courses online, that we can provide that option for them to stay on track to graduate.”

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Georgia Virtual School www.gavirtualschool.org

DeKalb Online Academy www.dekalbonlineacademy.org

Eaton Academy www.eatonacademy.org

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www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 23


Choosing a Summer Camp FINDING THE RIGHT FIT FOR YOUR CHILD

Y

ou shouldn’t wait until school’s out to figure out how your kids will fill their summer days. If sending your child to summer camp is a priority, planning needs to begin now.

students who aren’t enrolled during the school year, that offer core curriculum courses or refresher courses.

Pursuing a New Passion

Gaining an Educational Edge

Some camps enable children to pursue specific hobbies or interests. The summer camp at High Meadows School, for example, offers traditional camp activities as well as woodworking and photography. If your child is interested in the fine arts, there are camps that foster performance dance, writing, painting, sculpture or music, as well. Visit www.findacamp.org for more ideas.

Camp can be a fun way to help a child get ahead (or catch up) in subjects like algebra, or try their hand at architecture or marine biology. Private schools offer a variety of camps, often open to

With the right prior planning, both you and your children will certainly reap the rewards this summer.

Day or Night? The first step is to decide between day camp and overnight camp. Be aware that the choice boils down to more than just whether your child comes home every day or spends a week or more away. At day camp, children learn how to get along with others. At a sleepover camp, children learn about their ability to rely on themselves away from home. As a parent, it’s up to you to decide which type of camp is best for your child at this stage in his or her growth.

These summer camp tips were provided by High Meadows Summer Day Camp. High Meadows Summer Day Camp in Roswell helps children discover themselves through exciting programs and activities. For more information, call 770-993-7975 or visit www.highmeadowscamp.org.

24 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


schoolSPOTLIGHT

First Montessori School of Atlanta Teaching Through Engaging by Cady Schulman

F

irst Montessori School of Atlanta may look like any other school, but there is one distinct difference: Its students are placed into groups based on age rather than grade. Children ages 3-6 are grouped together, as are students ages 6-9 and 9-12. (Middle school students are grouped in traditional 7th and 8th grade classes.) This gives younger students the opportunity to latch onto their older peers, which is how children are wired, says Head of School Jerri King. Learning “doesn’t happen in batches, and it doesn’t happen over a limited set of time, and it doesn’t happen in conjunction with a birth date,” says King. “Over time, students solidify what they know by being little miniteachers in the classroom. We had a doctor once say, ‘Wow, this is great. This is like med school.’” First Montessori opened 47 years ago in the basement of Pace Academy with just eight students, settling into its current home on seven acres in Sandy Springs 35 years ago. The Middle School opened in 2002, offering families a way to extend their children’s Montessori education. “Over almost 50 years, we’ve done a lot of growing,” King says. “We keep slowly adding on.” One of the key principles at First Montessori is that of engaged learning, in which a concept is presented first as a whole, rather than one skill at a time. For example, when a 5-year-old is introduced to multiplication, he or she works with materials designed to prepare the mind for mathematical concepts, rather than simply memorizing multiplication tables. “The child will choose to work with a friend or alone, to work for a long or short period or to demonstrate multiplication to another student, which helps to solidify her or his understanding of multiplication,” says King. “When students are engaged, they want to discover, answer questions

and delve more deeply to increase their understanding.” Creativity is also an important part of the school’s curriculum, with students participating in opera as early as 6 years old. In addition, First Montessori’s culture gives students freedom of choice balanced with discipline, and encourages mutual respect rather than discouraging certain actions. For example, First Montessori doesn’t have an official anti-bullying policy. “We of course don’t tolerate bullying,” King says, “but instead of having a policy against something, we have a policy for something.” The school addresses the issue by emphasizing desired behaviors and attitudes. First Montessori is accredited by the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI), which was founded by Dr. Maria Montessori in 1929 and is recognized as the authority on Montessori education. AMI reevaluates First Montessori every three years. When students leave First Montessori, they’re ready for whatever course they choose to take, whether they’re headed to highly competitive collegepreparatory schools or International Baccalaureate courses. “They don’t all go to traditional programs,” King says. “You can tell a difference when you’re in an environment of students who are just trying to get through,” she continues. “I think that’s why they do so well when they leave here.” n

The Specifics Grades: Toddler-Middle School Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies Tuition: $5,130-$17,750 Location: Sandy Springs

Contact: 5750 Long Island Drive Atlanta, GA 30327 404-252-3910 Web: www.firstmontessori.org

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 25


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If you’re new to Atlanta, you may feel a little overwhelmed by the sheer number of neighborhoods and suburbs. On the pages that follow, we break down some of the area’s top communities for young professionals, families, empty nesters, and those looking to experience true intown living. And check out our list of Atlanta’s top 100 neighborhoods, with many more great places for you to explore.

Metro Atlanta’s

TOP 100

NEIGHBORHOODS

Whatever You’re Looking For, Atlanta’s Got It By Rachael Mason 26 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


4 GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS FOR FAMILIES Looking for a place that will please every member of your family? Here are four perfect neighborhoods filled with outdoor activities, excellent schools and more. Enjoy the shops and restaurants in walkable downtown Decatur.

PHOTOS: (Top) City of Decatur and (center) Courtesy of the City of Marietta

Decatur Located just east of Atlanta, this walkable city radiates a cozy, smalltown charm. Residents have easy access to public transportation— Decatur’s MARTA station is located right in the middle of downtown. Pet owners love the city’s three dog parks, while families enjoy the city’s youth and adult athletics, as well as simply biking and jogging around town. Shops near the historic Decatur Square include Little Shop of Stories, a bookstore catering to children and teens. And the annual Decatur Book Festival, held every Labor Day weekend, is one of the most family-friendly events in metro Atlanta.

Marietta The centerpiece of downtown Marietta is its historic square, which serves as a gathering place during events like farmers’ markets and festivals. Local eateries include ice cream shops and bakeries for family celebrations, as well as Thaicoon and Sushi Bar, a perfect spot for date night. The renovated Earl Smith Strand Theatre screens classic movies and hosts productions from the Atlanta Lyric Theatre. But the appeal

named a “Bicycling Friendly Community” by the League of American Bicyclists. The arts are also big here, with the Georgia Ensemble Theatre and the Atlanta Wind Symphony often performing at the Roswell Cultural Arts Center.

Suwanee

of Marietta—located 15 miles northwest of Atlanta—stretches way beyond downtown, with a public transportation system, a wealth of housing options and strong schools. Local parks include Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, a Civil War site with 16 miles of hiking trails.

Roswell The Chattahoochee River runs through this city in north Fulton County. Residents can explore the area’s natural beauty by walking the seven miles of the Roswell Trail System and River Walk, or learn all about the waterway at the Chattahoochee Nature Center. Residents are passionate about biking, and the city was

In the last decade, this Gwinnett County city has been transformed from a quiet small town into an energetic suburb recognized as a “City of Excellence” by the Georgia Municipal Association and Georgia Trend magazine. Parks and green space are a key part of Suwanee’s appeal, with 500 acres of parkland and miles of trails. Suwanee students are served by the Gwinnett County school system, widely considered the state’s best. The 10-acre Town Center Park, opened in 2003, is the city’s chief gathering place for recreation, exhibits and events. Referred to as “Suwanee’s front yard,” it includes an interactive fountain and a 1,000-seat amphitheater with adjacent businesses and residential space. Also notable is the city’s SculpTour program spotlighting public art, with sculptures on display in and around Town Center Park. X

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 27


{ { 4 GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS Metro Atlanta’s TOP Neighborhoods

Atlanta has many areas for those who are focused on their careers, with a high percentage of affordable starter homes, restaurants, parks and other things to do. Here are four to consider. Oglethorpe University in Brookhaven.

Smyrna’s Market Village.

Grant Park

Interest in the picturesque historic district of this northeast neighborhood has always been strong, but in the past few years, development has added to the demand for housing in the surrounding area. Residents enjoy a range of homes, from upscale apartments to single-family houses, and a MARTA station makes the area ultra-convenient for those who work downtown or in Midtown. Town Brookhaven, a mixedused development, brought new restaurants, residential and retail developments and even a movie theater to the neighborhood.

Green space is one of the biggest draws of this neighborhood convenient to downtown and Turner Field. The 131.5-acre park for which it’s named includes Zoo Atlanta and the Atlanta Cyclorama, a panorama depicting the 1864 Battle of Atlanta. Residents enjoy lovingly restored Victorian homes and newer condominiums. Oakland Cemetery, resting place of Margaret Mitchell and Bobby Jones, among others, is a popular attraction. Restaurant choices include breakfast favorite Ria’s Bluebird Cafe, as well as the Little Tart Bakeshop.

East Point

Smyrna

This Fulton County city is ideal for first-time homeowners who want to live close to downtown Atlanta: MARTA makes getting to the airport and downtown a snap. But residents don’t have to leave the city limits to eat out—restaurants include Thumbs Up Diner, Oz Pizza and Corner Tavern. Redevelopment plans for the 488-acre Fort McPherson include proposed live-work-play communities. Cyclists from across the country come to race at the Dick Lane Velodrome, one of only 22 such cycling arenas in the nation.

This suburban city, located 15 miles northwest of Atlanta, has undergone a complete transformation in recent years. Downtown, the Village Green serves as a town center complete with a library and community center, while residential and retail space can be found at Market Village. Residents can enjoy 33 acres of park space within a mile of downtown Smyrna. Homes and businesses have developed along the Silver Comet Trail, a free walking and biking trail that starts in Smyrna and runs all the way to the Georgia-Alabama state line.

28 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

AWARD-WINNING COMMUNITIES t Atlanta—ranked among the “Top 10 Cities to be a Moviemaker” by Moviemaker Magazine for its flourishing filmmaking industry. t Gainesville—named one of the top 10 affordable cities for retirement by the AARP in 2011. Gainesville also ranked among the top 25 “Most Fun Affordable Cities,” as listed by Bloomberg Businessweek. t Stockbridge—listed at No. 14 in a 2011 CNN Money list of top 25 towns where homes are affordable. t Peachtree City—ranked among the Top 100 “Best Places to Live” on CNN Money’s 2011 list. Peachtree City has made the list four times in the last seven years, and twice ranked in the top 10. t Roswell—named a “Bicycling Friendly Community” by the League of American Bicyclists. Conyers also made the organization’s list of bike-friendly towns. t Decatur—named a “Silver Walk Friendly Community” for its initiatives by the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center in 2011.

TOP RIGHT PHOTO: City of Smyrna

Brookhaven


{ { 4 GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS FOR EMPTY NESTERS Metro Atlanta’s TOP Neighborhoods

Whether you’re looking for options for active retirees or simply want to be closer to your grandchildren, these four neighborhoods will suit your needs.

Buford

2011. On three sides, Gainesville is surrounded by Lake Lanier, which offers boating, swimming and fishing. The city boasts 19 parks, and downtown Gainesville offers more than 50 restaurants and shops. City officials are working to renovate the Midtown area of the city, including the restoration of an historic train depot.

This Gwinnett County city combines old and new with its well-preserved historic downtown and ever-expanding retail offerings at the Mall of Georgia and beyond. Downtown, the Tannery Row Artist Colony showcases the work of local artists. Buford is just south of Lake Lanier, which includes 46 park areas for such activities as camping, picnics, boat launches, fishing, swimming and hiking.

Peachtree City

Duluth Located about 25 miles northeast of Atlanta, this Gwinnett County city features a walkable downtown area filled with historic buildings and bustling restaurants and businesses. The 35-acre Southeastern Railway Museum draws railroad buffs of all ages. The Arena at Gwinnett Center hosts concerts, circuses, the Georgia Force arena football team and hockey’s Gwinnett Gladiators. And the Gwinnett

Braves—the Atlanta Braves’ biggest minorleague affiliate—play nearby.

Gainesville Located about 50 miles northeast of Atlanta, Gainesville was named one of the top 10 affordable cities for retirement by the AARP in

This planned city in Fayette County is best known for its golf courses—and for the golf cart paths that provide the main means of transportation. Of course, the 90 miles of paths are also ideal for walking, jogging and bike riding. Life here doesn’t revolve entirely around golf: The Fredrick Brown Jr. Amphitheater (aka The Fred) hosts a summer concert series, while year-round outdoor activities include boating, fishing, biking and bird-watching. There’s also plenty of shopping at both independent stores and big-box retailers.

4 GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS FOR INTOWN LIVING

If you love the city scene, consider an area that will put you right in the middle of all the action. These four neighborhoods all offer close proximity to dining, shopping and entertainment. extremely cosmopolitan feel. Residences include brand-new condos and retro rentals, all within walking distance of clubs and restaurants. Continued development means new hotels and eateries open frequently. The Woodruff Arts Center campus includes the award-winning Alliance Theatre, the High Museum of Art and Atlanta Symphony Hall.

BOTTOM PHOTO: © 2012, Kevin C. Rose/AtlantaPhotos.com

Buckhead This chic neighborhood is home to some of Atlanta’s most upscale residences. Area restaurants and boutiques regularly attract a celebrity clientele, and walking from place to place is easy. Phipps Plaza and Lenox Square offer shopping galore. The Atlanta History Center showcases the region’s past with a 33-acre campus that includes a museum, the historic Swan House and the Smith Family Farm.

Virginia-Highland

Little Five Points The heart of this eclectic neighborhood, a favorite of locals and visitors alike, is the intersection of Euclid and Moreland Avenues, where stores offer vintage clothing, records, funky shoes, kitschy collectibles and more. Local theater groups and the Variety Playhouse add to the city’s vibrant arts scene. Restaurants include the Vortex Bar and Grill, known

for its signature burgers and skull-shaped entrance, and the Wrecking Bar Brewpub.

Midtown With looming high-rises and streets laid out along a grid system, this neighborhood has an

This charming area, with its treelined streets and historic bungalows, is among Atlanta’s most picturesque neighborhoods. Crowds flock to contemporary boutiques and a host of casual bars and restaurants, including Moe’s and Joe’s (established in 1947) and Murphy’s, a favorite brunch spot. Music lovers head to Blind Willie’s to hear the blues, while audiences typically sing along to the Irish tunes performed at Limerick Junction.

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 29


{ { ATLANTA’S 100 MOST POPULAR NEIGHBORHOODS Metro Atlanta’s TOP Neighborhoods

Once again, Newcomer presents our annual list of 100 of the most popular neighborhoods in metro Atlanta. Popularity is based on a number of factors, including but not limited to home sales.* Note that home sales include single family as well as condos/townhomes, where those are available. KEY TO NEIGHBORHOODS’ DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS

Neighborhood

Acworth

County

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Distinguishing Characteristics

F, YP, NC

Cobb

737

90

95%

$164,091

www.acworth.org

Adairsville

Bartow

99

73

95%

$83,362

www.adairsvillega.net

F, EN

Alpharetta

Fulton

1470

89

94%

$333,929

www.alpharetta.ga.us

F, YP, NC

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Fulton

547

86

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$93,194

www.southeastatlanta.org

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Fulton

544

87

94%

$233,732

www.eaca.net

F, YP

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Fulton

777

90

96%

$106,817

www.atlantaga.gov

F, YP

Austell

Cobb

554

84

95%

$64,915

www.austellga.gov

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Gwinnett

53

116

89%

$391,147

www.braselton.net

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Carrollton

Carroll

526

109

92%

$84,898

www.carrollton-ga.gov

F, HA

Cartersville

Bartow

561

106

93%

$94,870

www.cityofcartersville.org

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Newton

1280

95

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www.cityofcovington.org

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Gwinnett

610

89

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$170,486

www.daculaga.gov

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Douglasville

Douglas

1211

94

95%

$90,023

www.ci.douglasville.ga.us

F, EN, NC

Duluth

F, EN, NC

Gwinnett

851

82

94%

$192,662

www.duluthga.net

Dunwoody

DeKalb

545

94

95%

$340,902

www.dunwoodyga.gov

F, YP, NC

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Fayetteville

Fayette

604

118

94%

$204,578

www.fayetteville-ga.gov

F, EN, H

Hall

421

90

94%

$164,581

www.flowerybranchga.org

F, NC

Forest Park

Clayton

327

64

96%

$25,267

www.forestparkga.org

F, EN

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Hall

924

105

92%

$141,095

www.gainesville.org

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Coweta

67

109

93%

$68,327

www.grantville.georgia.gov

F, EN

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Gwinnett

236

95

96%

$162,463

www.cityofgrayson.org

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* Information provided by SmartNumbers (770-424-5128, www.smartnumbers.com).

30 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Chart continued on page 32


www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 31


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County

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93

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$373,673

www.johnscreekga.gov

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1024

90

95%

$172,978

www.kennesaw-ga.gov

Bartow

20

64

95%

$78,780

www.kingston.georgia.gov

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Douglas

165

79

94%

$61,221

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DeKalb

1360

84

94%

$57,394

www.lithonia.georgia.gov

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Henry

346

88

94%

$115,884

www.locustgrove-ga.gov

F, HA, NC

Gwinnett

461

104

95%

$106,325

www.loganville-ga.gov

F, NC

Hall

64

109

90%

$78,916

www.hallcounty.org

F, EN

Cobb

530

96

95%

$154,831

www.cobbcounty.org

F, EN, NC

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Coweta

29

84

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$211,597

www.coweta.ga.us

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Coweta

1141

107

95%

$145,269

www.ci.newnan.ga.us

F, HA, EN, NC

Norcross

Gwinnett

1076

81

95%

$100,821

www.norcrossga.net

F, NC, HA

Oakwood

Hall

90

102

93%

$93,657

www.cityofoakwood.net

F, EN

Newton

112

96

92%

$114,636

www.oxfordgeorgia.org

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744

94

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$129,097

www.cityofpowdersprings.org

F, EN, HA, NC

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Clayton

314

66

96%

$43,540

www.claytoncountyga.gov

F, EN

Riverdale

Clayton

705

68

96%

$37,141

www.riverdalega.gov

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Bartow

14

80

93%

$97,457

www.bartowga.org

F, EN

Sandy Springs North

Fulton

618

115

93%

$257,278

www.sandyspringsga.org

F, YP, NC F, YP, NC

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245

109

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$536,806

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Coweta

251

100

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$201,776

www.coweta.ga.us

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Gwinnett

1072

92

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$110,363

www.snellville.org

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Tyrone

Fayette

109

94

95%

$217,672

www.tyrone.org

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Union City

Fulton

315

89

95%

$64,245

www.unioncityga.org

F, EN, NC

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Douglas

119

105

95%

$124,296

www.villarica.org

F, EN, NC

Cobb

191

115

94%

$288,076

www.viningsga.org

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32 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


Fayetteville Living

F

EVENTS, EDUCATION AND SMALL-TOWN CHARM

ayetteville is only 15 miles from Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, providing easy proximity to downtown Atlanta, yet just far enough away to offer a peaceful retreat. Pedestrian-friendly with a cozy, small-town feel, Fayetteville boasts a thriving, historic downtown, with more than two dozen community events each year, in addition to national performing acts at the Villages Amphitheater. The Holliday-Dorsey-Fife Museum, which has ties to Doc Holliday and Margaret Mitchell, is one of the premier historical museums in the state. Recognized as a top 10 suburb for retirement by Forbes magazine, Fayetteville is home to nationally recognized Piedmont Fayette Hospital. It is the county seat of Fayette County, which features one of the best public school systems in the state and was listed among “Top 20 Locations for a Budding Technology Economy” by Business Insider.

For more information on one of Georgia’s most desirable places to live, visit www.fayetteville-ga.gov.

Powder Springs EXPLORING CULTURE, CONVENIENCE AND HISTORY

P

owder Springs, located just 30 miles west of Atlanta in Cobb County, offers a convenient retreat bursting with history, culture and recreation. Take a leisurely stroll through the city’s pedestrian-friendly downtown, filled with charming shops and restaurants. Learn about the area’s rich past at the Seven Springs Museum, and then take in the Southern Quilt Trail, featuring folk art quilt patterns adorning historic barns and buildings. Explore a city-wide trail system that connects with the Silver Comet Trail, or enjoy one of many parks and recreational facilities. Powder Springs is also a good place to do business, with economic development incentives, ongoing transportation and enhancement improvements and approximately 400 acres available for building.

For more information, call 770-9438001, ext. 354 or visit the city’s website at www.cityofpowdersprings.org. SPECIAL PROMOTION

A GREAT PLACE TO WORK. A BETTER PLACE TO LIVE. Powder Springs offers a safe, family-oriented community and business destination. Just 30 miles west of Atlanta, it’s a convenient retreat filled with culture, history and recreation.

www.cityofpowdersprings.org | 770-943-1666

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 33


Spring

into Georgia

10 Fun Ways to Explore the State This Season by Hope S. Philbrick

G

eorgia does spring big. Blooms burst in spectacular color and quantity. Sandals replace boots. Sleeves get shorter. And excuses to get out of the house abound. All across the state, you’ll find a range of festivals with varied themes to make this season unforgettable. Here are 10 of our favorite ways to enjoy warm weather and have a good time while getting to know the different corners of your new state.

ArtSSpring

BBQ, Boogie & Blues

This month-long celebration of the arts runs April 13-May 13 and showcases some of Sandy Springs’ top talent, art and cuisine. The event roster includes cabaret and comedy, jazz and chamber music, theatre and talent shows, paintings and poetry, artists and authors, astronomy and gastronomy, gardens and more. Event admission prices vary—and the best news is that several events are free. www.artsandysprings.org.

This two-day festival in downtown Calhoun, which replaces the annual “More Than a Taste of Calhoun” event, aims to kick off a new tradition. Enjoy food from (or even participate in) a barbecue cook-off sanctioned by the Kansas City BBQ Society. There’s also a street dance, a fashion runway event, a bicycle ride, children’s zones, live music and more. April 27-28. www.exploregordoncounty.com.

34 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


Statesboro Kiwanis Rodeo.

Celebrate the blues at the Blind Willie McTell Blues Festival.

The Blessing of the Fleet in Darien, Ga.

Statesboro Kiwanis Rodeo

artists’ market showcasing more than 250 of the nation’s top artists working in painting, photography, glass, clay, leather, metal, wood and mixed media. www.dogwood.org.

This second annual event promises family fun and excitement. Along with daring humans— including some award-winning champions from around the world—the two evening and Saturday afternoon matinee shows feature a herd of world-champion bulls and broncs. You’ll also find pancakes and sausage plates, vendors, specialty acts and more. April 2728 at the Kiwanis Fair Grounds in Statesboro. www.statesbororodeo.com.

Vidalia Onion Festival

Georgia Mountain BirdFest

Featured on The Food Network and recognized as one of the “5 Don’t-Miss Festivals Across the U.S.” by MSNBC, this four-day festival celebrates its 35th anniversary this year. Take in a range of events including the Miss Vidalia Onion Pageant, a children’s parade, outdoor music concerts, a battle of the bands, an arts and crafts festival, a car show, the Kiwanis Onion Run, a rodeo and the famous onion-eating contest. For the first time this year, 12 talented chefs from across the state are invited to showcase their culinary skills in the Golden Onion professional cooking competition. April 26-29 in Vidalia. www.vidaliaonionfestival.com.

Head to the North Georgia Mountains and join bird-watching enthusiasts, from beginners to experts, for guided walks, field trips, lectures and hands-on activities. Advance registration is required. May 3-6 at Unicoi State Park & Lodge in Helen. www.gamtnbirdfest.com.

Vidalia Onion Festival.

PHOTOS: (Top left) Gene Driskill, (top right) Scott Bryant, Statesboro Herald, (bottom left) Courtesy of the Vidalia Onion Festival Committee.

Blessing of the Fleet This three-day event is the largest shrimp-boat blessing on the East Coast. Events include a seafood cook-off, a shrimp peeling and eating contest, a fishing rodeo, the Miss Blessing pageant and a classic car show. You’ll also find food vendors, children’s activities, live entertainment, parades, fireworks and a juried art show that draws talent from across the Southeast. April 20-22 in Darien. www.blessingofthefleet.com.

Atlanta Dogwood Festival Celebrating 76 years in 2012, the Dogwood Festival is the longest-running celebration in the city and one of the country’s oldest fine arts festivals. Held April 20-22 in Midtown Atlanta’s Piedmont Park, the event features local artists, crafters, musicians and food vendors, and boasts a 24-foot rock-climbing wall and children’s village. The centerpiece is a diverse

Tall Ships Challenge 2012 The Tall Ships Challenge is an annual race that rotates between the Atlantic Coast, the Pacific Coast and the Great Lakes. The featured tall ships are rigged sailing vessels crewed by youths ages 13 to 25. This year, the race begins in Savannah and finishes in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 35


Savannah riverfront welcomes the competing ships from May 3-7. Visitors can view all the ships, board many and even set sail on a brief excursion. www.savannahtallshipschallenge.com.

Blind Willie McTell Blues Festival Each year, the town of Thomson, Ga., celebrates its association with one of America’s most influential musicians. While few of his recordings ever earned mainstream popularity, McTell is widely regarded as one of the genre’s most accomplished guitarists and lyrical storytellers. Many of McTell’s songs, including “Statesboro Blues” and “Broke Down Engine Blues,” have been recorded by such artists as the Allman Brothers and Taj Mahal. Talent from across the nation will perform on May 19. www.blindwillie.com.

Papa Joe’s Banjo-B-Que This annual bluegrass festival and barbecue cook-off moves from South Carolina to Georgia for the first time this year, with a robust lineup of musical entertainment and flavorful fare. It promises “a swine-smackin’ good time,” though in addition to pork, grill masters will be cooking up brisket, chicken, ribs and steak for a combined $40,000 in prize money. There are also carnival rides and a petting zoo for the kids, and plenty of arts and craft vendors as well. May 27-28 at the new Evans Towne Center Park in Evans, Ga. www.banjobque.com.

Carrabelle, Fla.

S

RELAX ON FLORIDA’S “FORGOTTEN COAST”

pring is the perfect time for a vacation—a chance to escape the stresses of everyday life and have a good time while you’re at it. And there’s no better spot to achieve both of those goals than sunny Carrabelle, Fla. Located in the Florida panhandle just an hour’s drive from Tallahassee, Carrabelle presents a tranquil oasis perfect for a vacation or romantic retreat. There are no traffic snarls or gaudy fast-food shacks in this rural corner of the state, just miles of unspoiled natural beauty. The area’s natural wildlife makes this a great family destination—you just might see a deer, porpoise or even a family of black bears at play. By day, soak up the sun on one of the gorgeous white-sand beaches, or take part in sailing, fishing, snorkeling, golfing, scuba diving and many other activities. And in the evening, feast on fantastic fresh seafood and enjoy relaxing, affordable accommodations as you relax, unwind and reconnect with one another. For more information on Florida’s “forgotten coast,” call 850-697-2585 or visit www.carrabelle.org.

36 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


Atlanta Falcons at the Georgia Dome.

Atlanta’s majestic skyline.

Suwanee’s Town Center.

PHOTOS: (Top and second from bottom) © 2010, Kevin C. Rose/AtlantaPhotos.com

SHARPSBURG

What you need to know before, during and after your move INDEX 38 42 Tips on Getting Started 40 44

Counties, Neighborhoods, Utilities, Hospitals, Education

51 Metro Atlanta Region Map 47


GETTING STARTED

HERE MARTA

TO

THERE Driver’s License

Out-of-state drivers are required to obtain a Georgia driver’s license within 30 days. To obtain your license, you will need to provide the following: 1) Previous driver’s license; 2) Two pieces of identification; 3) An eye exam at the time of issue; 4) A $20 fee (in cash) for a five-year license, or a $35 fee for a 10-year license. Licenses are issued through the Georgia Department of Driver Services at several sites across Atlanta. Call 678-413-8400 or visit www.dds.ga.gov.

Mass Transit

One way to avoid long commutes is to take advantage of the city’s local transit system, Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA). Offering both train and bus service, MARTA is a convenient way to travel to downtown or the airport. The fee for traveling one way is $2.00 including transfers, and payment is even easier now with the Breeze limited-use and extendeduse cards. Weekly and monthly passes can be obtained at discounted rates. For fares, schedule and route information call 404848-5000 or visit www.itsmarta.com.

38 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Car Tag

MARTA Rail Service

You must register your car within 30 days of residency. Bring with you the following information: 1) Car title, name and address of lienholder, or copy of lease agreement; 2) Current tag registration; 3) Mileage reading of vehicle; 4) Proof of insurance; 5) Emission certificate (if applicable). There is an approximate $20 fee for your tag. In January 2006, the state began charging sales tax on vehicles. Your tag office will


GETTING STARTED provide the amount of sales tax on your vehicle. For information on a specific county, contact the county’s Tax Commissioner’s Office.

Vehicle Emission Inspection

Vehicles dating from 1985 through 2006 model year must be checked each year for emission standard compliance. Visit a statedesignated inspection station for the service. Call 800-449-2471 or visit www.cleanairforce.com.

Driving Tips

Georgia 400 is the only toll road in Atlanta. If you travel it daily, obtaining a Cruise Card is recommended. Purchased in advance, the Cruise Card allows drivers to bypass the tollbooth and avoid long lines. Call 404-893-6161 or visit www. georgiatolls.com to purchase a card. The Georgia DOT provides daily updates of road work, road closings and traffic delays, which are helpful when commuting. Updates can be obtained by calling (toll free) 1-877-694-2511, by dialing 511, or by visiting www.georgia-navigator.com.

NEED TO KNOW Voter Registration

Registration applies to U.S. citizens at least 18 years of age. You have up to 30 days before an election to register. Register at your local Voter Registration Office and most public libraries. Refer to the AT&T directory for locations, or download a registration form at www.sos.georgia.gov.

Making a Phone Call All phone numbers in the Metro Atlanta area include the area code plus the sevendigit number. To make a phone call, dial one of the three area codes (404, 770, 678) and the seven-digit number. In general, the 404 area code is designated for intown areas, the 770 area code for suburbs, and the 678 area code is normally used for cell phones, fax numbers and some suburbs.

Registering for School By law, children must be 5 years old on or before September 1 to enter kindergarten and 6 years old on or before September 1 to enter the first grade. To enroll your child in either kindergarten or first grade, you will need to provide the child’s social security number; a vision, hearing, and dental screening from a family practitioner or local health clinic; and immunization records on Georgia State Form 3231.

Arlington

Christian School

Changing the world for Christ…one child at a time.

Taking learning to new heights! • Announcing New K4 Program (Fairburn, Newnan, Tyrone) • SACS Accredited, K4-12th Grade • Now Offering Forensic Science • College Preparatory Curriculum • Championship GISA Athletic Program • Extended Learning Day Programs • Classroom SMART Boards & Computer • 9 Advanced Placement Courses Offered

4500 Ridge Road, Fairburn, GA 30213 770.964.9871 www.arlingtonchristian.org

Fully Accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and “with quality” by the Georgia Accreditation Commission.

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Carroll!

With about 100 geocaches hidden across the county, Carrollton/Carroll County is a great destination for geocachers. Spend the day (or the weekend) adding to your RW]ZVITWN KIKPMÅVL[_PQTMM`XTWZQVO\PMXIZS[ [PWX[ZM[\I]ZIV\[IVLI\\ZIK\QWV[WN +IZZWTT+W]V\a *ZQVOaW]Z[MV[MWN M`XTWZI\QWV+IZZWTT\WV +IZZWTT+W]V\aQ[aW]ZKIKPMTWKI\QWVLM[\QVI\QWV

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800-292-0871 | www.visitcarrollton.com www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 39


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION public schools Cherokee County Schools Board of Education 770-479-1871

Cherokee County QUICK INFO

Elementary Schools 22 Middle Schools 7 Intermediate Schools 1 High Schools 6 Alternative 1 Evening 1 Per-pupil expenditures $8,578 School & bus information: 770-720-2112 Avg. SAT Scores Cherokee Co. Georgia National

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 Electricity Amicalola EMC 706-276-2362 Cobb EMC 770-429-2100 Georgia Power 888-660-5890 770-887-2363

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T 888-436-8638 ETC Communications 678-454-1212 TDS Telecom-Nelson Ball Ground 770-735-2000 Windstream

800-501-1754

Water Cherokee County Water Authority City of Ball Ground City of Canton City of Waleska

770-479-1813 770-735-2123 770-704-1500 770-479-2912

City of Woodstock

770-926-8852

Cable TV Charter Communications 888-438-2427 Comcast

404-266-2278

ETC Communications

678-454-1212

Hospitals Northside Hospital-Cherokee 770-720-5100 Wellstar Kennestone Hospital

770-793-5000

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

1560 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

Sawnee EMC

County Neighborhoods Schools

www.cherokeega.com www.canton-georgia.com www.woodstockga.gov www.cityofballground.com www.hollyspringsga.us www.cityofwaleska.com www.cherokee.k12.ga.us

Median household income: $63,518 Median age of residents: 34 Population: 210,529 Sales tax: 6% Chamber of Commerce Cherokee County 770-345-0400, www.cherokeechamber.com Property Taxes Per $1,000 of assessed value is: Unincorporated Cherokee County, $26.80; Incorporated Cherokee County, $24.06. Tax Commissioner: 678-493-6400

Cagle Dairy Farm, Canton

Located northwest of Atlanta, Cherokee County gets its name from the original inhabitants of the area, the Cherokee Indians. The county seat, then called Etowah, was established in 1833 and renamed Canton in 1834. Today, the city is enjoying its greatest economic boom in its history since more than $60 million was invested in residential and commercial development in 1998. Despite developing its own industrial base, Cherokee County remains idyllic and serene. Farming, especially poultry processing, remains a leading industry. Canton and the neighboring community of Woodstock have seen tremendous growth as subdivisions crop up to accommodate newcomers. In fact, nearly 60 percent of the county’s population are commuters. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median value of homes in 2006 was $194,900. Homes for well over $1 million can be purchased in such neighborhoods as Bradshaw Farms, Bridge Mill and Town Lake Hills. Interstate 575 and Ga. Highway 92 traverse the county, affording residents easy access to Atlanta and the nearby attractions of Town Center Mall, Lake Allatoona and the North Georgia Mountains. Other great places to live,

40 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

Ridge Mountains and along the banks of the Etowah River, Canton is prime location for development.

Woodstock

work and play in Cherokee County include the cities of Ball Ground, Holly Springs and Waleska.

Neighborhoods

Canton Canton was incorporated in 1833 and renamed in 1834 at the request of two founding fathers who had visions that the town might become a silk center similar to what existed in Canton, China. Canton did become famous for its “Canton Denim,” known worldwide for the high-quality denim produced by Canton Cotton Mills. Today, Canton is attracting new industry and residents. As a result, the city is re-investing in its downtown. As part of its “Streetscapes” program, downtown Canton will be restored to its historic look and features a newly designed theater on Main Street. Located at the foothills of the Blue

Twelve miles south of Canton, Woodstock is the fastest-growing city in Cherokee County. With a growth rate of 70 percent over the past 10 years, the city has doubled in size. Residents enjoy easy access to Interstate 575 and Ga. Highway 92, allowing short commutes to Cobb and Fulton counties. While affording convenience to big-city attractions, Woodstock still maintains its small-town appeal. Buildings dating back to 1879 characterize the downtown, where antique and other specialty shops are located. Various golf courses are located in Woodstock, including Arnold Palmer’s Eagle Watch, a course with wooded countryside views that is considered to be one of the top places to play in Atlanta. The 11,860-acre Lake Allatoona provides additional recreation. Woodstock is also convenient to more than 13 state parks. N For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com


COUNTY INFORMATION

Clayton County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

Life in Clayton County revolves around transportation, much like it did when the Central Railroad passed through the county seat of Jonesboro carrying goods and people. Today, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport employs more than 35,000 people, one-third of whom

Neighborhoods

Jonesboro Clayton County is steeped in history, especially Jonesboro, the fictional setting for Margaret Mitchell’s legendary Civil War

novel, Gone With the Wind. In truth, the farming community of Jonesboro was all but destroyed in the decisive Battle of Jonesboro. Today, this community of more than 4,000 residents maintains its small-town atmosphere despite its proximity to Atlanta and major freeways. Jonesboro’s Main Street buildings, some dating back to the mid-1800s, have been renovated and now house antique shops, gift shops and government offices. Many residential homes have also been restored, including the historic Ashley Oaks Mansion (1879) and Stately Oaks (1939). Open to the public, these antebellum gems transport visitors to the Gone With the Wind era.

Morrow Stately Oaks quilt show

QUICK INFO

live in Clayton County. Many of the county’s almost 267,000 County www.co.clayton.ga.us residents have lived in the area Neighborhoods www.cityofmorrow.com for generations. Unlike in other www.jonesboroga.com Metro Atlanta counties, nearly Schools www.clayton.k12.ga.us half of them also work in the county. Median household income: $43,674 Just 15 miles south of Median age of residents: 32 Population: 273,718 downtown Atlanta, Clayton Sales Tax: 7% County, one of the smallest counties in Georgia, offers Chamber of Commerce residents many natural reClayton County treats, including the Reyn678-610-4021, www.claytonchamber.org olds Nature Preserve, the Property Taxes Newman Wetlands Center, The property tax rate is $32.52 per $1,000 of Lake Blalock and Lake Shamassessed value. Tax Commissioner: 770-477-3311 rock. The county also boasts several private and public golf courses. World-renowned Spivey Hall, located on the campus of Clayton State University, attracts acclaimed performers and is one of the world’s foremost acoustical facilities. The 2006 median value of homes, according to the Census Bureau, was $133,700. Milliondollar homes can be found in the Lake Spivey area.

A passenger traveling north from Jonesboro to Atlanta in the mid-1800s would have invariably passed through a small farming community known as Morrow Station. Once depicted as “the whistle stop” south of Atlanta, today Morrow is a booming city of more than 5,000 residents with a thriving industrial, commercial and retail base that includes Morrow Industrial Park and Southlake Mall. N For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com

EDUCATION

public schools Clayton County Schools Board of Education 770-473-2700 Elementary Schools 36 Middle Schools 14 High Schools 10 Charter 3 Alternative 2 Per-pupil expenditures $8,146 School & bus information 770-473-2835 Avg. SAT Scores Clayton Co. Georgia National

1273 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity

Central GA EMC

880-897-0671

Georgia Power Company

770-395-7611

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T 888-436-8638 Ultimate Security of America, Inc. 770-460-5722 Water Clayton County Water Authority 770-961-2130 Cable TV Comcast

800-266-2278 Hospitals

Southern Crescent Hospital for Specialty Care 770-897-7600 Southern Regional Medical Center

404-699-8586

South Fulton Medical Center

404-466-1170

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 41


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION

pUBLIC schools Cobb County Schools Board of Education 770-426-3300 Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Magnet Charter Special Per-pupil expenditures

770-422-3500

Elementary Schools 7 Middle Schools 1 High Schools 1 Sixth-Grade 1 Magnet 1 Per-pupil expenditures $9,061 School and bus information 678-594-8000 Avg. SAT Scores

Cobb Co. Marietta City Georgia National

1534 1514 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 ELECTRICITY Acworth Power 770-974-5233 Cobb EMC 770-429-2100 Georgia Power 888-660-5890 GreyStone Power Corp. 770-942-6576 Marietta Power/ Columbia Energy 770-794-5100 GAS Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T 888-436-8638 Comcast 404-266-2278 MCI Worldcom 770-541-7235 Outside Georgia 800-356-3094 WATER Austell Water Cobb County Water Systems Marietta Water Powder Springs Water Smyrna Water

770-944-4300 770-423-1000 770-794-5100 770-943-8000 770-319-5338

CABLE TV Bellsouth Multimedia 770-360-5000 Charter Communications 888-438-2427 Comcast 404-266-2278 HOSPITALS Emory Adventist Hospital 770-434-0710 WellStar Cobb Hospital 770-732-4000 WellStar Kennestone Hospital 770-793-5000 WellStar Windy Hill Hospital 770-644-1000

White Water

Cobb County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

Marietta City Schools Board of Education

71 25 16 6 6 4 $8,816

Neighborhoods

Kennesaw

One of Family Circle magaCobb County came zine’s “Ten Best Towns for Famiinto being in 1832 when lies,” Kennesaw takes pride in its the state redistributed land small-town atmosphere and boasts County www.cobbcountyga.gov once part of the Cherokee abundant parks and green space, Neighborhoods www.austellga.org Nation. Named after Thomas exceptional recreational programs www.mariettaga.gov Welch Cobb, the county and top-notch schools, includ www.ci.smyrna.ga.us experienced a devastating ing Kennesaw State University. www.kennesaw-ga.gov setback during the Civil www.cityofpowdersprings.org Kennesaw’s Historic Downtown War when most of it was features shopping, dining and atSchools www.cobb.k12.ga.us destroyed during the Battle tractions such as the Smithsonian www.marietta-city.org at Kennesaw Mountain. affiliated Southern Museum of Median household income: $65,123 Today, Cobb County, Civil War and Locomotive History, Median age of residents: 35 located north of Fulton the Smith-Gilbert Arboretum and Population: 698,158 County, is one of the fastnearby Kennesaw Mountain NaSales tax: 6% est-growing counties in the tional Battlefield Park. Chamber of Commerce nation. With a diverse ecoCobb County nomic base that includes 770-980-2000, www.cobbchamber.org Rapidly defining what’s new jobs in the service, retail, Property Taxes and progressive in quality of life aerospace and technology The property tax is $28.75 per $1,000 of assessed and citizen services, Smyrna sectors, Cobb County offers value. Tax Commissioner: 770-980-2000 delivers an amazing sense of style a quality of life unsurpassed and love of life. The new Market in the Southeast. More than $770 million has been spent on apartments and condos near Cum- Village, home to fabulous restaurants, transportation improvements in re- berland Mall, secluded subdivisions bars and upscale shops and services, cent years, allowing residents easy in East Cobb and horse ranches in is the final piece of a master plan for access to Atlanta and the commer- the northwest corner of the county. success. Call it “Main Street USA” or cial districts of Vinings Overlook, The small towns of Marietta, Vin- “Disneyland,” but don’t overlook its Cumberland Parkway and the pres- ings, Smyrna and Austell still retain charm and ability to offer the best in tigious “Platinum Triangle” in the their Southern charm amidst urban fresh, trendy lifestyle options. N Galleria area. settings. According to the Census For more counties and neighborhood A variety of housing options ex- Bureau, the median value of homes information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com ist in Cobb County, including luxury in 2006 was $205,200.

42 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

QUICK INFO

Smyrna


COUNTY INFORMATION

DeKalb County

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development

Located east of Fulton County, DeKalb County is the second largest county in the state with a population of about 705,000. DeKalb County contributes to Atlanta’s status as an “ international city” with its businesses and residences representing more than 30 different countries and 120 languages.

Neighborhoods

Decatur

As the county seat, Decatur revolves around the Courthouse Square. In recent years, the square has undergone a renaissance as small storefront mo-

shed and Supper Club. The square also plays host to numerous festivals, town celebrations and neighborhood parties. Decatur is home to a diverse population, attracting young professionals, families and retirees. With Agnes Scott College, a prestigious women’s college, and just outside the city limits, Emory University, Decatur is a college town amidst a big city. Older brick homes, smaller bungalows and cottage homes distinguish the community and the surrounding neighborhoods of Avondale Estates, Oakhurst and Candler Park.

Dunwoody

Emory University

QUICK INFO County

www.co.dekalb.ga.us

DeKalb County prosNeighborhoods www.decaturga.com pers in part due to its ex- www.druidhills.org cellent transportation sys- www.dunwoodyga.org tem. Five major road ar- www.candlerpark.org teries traverse the county: www.stonemountaincity.org Interstates 20, 85, 285, Schools www.dekalb.k12.ga.us 675 and US Highway 78. www.csdecatur.net Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport is only six Median household income: $51,753 miles from DeKalb’s south- Median age of residents: 35 Population: 739,956 ern border and the DeKalb Sales tax: 7% Peachtree Airport, a general aviation field, is report- Chamber of Commerce DeKalb County ed to be the second busiest 404-378-8000, www.dekalbchamber.org airport in Georgia. DeKalb County is also a leader in Property Taxes the biomedical commu- The property tax rate is $41.50 per $1,000 for unincorporated DeKalb County. Tax Commissioner: nity with The Center for 404-298-4000 Disease Control headquartifs have been preserved, attracting tered there. The median value of homes in unique shopping, entertainment and 2006, according to the Census Bu- dining that includes By Hand South, Square Roots, Eddie’s Attic, Waterreau, was $190,100.

In the northern corner of the county is Dunwoody, a popular neighborhood among established professionals and young, upwardly mobile professionals raising families. It is often referred to as the “tennis set” neighborhood because of its numerous recreational outlets that include Lynwood Park and Recreation Center, as well as Blackburn Park and Tennis Center. Cultural attractions include the Dunwoody Nature Center and the Spruill Gallery. A variety of housing is available in Dunwoody, including apartments, townhomes, ranch-style homes, bungalows and mini-mansions with manicured lawns. Nearby Perimeter Mall provides shopping, dining and family entertainment. With its proximity to all major expressways and North Fulton’s booming business opportunities, Dunwoody is a hot-spot for families. N For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com

EDUCATION pUBLIC schools DeKalb County Schools Board of Education 678-676-1200 Elementary Schools 83 Middle Schools 20 High Schools 20 Per-pupil expenditures $9,896 School & bus information 678-676-1300 City Schools of Decatur Board of Education

404-370-4400

Early Learning 1 Elementary Schools 4 Middle Schools 1 High Schools 1 Per-pupil expenditures $13,444 School & bus information 404-370-8737 Avg. SAT Scores DeKalb Co. City of Decatur Georgia National

1334 1577 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity Georgia Power

404-395-7611

Snapping Shoals EMC

770-786-3484

Walton EMC

770-972-2917

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T

888-436-8638

Bellsouth

404-780-2355 Water

DeKalb County Water System 770-621-7200 Cable TV Charter Communication

877-728-3121

Comcast Cablevision

404-266-2278

Hospitals Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston

404-785-6000

DeKalb Medical Center

404-501-1000

Emory University Hospital

404-712-2000

Piedmont Hospital and Medical Care Center

404-605-5000

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 43


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION

pUBLIC schools Fayette County Schools Board of Education 770-460-3535

Fayette County

Photo: Courtesy of the City of Fayetteville

Fayette Co. Georgia National

1550 1431 1483

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES ELECTRICITY Georgia Power Company 888-660-5890 Coweta-Fayette EMC 770-253-5626 Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. TELEPHONE AT&T Residential

888-757-6500

WATER Fayette County Water 770-461-1146 Comcast

CABLE TV 404-266-2278

HOSPITALS Fayette Care Clinic 770-719-4620 Piedmont Fayette Hospital 770-719-7000

Fayetteville

Old-fashioned community pride mingles with a progressive sensibility on the streets of historic downtown Fayetteville, where antique stores and boutiques sit side by side in refurbished buildings. Boasting a population of approximately 16,000 residents, Fayetteville is home to the Fayette County Historic Society, Research Center and Museum. A haven for family fun, Dixieland Fun Park offers an assortment of activities for young and old alike. The HollidayDorsey-Fife Museum provides a fascinating link to the past thanks to its association with several historical figures, including Margaret Mitchell and Dr. Crawford Long. The 1,500seat Villages Amphitheater attracts national touring acts with its annual summer concert series.

Elementary Schools 17 Middle Schools 6 High Schools 5 Alternative 1 Open Campus 1 Per-pupil expenditures $8,359 School & bus information 770-460-3520

Avg. SAT Scores

Neighborhoods

Starr's Mill in Fayetteville

Located southwest of Atlanta, the land comprising Fayette County was ceded from the Creek Indian Nation in 1821, thus creating Georgia’s 49th county. The county seat, the city of Fayetteville, was established in 1823 and contains the oldest courthouse in the County www.fayettecounty.ga.gov state, built in 1825 and located Neighborhoods www.fayetteville-ga.gov The land where Fayette on Fayetteville’s historic town www.peachtree-city.org County’s largest city now square. Both the county and city Schools www.fcboe.org sits was originally settled were named for the Marquis de several thousand years ago LaFayette, who fought alongside Median household income: $82,216 Median age of residents: 42.4 by Woodland Era Indians, George Washington in the Population: 107,104 and ceded to the federal Revolutionary War. Sales tax: 6% government by Chief Author Margaret Mitchell Chamber of Commerce William McIntosh, Jr. in the spent many summers at her 770-461-9983, www.fayettechamber.org early 19th century. grandfather’s home in Fayette Comprising some County, which helped to inspire Property Taxes Per $1,000 of assessed value is: 12,000 acres, Peachtree locations in her novel Gone With Unincorporated Fayette County, $30.70; City was chartered in the Wind. Fayetteville, $31.64; the 1950s as a masterToday, the 199-square mile Peachtree City, $34.54. planned community of five area is renowned as a thriving Tax Commissioner: 770-461-3611 separate villages. Today, economic center that features the area is linked by a 90numerous attractive incentives mile network of trails and for businesses, including the 2,200From 1984 to 1994, Fayette acre Peachtree City Industrial Park, County was the fifth-fastest growing golf cart paths connecting homes, businesses, schools and parks. Golf which features its own Foreign Trade county in the U.S. Zone, which allows merchandise to Fayette County boasts several carts, bicycles and walking are the enter from or exit to foreign countries golf courses and two amphitheaters, preferred modes of transportation without a formal U.S. Customs entry among other attractions serving a among its 35,000 residents, who or payment of duties. In addition, family-oriented population of more enjoy its wooded scenery and Fayette County maintains a rural, than 106,000 residents. Single-family wealth of parks, playgrounds and small-town allure, and has been housing in Fayette County ranges recreational areas. N recognized as one of the nation’s from the $50,000s in moderateFor more counties and neighborhood most attractive communities for income areas to more than $2 million information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com corporate family relocation. in affluent neighborhoods.

44 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

QUICK INFO

Peachtree City


COUNTY INFORMATION

Fulton County

pUBLIC schools Fulton County Schools Board of Education 404-768-3600

Buckhead is also the epicenter for the city’s entertainment and dining industries. With more than 200 restaurants, luxury hotels and nightspots, it has long been a young professional’s paradise. The area also offers numerous antique stores, art galleries and mall shopping at Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza.

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Charter Per-pupil expenditures

Downtown Atlanta skyline

QUICK INFO

Neighborhoods

Buckhead

Considered Atlanta’s “silk stocking district,” Buckhead is “where old money lives and new money parties,” according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. With its one-of-a-kind Georgian and Neoclassical mansions and uniquely styled homes from the 1950s and 1960s, Buckhead is a favorite locale among architecture and history buffs. It is home to the Governor’s Mansion, the historic Swan House and the Atlanta History Center.

County Neighborhoods Schools

www.co.fulton.ga.us www.alpharetta.ga.us www.buckhead.net www.virginiahighland.com www.eastpointcity.org www.collegeparkga.com www.hapeville.org www.ci.roswell.ga.us www.sandyspringsga.org www.fultonschools.org www.atlanta.k12.ga.us

Median household income: $57,586 Median age of residents: 35 Population: 963,676 Sales tax: 7%, Atlanta City: 8% Chamber of Commerce Greater North Fulton 770-993-8806, www.gnfcc.com Metro Atlanta 404-880-9000, www.metroatlantachamber.com South Fulton 770-964-1984, www.sfcoc.org Property Taxes The property tax rate per $1,000 is: $30.49 for the City of Atlanta; $28.03 for incorporated Fulton County; $33.69 for unincorporated South Fulton and $31.90 for unincorporated North Fulton County County. Tax Commissioner: 404-730-6100

Photo: Georgia Dept. of Economic Development.

At the center of the Metro Atlanta area is Fulton County. Bordered on the west by the Chattahoochee River and encompassing Interstates 85, 75, 285 and Ga. 400, Fulton County is at the hub of the area’s financial, transportation, retail, communications and cultural services. Most Fortune 500 corporations maintain national or regional facilities in the area; many are headquartered here, including Coca-Cola, Equifax, United Parcel Service, Home Depot, Delta Airlines and Turner Broadcasting System. More than 3 million live and work in Fulton County. Older, innercity neighborhoods, such as Inman Park, Candler Park and trendy Virginia-Highland offer eclectic living amidst unique boutiques and restaurants. Midtown is at the heart of the city’s cultural life, home to the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, High Museum of Art, Alliance Theatre and the historic Fox Theatre. Many outdoor festivals are held at Piedmont Park. According to the Census Bureau, the median value of homes in 2006 was $270,000. Homes in the millions can be found in such affluent neighborhoods as Buckhead, Sandy Springs and Alpharetta.

EDUCATION

one of Atlanta’s most affluent neighborhoods. Homes range from elegant subdivisions to those with acreage. The Country Club of the South is a planned community home to several sports stars, high profile executives and celebrities. A successful combination of old and new, Alpharetta has become a haven for singles, families and professionals wanting a bit of country living with all the amenities that city dwelling offers. While many residents shop at nearby Northpoint Mall and Gwinnett Mall, many still enjoy the old stores on Main Street— a visit to the Alpharetta Soda Shoppe is a special treat. N

Alpharetta

Once a small farming community, Alpharetta has greatly boomed within the last 20 years to become

For more counties and neighborhood information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com

58 19 16 6 $9,746

Atlanta City Schools

404-802-3500

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Charter Non-Traditional Per-pupil expenditures: School & bus information:

55 16 22 7 2 $13,710 404-753-9815

Avg. SAT Scores Atlanta (City) 1285 Fulton Co. 1584 Georgia 1460 National 1509 pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS HOME SERVICES Cobb Energy (Electricity, Security, Telephone and Satellite TV) 770-429-2222 Electricity City of College Park 404-669-3772 City of East Point 404-270-7093 City of Fairburn 770-964-2244 City of Palmetto 770-463-3377 Georgia Power Company 404-395-7611 GreyStone Power Corp. 770-942-6576 Sawnee EMC 770-887-2363 Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com. Telephone AT&T 888-436-8638 Outside Georgia 800-356-3094

Fulton County

Water

404-730-6830

Cable TV Charter Communications 877-728-3121 Comcast 404-266-2278 Hospitals Atlanta Medical Center 404-265-4000 Center for the Visually Impaired 404-875-9011 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Hughes Spalding 404-785-9500 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite 404-785-5252 Emory Crawford Long Hospital 404-686-2513 Fulton County Health Dept. 404-730-1211 Grady Memorial Hospital 404-616-4307 North Fulton Regional Hospital 770-751-2500 Northside Hospital 404-851-8000 Piedmont Hospital 404-605-5000 Shepherd Center 404-352-2020 South Fulton Medical Center 404-466-1170 St. Joseph’s Hospital 404-851-7001

www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 45


COUNTY INFORMATION EDUCATION pUBLIC schools Henry County Schools Board of Education 770-957-6601 Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Alternative Per-pupil expenditures School & bus information

Neighborhoods

29 12 10 1 $7,910 770-957-2025

Avg. SAT Score Henry Co. Georgia National

McDonough

1410 1460 1509

pRivate schools Visit our Web site at newcomeratlanta.com for a list of private schools in this county.

UTILITIES & CONTACTS Electricity Central Georgia EMC 770-775-7857 Georgia Power

770-395-7611

Snapping Shoals EMC

770-786-3484

Gas Georgia’s natural gas market is deregulated. For a list of providers for this county, visit www.newcomeratlanta.com.

McDonough’s town square

Henry County QUICK INFO

Incorporated in 1823, McDonough was named after Commodore McDonough of the War of 1812 and is the county seat. Many historic structures with architecture dating back to the 1800s can be seen in and around McDonough’s town square. McDonough, in an effort to bring its residents a sense of community, created its Main Street Program, which revitalized its Main Street. Today, the street is not only home to intimate boutiques and family-friendly restaurants, it is also home to a variety of free community events throughout the year on the town square, including Music on the Square summer concerts, Santa on the Square at Christmas, classic car shows and chili cook-offs.

Named after Patrick Henry, orator from the Revolutionary War, Henry County is one of 17 County www.co.henry.ga.us counties created from the Creek Neighborhoods www.cityofstockbridge.com Indian land secessions. The Schools www.henry.K12.ga.us county is known as the “Mother Median household income: $63,395 Host of the LPGA of Counties” because much of Median age of residents: 32 Chick-fil-A Charity Chamits land was taken to develop Population: 191,502 pionship each year in April, surrounding counties, including Sales tax: 7% Stockbridge is a golfer’s parFulton, DeKalb and Clayton. Chamber of Commerce adise. Eagle’s Landing, the Today Henry County is Henry County community surrounding made up of the cities of 770-957-5786, www.henrycounty.com the 18-hole Eagle’s LandMcDonough, Stockbridge, ing golf course, is home to Locust Grove and Hampton. Property Taxes some of the most beautiful It is one of the fastest-growing The property tax rate per $1,000 of assessed value is $37.51 for unincorporated Henry County. and exclusive neighborcounties in Metro Atlanta with Tax Commissioner: 770-288-8180 hoods south of Atlanta. The more than 198,000 residents. 51,000-square-foot, plantaThe county continues to flourish as a major industrial and retail hosts the LPGA Chick-fil-A Char- tion-style clubhouse on the property exemplifies Georgian charm. Home center. Tanger Outlet Center in ity Championship. Locust Grove is a favorite attraction With the county’s rich resources prices range from the hundredamong Atlanta’s shoppers. and convenience to I-75, housing thousands to the millions. Incorporated in 1920, StockHenry County is known best, has continued at a steady growth however, as the home of Atlanta Mo- with such planned developments bridge began as a settlement in tor Speedway and Eagle’s Landing as Heron Bay Golf & Country 1829 and celebrates its heriCountry Club. Located in the county Club and Crown Ridge cropping tage each May with Ole’ Stocksince 1959, the speedway attracts up everywhere. The median value bridge Days. N people from all over the state for of homes in 2008 was $150,189, For more counties and neighborhood its two annual NASCAR races. making Henry County a very information, visit our Web site at www.newcomeratlanta.com Eagle’s Landing in Stockbridge affordable place to live.

Stockbridge

AT&T

Telephone 888-436-8638 Water

City of Hampton

770-946-4306

City of Stockbridge

770-389-7900

Henry County Water System 770-957-6659 Locust Grove

770-957-5043

McDonough

770-957-3915 Cable TV

Charter Communications

888-728-8121

Comcast

404-266-2278 Hospitals

Henry Medical Center

678-604-1000

Southern Regional Medical Center

770-991-8000

Sylvan Grove Hospital

770-775-7861

46 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com


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www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 47


upcomingEVENTS

Superior Plumbing Kennesaw Big Shanty Festival, Kennseaw Experience more than 250 arts and craft booths, 25 food booths, two stages of live entertainment, a Civil War encampment, live acoustic music and children’s activities at this free festival in downtown Kennesaw. April 21-22, 770-423-1330, www.kennesawbusiness.org.

PHOTO: Cameron Mackintosh

National Astronomy Day, Tellus Science Museum

Les Misérables, Fox Theatre

See and touch specimens from the Georgia Meteorite Association, chat with local astronomy clubs, see Saturn, Mars, the moon and the double star Gamma Leo via the observatory’s telescope and more. April 28, 770-606-5700, www.tellusmuseum.org.

Sterling on the Lake Arts Fest, Flowery Branch Take in art, jazz and blues music, food, a wine tasting and more at this inaugural daylong arts festival at the Village Center Park at the Sterling on the Lake residential community. Admission is free and parking is $5 per car. April 28,

Theater & Concerts

Exhibits & Events

Moscow Festival Ballet Performs Cinderella, Fox Theatre

Taste of Forsyth, City of Cumming Fairgrounds

The acclaimed Russian company performs its production of the classic children’s tale. April 3,

Sample culinary delights from more than 25 local restaurants and enjoy live entertainment including a puppet show, an Easter egg hunt, music and more. Admission and parking are free, and food samples cost $1-$4 each. April 7,

Atlanta Blooms

www.cummingfair.net.

www.atlantabotanicalgarden.org.

ArtSSpring, Sandy Springs

Barefoot in the Park, Duluth Town Green

This 30-day celebration of the arts showcases the best art, cuisine and performance that Sandy Springs has to offer. Enjoy cabaret and comedy, theater and talent shows, paintings and poetry, artists and authors, and restaurants galore. April

This popular regional event celebrates its eighth year with a juried art festival, food, a children’s art tent, a wine tasting, the Barefoot Gala and a continuous schedule of musicians and dancers.

800-745-3000, www.foxtheatre.org.

Annie, Averitt Center for the Arts Everyone’s favorite orphan girl visits the Emma Kelly Theater at the Averitt Center in the popular musical known for the timeless songs “Tomorrow” and “It’s a Hard Knock Life.” April 12-14, 912-212-2787, www.averittcenterforthearts.org.

Earth Day Kids Fest, Chattahoochee Nature Center Meet Captain Planet, enjoy the music of Laughing Pizza, witness live animal presentations, examine a variety of earth-friendly household goods and ideas and much more. April 14, 770-992-2055,

.

www.sterlingonthelake.com.

13-May 13, 404-255-3331, www.artsandysprings.org.

This 12th annual event features a 13-mile canoe and kayak race on the Oostanaula River, canoe and kayak tug-o-wars and an environmental fair with reptile and raptor shows, children’s activities, a scavenger hunt and more. Events take place at Ridge Ferry Park and the E.C.O. River Center. May 4-5, www.coosa.org/events/waterfest.

www.chattnaturecenter.org.

Statesboro Film Festival, Averitt Center for the Arts View entertaining and thought-provoking short films by filmmakers from across the state. April 19,

Spring Tour of Homes, Douglasville

www.statesborofilmfestival.com.

48 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

PHOTO: Chris Kozarich

Les Misérables, Fox Theatre

www.foxtheatre.org.

May 4-6, 678-475-3506, www.barefootinthepark.org.

WaterFest, Rome

Atlanta Blooms, Atlanta Botanical Garden

A brand new 25th anniversary production of the legendary musical about the survival of the human spirit, dazzlingly reimagined with glorious new staging. April 24-29, 800-745-3000,

This second annual event showcases hundreds of thousands of tulips, daffodils, hyacinths and other bulbs in full bloom, offering a spectacular array of colors. Through April 30, 404-876-5859,

Tour some of the finest and most unique homes n Douglasville as city residents open up their homes for tours and interior décor showcasing. All proceeds benefit the Downtown Development Authority’s downtown revitalization efforts. Tickets are $15. May 5, 678-715-6092, www.downtowndouglasville.com.


Main Street Spring Market, Douglasville Browse local vendors selling arts, crafts and antiques at O’Neal Plaza in downtown Douglasville. Free and open to the public. May 5, 678-715-6092, www.downtowndouglasville.com.

Mother’s Day Brunch, Brasstown Valley Resort Treat Mom to a wonderful brunch including breakfast items, seafood, hot entrees and dessert. Admission is $39.95 per adult and $19.95 for children 6-12. Reservations strongly encouraged. A full menu is available online. May 13,

Global Imports Sandy Springs Cycling Challenge

706-379-4617, www.brasstownvalley.com.

This fifth annual event features top international pro cyclists competing in a variety of races. There’s also an outdoor arts festival. May 6,

Horsin’ Around BBQ Showdown, Brasstown Valley Resort

678-428-7442, www.sandyspringschallenge.org.

Sandy Springs Food & Wine Classic, Sandy Springs Following the Sandy Springs Cycling Challenge, stick around for this inaugural event featuring food and drinks from more than 30 area restaurants. May 6, 866-511-7742, www.visitsandysprings.org.

Experiences with the Hubble Telescope, Tellus Science Museum Former NASA astronaut Story Musgrave talks about his experiences in space, including three space walks to repair the Hubble telescope. May 11, 770-606-5700, www.tellusmuseum.org.

Sample more than 20 different barbecue dishes and enjoy live music, vendors and a children’s fun zone at this competition sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbecue Society. May 26, 706-379-4606, www.brasstownvalley.com.

Memorial Day Service, Duluth Town Green Join the city of Duluth in honoring our fallen soldiers at this inspiring event. May 26, www.duluthga.net.

American Legacy: Our National Parks, Booth Western Art Museum View 100 paintings of some of the nation’s most beautiful national parks, painted by artists on location at each park. Through Aug. 26, 770-387-1300, www.boothmuseum.org.

Main Street Spring Market, Douglasville

Snap Suwanee, Suwanee City Hall

PHOTO: Courtesy City of Douglasville

View 13 winning photos representing different Suwanee locales from the annual Snap Suwanee photo competition. Through Dec. 31, www.suwanee.com.

Southern Quilt Trail, Powder Springs Tour this series of quilt patterns painted on the sides of historic barns and other buildings in an effort to promote and preserve the history of this traditional art form. Ongoing, 770-439-1780, www.southernquilttrail.com.

This second annual barbecue competition and festival offers a redneck beauty contest, live music and arts and crafts booths along the banks of the Oostanaula River in Rome, Ga. May 11-12, www.rfpra.com.

50th Anniversary Celebration, New Echota Historic Site Celebrate the 50th anniversary of this significant Cherokee Indian historic site, where the tragic Trail of Tears officially began. All buildings will be open with Cherokee and non-Cherokee authors, demonstrators and more. May 12, 706-624-1321, www.gastateparks.org/newechota.

PHOTO: Courtesy Sandy Springs Cycling Challenge

Roman Roast on the River, Ridge Ferry Park

Global Imports Sandy Springs Cycling Challenge www.newcomeratlanta.com | Newcomer Magazine | 49


hiddenATLANTA

Braves Museum & Hall of Fame

T

he Atlanta Braves have a long and storied history, dating all the way back to the 1870s. But you don’t need to be a sports historian or own a time machine to relive the team’s biggest moments. All you have to do is stop by the ballpark. From Hank Aaron’s 715th home run bat and ball to the team’s 1995 World Series trophy, visitors to the Ivan Allen Jr. Braves Museum & Hall of Fame at Turner Field can take in more than 600 artifacts and photographs tracing the journey of the longest continually operating team in professional sports. Silver Slugger, MVP and Cy Young awards, jerseys from the club’s days in Milwaukee and Boston and an exhibit showcasing Braves who’ve by Cady Schulman been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame—all the bases are covered. Other features include the Braves Leaderboard, which is updated daily to keep visitors up to date on Braves records and milestones, and a video showing how Olympic Stadium was transformed into Turner Field. One of the more interesting parts of the museum is a cross-section of an original railroad car. Visitors can “see how it was to travel by rail back through the 1950s,” says Carolyn Serra, the museum’s director. “That’s very popular with the kids. They can actually get on it and walk through it.” The museum also includes the Braves Hall of Fame, which features photographs and memorabilia relating to the more than 20 players, broadcasters and executives who’ve been inducted. Another honoree will be added to the ranks during the annual Hall of Fame ceremony on June 8. Each year, between 50,000 and 60,000 people buy a ticket to the Braves Museum & Hall of Fame, which includes a guided tour of Turner Field. “They’ll get to see areas like the press box, the dugout, areas that they don’t get to see during the game,” Serra says. The Braves Museum & Hall of Fame is located on the northwest side of Turner Field at Aisle 134. Admission to the museum is $2 during games and $5 on non-game days. Walk-up tour tickets are $12 for adults, $7 for children and $10 for groups of 20 or more. For hours of operation and other information, call 404-522-7630 or visit the website at www.braves.mlb.com. N

50 | Newcomer Magazine | www.newcomeratlanta.com

LEFT PHOTO: ©2012, Kevin C. Rose/AtlantaPhotos.com

Exploring the History of Atlanta’s Baseball Heroes


Newcomer Magazine Atlanta | April/May 2012  

Newcomer magazine is Atlanta’s leading relocation and new-resident guide, providing an invaluable resource for businesses, executives and fa...

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