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Atlanta Schools Embrace the Arts

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Independent School Directory

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Understanding Common Core

Beyond the Expanding Education Outside the Four Walls COVERING:

Independent | Boarding | Early Education | Public Charter | Summer Camps | Field Trips and More


Excellence. Innovation. Character. Serving Advanced and Gifted Students Award-Winning Educational Excellence Pre-K Through High School Fulton Science Academy embraces an innovative, STEAM-based curriculum. Our growing student body is diverse and reflects awardwinning academic teams, competitive athletes, personal entrepreneurs, professional working actors, and award-winning critical thinkers. Built upon core values of excellence, innovation, and character, FSAPS is shattering industry stereotypes by building strong students and great human beings.

Alpharetta, GA | (678) 366-2555 | admissions@fultonscienceacademy.org

www.fultonscienceacademy.org


CONTENTS

WINTER/SPRING 2017

26

30 34

FEATURES

26

In Every Issue

Learning Outside the Classroom In the local community, across the country and around the globe, students can learn more about the outside world—up close and personal.

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34

Atlanta Schools Are Embracing the Arts

8 Critical Communication 18 Headmaster’s Corner

Ayanna Hill-Gill of Atlanta Girls’ School.

20 Special Needs Resources

Experiencing the arts enables young people to appreciate our shared cultural heritage, and it opens the door to a richer, more rewarding life.

40 Independent School Guide

Common Core and Beyond

97  Educational Resources

What exactly is Common Core, and how is it impacting Georgia students’ educational journey? 4

6 How to Use This Guide

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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Boarding School Directory 79  88  Public Schools by County Tutoring, summer camps and activities, field trips and more.

105 Advertiser Index


HOW TO

Use This Guide Find an Independent School in

4

1

Easy Steps!

Metro Atlanta Area Map To search for independent schools by region or neighborhood, turn to page 38 and use the color-coded map to direct you to each region’s page number.

2

Education At-a-Glance

3

Region Maps and Listings

4 6

Once you’ve selected your region of interest, the charts beginning on page 40 include a comparison of features for each school in that region, along with the page number for each school’s ad.

Divided into regions of Atlanta, the color-coded maps beginning on page 44 provide each school’s location and page number for their ad.

Advertiser Index To find a school or resource by name, turn to the advertiser index on page 105 to find the appropriate page number.

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2017

We graciously thank our advertisers for their support of the Atlanta School Guide. Publisher/President PATRICK KILLAM Editor LARRY ANDERSON Marketing & Promotions JEFF THOMPSON Account Directors LACEY JAMES STEPHEN CONNOR Contributing Writers KEN ABRAMCZYK MICHELLE BOURG CADY SCHULMAN

TO ADVERTISE CALL

770-992-0273 Space closing for Summer/Fall 2017 issue: April 14, 2017 Atlanta School Guide, Winter/Spring 2017, Volume 12, Issue 1. Published bi-annually by Killam Publishing, Inc., 200 Market Place, Suite 230, Roswell, GA 30075. Atlanta School Guide assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. Information may have changed since press time, so please verify all information when contacting a school or educational resource. Reproduction in whole or in part of any elements of this publication is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. © 2017 Killam Publishing, Inc. For additional copies, further information or advertising, please contact:

KILLAM PUBLISHING, INC. P: 770-992-0273 F: 770-649-7463 info@killampublishing.com www.atlantaschoolguide.com


Critical Communication

Important Dates Dates subject to change. Please check with your local school district for updates.

DECFEB

MARAPR

PUBLIC SCHOOLS WINTER HOLIDAYS Dec. 19-Jan. 2 Dec. 19-Jan. 3 Dec. 19-Jan. 4 Dec. 21-Jan. 4 Dec. 22-Jan. 3 Dec. 22-Jan. 4 Dec. 23-Jan. 6 Jan. 16 Feb. 10 Feb. 13-17 Feb. 17 Feb. 17-20 Feb. 17-21 Feb. 20 Feb. 20-24 Feb. 20-21 Feb. 20-22 Feb. 20-27

Bartow, Cartersville City, Cherokee, Clayton, Decatur City, Douglas, Gainesville City, Henry Atlanta Public Schools, Buford City, Fayette, Hall, Rockdale Griffin-Spalding Coweta, Forsyth, Paulding DeKalb Cobb, Gwinnett, Marietta City Fulton All Gwinnett Decatur City Atlanta Public Schools DeKalb, Fulton, Hall Forsyth, Clayton Gainesville City, Gwinnett Buford City, Cherokee, Cobb, Coweta, Fayette, Marietta City, Paulding, Rockdale Atlanta Public Schools, Bartow Cartersville City, Douglas Griffin-Spalding, Henry

SPRING BREAK HOLIDAYS

March 31-April 7 Gwinnett April 3-7 All (except Griffin-Spalding, Gwinnett) April 17-21 Griffin-Spalding

LAST DAY OF SCHOOL

MAY OCTMAR JANJUN 8

May 19 May 23 May 24 May 25 May 26

Bartow, Cartersville City, Gainesville City Clayton Gwinnett, Hall Atlanta Public Schools, Cherokee, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton Buford City, Coweta, Decatur City, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth, Griffin-Spalding, Henry, Marietta City, Paulding, Rockdale

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS Open Houses Application Deadlines

TESTING DATES

Oct. to Mar., in general Late Jan. to late Feb., in general

SAT SSAT Dates apply to both public Jan. 21, March 11, Jan. 7, Feb. 11, March 4, and independent schools. For May 6 and June 3 April 22 and June 10 registration deadlines, visit www.collegeboard.org www.ssat.org the appropriate websites.

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Critical Communication

Trends and Happenings in Georgia Education What You Need to Know to Stay Up to Date With Atlanta and Georgia Education Local Blue Ribbon Winners Six metro Atlanta public and independent schools have been named 2016 National Blue Ribbon Schools by the U.S. Department of Education. Those schools are Morningside Elementary, Mount Bethel Elementary, St. Joseph Catholic School, St. Thomas More Catholic School, Sharon Elementary, and the Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology. Atlanta Schools Open Health Clinics Two schools in the Atlanta Public Schools system, Dobbs Elementary and Miles Intermediate School, recently opened health centers offering physical, dental and behavioral health services. Burnett Elementary School in Douglas County has also opened a health clinic for Burnett and Eastside Elementary students. 10

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Woodward President Named “Most Admired” Dr. Stuart Gulley, president of Woodward Academy, was recently recognized as the “Most Admired CEO in Education” by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. Dr. Gulley has been with the academy, the largest independent school in the continental U.S., since July 2009. Cumberland Academy Awarded Cumberland Academy of Georgia, which serves students with autism, Asperger’s and other learning disabilities, recently received a grant from the Captain Planet Foundation to establish a “learning garden” to help students learn how to care for the environment. Five New Charter Schools to Open The State Charter Schools Commission of Georgia has approved five new

Winter/Spring 2017

charter schools to open for the 2017-18 school year, including three metro Atlanta schools: Genesis Academy for Boys and Genesis Academy for Girls in Atlanta, and Resurgence Hall in Fulton County. Cobb School Opens Food Pantry Students at McCleskey Middle School in Cobb County have opened a food pantry to provide food for students and community members in need. Students run the pantry and organize drives for clothes and other items as well. GACS Raises Funds for Improvements Greater Atlanta Christian School, an independent school in Norcross, has raised $30 million to renovate six existing buildings—including the transformation of its current chapel into a


performing arts center. The fund will also pay to build four new buildings at the school. Atlanta School Opens “Inclusive” Playground Atlanta’s Toomer Elementary School has opened an “inclusive” playground with features that are accessible to children with special needs. Teacher Emily Max won a $100,000 grant from Farmers Insurance to build the playground. Pride School Opens Pride School, an independent school for LGBTQ students, has opened its doors for the 2016-2017 school year. The school is open to students ages 5-18.

Fulton Schools Receive Athletic Gear Sportswear company Under Armour will equip 13 Fulton County high schools with discounted athletic wear under a fiveyear sponsorship agreement. The deal provides for discounted prices on jerseys, cleats, gloves and other apparel. Local High Schools Make Newsweek’s Top 500 Seven metro Atlanta high schools have been recognized by Newsweek magazine, making its list of the top 500 high schools for 2016. Brookwood High, Chamblee Charter High, Chattahoochee High, DeKalb School of the Arts, Harrison High, Northview High and Pope

High School were the local schools honored, among 10 Georgia schools total. Schools were evaluated based on college enrollment rate, SAT and ACT scores, and other factors. Independent Schools Form New Sports League Ten independent schools in metro Atlanta, including Pinecrest Academy, Mount Paran Christian School and Mount Pisgah Christian School, have joined forces to form the Metro 10, a new middle-school athletic league. The league hopes to create a more consistent and stable competitive environment for students in member schools. First Lady Honors Atlanta Schools Nine metro Atlanta schools received the “Let’s Move!” award in September. Blackwell, Glennwood, High Point, Lake Windward, Mableton, Russell, and Stonewall Tell Elementary Schools, along with Floyd and Smitha Middle Schools, received the honor as part of Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” initiative, which recognizes schools with a significant commitment to physical activity. In all, a total of 544 schools from 41 states and Washington D.C. were recognized. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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Critical Communication

Education 101

Terms to Know in Your Search for the Right Educational Experience for Your Child CHARTER SCHOOL  A tax-supported public school that is independently run, allowing for greater educational choice for parents in the community. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING  An educational approach using applied, hands-on methods of learning. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB)  A specifically designed comprehensive academic program emphasizing traditional disciplines while instilling a global perspective in its students.

MAGNET SCHOOL  A public school that offers a specific or enhanced curriculum designed for students of special interest or ability. MONTESSORI  A school following the principles developed by Dr. Maria Montessori focusing on the unique individuality, self-reliance and independence of children. SPECIAL NEEDS A school or program for children who have mild-tomoderate learning differences. It usually features smaller class sizes, individualized attention and multisensory learning methods.

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ACCREDITATION  Official certification that guarantees a school provides an education of a reasonably high quality. Schools must prove levels of quality and maintain continuous standards of improvement. ACT An alternative to the SAT, this national college admissions examination consists of subject area tests in English, Mathematics, Reading and Science, with an optional 40-minute writing test. ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS (AYP) A measure of year-to-year student achievement on statewide assessments as required by the No Child Left Behind Act.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION  Education that applies to children from birth to age 8, focusing specifically on their development, including physical, emotional, sensory, communicative, cognitive and social needs.

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT A federal law passed in 2001 designed to ensure that all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a high-quality education and meet state academic standards of proficiency.

GEORGIA MILESTONES Tests designed to measure how well students in grades 3 through 12 acquire the skills and knowledge outlined in the state-adopted content standards.

PSAT  A standardized test that offers students practice for the SAT Reasoning Test and allows them to qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Program.

HOPE SCHOLARSHIP (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally)  A scholarship in Georgia, funded by the Georgia Lottery, that rewards academically achieving students with financial assistance to attend a degree, diploma, or certificate program at eligible public and private Georgia colleges and universities.

SAT  This standardized test measures the critical thinking, writing and mathematical reasoning skills of students planning to attend college. SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS TEST (SSAT) The admissions test that many independent and private schools require students to take in order to be considered for enrollment.

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Critical Communication

Deciphering Associations and Organizations Many local and national organizations work to bring out the best in summer camps and public, private and boarding schools by identifying schools that meet certain standards through accreditation. These groups also set policies, research educational advancements and offer services to the educational communities both in Atlanta and in Georgia. The following are just some of the associations and organizations you should know in your search for the best educational experience for your child. AdvancED www.advanc-ed.org The parent organization for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, AdvancED advances education excellence through accreditation and school improvement. American Camp Association (ACA) www.acacamps.org Accredits camps that meet industry-accepted and 14

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Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) www.acsi.org ACSI strives to enable Christian educators and schools worldwide to teach effectively using Christcentered curricula and programs. Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) www.montessori-ami.org Recognizes schools that strongly adhere to Montessori principles and practices. Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools (AAAIS) www.aaais.org Although not an accrediting agency, AAAIS is an affiliation of independent schools and operates under analogous principles and a common code of ethics.

government-recognized standards, educates owners and directors and establishes guidelines.

The Council of International Schools (CIS) www.cois.org The premier organization in international education for the accreditation of schools and the development of best practices.

The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS) www.boardingschools.com This organization of 300 boarding schools serves the professional development needs of boarding schools and provides information to potential students and their families.

Department of Education (DOE) www.doe.k12.ga.us A statewide, policy-driven organization governing the public school system of education in Georgia for grades K-12, the Georgia DOE operates under the direction of the state superintendent of schools.

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Georgia Accrediting Commission (GAC) www.coe.uga.edu/gac GAC offers four levels of approval: preparation status, provisional accreditation, accreditation and accreditation with quality. Georgia Association of Christian Schools (GACS) www.gacs.org Uses generally accepted indicators of quality, voluntary self-improvement and peer review to measure Christian schools. Georgia Association of Educational Leaders (GAEL) www.gael.org This statewide umbrella organization of six professional associations provides unity among school leadership organizations in Georgia. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC) www.gapsec.org This state organization is for schools that serve students with learning issues. Georgia Charter Schools Association (GCSA) www.gacharters.org A membership organization whose mission is to be an effective advocate and service provider for all charter public schools in Georgia.

Georgia Independent School Association (GISA) www.gisaschools.org An association of private, independent and parochial schools throughout the state whose mission is to advance excellence and collaboration among private, independent and parochial schools.

conduct of public school teachers and staff.

Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education (GPEE) www.gpee.org This nonprofit organization of business, education, community and government leaders aims to shape policy and reform public education in the state.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) www.naeyc.org The NAEYC focuses on the quality of educational and developmental services for children, from birth to age 8, including day care and pre-K centers. It is a national network of more than 300 local, state, and regional affiliates, and a growing global alliance.

Georgia Private School Accreditation Council (GAPSAC) www.gapsac.org Association of K-12 private schools whose students are recognized and approved by the Georgia DOE for transferring credits to public schools on the same basis as students from public schools. Georgia Professional Standards Commission (PSC) www.gapsc.com A state organization responsible for setting and applying high standards for the preparation, certification and continued licensing of Georgia public educators, as well as

Georgia School Boards Association (GSBA) www.gsba.com Representing Georgia’s 180 elected boards of education, GSBA provides leadership and services to local school boards.

National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) www.nais.org This association values and works to maintain the independent nature of each member school by promoting high standards of educational quality and ethical behavior. National Association of Private Special Education Centers (NAPSEC) www.napsec.org Represents private specialized education programs and their leaders u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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by promoting high-quality programs and services for individuals with disabilities and their families. National Christian School Association (NCSA) www.nationalchristian.org An organization that accredits member schools, overseen by a board of administrators from Christian schools and universities. National Council for Private School Accreditation (NCPSA) www.ncpsa.org A consortium of several private school organi-

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zations dedicated to preserving the integrity of the accreditation process for thousands of private schools across the nation. Southeastern Association of Boarding Schools (SABS) www.sabs.org An association of 23 boarding schools committed to promoting and supporting boarding education opportunities in Southeastern states, including the Carolinas, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia and Florida.

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) www.sacs.org Member schools meet research-based standards and maintain continuous school improvement and quality assurance. Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS) www.sais.org Members meet quality standards, receive peer evaluation and implement a school plan focused on strategic improvement.

For more information about these and other organizations and associations that ensure quality education among camps and schools, visit the websites of the Georgia Department of Education (www.gadoe.org) or the U.S. Department of Education (www.ed.gov).

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Headmaster’s Corner

Ayanna Hill-Gill

Head of School, Atlanta Girls’ School Ayanna Hill-Gill, known as Yanni, is the Head of School at Atlanta Girls’ School. Prior to AGS, Yanni was the Head of School at Purnell School in Bedminster, N.J. Yanni holds a bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College and a master’s degree from Columbia University Teacher’s College. She is a graduate of an all girls’ school in Philadelphia.

What is your educational philosophy? My role as an educational leader is to create a rich environment where students feel safe to initiate learning, are rewarded for curiosity, and are celebrated for expressing their true selves What do you love most about your job? In the true spirit of learning, I love collaborating with all members of our community—faculty, staff, students, parents, and Trustees—to make AGS the best it can be. It makes my leadership role fun. How can parents best contribute to the education process? A parent should always see themselves as a partner with their student’s educators in providing support for the student’s journey to graduation. How is the field of education changing? The world is becoming more and more complex, and we know students will face challenges and opportunities that may 18

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not even exist today. I feel that graduates must be equipped with curiosity, creativity, collaboration, and confidence to solve and seize on the unknown that lies ahead. What advice would you offer parents about their children’s education? Education is not one-size-fits-all, and there are many paths to a student’s success. As educators, and their parents’ partners, we can help to define the best path for each individual student, and how he or she is challenged along the way.

THE ESSENTIALS: ATLANTA GIRLS’ SCHOOL Mission Statement: Inspiring Girls to Lead Lives of Purpose. Year Founded: 2000 Grades: 6-12 
 Students: 260 Avg. Class Size: 12 Tuition: $23,330

Accreditations or Affiliations: NAIS, SAIS, SACS, National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS) Location: 3254 Northside Pkwy. NW Atlanta, GA 30327 Contact: 404-845-0900, atlantagirlsschool.org


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room setting. Others may teach average or even above-average learners while also offering additional programs and classes for students with learning differences.

him or her evaluated by a mental health professional. A diagnosis is crucial in order to address the child’s educational needs.

After a Diagnosis: What’s Next? How to Tell if Your Child Has a Special If your child is diagnosed with a learnNeeds Situation ing disability and attends public school, First, it’s important to identify your child’s talk with the principal, school counselor issues. Students who exhibit average or or another administrator about developabove-average intelligence but often ing an Individualized Education Program seem distracted and don’t perform well (IEP). All public schools are required to in a traditional classroom create an IEP for students setting may be struggling with learning disabilities with dyslexia, Asperger’s who meet special educasyndrome, ADHD or some A professional tion requirements. An IEP other disorder that affects is a document that specievaluation is their ability to learn effecfies your child’s learning tively. Also, disruptive or crucial in order situation and educaaggressive children may tional needs and outlines to evaluate be exhibiting frustration a course of action for brought on by a learning teachers and other proyour child’s disability. fessionals to follow to educational If you suspect your child help make sure your child may have a learning dislearns to the best of his or needs. ability, it’s critical to have her ability. u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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Critical Communication If you feel your local public school isn’t the right environment for your child, or simply want to explore all your options, there are many quality independent schools in the metro Atlanta area devoted to helping children with special needs and learning issues. Visit the Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children’s website (www.gapsec.org) or our listings for special needs schools on page 106 to help you with your search.

needs education. Independent special needs schools can offer more individualized instruction and a more structured and predictable environment, and are likely to address nonacademic issues such as social skills and self-esteem. As you begin searching for the right school for your child’s situation, here are some questions to keep in mind: • Will your child fare better in a school that focuses on his or her specific learning disability, or would you rather that he or she be able to interact with students with a wide range of learning capabilities? • Does the school serve a specific age range, or work with students on all grade levels? Many students with learning disabilities have trouble transitioning to new schools.

How Do I Find the Right School? All special needs schools are not the same. The first step is to identify those schools that can address your child’s specific learning difficulty, and offer the level of special needs instruction that you (and perhaps a professional) feel is best for your child. You may be more comfortable enrolling your child in a school that focuses specifically on his or her issue, or you may want a more diverse environment where he or she can interact with many different kinds of students. Familiarize yourself with the different options offered by each kind of school. Traditional indeIdentify those pendent schools that offer special needs schools that programs as part of a can best larger curriculum can offer that kind of enviaddress your ronment, but may have larger class sizes than child’s specific schools that specialize learning in specific learning disabilities. These kinds of difficulty. schools may also focus more on academics than on the therapeutic aspects of special 22

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Critical Communication • D  oes the school offer a variety of extracurricular activities, including arts and sports programs? •  Is the school accredited? If so, by which organizations? • Is the staff certified to instruct special needs children, or those with your child’s specific learning difficulty? • Does the school focus more on academics or on addressing the child’s therapeutic needs? Financial Assistance Many independent special needs schools participate in the Georgia Special Needs Scholarship program (GSNS), a school choice program available to special needs students attending Georgia public schools. The program offers funds to off-

set tuition and fees at participating private schools authorized by the State Board of Education. According to the Georgia Department of Education, scholarship amounts range from $2,500 to $13,500, with an average amount of around $6,000. The Quality Education Expense Credit program provides another scholarship option. Donations are made to an organization known as a Student Scholarship Organization (SSO), which uses the money to award scholarships to students in pre-K through grade 12. Many schools also offer their own scholarships or tuition assistance programs as well. Contact individual schools for details. For more information on special needs schools and resources, please see our listings on page 106.

An occupational therapy service

for children toddler through teen

Year-round OT. Handwriting and sensory summer camps (May through August) Check our website for more information

• Exclusive provider for OT

• Goddard School Crabapple creative traditional learning ~catering to the family and the child • Learning on the Log Programs special needs with special care in an unique therapy gym environment

• Math and Science tutoring for children grades 3-12 Dr. David Orloff PhD Professor (ret.) GA Tech Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L, FAOTA CEO/Executive Director Children’s Special Services, LLC

770-394-9791 • info@childrens-services.com

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COMMON SPECIAL NEEDS TERMS Asperger’s Syndrome: A developmental disorder on the autism spectrum, characterized by high intelligence, impaired social skills and repetitive patterns of behavior and interest.

Individualized Educational Program (IEP): A written statement that outlines the needs of a public school student with learning disabilities and creates a customized plan for meeting those needs.

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): A strain of ADHD (see below) marked by a difficulty maintaining focus or concentration and frequent or consistent fatigue. ADD differs from ADHD in that hyperactivity or impulse-control issues are markedly decreased.

Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): The federal law that governs how states and public education agencies that accept funding under the law address the educational needs of students with disabilities.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A chronic condition that includes hyperactivity, impulsive behavior and difficulty keeping one’s attention focused.

Learning Disability: A neurological condition that affects how one processes information.

Autism: A developmental disorder that affects the ability to communicate and interact with others, accompanied by rigid, repetitive behavior patterns. Dyslexia: A learning disability that impairs one’s ability to read. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC): An organization of independent schools serving students with learning disabilities and differences. Georgia Special Needs Scholarship (GSNS): A school-choice scholarship program for special needs students being served by an IEP in Georgia public schools.

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High Meadows School

TAKING LEARNING

STUDENTS TRAVEL THE COUNTRY AND WORLD TO PUT LESSONS INTO ACTION BY CADY SCHULMAN

S

ometimes education goes beyond the classroom. Learning doesn’t have to be limited to books and lectures. Teachers can also rely on real26

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world experiences to engage students and give them a first-hand look at what is going on beyond the four walls of the classroom.

PHOTO: Courtesy High Meadows School

OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM


Connecting to the world is a vital part of education, says Jason Underwood, head of school at High Meadows School in Roswell. It sparks curiosity and joy in students, which means they pay more attention when they are in class. “We’ve noticed that our kids really are successful academically and socially as a result of getting outside of the classroom and getting outside of themselves,” Underwood says. Learning Beyond the Desk Going outside the classroom might be as simple as a trip to the Atlanta Zoo or the

High Museum of Art, both of which offer activities that are geared to each grade level. Visiting the Atlanta Botanical Gardens’ Rainforest Conservatory could add sensory experiences to the concepts in a geography chapter. In the local community, across the country and around the globe, students can learn more about the outside world—up close and personal. The result is students who are better citizens and more eager to learn. “(Our) kids spend a good deal of time outdoors,” says Underwood of High Meadows School. “We certainly believe in kids playing on their own. We believe it’s absolutely imperative for kids to have that freedom and free play to support them academically. They need to be inspired and have a context of learning that’s well beyond the desk.” In fact, at High Meadows School, the outdoors are viewed as another teacher. On a campus that includes more than 40 acres of farm and woodland, nature is an extension of the school’s classrooms. Students perform environmental studies of ponds and wooded areas, middle school students take an outdoor living skills class as an elective, and students create environmental art, learning how to use natural materials to create art rather than canvas or molding clay. There are also a variety of animals on campus—including bunnies, chickens, goats and sheep—and the students are able to help care for them. In addition to outdoor learning programs, the school also partners with the city’s STAR House Foundation to allow students to work with at-risk children and www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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The Lovett School

Pace Academy

learn first-hand about poverty and how they can help with the needs in the local community. Traveling the World for Environmental Studies Journeying outside the classroom may involve a local field trip—or it could be a trip to a distant locale. Pace Academy’s Isdell Center for Global Leadership focuses on one global theme each year and takes more than 200 students to various global locations. This year’s climate theme will take upper school students from the Buckhead school to several unique locations. Traveling to South Africa, Alaska, and New Zealand, they will see how global warming affects various environments and cultures. “It’s bringing forward an experience, allowing kids to experience the world,” says Tricia Anderson, director of the Isdell Center for Global Leadership. “No teacher can possibly give them that 28

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alone. We can supplement that experience and give them academic focus, but [travel enables them to] experience sitting with people who live it and are in it and doing research with scientists.” Meanwhile, some trip choices at Pace Academy for middle schoolers include Australia to study the acidification of the ocean and its impact on the great barrier reef, and Kenya to promote HIV and AIDS awareness and to look at sustainable agriculture for people affected by the disease. Again, experiences add to learning. Four Pace students who went through an intense selection process will spend 12 days in Churchill, Manitoba, working with scientists at the Northern Arctic Study Center to study the ecosystems of polar bears and environmental issues related to vegetation. “When they’re in the field, they see these subject areas come to life, and they finally get it,” says Anderson


PHOTO: (Top Right) Courtesy High Meadows School

High Meadows School

Partnerships at Home and Abroad Taking education outside the classroom is part of a broader trend among educators to make the lessons students learn more relevant to the real world. “Education is moving away from memorization and rote things,” says Angela Morris-Long, director of civic engagement at The Lovett School in North Atlanta. “We’re moving into solving real world issues and application of that. [We’re] trying to teach kids about the world they live in and take it out of the classroom. I think we all have to be doing a better job of that. The world is an everchanging place.” For the last 24 years, The Lovett School has partnered with Habitat for Humanity to give its students the chance to learn necessary life skills while helping build homes for people in need. This year, the students will build a house oncampus to enable students under the age of 16 to participate as well.

Two years ago, the school took its partnership with Habitat a step further by traveling to Romania to build houses for orphans nearing age 18, the age at which they can no longer live in orphanages. The students saw poverty and the problem of readily available affordable housing first-hand during their 10-day trip. The school also has taken students to Ecuador to study tropical ecology and has held a two-week program during which students spent time away from school learning about poverty right here in the metro Atlanta area. Engaging Students Outside the Classroom Keeping the attention of students is an ongoing challenge in any education environment. Classrooms, books and lectures are important tools for teachers, but hands-on experiences outside the school building are also important ways to engage students. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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S C A H T O N O A L L T S A x Embrace the Arts

x

ENHANCING CONNECTIONS TO OTHER ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES BY MICHELLE BOURG

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Greater Atlanta Christian School

T

he last 15 years have seen educators put more emphasis on test performance in basic subjects, particularly reading and math. But the arts are now making a comeback. New studies on the correlation between the arts and academic achievement support a trend to put the arts back into classrooms both here in Atlanta and across the country. Arts experience has a positive effect on learning in general. According to Dr. Robin Hensley, Elementary Music Specialist at Greater Atlanta Christian School (GACS) in Norcross, “The fine arts enhance and strengthen connections to every other academic discipline.” Numerous studies show a positive connection between hands-on arts experience and

motor skills, verbal learning, test performance and IQ. Students with arts exposure are also more socially adept and exhibit more confidence, motivation, resilience, and innovative thought. “Our strongest supporting evidence is our children,” says Nicole Kelly, Director of Curriculum and Special Projects at Benjamin Preparatory School of the Performing Arts in Atlanta. “When they leave the classroom, they excel in many areas.” The arts can also complement academics and clarify or reinforce key concepts, says Peggy Benseker, Director of Arts at The Galloway School. “Some content may be challenging when presented in a passive or traditional way. Using the arts as a vehicle for teaching enables that www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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content to become accessible through the integration of movement, music, drama and visual arts.” While voluntary national arts education standards are in place, state standards vary widely. Georgia policies stipulate only that opportunities be provided for students to master fine arts competencies, making it necessary for parents to research individual schools and their respective arts programs to find the best fit for their child. At Benjamin Preparatory, the belief is that artistic expression can and should be part of a child’s earliest experiences. “As of now, we are the only Georgia school offering a specialized arts program for this age group,” says Kelly. “We realized God-given talents start early, so we sought out to nurture those talents at a younger age.” Music, dance, literature and foreign lan32

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2017

guage at Benjamin Preparatory are woven into a Christian curriculum for infants through Grade 2. Children create and perform original works for the stage by kindergarten age. Arts and crafts are also a part of daily lessons, and a new computer and video lab will soon enable the children to explore the creative side of technology. As students progress, extracurricular participation expands their artistic horizons. At Greater Atlanta Christian School (GACS), programs are offered during the day in band and orchestra, choir, drama, dance and the visual arts. In addition, the School of Music offers private instruction in vocal and instrumental music after school at the junior and senior high level, and in weekly classes during recess for grades K-12. The School of Ballet offers classes in dance disciplines and is also open to non-GACS students.

PHOTO: Foon Fu/Meagan Francisco Photography

Benjamin Preparatory School


At The Lovett School in northwest At- grades 9-12; non-residents are admitlanta, more than 90% of the K-12 student ted on a fee-paying basis when space body participates in sculpture, paint- permits. The program features concening, drawing, photography, film, theater trations in vocal and instrumental music, arts, technical theater, chorus, orchestra, drama, visual arts, graphic design, audioband, jazz ensemble, or dance classes, video (AV) tech and film, and web design. As the visual arts have gone beyond with applied lessons offered for 14 instruments and voice. Students can take to the canvas and clay, Atlanta-area schools stage in the 650-seat Hendrix-Chenault kept pace. At North Springs, career conTheater, and showcase their work at art centrations are offered in graphic design, web design and AV techexhibits and competitions. nology and film. DeKalb Known for a program School of the Arts students designed to inspire a natuhave shot public service ral love of learning, The announcements (PSAs) for Galloway School integrates the public library. the visual arts, dance, draCreative Career Acadma, and music across disciemy in Roswell offers an plines at every grade level. off-campus alternative for For more in-depth involvestudy in the visual arts, with ment, students can choose classes offered both at the from a number of electives school and online for youth and participate in the Art ages 8-18 with courses in Club, The Galloway Thesuch skills as fashion illusatre Ensemble, Tech Crew, tration and graphic design Band, Orchestra, Guitar Finding the as well as traditional paintEnsemble or Chorus. Paring and sculpture. Their ticipation in most groups right arts C-Fuse program combines requires no experience and program takes academic disciplines and is on a “no cut” basis. series of applied skills The DeKalb School of diligence, but acourses: literature with the Arts in Avondale Esfilmmaking, sciences and tates is part of the DeKalb the results animation, and math and County School District. are more than video game design. Its academically rigorous Finding the right arts program for grades 8-12 worthwhile. program for your child includes vocal and instrumental music, drama, dance, visual arts, takes diligence, but the results are more creative writing, video technology and than worthwhile. Besides its academic multimedia production. Admission to the benefits, arts experience enables young people to appreciate our shared culschool is highly competitive. North Springs Charter High School tural heritage and opens the door to a in Roswell is the only Georgia magnet richer, more rewarding life. Dr. Hensley school for visual and performing arts as expresses it enthusiastically: “…the fine well as science and math. Admission is arts grow wholeness, mental well-being, open to all Fulton County residents in joy, and humanity. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

33


COMMON CORE and

HOW STANDARDS HELP STUDENTS COMPETE GLOBALLY BY KEN ABRAMCZYK AND LARRY ANDERSON

C

ommon Core standards help to ensure that students in the United States are proficient in language arts and mathematics. But what exactly is Common Core, and how is it impacting Georgia students’ educational journey? Georgia is one of 42 states that have embraced the initiative, although some aspects in Georgia have changed, and the standards have a new name. Common Core: The Basics Common Core Standards are a single set of academic expectations of students at each grade level in English/language arts and math. The standards are basically descriptions of needed skills. They do not 34

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2017

include a specified, day-to-day curriculum. Rather, they are a broad outline of expectations from which a curriculum can be created. The recent history of education standards began when the 1983 report “A Nation at Risk” warned of a “rising tide of mediocrity” in education and led many states to create their own set of education standards. However, standards varied widely from state to state, with some states setting the bar higher than others. Governors and state school officers decided to tackle the task of developing nationwide standards and launched Common Core State Standards in 2009. Most states


Nationwide, Common Core standards have become a lightning rod for controversy.

adopted the standards, including Georgia in the fall of 2012. Among the elements of the English/language arts standard are more emphasis on non-fiction reading versus literature and a focus on increasing students’ ability to read complex texts. It also calls on teachers of other disciplines to teach literacy skills related to those disciplines. The math standard prioritizes a deeper focus on fewer topics. Nationwide, the standards have become a lightning rod for controversy. Some say the national standards are another form of federal government overreach (although the standards were developed by the states). Incorporating Local Feedback In 2015, the Georgia State Board of Education made minor changes to the Com-

mon Core language arts and math standards, with most of the revisions in math, clarifying language and sequence. Those changes were completed after incorporating local feedback. Surveys were conducted, the legislative and state boards held listening sessions, and there was a 60-day period of public input. The state board then voted in February 2015 to rename the standards the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE). The board approved new standards in science in March 2016 and social studies in June 2016. In Georgia, state education leaders are quick to point out that standards are developed in Georgia by the state’s own teachers, curriculum leaders, postsecondary educators, and the business community with input from parents and the public. u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

35


The approach by the Georgia Department of Education to develop the GSE is summed up best by Richard Woods, Georgia’s school superintendent: “We want to provide a holistic education, so that Georgia’s children graduate ready to learn, ready to live, and ready to lead.” The standards set challenging instructional goals and support more personalized learning in meeting the diverse educational needs of all students. “Georgia Standards of Excellence provide consistency across the state to ensure equitable access to quality standards for a quality education,” says Pam Smith, associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction. Those standards are personalized for all students, incorporating technology and providing a handson, student-centered, and inquiry-based instructional program. The state board adopts content area standards, but each local school district may expand and enrich content 36

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2017

standards. The Georgia DOE provides instructional resources, but decisions regarding strategies and resources are left to local school districts. State laws governing textbook adoption were changed in 2016 so that local districts decide. The DOE is considering how to support districts in program evaluation without being part of the formal process of adopting and evaluating them. Reviews of the standards are conducted every four years to determine revisions based on teacher and education stakeholder feedback. The Independent School Approach Private schools are not subject to Common Core or Georgia’s state educational standards. However, private school stu-


dents face the same SAT/ACT tests as public school students when they seek to get into college. These and other standardized tests are aligned with Common Core State Standards, so even private schools are needing to adapt. Dr. Jeff Jackson, president of the Georgia Independent Schools Association (GISA), which consists of 160 private, independent and parochial schools with 75,000 students, says that independent schools are “highly student-centered to what the individual needs.” Jackson says Georgia independent schools use the SAT scores and college placement as barometers of scholastic success. “Generally, we do very well with our college placements,” Jackson says. Each member school is fully accredited by at least one of the nationally recognized regional accreditation organizations.

Applying Standards to Student Needs Standards like Common Core are one element to guide students to achieve education success. Georgia has incorporated Common Core concepts into the Georgia Standards of Excellence at the state and local level to improve student achievement. The aim is to address the individual needs of each student with an eye toward achieving higher educational standards that equip more students to compete and succeed in a changing world. FOR MORE INFORMATION • Review Georgia’s educational standards and sample instructional resources at georgiastandards.com • Learn more about the Common Core State Standards initiative at corestandards.org • Information on accreditation of private schools in Georgia is available at gapsac.org

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

37


38

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2017

5

1

For features of independent schools, turn to Education At-a-Glance on pg. 40. For public school system information by county, turn to pg. 88.

2 3

REGIONS FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

metro atlanta area map

N


Alpharetta, Brookhaven, Cumming, Duluth, Dunwoody, Flowery Branch, Johns Creek, Northeast Atlanta, Peachtree Corners

Fairburn, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Metro-Atlanta, South Fulton Downtown, Forest Hills, Kennesaw, Marietta, Smyrna

p.73  REGION 5: Atlanta West

p.69 R  EGION 4: Atlanta South/ Southeast/Southwest

Ansley Park, Athens, Dacula, Decatur, Midtown, Morningside, North Druid Hills, Northeast Atlanta, Stone Mountain

p.62 REGION 3: Atlanta East

p.54 REGION 2: Atlanta North/Northeast

Alpharetta, Buckhead, Crabapple, East Cobb, Marietta, Roswell, Sandy Springs

p.44 REGION 1: Atlanta North/Northwest

Page | Region | Neighborhoods

4

 utoring, Summer Camps and Activities, T Field Trips and Education Programs.

p.97 Educational Resources

p.88 Public School County Guide

Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia

p.79 Boarding Schools

Additional Education Sections

S


Education At-a-Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

164 1,194 13-20

32

168

9

17

90

8

APPLICATION DEADLINE

14

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

260

UNIFORM

29

AP/IB COURSES

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

AVG. CLASS SIZE

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

# STUDENTS

REGION 1: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHWEST

45

Atlanta Girls’ School

47 49

2

404-845-0900

Atlanta International School

404-841-3840

The Cottage School

770-641-8688

Cumberland Academy of Georgia Fulton Science Academy Private School

23

404-835-9000 678-366-2555

3

High Meadows School

770-993-2940

46

Holy Spirit Preparatory School

678-761-7992

48

Johnson Ferry Christian Academy

678-784-5231

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of East Roswell

770-993-8684

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Historic Roswell

770-642-1900

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids at Sandy Plains

770-552-8877

45

Mill Springs Academy

770-360-1336

50

Mt. Bethel Christian Academy

770-971-0245

47

Pace Academy

404-262-1345

49

Porter Academy

770-594-1313

52

Saint Francis School

770-641-8257

52

Swift School

678-205-4988

53

Village Montessori School

770-552-0834

51

The Walker School

770-427-2689

53

The Weber School

404-917-2500

54

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

# TEACHERS

44

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian CC = Catholic E = Episcopal J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian PR = Protestant Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

$23,330 6-12th $21,0003K-12th $24,000 $18,5004-12th $25,450 4-12th $23,400 +PG $11,000- PK$13,000 12th $6,300PK-8th $18,750 $6,318- 6mo$23,365 12th $3,850K-12th $4,500 $5,148- 6wks$14,820 10y $12,320- 8wks$14,000 12y $10,920- 6wks$12,480 13y

$25,215

K-12th

Dec. 3 Jan. 31 Appt. Rolling

• Dec. 4 Rolling

58

455

18

53

388

20

90

560 12-22

CC

B

Jan. 20 Feb.

• •

Jan. Rolling

51

392

50

300 12-22

Appt. Rolling

30

175

Appt. Rolling

30

190 8-18

56

350

11

645

18

• •

14

Appt. Rolling

18

67

124 1,105 12

23

70

10

1-12th

100

750

14

1-8th

52

260

12

$5,000- 18mo$13,000 8th $12,0003y-12th $21,790

P1-12th PK-8th

• Monthly Jan. 27

$22,926 1-12th $9,900$13,800 $22,720$26,180 $19,046$19,871 $16,000$21,000

Nov. Mar. 31

Appt.

• •

ND

Call

Sept. Rolling Oct.

Call

Appt. Feb. 1

Sept. Rolling

• •

Oct.

Appt. Rolling

March

10

165 Varies

123

925

14

44

238

16

33

146

8

30

163

15

36

307

14

12

80 Varies

33

208

10

Appt. Rolling

30

250

15

Appt. Rolling

30

285 4-18

$26,700 9-12th

Oct. Rolling

J

Oct. Feb. 16

Appt. Rolling

• Ongoing Rolling

REGION 2: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHEAST

81

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

$31,940$69,354 $2,940$11,375 $9,734$12,392 $650$1,275 $5,200$14,820

56

Bridgeway Christian Academy

770-751-1972

61

Cornerstone Christian Academy

770-441-9222

59

Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia

770-814-8001

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Alpharetta

770-442-3400

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Cascade

404-629-5437

$10,000

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Duluth/ Suwanee

770-622-2900

$5,148$12,480

40

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

6-12th P3-8th

K-8th 8wks6y 6wks12y 6wks12y 6wks12y

Winter/Spring 2017

• C

Appt. Rolling

Oct.

Call

Appt. Rolling

n/a

Rolling


Education At-a-Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Milton

770-518-6868

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Pleasant Hill Academy

770-813-9600

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Suwanee

770-945-8400

58

Lanier Christian Academy

678-828-8350

55

McGinnis Woods Country Day School

770-664-7764

59

MJCCA Preschools

678-812-3800

9

Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs

770-205-6277

9

Montessori at Vickery

770-777-9131

60

Northwoods Montessori School

770-457-7261

57

Notre Dame Academy

678-387-9385

60

Perimeter School

678-405-2300

56

The Piedmont School of Atlanta

404-382-8200

57 61

62

Pinecrest Academy

770-888-4477

Wesleyan School

770-448-7640

APPLICATION DEADLINE

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

230

20

44

288

20

Appt. Rolling

50

250

18

Appt. Rolling

35

250 Varies

Appt. Rolling

33

246 10-15

60

410

16

70

400

15

115

350

14

$24,000 PK-9th

$6,580- PK3$15,950 12th $16,455K-12th $22,425

• • •

UNIFORM

20

AP/IB COURSES

$4,940- 6wks$9,880 12y $5,670- 6wks$13,260 13y $12,336- 6wks$13,500 12y Infant$11,000 7th $4,000- 6wks$12,000 12y $4,440K-12th $10,245 $9,200- Infant$12,900 8th $3,500- 6wks$14,500 PK $7,000- 14mo$11,000 15y $7,000- 14mo$10,000 9y $11,110- 12mo$15,635 12y $3,940- PK2$15,005 11th $5,868K-8th $11,089

Appt. Rolling

n/a

Rolling

Oct. Ongoing

Appt. Rolling

240 14-30

Ongoing Rolling

180 18-30

• Ongoing Rolling

C

J

Appt. Rolling

30

24

5

93

71

571 15-21

CC

54

550

14

P

5

12

8-10

84

821

20

RC

• Jan. 29 Rolling

138 1,148 16

C

20

Appt. Rolling

• •

Appt. Feb. 13

Appt. Feb. 15

Appt. Rolling

Nov.

Feb.

Nov.

Feb.

REGION 3: ATLANTA EAST

64

Arbor Montessori School

404-321-9304

63

Athens Academy

706-549-9225

9

AVG. CLASS SIZE

37

# STUDENTS

770-476-3877

# TEACHERS

PHONE 770-751-3900

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

37

SCHOOL Kids ‘R’ Kids of Johns Creek/ Morton Road Kids ‘R’ Kids of Johns Creek Parkway

KINDERGARTEN

37

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian CC = Catholic E = Episcopal J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian PR = Protestant Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Atlanta Montessori International 404-325-6777 School

$9,325$18,500 $8,500$17,500 $11,000$18,000 $900$1300/mo. $12,995$19,990

18mo14y

26

285

25

K3-12th

125

955

15

8wks15y InfantPK

40

245 6-30

12

85

10

3yr-7th

48

370

22

13

23

6

Nov. Rolling Ongoing Rolling

66

Canterbury School

404-522-5659

65

The Children’s School

404-873-6985

23

The Cloverleaf School

404-474-3904

$26,000

67

The Drake School

770-879-0313

$546/mo PK-5th

4

$16,900$20,300 $12,070$18,795 $7,975$9,750 $5,300$15,750 $3,640$9,880

PK-8th

40

9

Q

K312th

169 1,800 13

ND

• Jan. 12 Rolling

62

920

19

B

27

152

10

C

42

250

20

65

The Friends School of Atlanta

67

Greater Atlanta Christian School

404-373-8746 770-243-2000

64

Hebron Christian Academy

770-963-9250

63

Heritage Preparatory School

404-815-7711

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Bogart/Athens

706-546-9400

K-7th

K-12th PK4-8th

6wks12y

Varies 15 175

Ongoing

Call

Appt. Feb. 24

Appt. Rolling

C

Appt.

Call

Dec. Feb. 21

• •

Appt. Rolling Nov.

Feb.

Appt. Rolling

Education At-a-Glance Continued on Page 42 u


Education At-a-Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Lawrenceville

770-513-2222

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Medlock Bridge

770-446-8700

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Oakbrook

770-279-8500

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Snellville

770-979-6767

37

$10,400

$4,732$9,724 $17,400K-10th $18,400 $6,000 PK4-8th $9,000

15

52

353

22

30

226

15

Appt. Rolling

30

216

15

Appt. Rolling

28

190

15

May Rolling

40

250

15

42

200

12

15

65

12

Ongoing Rolling Appt. Rolling

66

Midtown International School

404-542-7003

68

Mount Carmel Christian School

770-279-8443

69

REGION 4: ATLANTA SOUTH/SOUTHEAST/SOUTHWEST

71

Arlington Christian School

770-964-9871

$5,775$9,125

PK412th

70

The Bedford School

770-774-8001

$18,750

1-9th

70

Counterpane Montessori School

770-461-2304

$13,000

PS-HS

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of North Peachtree City

770-631-3555

$11,000- 6wks$12,700 12y 6wks$8,840 12y $6,000- PK3$12,000 12th $16,000PK-12th $25,800

• •

Kids ‘R’ Kids of South Fulton

770-774-0206

Strong Rock Christian School

678-833-1200

72

Woodward Academy

404-765-4000

73

• •

34

225 14-16

25

158

10

100 Varies

46

230

19

36

250

15

870

17

Appt. Rolling Appt. Rolling C

C

• •

10

Oct. Rolling

Nov. Rolling

Jan.

Open

Appt. Rolling Appt. Rolling

80

378 2,703 16

Infant-K

• Varies Varies Varies C

6wks2nd

16

90

12

C

6

48

16

ND

14

C

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

Oct. Feb. 28

REGION 5: ATLANTA WEST

74

Atlanta First Day School

404-333-0270

7

Benjamin Preparatory School

770-436-5200

78

Center Academy

770-333-1616

75

Covenant Christian School

770-435-1596

76

First Baptist Christian School

770-442-3254

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of East Cobb/ Johnson Ferry

770-565-2220

37

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Mableton

678-213-2184

76

Mount Paran Christian School

770-578-0182

5

The SAE School

678-239-3200

St. Joseph Catholic School

770-428-3328

77

79

APPLICATION DEADLINE

270

770-339-1300

71

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

35

UNIFORM

AP/IB COURSES

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Sugarloaf

37

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

AVG. CLASS SIZE

37 37

$7,800$8,840 $1,210$11,960 $2,860$10,400

Birth12y 6wks14y 6wks15y 6wks12y 6wks12y 6wks12y

# STUDENTS

$10,400

# TEACHERS

ANNUAL TUITION

770-963-9110

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

Kids ‘R’ Kids of Grayson

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

37

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian CC = Catholic E = Episcopal J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian PR = Protestant Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

Call $7,800$14,500 $5,000$14,680 $5,460$8,990 $2,450$6,748 $11,000$15,000

4-12th K4-8th

22

213

2y-5th

15

124 15-18

InfantPre-K Infants$10,000 2nd $14,698- PK3$16,889 12th $8,750PK-12th $12,250 $6,519K-8th $8,476

45

240 Varies 200 Varies

40

102 1,190 18

46

325 12-15

54

485

26

3

32

8-10

Call

Call

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

PR

Oct.

C

Call

Jan. Rolling Appt. Rolling

ND

Appt. Rolling

Nov. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

Oct. Rolling

RC

BOARDING SCHOOLS

25

The Academy at SOAR

42

828-456-3435

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

$52,000 7-12th

Winter/Spring 2017

Appt. Rolling


Education At-a-Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

86

Chatham Hall

434-432-2941

80

Forman School

860-567-8712

86

George School

215-579-6547

83

Lake Forest Academy

847-615-3267

87

Massanutten Military Academy

877-466-6222

$8,800- 6-12th, $45,000 PG

83

Missouri Military Academy

573-581-1776

$36,300 7th-PG

85

The Outdoor Academy Semester School

828-877-4349

$21,046

82

Riverside Military Academy

770-538-2938

87

St. Margaret’s School

804-443-3357

84

The Stony Brook School

631-751-1800

$15,600$34,840 $18,400$47,900 $45,400$55,900 $10,600$39,500 $27,250$56,500

9-11th

50

143

7

66

210

8

86

540

14

72

430

12

25

108

10

36

250

10

10

24

6

65

500

15

C

10

E

13

C

5-12th

48

467

15

7-12th, PG

54

300

12

15

103

4-8

The Vanguard School

863-676-6091

$46,000 6-12th

860-928-6575

$14,5009-12th $46,722

110 1,000 17-22

APPLICATION DEADLINE

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

Oct. 23 Jan. 15

Oct. 23 Feb. 1

• Ongoing Rolling

Call

Rolling

Bi• Monthly Rolling • Appt. Rolling

• •

Oct. Dec. 15

Jan.

Appt. Rolling

120

81

Jan. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

370

706-754-0400

Appt. Jan. 20

Q

30

845-855-4825

• Ongoing Rolling

E

55

Tallulah Falls School

UNIFORM

8-12th

Trinity-Pawling School

AP/IB COURSES

8

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

AVG. CLASS SIZE

146

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

# STUDENTS

33

7-12th

85

The Woodstock Academy

7-12th

82

80

# TEACHERS

$31,9406-12th $69,354 $20,0009-12th $49,500 9-12th, $70,555 PG $37,7009-12th $55,600 $41,6009-12th $55,350

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

770-394-8177

KINDERGARTEN

PHONE

Brandon Hall School

GRADES/AGES

SCHOOL

81

ANNUAL TUITION

PAGE

PRESCHOOL

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS *KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian CC = Catholic E = Episcopal J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian PR = Protestant Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

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Get your copy today! 770-992-0273 www.newcomeratlanta.com www.atlantaschoolguide.com

43


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHWEST

45

1 GION RE

53 49 3 52 52 51

50 48 50

2 49

53 23

46 45 47

47

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta Girls’ School 45 Atlanta International School 47 The Cottage School 49 Cumberland Academy of Georgia 23 Fulton Science Academy Private School 2 High Meadows School 3 Holy Spirit Preparatory School 46 Johnson Ferry Christian Academy 48

Mill Springs Academy Mt. Bethel Christian Academy Pace Academy Porter Academy Saint Francis School Swift School Village Montessori School The Walker School The Weber School

45 50 47 49 52 52 53 51 53

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Alpharetta Once a small farming community, Alpharetta’s growth has exploded in recent years, and the North Fulton city is now one of Atlanta’s most affluent neighborhoods, creating the perfect mix of country living and lots of city amenities. 44

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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Woodstock Located in Cherokee County, Woodstock is, as locals say, “where modern amenities meet old Southern charm.” Historic Olde Towne pays a continual tribute to Woodstock’s pioneers through vintage shops and good old-fashioned Southern hospitality.


ALPHARETTA • BUCKHEAD www.atlantaschoolguide.com

45


BUCKHEAD


BUCKHEAD www.atlantaschoolguide.com

47


EAST COBB


CRABAPPLE • ROSWELL www.atlantaschoolguide.com

49


MARIETTA


MARIETTA


ROSWELL 52

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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ROSWELL • SANDY SPRINGS

“Free a child’s potential and you will transform him into the world.” - MARIA MONTESSORI

We are committed to: Fostering independence, self-discipline, and responsibility Maintaining traditional AMI principles and curriculum Nurturing your child from toddler through the adolescent years Treating parents as partners in education AMI CERTIFIED, SACS ACCREDIATED 18 MOS. - MIDDLE SCHOOL HALF-DAY & ALL-DAY CLASSES - AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Open House first Wednesday of each month October-March 9:30-10:30.

1610 Woodstock Rd. • Roswell, GA 30075 • www.vmschool.com • 770-552-0834

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

53


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHEAST

9 58 9 57

55

56

59 57

60 81

61

59

61

60

56

Independent Schools

Schools Page Brandon Hall School 81 Bridgeway Christian Academy 56 Cornerstone Christian Academy 61 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia 59 Lanier Christian Academy 58 McGinnis Woods Country Day School 55

2 GION RE

MJCCA Preschools 59 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs 9 Montessori at Vickery 9 Northwoods Montessori School 60 Notre Dame Academy 57 Perimeter School 60 The Piedmont School of Atlanta 56 Pinecrest Academy 57 Wesleyan School 61

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Duluth A successful mix of small-town charm and booming economic growth, Duluth plays host to many major corporations and is also home to numerous golf clubs, private tennis clubs and parks. The city prides itself on accommodating a growing, diverse population. 54

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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Dunwoody A popular community among young and established professionals alike, Dunwoody is often referred to as the “tennis set” neighborhood because of its numerous recreational outlets. Its location provides suburban living close enough to the city.


ALPHARETTA


BROOKHAVEN • ALPHARETTA 56

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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CUMMING • DULUTH www.atlantaschoolguide.com

57


FLOWERY BRANCH


DUNWOODY • JOHNS CREEK

Sowing the Seeds of Organic Learning

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

59


NORTHEAST ATLANTA • JOHNS CREEK 60

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PEACHTREE CORNERS www.atlantaschoolguide.com

61


ATLANTA EAST

3 GION RE

64

67

ATHENS

63

64 66 9 23 63

68

MONROE

66

65

65

67

Independent Schools Schools Page Arbor Montessori School 64 Athens Academy 63 Atlanta Montessori International School 9 Canterbury School 66 The Children’s School 65 The Cloverleaf School 23

The Drake School The Friends School of Atlanta Greater Atlanta Christian School Hebron Christian Academy Heritage Preparatory School Midtown International School Mount Carmel Christian School

67 65 67 64 63 66 68

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Decatur The county seat of DeKalb County, Decatur’s small-town charm revolves around the Courthouse Square, which features trendy restaurants and shopping, entertainment options and special events, including its annual summer beach bash. 62

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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Lawrenceville Located in the heart of Gwinnett County and known as “Crepe Myrtle City,” Lawrenceville is Atlanta’s second oldest city. Its historic downtown square, which has been revitalized, is home to a variety of shops, restaurants and community events.


ANSLEY PARK • ATHENS www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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DECATUR • DACULA 64

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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DECATUR • MIDTOWN www.atlantaschoolguide.com

65


MORNINGSIDE • MIDTOWN 66

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NORTHEAST ATLANTA • STONE MOUNTAIN

67

www.atlantaschoolguide.com


STONE MOUNTAIN

MOUNT CARMEL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

NOW ENROLLING PRE K THROUGH 8TH GRADE

emic A qualit y ioancaind a educat ir onment C hr ist ian env

W Small Class Sizes and Certified Teachers W Outstanding Art and Music Program W Enrichment Classes W S.T.E.M.

Accredited by the Georgia Accrediting Commission

Call 770-279-8443 to schedule a private tour www.mccsch.org • 6015 Old Stone Mountain Rd., Stone Mountain, GA 30087

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4 GION RE

EAST POINT

71

72

DEKALB

Carrolton

70

70

71

Independent Schools Schools Page Arlington Christian School 71 The Bedford School 70

Counterpane Montessori School Strong Rock Christian School Woodward Academy

70 71 72

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE McDonough One of the fastest-growing neighborhoods South of Atlanta, McDonough is the county seat of Henry County and features many historic structures around its town square. The city has ample green space and is a favorite destination for antique shoppers.

Peachtree City A master-planned city comprised of several smaller villages, Peachtree City’s many amenities include golf courses, lakes and an amphitheater. The city is renowned for its network of golf paths connecting its neighborhoods. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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FAYETTEVILLE • FAIRBURN 70

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LOCUST GROVE • SOUTH FULTON www.atlantaschoolguide.com

71


METRO-ATLANTA


BARTOW

ATLANTA WEST

5 GION RE

76

76 77

78 75

7

5

FULTON

74

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta First Day School 74 Benjamin Preparatory School 7 Center Academy          78 Covenant Christian School 75

First Baptist Christian School Mount Paran Christian School The SAE School St. Joseph Catholic School

76 76 5 77

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Acworth Surrounded by two lakes and 12 parks, Acworth offers plenty of recreation opportunities. Located 35 miles northwest of Atlanta, the town is convenient to both I-75 and Highway 41. Acworth is designated as a Georgia Main Street City.

Douglasville Located west of Atlanta on I-20, Douglasville has easy access to all that Atlanta offers. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Downtown Douglasville’s historic district is an outstanding example of a turn-ofthe-century southern railroad town.

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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DOWNTOWN


FOREST HILLS


KENNESAW KENNESAW 76 76

ATLANTASCHOOL SCHOOLGUIDE GUIDE Winter/Spring Winter/Spring2017 2017 ATLANTA


MARIETTA


SMYRNA

1968

Jump Get a on the

competition

advertise in Atlanta School Guide and get results. Call to reserve your spaCe in our next issue!

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ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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BOARDING SCHOOL DIRECTORY

T

here are many benefits of a boarding school education. Boarding schools are an option for students seeking a more independent learning experience. Because students generally live on campus, learning takes place in and out of the classroom almost on a 24-hour basis. When selecting a boarding school, it is important to visit the school campus, but representatives from many boarding schools visit Metro Atlanta throughout the year—contact each school for specific dates.

Boarding Schools Schools Page The Academy at Soar 25 Brandon Hall 81 Chatham Hall 86 Forman School 80 George School 86 Lake Forest Academy 83 Massanutten Military Academy 87 Missouri Military Academy 83

The Outdoor Academy Semester School 85 Riverside Military Academy 82 St. Margaret’s School 87 The Stony Brook School 84 Tallulah Falls School 82 Trinity-Pawling School 85 The Vanguard School 81 The Woodstock Academy 80 www.atlantaschoolguide.com

79


CONNECTICUT 80

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FLORIDA • GEORGIA www.atlantaschoolguide.com

81


GEORGIA 82

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ILLINOIS • MISSOURI www.atlantaschoolguide.com

83


NEW YORK


NEW YORK • NORTH CAROLINA www.atlantaschoolguide.com

85


VIRGINIA • PENNSYLVANIA 86

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VIRGINIA www.atlantaschoolguide.com

87


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

SPOTLIGHT ON METRO ATLANTA’S SCHOOL SYSTEMS

A

variety of improvements and innovative programs in Georgia’s public school systems have resulted in many stellar elementary, middle and high schools across the Metro area. Different school systems feature specialized programs and academic opportunities, such as magnet, charter, vocational or alternative schools to suit their respective students, parents and communities. However, despite variations in programming and academic offerings, all public schools must offer the core curriculum as determined by the Georgia Board of Education. Here is a county-by-county guide to Metro Atlanta’s public school systems. For more information about the Georgia Department of Education, call 404-656-2800 or visit www.gadoe.org. u 88

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CHARTER SCHOOLS


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

BARTOW ADAIRSVILLE WHITE

BARTOW CARTERSVILLE

Number of Schools Elementary 12 Middle 4 High 3 1 Career Academy Total # of Students: 13,560 Student Spending: $8,379

EMERSON

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 505.4 (M) 518.9 (S) 512.0 (SS) 508.9 5th: (ELA) 508.7 (M) 515.3 (S) 507.1 (SS) 503.3 8th: (ELA) 508.8 (M) 504.3 (S) 484.9 (SS) 509.3 2016 Average SAT: 1426 Top 3 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Woodland 1463 Adairsville High 1404 Cass High 1395

Board of Education 770-606-5800 www.bartow.k12.ga.us

What’s New An online health documents management system, CareDox, is helping school nurses deliver care, keeping students safe and connecting with parents.

CHEROKEE

Number of Schools Elementary 24 7 Middle High 6 Centers 3 Preschool Centers 2

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514.5 (M) 527.6 (S) 512.5 (SS) 517.1 5th: (ELA) 521.5 (M) 528.0 (S) 527.0 (SS) 512.4 8th: (ELA) 530.2 (M) 517.3 (S) 496.5 (SS) 521.7

Total # of Students: 41,787 Student Spending: $8,177

Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Woodstock High 1603 Cherokee High 1586 Creekview High 1577 Sequoyah High 1575 Etowah High 1564

CHEROKEE

Board of Education 770-479-1871 www.cherokeek12.net

CLAYTON

CLAYTON

2016 Average SAT: 1577

What’s New The district is developing a consistent and systemic “Instructional Frameworks” plan for teaching and learning to support teacher effectiveness. Number of Schools Elementary 35 Middle 16 High 11 Alternative 3 Total # of Students: 53,408 Student Spending: $7,661

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 480.0 (M) 495.0 (S) 489.2 (SS) 488.5 5th: (ELA) 491.4 (M) 488.8 (S) 487.4 (SS) 489.8 8th: (ELA) 502.2 (M) 484.9 (S) 464.9 (SS) 492.9 2016 Average SAT: 1284 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score M.E. Stilwell School of the Arts 1452 Elite Scholars Academy 1408 Forest Park High 1304 Morrow High 1295 Jonesboro High 1293

Board of Education 770-473-2700 www.clayton.k12.ga.us

What’s New The Enrollment Balancing Project seeks to ensure students attend a school that is not over or under capacity, based on student enrollment, projections, and classroom capacity for each school.

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COBB

Number of Schools Elementary 67 Middle 25 High 16 Charter 2 Special Education Centers 2 Adult Education Center 1 Performance Learning Ctr. 1 Total # of Students: 112,708 Student Spending: $8,343

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 515.4 (M) 522.3 (S) 511.1 (SS) 506.2 5th: (ELA) 524.9 (M) 520.0 (S) 512.0 (SS) 506.2 8th: (ELA) 530.0 (M) 517.5 (S) 497.1 (SS) 516.7 2016 Average SAT: 1520 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Walton High 1730 Lassiter High 1654 Pope High 1648 Wheeler High 1635 Kennesaw Mountain High 1610

Board of Education 770-426-3300 www.cobbk12.org

What’s New New replacement facilities are being built for Brumby Elementary and East Cobb Middle School on land in the 800 block of Terrell Mill Road Southeast.

COWETA

Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 6 High 3 Charter & Career Academy 1 Alternative 2 Centre for Performing and Visual Arts 1

COWETA

Total # of Students: 22,496 Student Spending: $8,149

Board of Education 770-254-2800 www.cowetaschools.org

DEKALB

DEKALB

Board of Education 678-676-1200 www.dekalbschoolsga.org

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 506.5 (M) 520.3 (S) 513.3 (SS) 511.5 5th: (ELA) 510.7 (M) 516.6 (S) 516.8 (SS) 506.7 8th: (ELA) 525.6 (M) 531.2 (S) 515.0 (SS) 519.0 2016 Average SAT: 1497 Top 3 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Northgate High 1531 East Coweta High 1495 Newnan High 1456

What’s New Overall, Coweta County schools began the 2016-17 school year with 97 percent attendance in the first month—better than the state average. Number of Schools Elementary 76 Middle 19 High 22 Charter 9 Total # of Students: 101,482 Student Spending: $9,405

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 490.5 (M) 499.3 (S) 496.3 (SS) 492.5 5th: (ELA) 500.7 (M) 492.9 (S) 488.9 (SS) 489.2 8th: (ELA) 501.3 (M) 492.5 (S) 482.5 (SS) 492.9 2016 Average SAT: 1352 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score DeKalb School of the Arts 1670 Chamblee Charter High 1647 Dunwoody High 1610 Lakeside High 1547 DeKalb Early College Academy 1513

What’s New DeKalb County Schools are among a handful of school systems in the U.S. with a comprehensive social media program that includes dedicated staff experts. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

COBB


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

DOUGLAS

DOUGLAS

Number of Schools Elementary 20 Middle 8 High 5 Centers 2 Total # of Students: 25,034 Student Spending: $9,008

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 501.6 (M) 516.1 (S) 514.4 (SS) 506.2 5th: (ELA) 511.4 (M) 511.7 (S) 520.3 (SS) 506.6 8th: (ELA) 514.0 (M) 513.2 (S) 504.9 (SS) 506.6 2016 Average SAT: 1361 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Douglas County High 1478 Alexander High 1410 Chapel Hill High 1328 1278 Lithia Springs High New Manchester High 1251

Board of Education 770-651-2000 www.douglas.k12.ga.us

What’s New Let’s Talk is an interactive tool on the school district’s website to facilitate communication among the community, parents, and the school system.

FAYETTE

Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 5 High Alternative 1 Open Campus 1

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 528.4 (M) 537.7 (S) 532.8 (SS) 531.1 5th: (ELA) 533.1 (M) 536.4 (S) 545.8 (SS) 527.3 8th: (ELA) 538.6 (M) 542.1 (S) 542.4 (SS) 535.8

Total # of Students: 20,127 Student Spending: $8,572

Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score 1654 McIntosh High Starr’s Mill High 1622 Whitewater High 1535 Sandy Creek High 1469 Fayette County High 1456

FAYETTE

2016 Average SAT: 1567

Board of Education 770-460-3535 www.fcboe.org

What’s New Liberty Tech, a state-chartered public school, has opened at the site of Brooks Elementary School, leased from the Fayette County Board of Education for three years.

FORSYTH

Number of Schools Elementary 21 Middle 10 High 5 Non-Traditional 1 Virtual 1 Alternative 1

FORSYTH

Total # of Students: 46,284 Student Spending: $7,597

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 543.0 (M) 554.6 (S) 532.9 (SS) 534.3 5th: (ELA) 549.2 (M) 560.3 (S) 547.8 (SS) 535.5 8th: (ELA) 549.4 (M) 557.3 (S) 415.6 (SS) 543.3 2016 Average SAT: 1584 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score 1645 South Forsyth High Lambert High 1627 West Forsyth High 1543 North Forsyth High 1525 Forsyth Central 1511

Board of Education 770-887-2461 www.forsyth.k12.ga.us

What’s New Coming in 2018: the new Denmark High School and the Alliance Academy for Innovation of Cumming-Forsyth County, a college and career academy.

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Number of Schools Elementary 59 Middle 19 High 17 Charter 10 Virtual Campus 1

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 515.2 (M) 524.1 (S) 515.3 (SS) 508.7 5th: (ELA) 522.6 (M) 521.8 (S) 517.0 (SS) 506.9 8th: (ELA) 523.6 (M) 512.6 (S) 498.2 (SS) 510.7

Total # of Students: 94,124 Student Spending: $9,534

Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Northview High 1810 Johns Creek High 1730 Alpharetta High 1714 Chattahoochee High 1709 Cambridge High School 1678

FULTON

2016 Average SAT: 1502

Board of Education 470-254-3600 www.fultonschools.org

What’s New Under Armour has a five-year sponsorship to equip 13 of Fulton County’s high schools with discounted jerseys, shoes, apparel and school spirit materials.

GRIFFINSPALDING

Number of Schools Elementary 11 4 Middle High 2 Alternative 2 Academy 1

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 484.4 (M) 499.4 (S) 497.4 (SS) 498.1 5th: (ELA) 497.9 (M) 501.3 (S) 504.1 (SS) 496.7 8th: (ELA) 495.5 (M) 488.6 (S) 481.1 (SS) 490.4

Total # of Students: 10,000 Student Spending: $8,466

Top 2 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Spalding High 1422 Griffin High 1317

2016 Average SAT: 1366

Board of Education 770-229-3710 www.spalding.k12.ga.us

What’s New Administrators are reviewing the 10 recommendations of a recent curriculum audit and will incorporate them into a new strategic plan.

GWINNETT

Number of Schools Elementary 79 Middle 29 High 19 Alternative 4 Special Education 4 Charter 2 1 Virtual School Career/Technology 1

GWINNETT

Board of Education 678-301-6000 www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us

Total # of Students: 178,000 Student Spending: $7,968

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514.4 (M) 525.2 (S) 517.4 (SS) 515.7 5th: (ELA) 521.0 (M) 525.2 (S) 518.3 (SS) 512.7 8th: (ELA) 527.5 (M) 507.5 (S) 473.2 (SS) 528.7 2016 Average SAT: 1503 Top 2 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology 1870 North Gwinnett High 1649 Brookwood High 1572 Mill Creek High 1561 Parkview High 1553

What’s New A new teacher pay plan is aimed at recruiting and retaining the best teachers. Administrators hope to have the plan in place for the 2017-18 school year. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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FULTON


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

HALL HALL

Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 High 6 12 Charter Total # of Students: 27,829 Student Spending: $7,865

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 495.9 (M) 512.3 (S) 502.3 (SS) 502.2 5th: (ELA) 498.7 (M) 505.9 (S) 501.3 (SS) 500.0 8th: (ELA) 510.0 (M) 513.2 (S) 491.2 (SS) 511.7 2016 Average SAT: 1414 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score North Hall High 1494 Flowery Branch High 1459 Chestatee High 1439 Johnson High 1375 1336 East Hall High

Board of Education 770-534-1080 www.hallco.org/boe

What’s New The Hall County School District received the “All-Star School District Award” presented at the 2016 Inaugural Healthy Georgia Awards to recognize its role in health and wellness.

HENRY

Number of Schools Elementary 28 11 Middle High 10 Academies 4

HENRY

Board of Education 770-957-6601 www.schoolwires.henry. k12.ga.us/

PAULDING PAULDING BRASWELL

278

Total # of Students: 41,540 Student Spending: $8,018

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 501.5 (M) 512.2 (S) 505.0 (SS) 504.1 5th: (ELA) 509.7 (M) 504.9 (S) 500.4 (SS) 499.6 8th: (ELA) 515.5 (M) 497.9 (S) 499.0 (SS) 502.4 2016 Average SAT: 1371 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Union Grove High 1514 1489 Ola High Eagles Landing High 1417 Locust Grove High 1404 1377 Woodland High

What’s New Students gain valuable skills and experiences through the Henry County Schools work-based learning program. Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 9 High 5 Alternative 1 Total # of Students: 28,649 Student Spending: $7,903

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 511.5 (M) 522.1 (S) 510.9 (SS) 504.4 5th: (ELA) 514.2 (M) 513.5 (S) 515.8 (SS) 510.8 8th: (ELA) 515.3 (M) 503.4 (S) 515.8 (SS) 519.9 2016 Average SAT: 1391 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score North Paulding High 1464 Paulding County High 1393 1365 East Paulding High South Paulding High 1345 1332 Hiram High

Board of Education 770-443-8000 www.paulding.k12.ga.us

What’s New Responding to population growth in the northeastern part of the county, Shelton Elementary School has added 38 classrooms.

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LE RO CK DA

Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 4 High 3 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Magnet 1 Open Campus 1 Virtual School 1 Total # of Students: 16,568 Student Spending: $8,867

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 505.4 (M) 518.9 (S) 516.0 (SS) 513.5 5th: (ELA) 510.6 (M) 512.1 (S) 516.3 (SS) 504.5 8th: (ELA) 514.6 (M) 501.6 (S) 505.3 (SS) 509.7 2016 Average SAT: 1321 Top 3 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score 1345 Rockdale High Heritage High 1337 Salem High 1239

Board of Education 770-483-4713 www.rockdaleschools.org

What’s New RCPS now offers more than 14 Specialty and Choice programs for families across school attendance zones, including programs focused on STEM and performing/visual arts.

ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 404-802-3500 51,120 www.atlanta.k12.ga.us Student Spending: $14,571 Number of Schools 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Primary/Elementary 50 3rd: (ELA) 494.5 (M) 504.9 (S) 498.0 (SS) 499.8 Middle 11 5th: (ELA) 502.2 (M) 500.4 (S) 497.4 (SS) 497.5 High 11 8th: (ELA) 502.5 (M) 487.7 (S) 481.0 (SS) 494.6 Single Gender 2 Charter 17 Non-Traditional/Evening 6 2016 Average SAT: 1364 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score 1595 Grady High North Atlanta High 1476 1370 Carver Early College Maynard Jackson High 1318 Benjamin Mays High 1239 What’s New In the last two years, a new academic team has focused on improving teaching, especially in the city’s lowest performing schools.

BUFORD CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 770-945-5035 4,548 www.bufordcityschools.org Spending per Student: $10,620 Number of Schools 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Elementary (K-1) 1 3rd: (ELA) 534.9 (M) 536.6 (S) 531.0 (SS) 537.5 Academy (2-5) 1 5th: (ELA) 523.8 (M) 542.0 (S) 542.0 (SS) 528.2 Middle 1 8th: (ELA) 537.4 (M) 537.3 (S) 540.7 (SS) 542.7 High 1 2016 Average SAT: 1530 What’s New A new high school is being built on 30 acres adjacent to the existing high school. It is expected to open for the 2017-18 school year. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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ROCKDALE


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

CITY SCHOOLS OF DECATUR

Board of Education 404-371-3601 www.csdecatur.net Number of Schools Early Learning Center 1 Elementary 5 Middle 1 4th & 5th Grade Academy 1 High 1

Total # of Students: 4,385 Student Spending: $11,487 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 542.8 (M) 544.1 (S) 541.3 (SS) 537.1 5th: (ELA) 550.5 (M) 548.1 (S) 544.4 (SS) 528.6 8th: (ELA) 552.9 (M) 532.4 (S) 545.5 (SS) 536.7 2016 Average SAT: 1571

What’s New The Decatur Education Foundation works to help the youth of Decatur realize their full potential as people, not only in the classrooms of Decatur, but also through learning experiences that contribute to personal development.

GAINESVILLE CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-536-5275 www.gcss.k12.net Number of Schools Elementary 5 Middle 1 High 2

Total # of Students: 7,983 Student Spending: $8,129 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 481.1 (M) 499.0 (S) 491.3 (SS) 491.3 5th: (ELA) 493.2 (M) 495.0 (S) 493.4 (SS) 495.6 8th: (ELA) 499.7 (M) 509.1 (S) 483.9 (SS) 501.1

2016 Average SAT: 1399 What’s New Construction is under way on a new elementary school in the Mundy Mill subdivision—expected to open in August 2017. The new elementary school will have an initial capacity of 750 students and can be expanded to 1,000 students in the future. The two-story building will include 60 classrooms and 130,000 square feet.

MARIETTA CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 770-422-3500 8,900 www.marietta-city.org Student Spending: $10,452 Number of Schools Elementary 7 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Sixth Grade 1 3rd: (ELA) 511.0 (M) 522.5 (S) 515.3 (SS) 509.9 Middle 1 5th: (ELA) 516.9 (M) 516.8 (S) 515.5 (SS) 504.7 High 1 8th: (ELA) 513.7 (M) 502.0 (S) 505.6 (SS) 519.3 Magnet 1 Alternative 1 2016 Average SAT: 1431 What’s New The Board of Education of the City of Marietta is holding a nationwide search for a new Marietta City Schools (MCS) Superintendent. Emily Lembeck, who served as superintendent for more than 11 years, is retiring on Dec. 31, 2016. The Board of Education is surveying parents, teachers and staff about the qualities they want in a new superintendent.

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EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES Ways to Enhance your Child’s or Student’s Learning

Index

Tutoring & Study Skills 98 Summer Camps & Activities 98 Field Trips & Education Programs 101 www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES • TUTORING 98

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES


SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES 100

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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS

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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS 102

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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS

GoT a Fabulous

Field Trip? Let teachers and parents know how to find it!

Call today to advertise in our next issue.

770-992-0273

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Atlanta’s Leading Education Resource


ADVERTISER INDEX Boarding Schools The Academy at SOAR......................................25 Brandon Hall School...........................................81 Chatham Hall......................................................86 Forman School....................................................80 George School....................................................86 Lake Forest Academy.........................................83 Massanutten Military Academy.........................87 Missouri Military Academy.................................83 The Outdoor Academy Semester School.........85 Riverside Military Academy...............................82 St. Margaret’s School..........................................87 The Stony Brook.................................................84 Tallulah Falls School...........................................82 Trinity-Pawling School........................................85 The Vanguard School.........................................81 The Woodstock Academy....................................8

Field Trips & Education Programs Alliance Theater................................................104 Georgia Aquarium............................................101 Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (INK)........104 LEGOLAND Discovery Center Atlanta...........101 Lookout Mountain Attractions.........................102 Mayfield Dairy Farm.........................................102 Pine Mountain Gold Museum.........................103 Southeastern Railway Museum........................104 The Southern Museum of Civil War & Locomotive History.......................................103 Zoo Atlanta........................................................100

Independent Schools Arbor Montessori School...................................64 Arlington Christian School.................................71 Athens Academy.................................................63 Atlanta First Day School.....................................74 Atlanta Girls’ School...........................................45 Atlanta International School..............................47 Atlanta Montessori International School............9 The Bedford School...........................................70 Benjamin Preparatory School..............................7 Bridgeway Christian Academy..........................56 Canterbury School..............................................66 Center Academy.................................................78 The Children’s School.........................................65 The Cloverleaf School........................................23

Cornerstone Christian Academy.......................61 The Cottage School...........................................49 Counterpane Montessori School......................70 Covenant Christian School................................75 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................23 The Drake School...............................................67 First Baptist Christian School...............................7 The Friends School of Atlanta...........................65 Fulton Science Academy Private School............2 The German School of Atlanta..........................16 Greater Atlanta Christian School.......................67 Hebron Christian Academy................................64 Heritage Preparatory School.............................63 High Meadows School.........................................3 Holy Spirit Preparatory School..........................46 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....59 Johnson Ferry Christian Academy....................48 Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy........................37 Lanier Christian Academy..................................58 McGinnis Woods Country Day School.............55 Midtown International School...........................66 Mill Springs Academy........................................45 MJCCA Preschools.............................................59 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............9 Montessori at Vickery...........................................9 Mount Carmel Christian School........................68 Mount Paran Christian School...........................76 Mt. Bethel Christian Academy...........................50 Northwoods Montessori School........................60 Notre Dame Academy.......................................57 Pace Academy....................................................47 Perimeter School................................................60 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................56 Pinecrest Academy.............................................57 Porter Academy..................................................49 The SAE School....................................................5 Saint Francis School...........................................52 St. Joseph Catholic School ...............................77 Strong Rock Christian School............................71 The Suzuki School...............................................16 Swift School.........................................................52 Village Montessori School.................................53 The Walker School..............................................51 The Weber School..............................................53 Wesleyan School.................................................61 Woodward Academy..........................................72 Continued on Next Page u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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ADVERTISER INDEX (Continued from Previous Page)

Montessori Schools Arbor Montessori School...................................64 Atlanta Montessori International.........................9 Counterpane Montessori School......................70 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....59 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............9 Montessori at Vickery...........................................9 Northwoods Montessori School........................60 Village Montessori School.................................53

Public Schools & Charter Schools Cherokee Charter Academy..............................89 Coweta Charter Academy..................................89

The Bedford School...........................................70 Center Academy.................................................78 Children’s Special Services.................................24 Circus Arts Therapy............................................23 The Cloverleaf School........................................23 The Cottage School...........................................49 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................23 Mill Springs Academy........................................45 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................56 Porter Academy..................................................49 Squirrel Hollow Day Camp...............................100 Swift School.........................................................52

Summer Camps & Activities Resources & Services Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates...............17 Caron Treatment Centers...................................19 Dare 2 Care.........................................................17 Georgia Lottery........................ Inside Back Cover Pay it Forward Scholarships............... Back Cover The School Box...................................................68

Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education......19 Atlanta Riding Club............................................98 Circus Arts Institute............................................23 High Meadows Summer Day Camp..................99 Squirrel Hollow Day Camp...............................100 U.S. Space & Rocket Center: Space Camp......13 Zoo Atlanta........................................................100

Special Needs & Learning Difficulties

Tutoring & Study Skills

The Academy at SOAR......................................25

In-Home Tutors of Atlanta.................................98

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IT DOESN’T TAKE A GENIUS TO KNOW THAT WHEN YOU PLAY,

GEORGIA’S KIDS WIN.

It’s elementary, actually. See, every time you play the Lottery, you’re helping our kids get one step closer to their dreams. For over 20 years the Georgia Lottery has contributed more than $17.8 billion to education. On top of that, more than 1.7 million HOPE scholars have gone to college and more than 1.4 million four-year-olds have attended a Lottery-funded Pre-K Program. Add those numbers up and, well, let’s just say that’s a hair-raising number of happy kids.

galottery.com


Atlanta School Guide | Winter/Spring 2017  

Atlanta’s leading education resource provides a wealth of information for parents and educators.

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