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Atlanta’s Leading Education Resource Winter/Spring 2018

BALANCING

SPORTS AND

LIFE

How Athletics Benefit Your Child On and Off the Field

ALSO INSIDE:

High-Tech Learning Field Trips and Student Tours The STEM and STEAM Advantage COVERING:

Independent | Boarding | Public | Charter | Early Education | Summer Camps | Field Trips and More


CONTENTS

WINTER/SPRING 2018

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FEATURES

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In Every Issue

STEM and STEAM Education With today’s focus on STEM and STEAM it’s crucial to grasp how they benefit your child—and what skills they demand. Get the picture here.

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Technology in the Classroom Technology is transforming our lives and our schools—here’s what you need to know about its use in the classroom.

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Balancing Sports and Life Youth sports benefit your child’s health, social skills and school performance: here’s how to get him or her in the game.

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6 How to Use This Guide 10 Critical Communication 16 Special Needs Resources 21 Headmaster’s Corner Catherine Trapani of The Piedmont School

36 Independent School Guide Boarding School Directory 74  81  Public Schools by County 89  Educational Resources Tutoring, summer camps and activities, field trips and more

97 Advertiser Index


HOW TO

Use This Guide Find an Independent School in

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1

Easy Steps!

Metro Atlanta Area Map To search for independent schools by region or neighborhood, turn to page 34 and use the color-coded map to direct you to each region’s page number.

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Education At a Glance

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Region Maps and Listings

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Once you’ve selected your region of interest, the charts beginning on page 36 include a comparison of features for each school in that region, along with the page number for each school’s ad.

Divided into regions of Atlanta, the color-coded maps beginning on page 39 provide each school’s location and page number for their ad.

Advertiser Index To find a school or resource by name, turn to the advertiser index on page 97 to find the appropriate page number.

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We gratefully thank our advertisers for their support of the Atlanta School Guide. Publisher/President PATRICK KILLAM Editor MICHELLE BOURG Marketing & Promotions JEFF THOMPSON Account Directors LACEY JAMES HEATHER KEARNS Contributing Writers MICHELLE BOURG PAMELA BRIGGS

TO ADVERTISE CALL

770-992-0273 Space closing for Summer/Fall 2018 issue: April 13, 2018 Atlanta School Guide, Winter/Spring 2018, Volume 13, Issue 1. Published bi-annually by Killam Publishing, Inc., 200 Market Place, Suite 230, Roswell, GA 30075. Atlanta School Guide assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. Information may have changed since press time, so please verify all information when contacting a school or educational resource. Reproduction in whole or in part of any elements of this publication is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. © 2018 Killam Publishing, Inc. For additional copies, further information or advertising, please contact:

KILLAM PUBLISHING, INC. P: 770-992-0273 F: 844-706-1545 info@killampublishing.com www.atlantaschoolguide.com


Critical Communication

Trends and Happenings in Georgia Education What You Need to Know to Stay Up to Date With Atlanta and Georgia Education 2017 Blue Ribbon Schools Announced Seven metro Atlanta schools were among the 342 schools named as National Blue Ribbon Schools by the U.S. Department of Education: Atlanta Academy, Big Creek Elementary, Brookwood Elementary, Dickerson Middle, Dodgen Middle, Kedron Elementary and Riverwatch Middle School. GSMST Receives Innovation Grant The Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science and Technology has been awarded a $30,000 grant to transform some of its classrooms into innovation labs for the study of design, fabrication and engineering design. Japanese-Language School Coming to Gwinnett International Charter Academy, a dual-language charter school, will open 10

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in Peachtree Corners next fall. The school will offer instruction in both English and Japanese while teaching Georgia students about Japanese culture. Local Schools Score Top ACT Scores Students at metro Atlanta high schools posted the state’s highest scores in the ACT exam for the 2016-2017 school year. The Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology, Northview High, Walton High, Johns Creek High and Chattahoochee High School placed in the top five scores. Cristo Rey Students Score Corporate Jobs More than 500 students from Cristo Rey Atlanta Jesuit High School will work this school year at companies including Turner Sports, Southern Company, UPS and Emory Hospital as part of the

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school’s corporate workstudy program. APS Launches New Website Atlanta Public Schools unveiled a new website, apinsights.org, with data on test scores, enrollment, graduation rates and more. The site will give parents an understanding of how their children’s school compares to others in the district and across the state. AIS Builds New Learning Center Atlanta International School has begun construction on a new three-story Primary School Learning Center that will include a 9,000-squarefoot courtyard to be used for outdoor classrooms. The Center is the first phase of the school’s “Think Forward Campaign”campus master plan and will open in August, 2018.


Critical Communication

Education 101

Terms to Know in Your Search for the Right Educational Experience for Your Child CHARTER SCHOOL  A tax-supported public school that is independently run, allowing for greater educational choice for parents in the community. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING  An educational approach using applied, hands-on methods of learning. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB)  A specifically designed comprehensive academic program emphasizing traditional disciplines while instilling a global perspective in its students.

MAGNET SCHOOL  A public school that offers a specific or enhanced curriculum designed for students of special interest or ability. MONTESSORI  A school following the principles developed by Dr. Maria Montessori focusing on the unique individuality, self-reliance and independence of children. SPECIAL NEEDS A school or program for children who have mild to moderate learning differences. It usually features smaller class sizes, individualized attention and multisensory learning methods.

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ACCREDITATION  Official certification guaranteeing that a school provides an education of a reasonably high quality. Schools must prove levels of quality and maintain continuous standards of improvement. ACT An alternative to the SAT, this national college admissions examination consists of subject area tests and an optional 40-minute writing test. ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS (AYP) A measure of year-to-year student achievement on required statewide assessments. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION  Education that applies to children from birth to age 8, focusing on their physical, emotional, sensory, communicative, cognitive and social needs. EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT (ESSA) A federal law designed to ensure that all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a high-quality education. GEORGIA MILESTONES Tests designed to measure how well students in grades 3 through 12 acquire the skills and knowledge outlined in the state-adopted content standards. HOPE SCHOLARSHIP (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally)  A scholarship in Georgia that rewards


academically achieving students with financial assistance to attend a degree, diploma, or certificate program at eligible public and private Georgia colleges and universities. PSAT  A standardized test that offers students practice for the SAT Reasoning Test and allows them to qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Program. SAT  This standardized test measures the critical thinking, writing and mathematical reasoning skills of students planning to attend college. SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS TEST (SSAT) A standardized admissions test that many independent and private schools require prospective students in grades 3-11 to take in order to be considered for enrollment.

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Critical Communication

Deciphering Associations and Organizations Many local and national organizations work to bring out the best in summer camps and public, private and boarding schools by identifying schools that meet certain standards through accreditation. These groups also set policies, research educational advancements and offer services to the educational communities both in Atlanta and in Georgia. The following are just some of the associations and organizations you should know in your search for the best educational experience for your child. AdvancED www.advanc-ed.org The parent organization for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, AdvancED advances education excellence through accreditation and school improvement.

the professional development needs of boarding schools and provides information to potential students and their families.

The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS) www.boardingschools.com This organization of 300 boarding schools serves 14

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Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) www.ami-global.org Recognizes and provides support, training and development to schools that strongly adhere to Montessori method principles and practices.

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Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools (AAAIS) www.aaais.org Although not an accrediting agency, AAAIS is an affiliation of independent schools and operates under analogous principles and a common code of ethics. Department of Education (DOE) www.gadoe.org A statewide, policy-driven organization governing the public school system of education in Georgia for grades K-12. Georgia Association of Christian Schools (GACS) www.gacs.org Uses generally accepted indicators of quality, voluntary self-improvement and peer review to measure Christian schools. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC) www.gapsec.org This state organization of independent schools for students with learning disabilities maintains a code of ethics and shares information about programs at member schools. Georgia Independent School Association (GISA) www.gisaschools.org An association of private, independent and parochial


schools throughout the state whose mission is to advance excellence and collaboration among private, independent and parochial schools.

maintain the independent nature of each member school by promoting high standards of educational quality and ethical behavior.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) www.naeyc.org The NAEYC focuses on the quality of educational and developmental services for children, from birth to age 8, including day care and pre-K centers.

National Association of Private Special Education Centers (NAPSEC) www.napsec.org Represents private specialized education programs and their leaders by promoting high-quality programs and services for individuals with disabilities and their families.

National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) www.nais.org This association works to

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) www.sacs.org Member schools meet research-based standards and maintain continuous school improvement and quality assurance. Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS) www.sais.org Members meet quality standards, receive peer evaluation and implement an individualized school plan focused on strategic improvement.

For more information about these and other organizations and associations that ensure quality education among camps and schools, visit the websites of the Georgia Department of Education (www.gadoe.org) or the U.S. Department of Education (www.ed.gov).

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Critical Communication

Special Needs

Resources Information on Learning Disabilities, Education Options and More What is a Learning Disability? A learning disability is a neurological disorder that affects how your child processes certain information. Children with learning disabilities are as smart as or even smarter than other children, but may face challenges with reading, writing, spelling, reasoning and other functions. As a result, they often struggle to achieve in traditional classrooms. There are many types of learning disabilities, from Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and dyslexia to more serious forms such as autism. 16

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What is a Special Needs School? Special needs schools are those that serve children who struggle with learning disabilities or don’t perform well in a conventional school environment. These schools use alternative approaches to instruction in order to help children learn more effectively and also achieve success in the classroom and in social settings. Other schools don’t specifically target those with learning disabilities, but may teach different kinds of students who have had difficulty learning in a typical class-


room setting. Others may teach average or even above-average learners while also offering additional programs and classes for students with learning differences.

him or her evaluated by a mental health professional. A diagnosis is crucial in order to address the child’s educational needs.

After a Diagnosis: What’s Next? How to Tell if Your Child Has a Special If your child is diagnosed with a learnNeeds Situation ing disability and attends public school, First, it’s important to identify your child’s talk with the principal, school counselor issues. Students who exhibit average or or another administrator about developabove-average intelligence but often ing an Individualized Education Program seem distracted and don’t perform well (IEP). All public schools are required to in a traditional classroom create an IEP for students setting may be struggling with learning disabilities with dyslexia, Asperger’s who meet special educasyndrome, ADHD or some A professional tion requirements. An IEP other disorder that affects is a document that specievaluation is their ability to learn effecfies your child’s learning tively. Also, disruptive or crucial in order situation and educaaggressive children may tional needs and outlines to evaluate be exhibiting frustration a course of action for brought on by a learning teachers and other proyour child’s disability. fessionals to follow to educational If you suspect your child help make sure your child may have a learning dislearns to the best of his or needs. ability, it’s critical to have her ability. u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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Critical Communication If you feel your local public school isn’t the right environment for your child, or simply want to explore all your options, there are many quality independent schools in the metro Atlanta area devoted to helping children with special needs and learning issues. Visit the Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children’s website (www.gapsec.org) or our listings for special needs schools on page 98 to help you with your search.

needs education. Independent special needs schools can offer more individualized instruction and a more structured and predictable environment, and are likely to address nonacademic issues such as social skills and self-esteem. As you begin searching for the right school for your child’s situation, here are some questions to keep in mind: • Will your child fare better in a school that focuses on his or her specific learning disability, or would you rather that he or she be able to interact with students with a wide range of learning capabilities? • Does the school serve a specific age range, or work with students on all grade levels? Many students with learning disabilities have trouble transitioning to new schools.

How Do I Find the Right School? All special needs schools are not the same. The first step is to identify those schools that can address your child’s specific learning difficulty, and offer the level of special needs instruction that you (and perhaps a professional) feel is best for your child. You may be more comfortable enrolling your child in a school that focuses specifically on his or her issue, or you may want a more diverse environment where he or she can interact with many different kinds of students. Familiarize yourself with the different options offered by each kind of school. Traditional indeIdentify those pendent schools that offer special needs schools that programs as part of a can best larger curriculum can offer that kind of enviaddress your ronment, but may have larger class sizes than child’s specific schools that specialize learning in specific learning disabilities. These kinds of difficulty. schools may also focus more on academics than on the therapeutic aspects of special 18

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Critical Communication • D  oes the school offer a variety of extracurricular activities, including arts and sports programs? •  Is the school accredited? If so, by which organizations? • Is the staff certified to instruct special needs children, or those with your child’s specific learning difficulty? • Does the school focus more on academics or on addressing the child’s therapeutic needs? Financial Assistance Many independent special needs schools participate in the Georgia Special Needs Scholarship program (GSNS), a school choice program available to special needs students attending Georgia public schools. The program offers funds to off-

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set tuition and fees at participating private schools authorized by the State Board of Education. According to the Georgia Department of Education, scholarship amounts range from $2,500 to $13,500, with an average amount of around $6,000. The Quality Education Expense Credit program provides another scholarship option. Donations are made to an organization known as a Student Scholarship Organization (SSO), which uses the money to award scholarships to students in pre-K through grade 12. Many schools also offer their own scholarships or tuition assistance programs as well. Contact individual schools for details. For more information on special needs schools and resources, please see our listings on page 98.


Headmaster’s Corner

Catherine Trapani Head of School, The Piedmont School of Atlanta

What is your educational philosophy? No child chooses to fail. Given the proper understanding of their individual strengths and weaknesses, a thoughtful curriculum and thorough knowledge by teachers of teaching techniques, children may progress and succeed. What do you love most about your job? I love getting to know children and their families. Helping children to grow, achieve, and discover their talents is thrilling. My work leads me on a continuing adventure of learning and discovering new challenges. How can parents best contribute to the education process? Children thrive when parents have faith in their abilities and recognize that children do not choose to have problems. Parents should set high expectations for children and teachers when they have empowered them with all needed support.

PHOTO: Clint McGuire

Since 2011, Catherine Trapani has been Head of School and CEO of The Piedmont School, serving challenged children in grades K-high school. Previously, she was Director of Education at Atlanta’s Marcus Institute and Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Chicago.

How is the field of education changing? More than ever, education is constantly balancing the increasing quantity and speed of information with the basic principles of child development, which still require time. What advice would you offer parents about their children’s education? Foster independence. Cheer advancement. Promote interests and talents. Look at your children straight on and envision them 15 years from now. Work to enhance the gifts you may see. THE ESSENTIALS: THE PIEDMONT SCHOOL OF ATLANTA Emphasis: Addressing the individual needs of challenged children. Year Founded: 2011 Grades: K-High School 
 Students: 15 Avg. Class Size: 6-8 Tuition: $24,750

Accreditations or Affiliations: Georgia Accrediting Commission (GAC) Location: 4484 Peachtree Road Brookhaven, GA Contact: 404-382-8200, thepiedmontschoolofatlanta.org

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GAINING EXPLORING THE BENEFITS OF STEM AND STEAM EDUCATION BY MICHELLE BOURG

A

well-rounded curriculum used to be “The Three Rs,” or “reading, writing and arithmetic.” Today, STEM, and STEAM are becoming the dominant measure of what students need to learn. But what exactly are STEM and STEAM, and how are they different from traditional learning? Do they offer any real benefit to your child? A closer look shows that STEM and STEAM education is an approach that offers students real benefits and will change how they learn and prepare for the future. Focusing on Math and Science: STEM The history of STEM dates back to the beginning of the “space race,” and the 22

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call for a renewed focus on science and mathematics education in response to the launch of Sputnik by the then Soviet Union. As technological advances grew exponentially over the next four decades, educators renewed a commitment to science and math to address a perceived achievement gap in these subjects between U.S. students and their international counterparts. The National Science Foundation developed the now-universal acronym STEM in 2001 to describe guidelines for the teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. STEM uses an interdisciplinary, project-based approach to teach science and math and show their application to the


“real world,” as opposed STEM uses a batting averages, calculatto the traditional approach ing the angles of baselines project-based and analyzing the different of addressing them as separate textbook subjects. In of soil found on the approach to types Georgia, STEM education playing field. Students preis defined as “an integratteach science sented their findings to fans ed curriculum (as opposed and players; the project was and math. to science, technology, enso successful that the coungineering and mathematics taught in iso- ty will roll it out to other schools this year. lation) that is driven by problem solving, A STEM-oriented curriculum covers discovery, exploratory project/problem- every phase of education from Pre-K to based learning and student-centered de- college. At the elementary level, introducvelopment of ideas and solutions.” tory classes introduce structured inquiry Several Cobb County middle schools and problem solving, while presenting a recently applied STEM principles by us- general awareness of STEM-based fields ing the construction of SunTrust Park as and occupations. This awareness is more the inspiration for projects on computing strongly emphasized as students progress www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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into more challenging classes in middle school, with a special effort to reach underrepresented populations, including female students. Practical applications are emphasized at the high school level, with a concentration on preparing for postsecondary education and employment. The current emphasis on STEM in schools worldwide is in response to a pressing need. In the U.S. alone, projections predict a need for more than eight million workers in STEM-related jobs, and the manufacturing sector alone faces a shortage of 600,000 skilled employees. Students graduating with these skills find a wide range of opportunities, especially in computing, expected to produce more than 70 percent of jobs by next year. Significant numbers of jobs are also being created in engineering, the physical and life sciences, and mathematics. However, the emphasis placed on STEM over the past 15 years has not yet positioned the country to meet this need. The U.S. Dept. of Education reports that only 16% of high school students report an interest in a STEM-related career and 24

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A STEM curriculum covers educational phases from Pre-K to college. have the necessary proficiency in mathematics. Almost two thirds of high school freshmen that declare an interest in a STEM-related field lose interest before they graduate high school. In response to this, government and industry have been partnering to motivate more students to develop an interest in STEM fields and educate more teachers qualified to teach these subjects. The Committee on Stem Education (CoSTEM), which is made up of 13 separate agencies including the U.S. Department of Education, is creating a joint national strategy for federal funding of K-12 STEM programs, increasing public and youth engagement, and enriching postsecondary STEM education.


Adding an “A”: Enter STEAM Education As important as STEM education is, it’s been pointed out that it leaves out the arts and humanities, which many believe are equally important in addressing the needs of a 21st-century economy. In 2006, Georgette Yakman, a graduate student at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, added an “A” to the acronym to represent the liberal arts and developed the framework for STEAM education: “Science and technology, interpreted through engineering and the arts, all based in a language of mathematics.” The idea soon found its way into curricula around the globe. Using the STEAM approach, students might use their science studies to create education materials for that subject, or

create art designed for 3D viewing. At the Charles R. Drew Charter School in Atlanta, 3D printing is used across subjects and grade levels to apply classroom learning to the creation of real-world models. Some STEM proponents point to the current issues with student engagement with STEM to argue that science and math should remain the sole focus of modern education in order to bolster U.S. economic competitiveness, and that adding the arts detracts from this focus. Advocates of STEAM education argue that inclusion of the liberal arts equips scientists to think abstractly, adds a human element and addresses the problem of declining student engagement by fostering inclusion of “right brain” students. A STEAM education enables an architect to design structures that are visibly pleasing as well as practical and environmentally sustainable, or a textile designer to incorporate technological elements such as solar receptivity into attractive fabrics. To STEAM advocates, it’s not a case of adding creativity, but blending it with scientific thinking. Given the added appeal for children of a curriculum that includes the arts, and the expanded arena of realworld applications, it seems clear that STEAM elements will play an increased role in the future. Both STEM and STEAM allow students to think in new ways and to see the practical applications of their classwork. As the advantages of the integrated, practical approach of both STEM and STEAM continue to become a part of the curriculum in both public and private schools, the acronyms will lose their importance. Soon, students will only know either of these approaches as just “school.” For more information on STEM and STEAM education in Atlanta, see stemgeorgia.org. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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TECH

Classroom IN THE

HOW TECHNOLOGY IS HELPING KIDS LEARN BY PAMELA BRIGGS

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he pencil was the latest invention 450 years ago. Now we have devices that know our schedules, robots that learn and self-driving vehicles are coming down the road. It’s become increasingly important to ask ourselves: How do we choose good tech tools, and 26

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then use them carefully and wisely to do the job well? Technology has moved into the classroom as well, transforming the educational process for both students and teachers. Across the country, the majority of schools have adopted a “blended


learning” model, in which Project-based learning, Going online at least part of the curricuwhich itself frequently uses lets students technology such as digital lum is presented through online methods. As “ed and 3D printers, take control of cameras tech” becomes standard, is a revolution in education parents need to be pretheir learning. made possible by technolpared to ask new questions ogy: instead of merely beand learn new things as they assess how ing consumers of information, students it’s being used as an integral part of their are getting away from screens to become children’s education. creators, applying their knowledge to inOne of the major benefits of a blend- novation in the real world. It also allows ed learning approach is that students can students to practice soft skills such as colhave more control over the scheduling, laboration and leadership. location and pace of their learning: stuThe Children’s School, an independents who need more time with a con- dent school for children age 3 to eighth cept can watch Web-based content as grade in Atlanta, uses project-based many times as necessary, while those who learning at the core of its teaching style. are ready can find additional resources In a recent project, third-grade students for more research. This capability has partnered with engineering students given rise to the adoption of a “flipped from Georgia Tech to build machine proclassroom,” in which students are intro- totypes as part of their studies in weather duced to concepts through instructional and the forces of motion. Together with content that is usually delivered online their partners, the youngsters designed outside of class. Class time is then spent blueprints for machines that could move applying the concepts through discus- relief supplies between two points in the sion by the class or collaboration on proj- aftermath of a hurricane. They then conects and experiments. structed their plans using everyday rewww.atlantaschoolguide.com

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cyclable items such as paper towel rolls and plastic bottles. They completed the project by writing papers outlining how their machines operated using different forces of motion. Tech is also now the preferred method for handling the business of learning, and parents will need to know how to use the tools their children use to access their schoolwork as well as how to connect with their teachers. Students in Atlanta Public Schools and many area independent schools use myBackpack, a single-sign on portal that keeps track of passwords and enables students to conveniently sign on to school-related sites and applications across devices at any time. Parents of Atlanta public school students have access to class schedules, grades, attendance records and more through the Campus Parent Portal. We’re all tempted to add the latest tech to our lives, but for schools as well as individuals, it’s wiser to take time to review new options to ensure a genuine benefit. Schools should have a clear technology implantation plan that measures a number of factors: Is the device 28

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(application, program) easy to access? Does it adapt to existing routine? Does it support the curriculum and connect to relevant content? Does it promote interactive use and collaboration? What kind of learning curve is required for instructors? The content should drive the tech, not the other way around: There may be times when simple text conveys a message more efficiently than a video or PowerPoint presentation. When it comes down to it, technology is a tool, and its ultimate value is dependent on the vision and proficiency of those in charge of implementing it.


Kids may be using tablets in class, but if they’re only being used to complete online worksheets or read text, it’s a missed opportunity. At Atlanta Public Schools, Ed Tech specialists work with teachers to introduce new technology tools and help them best integrate these tools into the learning experience in a way that promotes “The Four Cs:” Critical Thinking, Creativity, Communication and Collaboration. Teacher training is vital, and parents should find out how their child’s teachers are trained in new technology and what professional development resources are available to them. With the increased reliance on online learning have come concerns about the responsible use of computers, children’s privacy and cyberbullying. The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) mandates that any external website requiring the establishment of an account by a student under the age of 13 requires parental consent. Parents should expect to provide this consent before their child is allowed to participate in programs requiring these accounts. Many area schools and districts participate in a digital citizen-

ship curriculum designed by Common Sense Education to teach kids about the safe and responsible use of technology, including issues of privacy and bullying. Parents will want to know how their child’s school addresses these issues. Of course, the reliance on tech means that a school’s technical capabilities have become of primary importance, and it’s important to find out what a school’s technical resources are. For example, are devices such as tablets shared in a media lab, provided individually to each student in what is known as 1:1 technology, or used on a “BYOD” basis? What hardware and software options are available? Does the school offer reliable and secure high-speed WiFi? Does it have a dedicated and trained IT staff to maintain its infrastructure? Whatever the tools used, the job is learning, not only about school subjects, but also about the world and how to interact with it. Using technology in the classroom helps make it easy and fun for young people to discover new things, revving up their enthusiasm for knowledge and inspiring them to find new ways to apply it in their lives. QUESTIONS TO ASK 1. What access will my child have to technology at school? Is it accessed through a shared learning lab, through a 1:1 model, or BYOD? If shared, how much time per week will he/she have to use it? 2. How are new technologies assessed before adoption? 3. How is the technology integrated into learning goals? 4. How are teachers trained to use this technology? 5. What type of tech support is available? 6. How reliable is the WiFi connection at the school? 7. Do teachers use online systems–email, dedicated portals and social media–to communicate with parents?

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BALANCING SPORTS AND LIFE HOW TO SUPPORT YOUR CHILD ON AND OFF THE FIELD

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BY MICHELLE BOURG

hether it’s Pee Wee Soccer, Little League or “Friday night lights,” youth sports are an American tradition. And that’s a great thing: in addition to providing the physical benefits of exercise, it’s been consistently shown that kids’ involvement in sports boosts self-esteem, improves academic performance, reduces the likelihood of engaging in risky behaviors and teaches important social skills, including teamwork, goal setting and emotional resilience. Nurturing your child’s involve-

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ment in sports offers definite benefits, but also demands active parental planning and involvement to maintain a balance with other aspects of growing up. For parents of young athletes, maintaining that balance is almost a sport in itself. Preschool: Time for Informal Play Youth sports today may actually be the true “national pastime” with lessons, teams and leagues available for children practically from infancy. However, up until the age of 6 or 7, kids’ bodies, motor skills


Grade School: Getting and powers of concentraYour Feet Wet tions are still developing. At around age 6 or 7, For the first couple of years Sports for children are usually physiof your child’s life, just getkids help cally and mentally ready ting outside and having to begin participating in fun together will give evboost many organized sports. Ask for eryone plenty of exercise social skills. your youngster’s input on as you model an active lifewhat sport she’d like to style. At this stage, your try: She may already have balancing act as a parent is to maintain equilibrium between the free- a clear favorite in mind, or want to play on dom of unstructured play and the struc- a team with her friends. But while signing up for too many acture of organized activity. At around age 3, you can introduce tivities of any kind can overload anyone, toddler classes, such as swimming, dance, it’s a good idea during this period to try martial arts or gymnastics, remembering at least two sports over the course of a that at this stage it’s important to keep year that each emphasize different skill the emphasis on fun and movement. sets. Playing one sport exclusively can Classes or games should be short and contribute to stress injuries and lead to avoid elements of perfect technique or burnout on sports and physical activity in competition. Encourage your youngster general. Mixing it up is fun and actually to explore different activities to maintain contributes to higher levels of success in interest. If he’s not interested, it’s fine to an athlete’s primary sport. When choosing a sport, consider your stick with informal play at this stage— there’s no evidence that participation in child’s physical and mental attributes. If preschool sports enhances development he’s on the small side physically, football or soccer may not be his best sport, at or activity levels later in life. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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least for now. If she’s still working on coordination, tae kwon do or a “big ball” sport such as soccer may suit her better than tennis or softball. Quiet and reserved kids may prefer an individual sport such as swimming, track or golf to the rough and tumble of team sports. Whatever sport your child participates in, competition should remain secondary to having fun, staying active and learning the fundamentals. However, this is also a good time to instill the value of commitment. Unless they’re experiencing genuine distress, ask them to play for a full season—usually only a few weeks at this age—before quitting. As a parent at this time, you’re finding the balance between encouraging participation and forcing it. It’s good for children to have the chance to find a sport that they’ll enjoy, hopefully for a lifetime. At this age it’s easy for kids to want Youth sports to stop if things don’t gel should focus tend to have better grades, right away, but listening higher achievement levto your child will tell you on fun els and more positive attiif they should try someand staying tudes toward school. thing else or walk away alNow you’re working together. If that happens, active. together with your child to accept it. Remember that strike a balance between it’s not about you. athletics and other priorities. Create a schedule as a family that includes your Middle and High School: child’s various commitments. Discuss with Building Character Traits Middle school can be a critical time for your child how to best manage his or her determining if a child continues an active time and if obligations aren’t being met, lifestyle. Academic and social demands work together to reset priorities, bearing begin to ratchet up at this time, and kids in mind that schoolwork is the primary often give up being active just when its one and that playing should still be fun. Ultimately, you want your child to be importance increases. The character lessons of sports, particularly those of dis- healthy, have fun, and build the characcipline and dealing with adversity, are ter traits that help them succeed in life off especially valuable now, and the camara- the field. Keep this in mind and you’ll sucderie of even “solo” sports gives kids a ceed in the balancing act that is parentsense of belonging. Student athletes also ing a young athlete. 32

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


34

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018

5

1

For features of independent schools, turn to Education At a Glance on pg. 36. For public school system information by county, turn to pg. 81.

2 3

REGIONS FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

metro atlanta area map

N


Alpharetta, Buckhead, Canton, Crabapple, East Cobb, Holly Springs, Marietta, North Buckhead, Roswell, Sandy Springs

Alpharetta, Brookhaven, Cumming, Dunwoody, Flowery Branch, Johns Creek, Northeast Atlanta, Peachtree Corners, Roswell

Ansley Park, Athens, Dacula, Decatur, Lilburn, Midtown, Midtown, Morningside, Briarcliff Morningside, Northeast North Atlanta

p.59 REGION 3: Atlanta East

p.50 REGION 2: Atlanta North/Northeast

p.39 REGION 1: Atlanta North/Northwest

Page | Region | Neighborhoods Douglasville, Fairburn, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Metro-Atlanta

Kennesaw, Powder Springs, Smyrna, Smyrna-Vinings

p.69  REGION 5: Atlanta West

p.65 R  EGION 4: Atlanta South/ Southeast/Southwest

4

 utoring, Summer Camps and Activities, T Field Trips and Education Programs.

p.89 Educational Resources

p.81 Public School County Guide

Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia

p.74 Boarding Schools

Additional Education Sections

S


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

39

REGION 1: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHWEST

40

Atlanta International School

404-841-3840

49

Brenwood Academy

770-704-4925

48

The Cottage School

770-641-8688

19

Cumberland Academy of Georgia

404-835-9000

43

Eastside Christian School

770-971-2332

2

Fulton Science Academy

678-366-2333

19

GRACEPOINT School

678-709-6634

3

High Meadows School

770-993-2940

46 Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School 404-847-1156 41

Holy Spirit Preparatory School

678-904-2811

43

Johnson Ferry Christian Academy

678-784-5231

Lyndon Academy

770-926-0166

44 40

Mill Springs Academy

770-360-1336

46

Mt. Bethel Christian Academy

770-971-0245

42

Pace Academy

404-262-1345

42

Porter Academy

770-594-1313

47

Saint Francis School

770-641-8257

48

Springmont School

404-252-3910

45

The Walker School

770-427-2689

50

$21,9583K-12th $25,066 $7,950- Infant$10,000 5th $18,5004-12th $25,450

144 1,217 16

22

166

50

188 8-10

24

100 8-10

50

300

14

67

510

20

32

110

5-8

400

18

13

58

300 1,370 16-18

2-12th

80

570 12-22 RC

K-12th

46

420 12-16

PK412th

20

175

12

48

290

6-8

67

620

18

126 1,115 12

20

64

10

110

710

14

21

270 12-22

118

869

14

60

300

16

32

125

8 18

Pre 1st12th PK-8th K-12th Toddler8th PK312th

C

B

APPLICATION DEADLINE

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS Appt.

Call

Jan. Feb. 28

Dec. Rolling

Appt. Rolling Nov. Feb. 16

Dec.

Nov. Mar. 17

Nov. June 1

Appt. Rolling

Sept. Rolling

Oct.

• •

ND

Apr.

• E

Call

March Rolling

PK38th PK312th

JK-12th

1-8th

Dec. Jan. 15

C

$6,000$19,000 $10,540$26,670 $6,510$24,065 $3,900$4,500 $10,500$16,000 $9,950$14,430 $23,630$27,225 $19,923$20,748 $14,000$21,000 $13,200$22,800 $12,469$22,770

UNIFORM

$20,500

$23,958 1-12th

AP/IB COURSES

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

AVG. CLASS SIZE

# STUDENTS

$23,900 4-12th $6,310K-8th $8,910 $11,000- PK$13,500 12th

# TEACHERS

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian E = EpiscopaL J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Feb. 1

Feb.

Appt. Feb. 1 Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling Appt. Feb. 15

Nov. Feb. 15

REGION 2: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHEAST

58

Atlanta Academy

678-461-6102

75

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

51

Bridgeway Christian Academy

770-751-1972

57

Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia

770-814-8001

56

Lanier Christian Academy

678-828-8350

52

McGinnis Woods Country Day School

770-664-7764

55

MJCCA Preschools

678-812-3833

8

Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs

770-205-6277

36

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

$14,660$15,160 $27,000$59,100 $2,940$11,375 $650$1,275 $4,930 $10,935 $9,450$13,300 $4,114$15,541 $8,000$12,350

PS-8th

6-12th PK3-8th

29

170

8wks6y

18

85 Varies

50

380

18

70

400

15

115

480

15

21

215 15-20

K-12th Infant8th 6wksPK 13 mo18y

Winter/Spring 2018

• •

• • • •

C

J

• Ongoing Rolling •

Jan. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

Nov. Ongoing

Appt. Rolling

• •

Nov. Feb. 15

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

5

Mount Pisgah Christian School

678-336-3400

57

Northwoods Montessori School

770-457-7261

53

The Piedmont School of Atlanta

404-382-8200

54

Pinecrest Academy

770-888-4477

58

Wesleyan School

770-448-7640

68

Woodward Academy

404-765-4000

59 61

404-321-9304

60

Athens Academy

706-549-9225

8

Atlanta Montessori International School

404-325-6777

64

Canterbury School

404-522-5659

63

The Children’s School

404-873-6985

62

The Friends School of Atlanta

404-373-8746

61

Hebron Christian Academy

770-963-9250

60

Heritage Preparatory School

404-815-7711

62

Killian Hill Christian School

770-921-3224

63

Midtown International School

404-542-7003

64 Shallowford Presbyterian School 404-321-3061

77

685

14

5

93

20

5

14

4-8

20 or 784 Less

PK312th

K-12th

86

230 1,159 16

APPLICATION DEADLINE

12mo12y

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

JK-12th

UNIFORM

15

AP/IB COURSES

134

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

155 20-30

23

$8,320$16,750 $16,700$23,210 $16,950$26,800 $10,650$19,100 $8,800$18,200 $13,215$20,270 $9,500$14,000 $13,500$21,990 $13,400$21,200 $9,450$11,550 $8,000$15,000 $4,500$11,550 $18,100$19,200 $900$6,000

Appt. Rolling

July Rolling

Jan. Feb. 27 Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

RC

Jan. Rolling

C

Jan.

Feb. 7

Oct.

Feb.

PK-12th

365 2,668 16

PK-8th

35

K3-12th

135

950

8wks15y

40

250 6-20

PK-8th

15

100

8

Appt.

3y-8th

51

375

22

Oct. Feb. 23

3y-8th

44

165

11

Q

67

912

18

ND

PK-8th

27

150

12

C

K4-12th

30

356

15

C

40

240

Max. 12

30

200

16

K-12th

K-10th Toddler4th

270 12-40

Nov. Rolling

12

Nov. Rolling Appt. Rolling

P

Call

Appt.

Call

Call

Rolling

Oct.

Feb.

Dec.

Aug.

Call

Rolling

Appt.

Jan.

Jan. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

REGION 4: ATLANTA SOUTH/SOUTHEAST/SOUTHWEST 770-774-8001

$19,250

67

Counterpane Montessori School

770-461-2304

$13,000

66

Harvester Christian Academy

770-942-1583

68

7

K-HS

The Bedford School

69

$24,750

66

67

REGION 3: ATLANTA EAST Arbor Montessori School

65

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

678-208-0774

AVG. CLASS SIZE

Montessori Kids Academy

13mo9y 18mo6th

# STUDENTS

53

$7,850$12,400 $10,000$12,000 $14,950$19,995 $11,500$16,335

# TEACHERS

770-777-9131

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

Montessori at Vickery

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

8

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian E = EpiscopaL J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Strong Rock Christian School

678-833-1200

Woodward Academy

404-765-4001

1-9th

28

152

10

PK-HS

10

100

n/a

K4-12

30

340

15

C

Jan. Rolling

PK312th

67

825

15

C

Appt. Rolling

PK-12th

365 2,668 16

Oct.

$7,800- 6wks$14,500 2nd $5,0004-12th $14,680

16

90

12

C

Appt. Rolling

6

48

16

ND

Appt. Rolling

$4,720$8,075 $5,917$12,198 $16,950$26,800

Feb.

REGION 5: ATLANTA WEST

7

Benjamin Preparatory School

770-436-5200

71

Center Academy

770-333-1616

Education At-a-Glance Continued on Page 38 u


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

19

The Academy at SOAR

828-456-3435

75

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

77

Eagle Hill School

413-477-6000

79

George School

215-579-6547

77

The Knox School

631-686-1600

76

Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

706-746-7720

76

Riverside Military Academy

770-538-2938

$27,000$59,100 $55,525$77,575 $39,000$57,550 $11,950$48,900 $8,755$52,962 $16,225$36,235 $18,900$48,900 $24,700$56,400

7

65

9

1-2

6

6

295

27

15

P

99 1,090 12

ND

4

32

8-10

125

8

56

210

5-7

88

540

14

6-PG

23

146

12

PK-12th 7-12th

804-443-3357 631-751-1800

80

Woodberry Forest School

540-672-3900

$55,600

860-928-6575

$14,500- 9-12th $48,500 & PG

90

600

12

125

500

15

Nov.

Feb. 1

Appt. Rolling Appt.

32

APPLICATION DEADLINE

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

9-12th

St. Margaret’s School

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

8-12th

The Stony Brook School

38

C

6-12th

79

The Woodstock Academy

16

$54,000 7-12th

78

75

191

UNIFORM

BOARDING SCHOOLS

25

AP/IB COURSES

74

770-590-1866

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

770-578-0182

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

Mount Paran Christian School

73

AVG. CLASS SIZE

70

770-429-4799

# STUDENTS

678-224-1595

70 73

# TEACHERS

Foundations for the Future School Kennesaw Mountain Nature Preschool Midway Covenant Christian School

$5,850K4-8th $9,650 $1,057PK-6th $7,807 $9003-5y $975 mo. $1,600K3-8th $7,000 $3,599- PK3$17,902 12th

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

770-435-1596

KINDERGARTEN

PHONE

Covenant Christian School

PRESCHOOL

SCHOOL

72

GRADES/AGES

PAGE

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian E = EpiscopaL J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

Appt. Rolling

Nov. Rolling

• Ongoing Rolling

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Jan. 15

Q

• P

Call

Appt. Rolling

Oct.

Feb. 2

Call

Rolling

Oct. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

8-12th

22

120

15

E

7-12th

57

386

14

C

See Jan. 15 Website

9-12th

60

400

10

C

Sept. Jan. 15

Appt. Rolling

Winter/Spring 2018

102 1,127 17-21


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHWEST

49

44

1

40

GION RE

19

42 3 47

45

46 43 46 43

2 48

19

46 48 41 42

40

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta International School 40 Brenwood Academy 49 The Cottage School 48 Cumberland Academy of Georgia 19 Eastside Christian School 43 Fulton Science Academy Private School 2 GRACEPOINT School 19 High Meadows School 3 Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School 46

Holy Spirit Preparatory School Johnson Ferry Christian Academy Lyndon Academy Mill Springs Academy Mt. Bethel Christian Academy Pace Academy Porter Academy Saint Francis School Springmont School The Walker School

41 43 44 40 46 42 42 47 48 45

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Roswell With its mix of stately neighborhoods and new developments, its quaint downtown area and miles of trails that meander through forests and along the Chattahoochee River, Roswell attracts many families and nature-loving residents to its city limits.

Sandy Springs Newbie, Sandy Springs became its own city in 2005, and multitudes of boutiques, bars and restaurants line Roswell Road, its main thoroughfare. Residents also enjoy the community’s many family-centered events held throughout the year. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

39


BUCKHEAD • ALPHARETTA 40

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


BUCKHEAD


CRABAPPLE • BUCKHEAD 42

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


EAST COBB www.atlantaschoolguide.com

43


HOLLY SPRINGS


MARIETTA


NORTH BUCKHEAD • MARIETTA 46

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


ROSWELL


SANDY SPRINGS • ROSWELL 48

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


CANTON

ALL THE WORLD IS A LABORATORY TO THE INQUIRING MIND. -Martin H Fischer

An effective and exciting, exploratory, student centered, problem based learning environment, Pre K through 5th grade.

Individualized Tours - Rolling Enrollment Contact Our Admissions Director Today 8991 East Cherokee Drive, Canton, GA 30115 770-704-4925 • www.brenwoodacademy.com

Looking for a better way to reach your target audience? Advertise in Atlanta School Guide and get results.

Call to reserve your space in our next issue!

770-992-0273

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

49


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHEAST

8 56 8 54 53 52 51 58

5

57 68

75 58

55 57

53

Independent Schools

Schools Page Atlanta Academy 58 Brandon Hall School 75 Bridgeway Christian Academy 51 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia 57 Lanier Christian Academy 56 McGinnis Woods Country Day School 52 MJCCA Preschools 55

2 GION RE

Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs Montessori at Vickery Montessori Kids Academy Mount Pisgah Christian School Northwoods Montessori School The Piedmont School of Atlanta Pinecrest Academy Wesleyan School Woodward Academy

8 8 53 5 57 53 54 58 68

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Norcross Founded in the late 1800s as a resort town for wealthy Atlantans, Norcross is Gwinnett County’s second oldest city. Today, with over 8,000 residents, it is a quiet city filled with upscale yet charming residential and retail developments. 50

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018

Cumming Called the “Gateway to Leisure Living,” Cumming offers the best of small-town living, but in recent years, it has seen rapid commercial and residential development, attracting many new residents with its prime location near the magnificent Lake Lanier.


ALPHARETTA


ALPHARETTA


BROOKHAVEN • CUMMING

Serving children grades Pre-K to High School with language, learning and social challenges.

Differentiated group instruction Community-Based instruction

2018-19

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

53


CUMMING


DUNWOODY www.atlantaschoolguide.com

55


FLOWERY BRANCH


JOHNS CREEK • NORTHEAST ATLANTA

Sowing the Seeds of Organic Learning

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

57


ROSWELL • PEACHTREE CORNERS 58

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


61

ATHENS

60 62 64 61 63 8 60

MONROE

64

63

62

Independent Schools Schools Page Arbor Montessori School 61 Athens Academy 60 Atlanta Montessori International School 8 Canterbury School 64 The Children’s School 63

The Friends School of Atlanta Hebron Christian Academy Heritage Preparatory School Killian Hill Christian School Midtown International School Shallowford Presbyterian School

62 61 60 62 63 64

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Stone Mountain More than just a mountain park, Stone Mountain also refers to a charming community of antique shops, art galleries and restaurants. Residents of Stone Mountain enjoy natural scenery and miles of walking and biking paths available in the nearby park.

Lawrenceville Strolling the brick-paved sidewalks in the revitalized historic downtown of Lawrenceville, you’ll feel instantly at home. Chartered in 1821, the city has gone through many changes over the years but has maintained its gracious small-town Southern charm. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

59

ATLANTA EAST

3 GION RE


ATHENS • ANSLEY PARK 60

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


DACULA • DECATUR www.atlantaschoolguide.com

61


LILBURN • DECATUR 62

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


MIDTOWN www.atlantaschoolguide.com

63


NORTH BRIARCLIFF • MORNINGSIDE

GoT a Fabulous

Field Trip? Let teachers and parents know how to find it!

Call today to advertise in our next issue.

770-992-0273

64

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018

Atlanta’s Leading Education Resource


EAST POINT

66

68

DEKALB

Carrolton

66

67

67

Independent Schools Schools Page The Bedford School 66 Counterpane Montessori School 67

Harvester Christian Academy Strong Rock Christian School Woodward Academy

66 67 68

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Newnan Established in 1828 and home to more than 30,000 residents, Newnan is one of the fastest-growing cities in Georgia. It has many new residential developments and boasts six historic districts on the national register filled with stately Southern homes.

College Park College Park is home to a small-town main street and the busiest airport in the world—Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The city is attracting young professionals and families by combining the historic elements with new developments. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

65

ATLANTA SOUTH • SOUTHEAST • SOUTHWEST

4 GION RE


15:1 studentto-teacher ratio

Sports for every grade

STEM-equipped labs

4241 Central Church Road • Douglasville, Georgia 30135 770-942-1583 • harvesteracademy.com

66

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018

SA Ac C S a cr nd ed A i te C d SI

FAIRBURN • DOUGLASVILLE

100% college acceptance rate


FAYETTEVILLE • LOCUST GROVE www.atlantaschoolguide.com

67


METRO-ATLANTA


BARTOW

ATLANTA WEST

5 GION RE

70 70

73

73 71 72

7

FULTON

Independent Schools Schools Page Benjamin Preparatory School 7 Center Academy          71 Covenant Christian School 72

Foundations for the Future School Kennesaw Mountain Nature Preschool Midway Covenant Christian School Mount Paran Christian School

70 73 73 70

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Kennesaw Home to the popular Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, the city of Kennesaw takes pride in its excellent recreation opportunities and parks, rich history and thriving downtown. Kennesaw State University is well known for academic programs in business, education, and nursing.

Smyrna With its unique charm, the city of Smyrna offers many fresh, trendy lifestyle options, and the Market Village plays host to numerous restaurants, bars and upscale shops. Known as the “Jonquil City,” because of the thousands of jonquils that flourish in gardens and along the streets in early spring.

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

69


KENNESAW 70

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


SMYRNA


SMYRNA-VININGS


KENNESAW • POWDER SPRINGS

Jump Get a on the

competition

advertise in Atlanta School Guide and get results. Call to reserve your spaCe in our next issue!

770-992-0273

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

73


BOARDING SCHOOL DIRECTORY

T

here are many benefits of a boarding school education. Boarding schools are an option for students seeking a more independent learning experience. Because students generally live on campus, learning takes place in and out of the classroom almost on a 24-hour basis. When selecting a boarding school, it is important to visit the school campus, but representatives from many boarding schools visit Metro Atlanta throughout the year—contact each school for specific dates.

Boarding Schools Schools Page The Academy at Soar 19 Brandon Hall School 75 Eagle Hill School 77 George School 79 The Knox School 77

74

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018

Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School 76 Riverside Military Academy 76 St. Margaret’s School 79 The Stony Brook School 78 Woodberry Forest School 80 The Woodstock Academy 75


CONNECTICUT • GEORGIA www.atlantaschoolguide.com

75


GEORGIA 76

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


MASSACHUSETTS • NEW YORK www.atlantaschoolguide.com

77


NEW YORK


PENNSYLVANIA • VIRGINIA www.atlantaschoolguide.com

79


VIRGINIA

Looking for a better way to reach your target audience? Advertise in Atlanta School Guide and get results.

Call to reserve your space in our next issue!

770-992-0273

80

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Winter/Spring 2018


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

SPOTLIGHT ON METRO ATLANTA’S SCHOOL SYSTEMS

A

variety of improvements and innovative programs in Georgia’s public school systems have resulted in many stellar elementary, middle and high schools across the Metro area. Different school systems feature specialized programs and academic opportunities, such as magnet, charter, vocational or alternative schools to suit their respective students, parents and communities. However, despite variations in programming and academic offerings, all public schools must offer the core curriculum as determined by the Georgia Board of Education. Here is a county-by-county guide to Metro Atlanta’s public school systems. For more information about the Georgia Department of Education, call 404-656-2800 or visit www.gadoe.org. u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

BARTOW ADAIRSVILLE WHITE

BARTOW CARTERSVILLE

Number of Schools Elementary 12 Middle 4 High 3 1 Career Academy Total # of Students: 13,560 Student Spending: $8,684

EMERSON

Board of Education 770-606-5800 www.bartow.k12.ga.us

CHEROKEE CHEROKEE

CLAYTON

CLAYTON

2017 Average SAT: 1041 Top 3 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Woodland High 1068 Cass High 1039 Adairsville High 1015

What’s New Five eighth-graders became the first Bartow County students to receive college scholarships from the REACH Georgia program. The $10,000 scholarship is applicable to any HOPEeligible post-secondary institution in Georgia for good grades, attendance and behavior until graduation from high school. Number of Schools Elementary 24 Middle 7 High 6 Alternative 1 1 Evening Virtual School 1 Centers 4 Total # of Students: 41,536 Student Spending: $8,293

Board of Education 770-479-1871 www.cherokeek12.net

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 507 (M) 517 5th: (ELA) 509 (M) 511 8th: (ELA) 511 (M) 504

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 519 (M) 536 5th: (ELA) 523 (M) 532 8th: (ELA) 528 (M) 517 2017 Average SAT: 1122 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Sequoyah High 1148 Woodstock High 1142 Cherokee High 1131 Creekview High 1120 Etowah High 1104

What’s New Cherokee County has launched the Volunteer Instructional Leadership Learning Academy (VILLA) to help parents learn about district governance and priorities, the role of board members and daily operations. Number of Schools Elementary 31 Primary 2 Middle 14 High 9 Virtual 1 Alternative 3 Performing Arts Center 1 Adult Education 1 Charter 2 Magnet 9 Open Campus 1 Total # of Students: 54,317 Student Spending: $7,894

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 482 (M) 502 5th: (ELA) 493 (M) 491 8th: (ELA) 499 (M) 489 2017 Average SAT: 964 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Elite Scholars Academy 1083 M.E. Stilwell School of the Arts 1023 Morrow High 975 Lovejoy High School 969 Forest Park High 968

Board of Education 770-473-2700 www.clayton.k12.ga.us

What’s New Martha Ellen Stilwell School for the Performing Arts and Elite Scholars Academy have been named to U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best High Schools.

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COBB

Board of Education 770-426-3300 www.cobbk12.org

COWETA COWETA

Number of Schools 2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Elementary 64 3rd: (ELA) 519 (M) 523 Primary 2 5th: (ELA) 526 (M) 523 Intermediate 2 8th: (ELA) 529 (M) 519 Middle 24 High 16 2017 Average SAT: 1082 Charter 1 1 Top 5 Schools by Average Learning Centers Special Education Centers 1 2017 SAT Score Virtual Academies 1 Walton High 1242 Lassiter High 1189 Total # of Students: Pope High 1164 114,410 Wheeler High 1153 Student Spending: Kennesaw Mountain High 1146 $8,893 What’s New The Atlanta Braves have created the Atlanta Braves Leadership Institute in partnership with Cobb County and Marietta City Schools, designed to develop student leaders through relevant content and exposure to leadership insights. Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 6 High 3 Charter & Career Academy 1 Alternative 3 Centre for Performing and Visual Arts 1 Total # of Students: 22,019 Student Spending: $8,567

Board of Education 770-254-2800 www.cowetaschools.net

DEKALB

DEKALB

Board of Education 678-676-1200 www.dekalbschoolsga.org

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514 (M) 523 5th: (ELA) 516 (M) 516 8th: (ELA) 523 (M) 534 2017 Average SAT: 1080 Top 3 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Northgate High 1102 East Coweta High 1070 Newnan High 1068

What’s New Infiniti of South Atlanta donated partial proceeds from sales and repairs orders to Communities In Schools (CIS) of Coweta County. CIS supports students, families and schools with the aim of increasing graduation rates and helping students achieve academically. Number of Schools Elementary 66 Middle 18 High 18 Charter 9 Magnet 6 Centers, Special Education and Alternative 18 Total # of Students: 101,014 Student Spending: $9,952

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 490 (M) 502 5th: (ELA) 498 (M) 494 8th: (ELA) 498 (M) 494 2017 Average SAT: 973 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score DeKalb School of the Arts 1170 Chamblee Charter High 1131 Dunwoody High 1110 Lakeside High 1098 DeKalb Early College Academy 1068

What’s New The District has implemented a new curriculum integrating digital options for text, materials, activities and assessments that includes more writing and reading and more collaborative learning and problem solving. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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COBB


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

DOUGLAS

DOUGLAS

Board of Education 770-651-2000 www.douglas.k12.ga.us

FAYETTE FAYETTE

Number of Schools Elementary 20 Middle 8 High 5 Centers 3 Total # of Students: 26,267 Student Spending: $8,621

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 504 (M) 514 5th: (ELA) 510 (M) 509 8th: (ELA) 513 (M) 511 2017 Average SAT: 1001 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Douglas County High 1053 1010 Chapel Hill High Alexander High 1008 983 Lithia Springs High New Manchester High 951

What’s New Superintendent Trent North held a new series of town hall-style meetings to provide an open forum for families and community members to offer ideas and suggestions directly to members of the DCSS Leadership team. Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 5 High Alternative 1 Open Campus 1

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 534 (M) 542 5th: (ELA) 533 (M) 534 8th: (ELA) 543 (M) 543

Total # of Students: 20,152 Student Spending: $9,145

Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score McIntosh High 1202 Starr’s Mill High 1142 Whitewater High 1116 Sandy Creek High 1080 Fayette County High 1039

2017 Average SAT: 1116

Board of Education 770-460-3535 www.fcboe.org

What’s New The Fayette County Education Foundation has awarded nearly $7,000 to teachers for STEAM-focused projects from robotics and model rocketry to book libraries and circuitry.

FORSYTH

Number of Schools Elementary 21 Middle 10 High 5 Non-Traditional 2 Virtual 1 Charter/Evening 1

FORSYTH

Total # of Students: 44,529 Student Spending: $7,866

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 542 (M) 553 5th: (ELA) 547 (M) 560 8th: (ELA) 549 (M) 561 2017 Average SAT: 1142 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Lambert High 1187 South Forsyth High 1186 West Forsyth High 1127 1117 North Forsyth High Forsyth Central 1091

Board of Education 770-887-2461 www.forsyth.k12.ga.us

What’s New Three Forsyth County schools were named 2017 National Blue Ribbon Schools. Only 342 schools in the U.S. and seven in Georgia were recognized with this honor, reserved for public and private schools where students achieve very high learning standards.

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Number of Schools Elementary 59 Middle 19 High 18 Charter 10 Alternative Schools 3 Virtual Campus 1 Total # of Students: 95,428 Student Spending: $10,072

FULTON

Board of Education 470-254-3600 www.fultonschools.org

GRIFFINSPALDING

GWINNETT

GWINNETT

Number of Schools Elementary 11 4 Middle High 2 Alternative 2

Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score 1227 Northview HS Chattahoochee HS 1191 Johns Creek HS 1183 Milton HS 1162 1157 Roswell HS

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 486 (M) 504 5th: (ELA) 495 (M) 498 8th: (ELA) 494 (M) 486 2017 Average SAT: 973 Top 2 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Spalding High 1007 Griffin High 938

What’s New The Griffin High School soccer team has received the United Soccer Coaches High School Team Academic Award for the fourth year in a row for having a combined 3.39 GPA during the 2016 spring season. The Lady Bears were one of only seven women’s teams recognized out of 390 Georgia High School Association (GHSA)-affiliated teams. Number of Schools 80 Elementary Middle 29 High 20 Alternative 4 Charter 2 1 Open Campus Virtual School 1 Special Education 4 Center 1 Career/Technical 1 Total # of Students: 180,235 Student Spending: $8,377

Board of Education 678-301-6000 www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us

2017 Average SAT: 1037

What’s New The Fulton Board of Education has approved funding for the purchase of PSAT materials to enable students in the 9th and 11th grades to continue taking the test in preparation for the SAT.

Total # of Students: 9,828 Student Spending: $8,957

Board of Education 770-229-3700 www.spalding.k12.ga.us

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514 (M) 527 5th: (ELA) 521 (M) 522 8th: (ELA) 523 (M) 517

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514 (M) 529 5th: (ELA) 520 (M) 526 8th: (ELA) 527 (M) 499 2017 Average SAT: 1084 Top 2 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology 1315 North Gwinnett High 1168 Brookwood High 1135 1131 Mill Creek High Peachtree Ridge High 1115

What’s New Gwinnett County public schools had an overall score of 82.4 on the state’s 2017 College and Career Ready Performance Index, better than the average statewide total of 75 points. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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FULTON


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

HALL HALL

Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 High 6 11 Charter Total # of Students: 27,916 Student Spending: $8,265

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 498 (M) 510 5th: (ELA) 505 (M) 508 8th: (ELA) 509 (M) 507 2017 Average SAT: 1034 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score 1084 North Hall High Flowery Branch High 1074 Johnson High 1037 1014 Chestatee High West Hall High 1003

Board of Education 770-534-1080 www.hallco.org

What’s New The district has been approved as a Common Sense Certified District: Digital Citizenship by Common Sense Education, in recognition of its efforts in teaching online responsibility.

HENRY

Number of Schools Elementary 27 Middle 11 High 10 Charter 2 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Virtual School 1

HENRY

Total # of Students: 42,125 Student Spending: $8,330

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 500 (M) 511 5th: (ELA) 508 (M) 505 8th: (ELA) 517 (M) 498 2017 Average SAT: 1012 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score Union Grove High 1105 Ola High 1082 Eagles Landing High 1037 Woodland High 1025 Dutchtown High 1016

Board of Education 770-957-6601 www.henry.k12.ga.us

What’s New About 3,000 Henry County third-graders participated in hands-on learning experiences about water resources as part of the 14th annual “Cubihatcha Kids” program.

PAULDING

Number of Schools 19 Elementary Middle 9 High 5 Alternative 1

PAULDING BRASWELL

278

Total # of Students: 28,759 Student Spending: $8,506

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514 (M) 525 5th: (ELA) 518 (M) 514 8th: (ELA) 516 (M) 506 2017 Average SAT: 1027 Top 5 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score North Paulding High 1057 East Paulding High 1027 Hiram High 1020 Paulding County High 1019 South Paulding High 1011

Board of Education 770-443-8000 www.paulding.k12.ga.us

What’s New Paulding County school officials sought public input on its programs during the district’s quarterly stakeholders meeting in October. Organizers also explained the district’s advisement process and demonstrated an online tool, YouScience, designed to help students decide future career directions and goals.

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LE RO CK DA

Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 4 High 3 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Magnet 1 Open Campus 1 Virtual School 1 Total # of Students: 16,311 Student Spending: $9,311

2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 503 (M) 515 5th: (ELA) 508 (M) 506 8th: (ELA) 507 (M) 499 2017 Average SAT: 978 Top 3 Schools by Average 2017 SAT Score 1015 Rockdale High Heritage High 999 920 Salem High

Board of Education 770-483-4713 www.rockdaleschools.org

What’s New Five Rockdale County schools were named National Beta Schools of Merit 2017 by the National Beta Club, honoring academic achievement, leadership, character and service.

ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Board of Education 404-802-3500

Total # of Students: 50,837 www.atlantapublicschools.us Student Spending: $14,713 Number of Schools 2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Primary 6 3rd: (ELA) 493 (M) 506 Elementary 44 5th: (ELA) 501 (M) 502 Intermediate 1 8th: (ELA) 499 (M) 486 Middle 10 6th Grade Academy 1 2017 Average SAT: 961 High 9 Charter 17 Top 5 Schools by Average Alternative 4 2017 SAT Score Evening School 1 Charles R. Drew Charter High 1105 Open Campus 1 Adult Education Center 1 Grady High 1087 1062 North Atlanta High Booker T. Washington High 1021 Carver Early College 1002 What’s New Fifty-six APS schools showed gains on the state’s latest College and Career Ready Performance Index results. This amounts to about two-thirds of the district and 23 more schools than in 2016.

BUFORD CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 770-945-5035 4,423 www.bufordcityschools.org Spending per Student: $9,536 Number of Schools 2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Elementary (K-1) 1 3rd: (ELA) 534 (M) 545 Academy (2-5) 1 5th: (ELA) 528 (M) 539 Middle 1 8th: (ELA) 545 (M) 552 High 1 2017 Average SAT: 1157 What’s New The Buford Board of Commissioners recently voted to purchase about 16 acres in Hall County as the site of a future elementary school to prepare for anticipated continued growth north of the county line. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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ROCKDALE


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

CITY SCHOOLS OF DECATUR

Board of Education 404-371-3601 www.csdecatur.net Number of Schools Elementary 5 Middle 1 4th & 5th Grade Academy 1 High 1 Early Learning Center 1

Total # of Students: 4,714 Student Spending: $11,546 2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 548 (M) 551 5th: (ELA) 550 (M) 551 8th: (ELA) 549 (M) 541 2017 Average SAT: 1145

What’s New CSD has begun the design development process for the new Grade 3-5 upper elementary school to be built on Talley Street for the 2019-2020 school year. Community presentation sessions were held in September and November giving residents the chance to provide input; presentations materials and an input form were also posted on the district website.

GAINESVILLE CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-536-5275 www.gcss.k12.net Number of Schools Elementary 6 Middle 1 High 1

Total # of Students: 8,394 Student Spending: $7,935 2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 485 (M) 504 5th: (ELA) 498 (M) 502 8th: (ELA) 508 (M) 514 2017 Average SAT: 1014

What’s New The Gainesville City School System has been selected for the Fuel Up to Play 60 – Atlanta Falcons Hometown Grant for the 2017-2018 school year. The program provides $10,000 to help facilitate sustainable physical activity and healthy eating initiatives. The GCSS grant will support initiatives for the school nutrition program and New Holland Knowledge Academy.

MARIETTA CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 770-422-3500 9,087 www.marietta-city.org Student Spending: $10,271 Number of Schools Elementary 7 2017 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Sixth Grade 1 3rd: (ELA) 506 (M) 519 Middle 1 5th: (ELA) 516 (M) 517 1 8th: (ELA) 512 (M) 505 High Alternative 1 Magnet 1 2017 Average SAT: 1057 What’s New This fall, Marietta City Schools initiated a new program, “Our First Steps,” to welcome students back to school. MCS staff, along with faith-based and community partners, visited the homes of MCS students in small teams for personal meetings. An estimated 250 to 500 volunteers planned to reach more than 2,000 MCS family homes.

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Winter/Spring 2018


EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES Ways to Enhance your Child’s or Student’s Learning

Index

Tutoring & Study Skills 90 Summer Camps & Activities 90 Field Trips & Education Programs 93 www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES


SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES 92

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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS


FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS

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Winter/Spring 2018


ADVERTISER INDEX After School Programs

Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education...........................Inside Back Cover Callanwolde Fine Arts Center................................. 13 Generation Infocus.................................................. 90 Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (INK)............... 96 LEGOLAND Discovery Center Atlanta.................. 93 Zoo Atlanta............................................................... 92

Boarding Schools

The Academy at SOAR........................................... 19 Brandon Hall School................................................ 75 Eagle Hill School...................................................... 77 George School......................................................... 79 The Knox School...................................................... 77 Rabun-Gap Nacoochee School.............................. 76 Riverside Military Academy.................................... 76 St. Margaret’s School............................................... 79 The Stony Brook ..................................................... 78 Woodberry Forest School....................................... 80 The Woodstock Academy....................................... 75

Early Education

Arbor Montessori School........................................ 61 Atlanta Academy..................................................... 58 Atlanta Montessori International School............... 33 Benjamin Preparatory School................................... 7 Brenwood Academy................................................ 49 Canterbury School................................................... 64 The Children’s School.............................................. 63 Counterpane Montessori School........................... 67 The Friends School of Atlanta................................ 62 Foundations For The Future................................... 70 Fulton Science Academy Private School................ 2 Heritage Preparatory School.................................. 60 High Meadows School.............................................. 3 Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School.......................... 46 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia......... 57 Kennesaw Mountain Nature Preschool................. 73 Lyndon Academy..................................................... 44 McGinnis Woods Country Day School.................. 52 MJCCA Preschools.................................................. 55 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............... 33 Montessori at Vickery.............................................. 33 Montessori Kids Academy...................................... 53 Mount Paran Christian School................................ 70 Northwoods Montessori School............................. 57 Pinecrest Academy.................................................. 54 Porter Academy....................................................... 42 Shallowford Presbyterian School............................ 64 Springmont School.................................................. 48 Strong Rock Christian School................................. 67 The Walker School................................................... 45 Woodward Academy............................................... 68

Field Trips & Education Programs

Callanwolde Fine Arts Center................................. 13 College Football Hall of Fame............................... 94 Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (INK)............... 96

LEGOLAND Discovery Center Atlanta.................. 93 Lookout Mountain Attractions................................ 95 Mayfield Dairy Farm................................................ 95 The Rock Ranch....................................................... 96 Theatrical Outfit....................................................... 93 Southeastern Railway Museum............................... 96 Zoo Atlanta .............................................................. 92

Independent Schools

Arbor Montessori School........................................ 61 Athens Academy...................................................... 60 Atlanta Academy..................................................... 58 Atlanta International School................................... 40 Atlanta Montessori International School................. 8 The Bedford School................................................ 66 Benjamin Preparatory School................................... 7 Brenwood Academy................................................ 49 Bridgeway Christian Academy............................... 51 Canterbury School................................................... 64 Center Academy ..................................................... 71 The Children’s School.............................................. 63 The Cottage School................................................ 48 Counterpane Montessori School........................... 67 Covenant Christian School..................................... 72 Cumberland Academy of Georgia......................... 19 Eastside Christian School........................................ 43 Foundations For The Future School...................... 70 The Friends School of Atlanta................................ 62 Fulton Science Academy Private School................. 2 GRACEPOINT School............................................. 19 Harvester Christian Academy................................. 66 Hebron Christian Academy .................................... 61 Heritage Preparatory School.................................. 60 High Meadows School.............................................. 3 Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School.......................... 46 Holy Spirit Preparatory School............................... 41 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia......... 57 Johnson Ferry Christian Academy......................... 43 Kennesaw Mountain Nature Preschool................. 73 Killian Hill Christian School..................................... 62 Lanier Christian Academy....................................... 56 Lyndon Academy..................................................... 44 McGinnis Woods Country Day School ................. 52 Midtown International School................................ 63 Midway Covenant Christian School....................... 73 Mill Springs Academy ............................................ 40 MJCCA Preschools.................................................. 55 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs ................ 8 Montessori at Vickery................................................ 8 Montessori Kids Academy...................................... 53 Mount Paran Christian School................................ 70 Mount Pisgah Christian School................................ 5 Mt. Bethel Christian Academy................................ 46 Northwoods Montessori School............................. 57 Pace Academy......................................................... 42 The Piedmont School of Atlanta............................ 53 Pinecrest Academy.................................................. 54 Porter Academy....................................................... 42 Saint Francis School................................................ 47

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ADVERTISER INDEX (Continued from Previous Page) Shallowford Presbyterian School............................ 64 Springmont School.................................................. 48 Strong Rock Christian School................................ 67 The Suzuki School.................................................... 13 The Walker School................................................... 45 Wesleyan School...................................................... 58 Woodward Academy............................................... 68

Montessori Schools

Arbor Montessori School........................................ 61 Atlanta Montessori International School................. 8 Counterpane Montessori School........................... 67 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia......... 57 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs ................ 8 Montessori at Vickery................................................ 8 Montessori Kids Academy...................................... 53 Northwoods Montessori School............................. 57

Resources & Services

Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates.................... 33 Caron Treatment Centers ....................................... 11 Dare 2 Care.............................................................. 98 Georgia Association for Play.................................. 13 Georgia Lottery.........................................Back Cover My Eye Dr................................................................... 9 The School Box........................................................ 55

Special Needs & Learning Difficulties

The Academy at SOAR........................................... 19 The Bedford School................................................ 66 Center Academy..................................................... 71 Children’s Special Services...................................... 20 The Cottage School................................................ 48 Cumberland Academy of Georgia......................... 19 GRACEPOINT School............................................. 19 Mill Springs Academy............................................. 40 The Piedmont School of Atlanta............................ 53 Porter Academy....................................................... 42

Summer Camps & Activities

Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education...........................Inside Back Cover Callanwolde Fine Arts Center................................. 13 Generation Infocus.................................................. 90 High Meadows Summer Day Camp....................... 91 LEGOLAND Discovery Center Atlanta.................. 93 Squirrel Hollow Day Camp ..................................... 92 Theatrical Outfit....................................................... 93 U.S. Space & Rocket Center: Space Camp........... 15 Zoo Atlanta............................................................... 92

Tutoring & Study Skills

In-Home Tutors of Atlanta...................................... 90

Promoting total wellness of all children With over 10 years experience, board certified and a bilingual staff, we offer a full scope of general pediatric services from birth through age 21. Dr. Madhuri will address your child’s school issues in detail including IEP review and advocacy, assessing for learning and emotional issues related to school with collaboration with therapists.

Free prenatal consultations and monthly lactation and baby care classes provided. M.D., Viswandham, trician Dr. Madhuri rtified Pedia -Ce ard Bo P. F.A.A.

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11125 Jones Bridge Rd., Ste. 100, Alpharetta, Ga, 30022

Winter/Spring 2018

770-615-7000 www.dare2carepediatrics.com


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GEORGIA’S KIDS WIN.

It’s elementary, actually. See, every time you play the Lottery, you’re helping our kids get one step closer to their dreams. For over 20 years the Georgia Lottery has contributed more than $18.7 billion to education. On top of that, more than 1.7 million HOPE scholars have gone to college and more than 1.4 million four-year-olds have attended a Lottery-funded Pre-K Program. Add those numbers up and, well, let’s just say that’s a hair-raising number of happy kids.

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Atlanta School Guide | Winter/Spring 2018  

Atlanta’s leading education resource provides a wealth of information for parents and educators.