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HOW TO TAKE THE OUT OF

SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOLS FIND THE RIGHT FIT FOR YOUR CHILD

Atlanta’s Leading Education Resource

Summer/Fall 2019

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PUBLIC SCHOOLS

A COUNTYBY-COUNTY GUIDE TO METRO ATLANTA SCHOOLS

CATHOLIC EDUCATION BLENDING ACADEMICS WITH FAITH

G BOARDINLS O O H C S GUIDE COVERING: Independent | Boarding | Public | Charter | Early Education | Summer Camps | Field Trips and More


CONTENTS

SUMMER/FALL 2019

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26 30

FEATURES

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In Every Issue

Take the Stress out of Tests Learn how to help your child stay calm and stay focused during tests.

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Finding a Special Needs School Finding the right special needs school can be a challenge. Here's how to weigh your options and make the best choice.

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The Benefits of Catholic Schools Discover the benefits of Catholic schools and why many parents choose this education experience for their child.

6 How to Use This Guide 10 Critical Communication 16 Special Needs Resources 21 Headmaster’s Corner Ande Notkes of Midtown International School.

40 Independent School Guide Boarding School Directory 77  87  Public Schools by County 97  Educational Resources Tutoring, summer camps and activities, field trips and more

105 Advertiser Index 4

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HOW TO

Use This Guide Find an Independent School in

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1

Easy Steps!

Metro Atlanta Area Map To search for independent schools by region or neighborhood, turn to page 38 and use the color-coded map to direct you to each region’s page number.

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Education At a Glance

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Region Maps and Listings

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Once you’ve selected your region of interest, the charts beginning on page 40 include a comparison of features for each school in that region, along with the page number for each school’s ad.

Divided into regions of Atlanta, the color-coded maps beginning on page 43 provide each school’s location and page number for their ad.

Advertiser Index To find a school or resource by name, turn to the advertiser index on page 105 to find the appropriate page number.

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019

We gratefully thank our advertisers for their support of Atlanta School Guide. Publisher/President PATRICK KILLAM Editor JACKSON STEWART Marketing & Promotions JEFF THOMPSON Account Directors MARIA ALEXANDER BRIAN PICHOT Contributing Writers LARRY ANDERSON, DONNA NEALE, JON ROSS, MARY WELCH

TO ADVERTISE CALL

770-992-0273 Space closing for Winter/Spring 2020 issue: October 11, 2019 Atlanta School Guide, Summer/Fall 2019, Volume 14, Issue 2. Published bi-annually by Killam Publishing, Inc., 200 Market Place, Suite 230, Roswell, GA 30075. Atlanta School Guide assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. Information may have changed since press time, so please verify all information when contacting a school or educational resource. Reproduction in whole or in part of any elements of this publication is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. © 2019 Killam Publishing, Inc. For additional copies, further information or advertising, please contact:

KILLAM PUBLISHING, INC. P: 770-992-0273 F: 844-706-1545 info@killampublishing.com AtlantaSchoolGuide.com


Critical Communication

Trends and Happenings in Georgia Education What You Need to Know to Stay Up to Date With Atlanta and Georgia Education Harvester Christian Names New Head of School Harvester Christian School has selected Rick Johnson as its new head of school. Johnson arrives with more than more than 35 years of experience in Christian and independent school education, most recently serving as headmaster at Springwood School in Lanett, Ala. He is also a celebrated athletic director and basketball coach, having recorded 625 wins and eight state titles. Atlanta School Is State’s First All-Girls STEM School The Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy was recently accredited as a science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) school by AdvancEd. The school, a part of the Atlanta Public Schools system, is the first all-girls 10

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middle and high school in Georgia to receive the accreditation. Woodward Academy Debate Wins State Championship Mona Mahadevan and Malachi Robinson, both seniors at Woodward Academy, won their fourth consecutive state championship for debate at the Georgia Forensic Coaches Association State Championships in late February. Mahadevan and Robinson were also the top two individual speakers at the tournament, winning first and second place, respectively. Local Student Accepted to Dozens of Colleges Jordan Nixon, a senior at Douglas County High School, has received national attention after being accepted to more than three dozen colleges. Nixon was also awarded more than $1.6 Summer/Fall 2019

million in scholarships. Congratulations, Jordan! Westminster Coach Named National Coach of the Year Scott Snyder, head coach of the varsity boys soccer team at The Westminster Schools, was recently awarded the 2018 National Coach of the Year Award by United Soccer Coaches. Snyder has served as the school’s soccer coach for 20 years, and won eight Georgia High School Association state championships. Local Schools Ranked Among State’s Best Metro Atlanta schools dominated the rankings in Niche.com’s lists of the state’s best public and independent schools. Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science & Technology, Northview High, Walton High, Alpharetta High, North Gwinnett High, Lambert High, South Forsyth High, Johns Creek


High and Chattahoochee High were among the top 10 public schools, while The Westminster Schools, Pace Academy, The Paideia School, The Lovett School, Woodward Academy, Athens Academy, Atlanta International School, Holy Innocents Episcopal School and The Marist School were named among the top 10 private schools. Local Students Win Big at Math Tournament Andy Zhang of Greater Atlanta Christian School and Adam Hordines of Lawrenceville’s Mountain View High School won first place in their divisions at the annual Jay Cliett

and Bill Kipp High School Mathematics Tournament at Georgia Southwestern State University. Greater Atlanta Christian, Brandon Hall School and The Heritage School were also among the winners. DeKalb Student Wins $25,000 Science Prize Zoe Weiss, a senior at Lakeside High School in DeKalb County, was named one of 40 finalists in the Regeneron Science Talent Search in April, winning a $25,000 prize. Weiss created an algorithm to detect rare cell types to help in diagnosing disease. She is the first Georgia student since 2014 to be a finalist in the

competition, a national science and math competition for high school seniors. Gwinnett Students, Teachers Honored at STAR Awards Students and teachers from Gwinnett County public and independent schools were recognized at the Student Teacher Achievement Recognition (STAR) program’s annual luncheon. Among the 29 schools represented were Buford High School, Covenant Christian Academy, Greater Atlanta Christian School, Hebron Christian Academy, Killian Hill Christian School, Providence Christian Academy and The Wesleyan School.

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Critical Communication

Education 101

Terms to Know in Your Search for the Right Educational Experience for Your Child CHARTER SCHOOL  A tax-supported public school that is independently run, allowing for greater educational choice for parents in the community. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING  An educational approach using applied, hands-on methods of learning. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB)®  A specifically designed comprehensive academic program emphasizing traditional disciplines while instilling a global perspective in its students.

MAGNET SCHOOL  A public school that offers a specific or enhanced curriculum designed for students of special interest or ability. MONTESSORI  A school following the principles developed by Dr. Maria Montessori focusing on the unique individuality, self-reliance and independence of children. SPECIAL NEEDS A school or program for children who have mild to moderate learning differences. It usually features smaller class sizes, individualized attention and multisensory learning methods.

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ACCREDITATION  Official certification that guarantees a school provides an education of a reasonably high quality. Schools must prove levels of quality and maintain continuous standards of improvement. ACT An alternative to the SAT, this national college admissions examination consists of subject area tests in English, Mathematics, Reading and Science, with an optional 40-minute writing test. COLLEGE AND CAREER READY PERFORMANCE INDEX (CCRPI) Georgia’s annual tool for measuring how well its schools, districts, and the state are preparing students for the next educational level.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION  Education that applies to children from birth to age 8, focusing specifically on their development, including physical, emotional, sensory, communicative, cognitive and social needs. GEORGIA MILESTONES Tests designed to measure how well students in grades 3 through 12 acquire the skills and knowledge outlined in the state-adopted content standards. HOPE SCHOLARSHIP (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally)  A scholarship in Georgia, funded by the Georgia Lottery, that rewards academically achieving students with financial assistance to attend a degree, diploma, or certificate program at eligible public and private Georgia colleges and universities.

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT (ESSA) A federal law passed in 2015 replacing the No Child Left Behind Act, designed to ensure that all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a quality education and meet state academic proficiency standards. PSAT  A standardized test that offers students practice for the SAT Reasoning Test and allows them to qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Program. SAT  This standardized test measures the writing and language, reading and mathematical reasoning skills of students planning to attend college. SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS TEST (SSAT) Assesses the verbal, math, and reading abilities of students seeking to enroll in an independent school.

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Critical Communication

Deciphering Associations and Organizations Many local and national organizations work to bring out the best in summer camps and public, private and boarding schools by identifying schools that meet certain standards through accreditation. These groups also set policies, research educational advancements and offer services to the educational communities both in Atlanta and in Georgia. The following are just some of the associations and organizations you should know in your search for the best educational experience for your child. AdvancED advanc-ed.org The parent organization for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, AdvancED advances education excellence through accreditation and school improvement. The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS) boardingschools.com This organization of 250 boarding schools serves 14

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the professional development needs of boarding schools and provides information to potential students and their families. Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) ami-global.org Recognizes and provides support, training and development to schools that strongly adhere to Montessori method principles and practices. Summer/Fall 2019

Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools (AAAIS) aaais.org Promotes the highest standards and best administrative practices for accredited independent schools in the Atlanta metro area. Department of Education (DOE) gadoe.org A statewide, policy-driven organization governing the public school system of education in Georgia for grades K-12. Georgia Association of Christian Schools (GACS) gacs.org Uses generally accepted indicators of quality, voluntary self-improvement and peer review to measure Christian schools. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC) gapsec.org This state organization of independent schools for students with learning disabilities maintains a code of ethics and shares information about programs at member schools. Georgia Independent School Association (GISA) gisaschools.org An association of Georgia’s private, independent and parochial schools, dedicat


ed to serving the professional growth, advocacy and interscholastic needs of member schools. National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) naeyc.org A professional membership organization working to promote high-quality early learning for all young children, birth through age 8, by connecting early childhood practice, policy, and research. National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) nais.org A membership association

providing research, leadership and governance guidance and professional development opportunities for school and board leaders in U.S. independent schools. National Association of Private Special Education Centers (NAPSEC) napsec.org Represents private specialized education programs by promoting quality programs and services for individuals with disabilities and their families.

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) sacs.org The recognized regional accrediting body for both public and private schools in the eleven U.S. southern states. Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS) sais.org Provides accreditation services, professional growth opportunities and leadership development programs for 375 independent U.S. schools.

For more information about these and other organizations and associations that ensure quality education among camps and schools, visit the websites of the Georgia Department of Education (www.gadoe.org) or the U.S. Department of Education (www.ed.gov).

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room setting. Others may teach average or even above-average learners while also offering additional programs and classes for students with learning differences.

her evaluated by a mental health professional. A diagnosis is necessary in order to address the child’s educational needs.

After a Diagnosis: What’s Next? How to Tell if Your Child Has a Special If your child is diagnosed with a learnNeeds Situation ing disability and attends public school, First, it’s important to identify your child’s talk with the principal, school counselor specific challenges. Students who exhibit or another administrator about developaverage or above-average intelligence ing an Individualized Education Program but often seem distracted and don’t per- (IEP). All public schools are required to create an IEP for students form well in a traditional with learning disabilities classroom setting may who meet special educabe struggling with dyslexia, Asperger’s syndrome, A professional tion requirements. An IEP is a document that speciADHD or some other disevaluation is fies your child’s learning order that affects their ability to learn effectively. Also, crucial in order situation and educational needs and outlines disruptive or aggressive to evaluate a course of action for children may be exhibiting teachers and other profrustration brought on by a your child’s fessionals to follow to learning disability. educational help make sure your child If you suspect your child learns to the best of his or may have a learning disabilneeds. her ability. u ity, it’s critical to have him or atlantaschoolguide.com

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Critical Communication If you feel your local public school isn’t the right environment for your child, or simply want to explore all your options, there are many quality independent schools in the metro Atlanta area devoted to helping children with special needs and learning issues. Visit the Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children’s website (www.gapsec.org) or our listings for special needs schools on page 106 to help you with your search.

needs education. Independent special needs schools can offer more individualized instruction and a more structured and predictable environment, and are likely to address nonacademic issues such as social skills and self-esteem. As you begin searching for the right school for your child’s situation, here are some questions to keep in mind: • Will your child fare better in a school that focuses on his or her specific learning disability, or would you rather that he or she be able to interact with students with a wide range of learning capabilities? • Does the school serve a specific age range, or work with students on all grade levels? Many students with learning disabilities have trouble transitioning to new schools.

How Do I Find the Right School? All special needs schools are not the same. The first step is to identify those schools that can address your child’s specific learning difficulty, and offer the level of special needs instruction that you (and perhaps a professional) feel is best for your child. You may be more comfortable enrolling your child in a school that focuses specifically on his or her needs, or you may want a more diverse environment where he or she can interact with many different kinds of students. Familiarize yourself with the different options offered by each kind of school. Traditional indeIdentify those pendent schools that offer special needs schools that programs as part of a can best larger curriculum can offer that kind of enviaddress your ronment, but may have larger class sizes than child’s specific schools that specialize learning in specific learning disabilities. These kinds of difficulty. schools may also focus more on academics than on the therapeutic aspects of special 18

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Continued on page 20 u


COMMON SPECIAL NEEDS TERMS Asperger’s Syndrome: A developmental disorder on the autism spectrum, characterized by high intelligence, difficulty with social situations and repetitive patterns of behavior and interest.

Individualized Educational Program (IEP): A written statement that outlines the needs of a public school student with learning disabilities and creates a customized plan for meeting those needs.

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): An outdated term used to refer to the inattentive form of ADHD, in which a person is typically inattentive or distractible, but not hyperactive or impulsive.

Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): The federal law that governs how states and public education agencies that accept funding under the law address the educational needs of students with disabilities.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A brain-based syndrome affecting the regulation of functions including attention, concentration, memory and impulsivity. Autism Spectrum Disorder: A developmental disorder affecting the ability to communicate and interact. Symptoms include repetitive behaviors; intense, narrow interests and sensory sensibility. Dyslexia: A learning disability that impairs specific language skills, particularly reading. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC): An organization of independent schools serving students with learning disabilities and differences. Georgia Special Needs Scholarship (GSNS): A school-choice scholarship program for special needs students being served by an IEP in Georgia public schools.

Learning Disability: A neurological condition that affects how one processes information. Learning disabilities can impair reading, writing, speech, math, reason, memory, attention and coordination, as well as social skills and emotional maturity. Multisensory Instruction: An educational approach involving the use of all of a child’s senses, not just sight and hearing, to help with understanding concepts and solving problems. Response to Intervention (RTI): A process used by educators to help identify and address the needs of students experiencing behavioral or educational challenges, based on screening, instruction and assessment. Student Scholarship Organization (SSO): An organization authorized by the state of Georgia to receive funds and award scholarships under the Georgia Qualified Education Expense Tax Credit program.

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Critical Communication • D  oes the school offer a variety of extracurricular activities, including arts and sports programs? •  Is the school accredited? If so, by which organizations? • Is the staff certified to instruct special needs children, or those with your child’s specific learning difficulty? • Does the school focus more on academics or on addressing the child’s therapeutic needs? Financial Assistance Many independent special needs schools participate in the Georgia Special Needs Scholarship program (GSNS), a school choice program available to special needs students attending Georgia public schools. The program offers funds to off-

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set tuition and fees at participating private schools authorized by the State Board of Education. According to the Georgia Department of Education, scholarship amounts range from $2,500 to $13,500, with an average amount of around $6,000. The Qualified Education Expense Credit program provides another scholarship option. Donations are made to an organization known as a Student Scholarship Organization (SSO), which uses the money to award scholarships to students in pre-K through grade 12. Many schools also offer their own scholarships or tuition assistance programs as well. Contact individual schools for details. For more information on special needs schools and resources, please see our listings on page 106.


Headmaster’s Corner

Ande Notkes

Head of School, Midtown International School (MIS) Ande Notkes has two decades of experience in education and educational administration. Her many years abroad and her multicultural family at home reinforce her passion for globally minded education in the strategy and day-to-day practices of MIS. She holds a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts, a master’s degree in philosophy, and most recently completed her MBA at Emory University.

What is your educational philosophy? Gifted students thrive when every decision centers around the idea that no one waits to learn. Creative problem-solving is the crux of all learning at MIS, as students learn to think critically and deeply, to collaborate and take in multiple perspectives.

How is the field of education changing? There seems to be a grassroots movement to really see and value each child as they are. I’m excited to see what can happen when every student feels a connection to their teachers and the student experience is placed at the forefront of decision-making.

What do you love most about your job? I love seeing what happens when we don’t put limits on learning. I love, love, love hearing the students talk about their thinking and learning. Their excitement and engagement are palpable when you walk in our doors.

What advice would you offer parents about their children’s education? Every child has a voice. Teach them to use it to advocate for themselves and to be fearless in their pursuit of learning that works for them.

How can parents best contribute to the education process? Our motto of “No one waits to learn” doesn’t just apply to students. Parents’ attendance at our weekly parent education events creates alignment between school and home. Students who feel like their parents “get” them are more successful.

MIDTOWN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Emphasis: Atlanta’s home for globally minded, gifted learners.

Accreditations or Affiliations: AdvancED, GAC, NAIS, NAGC

Year Founded: 2013

Location: 1575 Sheridan Rd. NE, Atlanta, GA 30324

Grades: K-12 Students: 250 Avg. Class Size: 12 Tuition Range: $22,000-$24,000

Contact: 404-542-7003, midtowninternational school.com

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TAKE THE STRESS OUT OF

TESTS HELPING YOUR CHILD STAY CALM AND FOCUSED

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BY LARRY ANDERSON

Any student can tell you: Tests cause stress.

That stress can come from many places. Most students want to perform well on tests, so a little anxiety is natural. On top of that, children—especially teenagers— can be subject to a swirling mass of emotions, causing them to doubt and criticize themselves. They may feel pressure to perform as well as their friends. And then they may feel pressure from their parents, especially when it comes to the SAT, which many colleges and universities use to measure a student’s readiness for college. The type of test can matter a great deal. Standardized tests can be especially very stressful.


TALK ABOUT THE PROBLEM

The first thing to remember is that stress is contagious. As the parent of a child facing a test, try not to stress out about that test yourself. Children take cues from their parents all the time, and sensing your stress and anxiety can add to their own. Instead, talk to your child about the pressure they may be facing. Ask them how they’re dealing with it, and ask follow-up questions. Do they know what specifically is making them anxious about this test? Is it a lack of preparation and planning that caused a bad outcome on the test? Do they feel extra stress because of the high expectation of others? Are they trying too hard to compete with their peers? The more a child understands the source of their anxiety, the easier it is for them to put those fears in perspective and work to overcome them.

THE FIRST THING TO REMEMBER IS THAT STRESS IS CONTAGIOUS. AS THE PARENT OF A CHILD FACING A TEST, TRY NOT TO STRESS OUT ABOUT THAT TEST YOURSELF. They’re different from typical tests, with rigid rules and timing. The teacher may act differently on the day of a standardized test, as they’re allowed less flexibility than they might use in a normal classroom setting. Midterms and final exams also carry more importance and expectation, and therefore more stress, than other tests. Whatever the reason, tests—and the stress they can cause—are a reality in school environments, and typically at every grade level. A little stress can play a positive role in test-taking, when it motivates a child to push toward a positive outcome. But too much stress can negatively affect a student’s performance, not to mention the effect it can have on their health. So what can parents do to help children deal with test-related stress?

Talking about stress with parents or others can help. Stress-related anxiety does the most harm when kept bottled up inside. Encourage your child to share their feelings about it. It’s also important to make sure you know what tests your child has coming up and when. This can help you help your child prepare for upcoming tests, of course. But it can also help the child to know that you’re aware of what they’re dealing with.

WAYS TO WORK THROUGH STRESS

It’s possible to help your child work through some of their stress. But first, you need to recognize the signs. Do they quickly change the subject or grow irritated when you ask atlantaschoolguide.com

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about upcoming tests? Do they display a loss or lack of appetite? Do they get headaches? If your child is dealing with stress while studying, allow them to pause, relax, take some deep breaths, and then push on with the job at hand. A variety of activities can help to push stress to the side, whether listening to classical music, taking a walk, or even petting the family dog or cat. And believe it or not, dark chocolate has been shown to fight the stress hormone cortisol, to release endorphins, and to have an overall relaxing effect.

BE PREPARED

No matter what test your child is preparing to take, there are some things he or she can do to make the experience easier and less intimidating. It may sound obvious, but preparation is key. Keeping up with schoolwork and 24

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DURING THE TEST

• Come prepared. Bring the proverbial No. 2 pencil (or better yet, two!), and a calculator or whatever else you’ll need. • Stay relaxed. Don’t panic. Take deep breaths to relax and maintain a positive attitude. • Have a plan, and execute it. Go through and answer the easiest questions first, or the ones that have the highest point value. Then come back to the rest as time permits. Read questions carefully and pay attention to details. • Use all your time. Don’t compete to finish first, or worry about when others finish. Don’t rush, but pace yourself. If you have extra time at the end, use it to check over your work to avoid careless mistakes.


homework in the days and weeks leading up to a test can help reduce a child’s fear that they’re not ready. “Cramming,” or trying to catch up on a ton of information immediately before a test, can be ineffective, and only cause more stress. Help your child maintain good study habits, which can strip away the stress of testing and replace it with confidence. Encourage them to manage their study time effectively, review their basic skills and work on improving their vocabulary. Avoid distractions and don’t try to multitask: Think of the brain as a spotlight that can only focus on one thing at a time. Determine what will be covered on the test. The more a student knows about what to expect from a test, the less anxiety he or she is likely to feel. Always go to review sessions, and try not to miss class the last day right before the test.

Try to determine the test format in advance. How long will it be? Will there be an essay portion? What’s allowed and what’s not? Will they lose points for a wrong answer? If your child is facing a standardized test, the student should take one or more practice tests if possible, reading each question carefully and identifying key words so that they understand exactly what the question is asking. Encourage your child to evaluate multiple-choice questions, eliminating each answer until only the correct one remains. Above all, make sure your child maintains a positive attitude, gets enough sleep and has a proper breakfast on the day of the test. Excessive stress is not inevitable when students face a test. With the right physical and mental preparation, your child can process their stress, minimize the effects, and put it in its place.

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SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOL

Choosing a school for your child can be a complex process

for any family, but it’s especially true if your son or daughter has a learning disability or struggles to learn effectively in a conventional school setting. Identifying the nature of your child’s difficulties and sorting through available educational options can be very daunting tasks. Fortunately, the Atlanta area boasts a large number of public and independent schools equipped to address the challenges 26

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SELECTING THE RIGHT FIT FOR CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DIFFICULTIES BY MARY WELCH AND DONNA NEALE

that these students can face, from specific disabilities such as autism, dyslexia, and speech and hearing difficulties to emotional and behavior disorders.

IDENTIFYING THE ISSUE

The first step to securing the best education for your struggling child is to pinpoint his or her issues. If your student exhibits average or above-average intelligence but doesn’t perform well in a traditional classroom setting, there may be a diagnosable


reason such as dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Asperger’s Syndrome, or vision or hearing difficulties. Don’t be afraid to request a professional evaluation. “When parents and teachers are concerned about a bright student struggling to learn and gain skills, a comprehensive psycho-educational evaluation is often recommended,” advises Amy Zaring, director of Woodward Academy’s Transition Learning Support Program, which helps students with learning difficulties develop the skills they need to successfully navigate a collegepreparatory curriculum. “The evaluation report provides a profile of the child’s abilities, weaknesses, processing areas that will support or inhibit learning, as well as social, emotional, or attentional strengths and needs. Comparing these scores to specific areas of academic achievement begins the road map of the child’s learning profile.” When choosing an evaluator, Catherine Trapani, Ph.D., head of The Piedmont School of Atlanta, advocates thoughtful decision-making. “Take the time to find

out about the professional’s credentials, including where the professional received education and training, the kind of childhood disorders they were particularly trained to evaluate, and how long they have been working in the field,” she says. “An important question would be to ask whether the evaluator offers assistance to the parents in determining the next steps to implement the recommendations that arise from the evaluation. If they do not, move on.” If your child’s testing results in the diagnosis of an eligible special education disability, and your child is currently enrolled in a public school, an Individualized Education Program (IEP) statement will be developed. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires all U.S. public schools to provide an IEP for learning-disabled students who meet special education requirements. Working with the parents, the educational system creates an IEP that details how the child learns, sets measureable goals, and outlines what teachers and other professionals can do to help the student learn much more successfully. u

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SEARCHING FOR THE RIGHT SCHOOL

When interviewing potential schools, ask questions about learning techniques, environment, and focus. “Is the school more geared for students with strong academics and poor social skills,” asks Betsy Box, admissions director and director emeritus of The Bedford School, “or is it more for students with learning disabilities who learn in different ways?” For instance, some schools are tailored to a specific disability. The Schenck School serves students with dyslexia, while The Piedmont School of Atlanta serves typical and bright children with autism, learning disabilities, and attention deficits. Mill Springs Academy and The Howard School cater to students with learning difficulties who plan to go to college. The Cottage School focuses on overall adult success, providing a comprehensive college preparatory curriculum as well as vocational and special “hands-on” classes for students with mild to moderate learning difficulties. Other schools don’t specifically target those with learning disabilities, but have programs in place to help those students. 28

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Woodward Academy, for example, provides a unique learning environment for students with mild to moderate dyslexia, dysgraphia and dyscalculia (among other diagnoses) within a conventional college preparatory school setting. Its Transition Learning Support Program allows younger students to learn the same curriculum as other Woodward students, but the material is taught in ways that suit their individual needs and learning styles. The program aims to equip these students to merge into the traditional classroom for high school. Parents will want to take other factors into consideration, as well. Are the teachers certified to instruct special education or special-needs children? Is the school accredited? If so, by which organizations? Does the school offer financial assistance or scholarships? Are there a variety of sports, after-school activities and/or arts programs? Are there summer programs? Does the school serve a specific age range, or work with students on all grade levels? As you begin compiling your short list of potential schools, don’t be shy about consulting with professionals. Your child’s doctor, counselor, or specialized tutor may have advice about school programs that relate to your child’s needs. Look into foundations or local support groups for your child’s disabilities and make connections with others who have traveled your path. Their experiences can prove invaluable. “Go deeper and consider the lifelong goals of the family,” says Trapani. “What do you want for your child in adulthood and what do they need to achieve that long-term goal?”

MAKING A DECISION

Visiting the schools you’re interested in is a crucial step, as talking to the staff will give you a sense of how they interact with their students.


Make an appointment, and come prepared. In addition to the results of a psychological exam or an IEP, bring a sample of the child’s schoolwork and a willingness to candidly discuss your child’s needs. “Parents should be prepared to talk about their child’s preferred learning style and environment and what will interest and excite their child outside of the classroom,” Woodward’s Zaring says. Ask questions. Take notes. See for yourself if the physical setting and overall atmosphere make you and your child feel comfortable. “Parents can tour the school and see the learning taking place,” says Debbi Scarborough, co-founder and headmaster of the Cumberland Academy of Georgia. “They know their child and will get a sense of if the child’s going to fit in.” Zaring agrees. “Including the student is a wonderful way to hear likes and dislikes,

as well as interests and passions,” she says. “A student’s reaction to a school tour or shadow day can be informative and exciting.” Once parents have done the work and gone through these important steps, the final choice may be easier than they think. “Parents know their children better than anyone,” says Box of The Bedford School. “There may be more than one school that could be appropriate for your child. Go with the school that you think will work best for your child. Go with your gut.”

For additional information on learning disabilities and special needs resources, including a list of common terms, please see our Special Needs section on page 16. For a list of special needs schools in this publication, turn to page 106.

THE COTTAGE SCHOOL

Building a sense of self for students with special learning needs through academic and experiential programming, The Cottage School (TCS) prepares individuals for fulfillment of their true potential as confident, productive, and independent adults. The Cottage School provides an educational environment for students with learning differences in grades 4-12. It prides itself in meeting the student where they need to be met. It also recognizes that all students learn differently, so it teaches differently. Based on three pillars of success. academic, social and emotional, TCS school offers: • Small class sizes (10-student average) for individualized learning. • Customized education plans for every student. • A work-based, incentive-based model that teaches life skills. • A year-round sports program that encourages all students to participate. • A required post-secondary plan that insures continued success after graduation. Come visit the beautiful 23-acre campus and contact the director of admissions for an appointment today. For more information, call 770-641-8688 or visit cottageschool.org. SPECIAL PROMOTION

atlantaschoolguide.com

29


BENEFITS OF A

Catholic Education When considering educational options for their

children, many parents may overlook one popular option: Catholic schools. But there are a number of reasons why parents might want to consider a Catholic education for their child. For parents who were raised in and are still active in the Catholic church, of course, grounding their son or daughter 30

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019

CONNECTING STRONG ACADEMICS WITH FAITH BY JON ROSS

in the moral teachings of their faith can be extremely important. But these schools can offer benefits that may be attractive to parents who belong to a different faith, as well. Fortunately for those parents, the metro Atlanta area offers many excellent options.

STRONG ACADEMICS

Catholic schools function much like other independent schools. Teachers at these


schools are certified and complete continuing education courses. And many are well-rounded professionals with experience in both public and independent school environments. What’s more, many Catholic schools offer first-rate academic programs that give students an advantage when applying for colleges, in addition to high-quality athletic and extracurricular programs. “We have a pretty rigorous curriculum,” says Brian Dooling, director of marketing and enrollment at the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta’s Office of Catholic Schools, which oversees 18 schools under the umbrella of the Archdiocese in the metro Atlanta area, Athens and Rome. (Not all Catholic schools in metro Atlanta fall under the Archdiocese’s jurisdiction.) Two of the Archdiocese’s schools, Christ the King School and Holy Redeemer Catholic School, were named 2018 National Blue Ribbon Schools, a distinction awarded each year based on academic excellence. According to Dooling, the Archdiocese’s schools benefit from a 100 percent gradu-

ation rate, and its students achieve better test scores than their peers in public and independent schools. “We have excellent results with regard to getting our kids into the colleges of their choice,” he says. That strong academic grounding is part of what appeals to parents who aren’t members of the church. Non-Catholic students make up about 14 percent of the student body at Archdiocese schools, according to Dooling.

TEACHING THE FAITH

One of the main advantages of a Catholic education is that parents can rest assured that their children are being raised in the teachings of their church. While religious curriculum can vary, parents curious about Catholic education options can look at these schools as providing students with a weekday extension of the church experience. Students will graduate from Catholic high schools, and progress from religious elementary schools, with a strong foundation in Catholic teachings. “Daily exposure to the Catholic faith is

atlantaschoolguide.com

31


MANY CATHOLIC SCHOOLS OFFER FIRST-RATE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS THAT GIVE STUDENTS AN ADVANTAGE WHEN APPLYING FOR COLLEGES, IN ADDITION TO HIGH-QUALITY ATHLETIC AND EXTRACURRICULAR PROGRAMS. important to developing a strong religious foundation,” Dooling says. “Non-Catholic parents who choose our schools for their children cite the moral formation that their children receive and the importance of service to others, which allows students to live the faith they are learning.” That moral formation is incorporated into every facet of a child’s education, says James Byrne, vice president of enrollment and operations at Marist School in Atlanta. Students receive an excellent education and benefit from an array of extracurricular activities from athletics to STEMfocused teams, all with a perspective that reflects the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. “I think what Catholic schools can clearly offer is a grounded set of moral teachings and emphasis,” he says. “It’s the focus on God and how that is connected 32

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019

in our study of math and our play on the football field. You can’t separate them.” Marist, like other Catholic schools, encourages parental participation in a child’s religious education. “We want families where faith development is important to them, and might be as important as the other pieces that every school emphasizes,” Byrne says. Academics and religion blend together at Catholic schools, but community service is just as important. During Holy Week leading up to Easter Sunday, Jerry Raymond, principal at Saint Thomas More Catholic School, devoted his time to helping his students complete a service-oriented project to help address the needs of less-fortunate Atlantans. Students spent that Thursday morning creating “blessing bags”—small sacks full of toiletries and snacks—to keep in their cars and pass out to the homeless. u


WEIGHING THE COST

Academics and a strong moral center are important factors to consider. But for many parents, the cost of that educational experience can make all the difference. Those parents may be pleasantly surprised to learn that in some cases, tuition at a Catholic institution may be less expensive than at a secular independent school. “The main misconception is that Catholic school—it’s not affordable,” says George Wilkerson, principal at Our Lady of Victory Catholic School, a K-8 school in Tyrone. Many different factors can go into a school’s tuition, including its size and the quality of its academics and other offerings, so making a direct, apples to apples comparison can be difficult. Still, a Catholic education may cost much less than parents might expect. Also, like independent schools, some Catholic schools offer financial aid to help defray the cost of tuition. “We try to make [tuition] affordable to as many families as we can,” Wilkerson says, noting that students at Our Lady of Victory receive an average of $3,500 in financial assistance. 34

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019

FINDING THE RIGHT FIT

Once you’ve weighed the benefits of a Catholic school education and decided to go down that path, there’s still the matter of finding the right school for your child. The best way to get a feel for whether a particular school is a fit for your child is to take a tour, says Raymond of Saint Thomas More. Your child can examine the academic and extracurricular offerings, and you can ask questions of the faculty and staff. Getting a feel for the academic curriculum, and the way the school teaches its faith, will help you get a sense of how the school might prepare your child for all aspects of life. After visiting his school, “Parents realize that their child, Catholic or non-Catholic, will get a very good education here,” Raymond says. FOR MORE INORMATION • For a list of schools in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta visit archatl.com • For additional Catholic school options, see our list of Catholic school advertisers on page 105.


CATHOLIC SCHOOL GUIDE

HOLY SPIRIT PREPARATORY SCHOOL

Holy Spirit Preparatory School (HSP) embraces the traditions of Catholic education to form students of deep faith, advanced intellect, and heroic virtue. The young but accomplished school is one of the few independent Catholic schools in the Atlanta metro area. It serves students from 6 months old all the way through 12th grade, so it’s perfect for families. Because it maintains a smaller enrollment than most independent schools, HSP finds the right place for each student—channeling them to the right club, the right gifted classes, the right team— and the right college fit after HSP. The school is all about personalized learning, small class sizes, and forming students in “mind, body, and soul” in a family of faith and learning. For all these reasons and more, it’s been repeatedly named one of the top Catholic schools in the country by the Catholic Education Honor Roll. For more information, call 678-761-7992 or visit holyspiritprep.org.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC SCHOOL

Celebrating more than 65 years of Catholic education as a K-8 school, St. Joseph Catholic School is a twice-recognized National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence! Located in Marietta, the school draws students from Cobb, Cherokee, Paulding, and Fulton counties and strives to educate the whole child through its curriculum. One key to the school’s success is the dedicated, certified faculty and staff. By continuing to use new methods of instruction, combined with programs such as OrtonGillingham, Wilson Language, Touch Math, and STREAM activities, the school offers a rigorous curriculum for its students. In addition to the core area subjects, the school offers instruction in the fine arts, offers support for learners with differences, has an extended care program, and extra-curricular activities. A rigorous curriculum, certified teachers, and a supportive environment—as one of our parents stated, “How wonderful to drop your child off at school and know that she is being cared for by such a lovely, capable teacher!” Come experience St. Joseph Catholic School—“Educating the mind… Expanding the heart.” For more information, call the school at 770-428-3328, or visit stjosephschool.org. You can follow the school at Facebook/sjcs.marietta, Twitter/SJCS_ MariettaGA, or Instagram/sjcs_marietta. SPECIAL PROMOTION

atlantaschoolguide.com

35


CATHOLIC SCHOOL GUIDE

SAINT THOMAS MORE CATHOLIC SCHOOL

What sets Saint Thomas More Catholic School apart? From the moment you step on the campus, you can feel a difference. Joy is abundant! Its community thrives in living out the school mission to be “a joyful learning community reaching out to the world as the hands of Christ.” As a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence, it provides an academically challenging and rewarding learning environment. As a Catholic school in the Jesuit tradition, Saint Thomas More is committed to the Jesuit ideals of academic excellence, service of faith, promotion of justice, and education of the whole child—mind, body and spirit. It strives to inspire a global sense of understanding and compassion for others and the courage to put its faith into action. Founded in 1950 and located near downtown Decatur, Saint Thomas More Catholic School offers kindergarten through 8th-grade students an academically excellent education grounded in the Catholic faith. Discover how it feels to be part of the STM family—schedule a tour today. For more information, call 404-373-8456 or visit stmga.org. SPECIAL PROMOTION

36

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019


an occupational therapy service

for children toddler through teen

TREATING DEVELOPMENTAL SENSORY AND BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS Services

Occupational Therapy for children with mild to moderate issues, inclusive of, but not limited to PDD, ADD, ADHD, Autism, motor and sensory delays, sensory integrative dysfunction, and more. Exclusive Provider of: WIN® Write Incredibly Now® Handwriting Program

CHILD/PARENT ADVOCACY IEP/504 accommodations help!

KNOW THE FACTS BEFORE YOU SIGN!

WIN® Handwriting and Sensory Social Skills Camp

OT, Art, music yoga included

HANDWRITING & SOCIAL SKILS

An Occupational Therapy based sensory-motor camp for handwriting skills and sensory regulation social skills! REGISTER AT PACE ACADEMY—forms on line at www.paceacademy.org/programs/summer-programs or

call Beth Singleton,Pace Academy Summer Camp Director at 404-240-9130. Possible funding GA Community Services 404-634-4222 ask for Nicole Brickhouse

Handwriting, Sensory Skills, Homework Organization our specialities! Year round treatment and evaluative services available

Fun activity based individualized treatments designed specific to your child’s needs.

Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L, FAOTA CEO/Executive Director Children’s Special Services, LLC

770-394-9791 • info@childrens-services.com • www.childrens-services.com atlantaschoolguide.com

37


38

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019

5

1

For features of independent schools, turn to Education At a Glance on pg. 40. For public school system information by county, turn to pg. 87.

2 3

REGIONS FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

metro atlanta area map

N


Alpharetta, Buckhead, Crabapple, Holly Springs, Marietta, North Buckhead, Roswell

Alpharetta, Brookhaven, Johns Creek, Peachtree Corners, Roswell

Ansley Park, Athens, Dacula, Decatur, Midtown, Athens, Dacula, Decatur, Inman Park, Lilburn, Morningside, Stone Northeast AtlantaWatkinsville Morningside, Mountain,

REGION 3: 3: Atlanta Atlanta East East p.58 REGION

p.53 REGION 2: Atlanta North/Northeast

p.43 REGION 1: Atlanta North/Northwest

Page | Region | Neighborhoods Douglasville, Eagle’s Landing, Fairburn, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Metro-Atlanta

Austell, Downtown Atlanta, Kennesaw, Marietta, Smyrna, Smyrna-Vinings

p.72  REGION 5: Atlanta West

p.66 R  EGION 4: Atlanta South/ Southeast/Southwest

4

Tutoring, Summer Camps and Activities, Field Trips and Education Programs.

p.97 Educational Resources

p.87 Public School County Guide

Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia

p.77 Boarding Schools

Additional Education Sections

S


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

43

REGION 1: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHWEST

46

Atlanta International School

404-841-3840

25

Big Blue Marble Academy

770-704-4925

50

Blessed Trinity Catholic High School

678-277-9083

$12,700 9-12th

51

The Cottage School

770-641-8688

20

Cumberland Academy of Georgia

$21,5004-12th $27,000

404-835-9000

2

Fulton Science Academy

678-366-2555

51

High Meadows School

770-993-2940

50

Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School

404-255-4026

45

Holy Spirit Preparatory School

678-761-7992

48

Lyndon Academy

770-926-0166

44

Mill Springs Academy

770-360-1336

46

Pace Academy

404-262-1345

47

Porter Academy

770-594-1313

52

Saint Francis School

770-641-8257

47

Springmont School

404-252-3910

49

The Walker School

770-427-2689

53

Atlanta Academy

678-461-6102

80

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

Bridgeway Christian Academy

770-751-1972

55 54

194 1,270

24

185 12-22

76

1,001

19

54

220

10

• •

PK412th

16

APPLICATION DEADLINE

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

UNIFORM

AP/IB COURSES

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

AVG. CLASS SIZE

Oct. Jan. 15

• Appt. Rolling •

CC

Oct.

Feb. 1

Ongoing Rolling

20

100

9

• Appt. Rolling

75

605

20

350

18

$25,000 4-12th $12,000$14,000 $6,590$20,080 $11,950$28,920 $3,400$24,780 $6,400$15,100 $20,000$26,000 $25,800$29,715 $20,476$21,301 $11,000$21,500 $10,500$21,200 $12,290$23,680

# STUDENTS

Dec. Rolling

PK-8th

58

PK312th

145 1,360 16-18

E

PK-12th

88

C

PK412th

20

185

12

53

285

10

164 1,105

12

20

72

10

110

800

12

Nov. Feb. 15

• Ongoing Rolling

1-12th P1-12th PK-8th

K-12th

550 12-14

18mo8th

35

250

20

3y-12th

117

865

14

60

345

16

28

135

8 12

Nov.

Feb.

Oct. Jan. 31

Nov. Mar. 12

• Appt. Rolling

• Sept. Rolling •

Nov.

Feb. 1

Appt. Rolling

Oct. Mar. 15 Appt.

Call

REGION 2: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHEAST

57

54

$23,9323K-12th $27,320 $8,000- Infant$11,200 5th

# TEACHERS

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist CC = Catholic C = Christian E = EpiscopaL J = Jewish M = Methodist ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker SA = Seventh-Day Adventist

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia McGinnis Woods Country Day School

770-814-8001 770-664-7764

3

MJCCA Preschools

678-812-3833

8

Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs

770-205-6277

8

Montessori at Vickery

55 The Piedmont School of Atlanta

$10,500$23,050 $27,000$52,850 $3,450$12,850 $650$1,465 $10,125$14,225 $5,233$19,998 $4,700$12,500 $9,160$13,600

P-8th

ND

PS3-8th

27

150

8wks6y Infant8th 6wksTK 6wks18y 13mo9y

18

80 Varies

65

400

15

120

480

15

30

230 12-30

• •

Nov. Rolling

• Rolling Rolling

• Appt. Rolling • Appt. Rolling

J

Appt. Rolling

• Appt. Rolling

20

177

30

• Appt. Rolling

$25,750

K-HS

7

22

4-8

Sept. Rolling

770-777-9131

57

Wesleyan School

770-448-7640

56

William & Reed Academy

678-456-5131

$10,450

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

6-12th

Summer/Fall 2019

C

404-382-8200

$17,440K-12th $24,900

40

6-12th

230 1,180

16

17

8

140

C

Nov. Jan. 29 Appt. Rolling


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

59

Athens Academy

706-549-9225

5

Atlanta Montessori International School

404-325-6777

64

Canterbury School

404-522-5659

62

Choice Educational Academy

770-921-3690

61

Connections School of Atlanta

404-602-9404

60

The Friends School of Atlanta

404-373-8746

59

Hebron Christian Academy

770-963-9250

63

Killian Hill Christian School

770-921-3224

108

Midtown International School

404-542-7003

61

Saint Thomas More Catholic School

404-373-8456

THRIVE Christian Academy

64 Westminster Christian Academy

470-375-4120 706-769-9372

The Bedford School

$11,260$19,825 $9,195$19,750 $13,500$20,970 $12,000$17,000 $7,500$11,000 $29,500 $13,950$22,100 $9,450$11,550 $5,100$12,400 $22,800$23,900 $8,222$11,314 $6,300$9,000 $3,950$9,565

APPLICATION DEADLINE

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

AVG. CLASS SIZE

# STUDENTS

18mo8th

28

265

K3-12th

128

955 10-12

8wks15y Infant8th

55

279 9-30

20

100

10

Call

Call

10

8

16

4-7

9

1-12th 14-21

Oct. Feb. 28

Appt. Rolling

25

Nov. Feb. 15

40

172

K4-12th

126

915 18-22

C

K4-12th

C

Appt. Mar. 31 Monthly Rolling

Q

Dec. Feb. 19

44

400

14

K-12th

45

260

12

K-8th

36

480 24-27

C

21

161

12

C

50

365

15

C

PK312th PK412th

Appt. Rolling Ongoing Call

PK3-8th

• Nov. Rolling

Jan.

Mar. 1

Ongoing Mar. 15

31

150 10-12

9

90

106 1,005

14

B

50

300

16

C

82

890

16

C

14

112

10

CC

115

830

12

C

352 2,635 16

16

90

12

C

6

48

16

ND

22

162 12-15

C

25

346

C

770-774-8001

$19,550

770-461-2304

$14,000 3y-18y

$4,068K3-12th $13,944 $4,250K4-12th $9,065 $12,640K-12th $18,690 $9,220

PK-8th

$6,721- PK3$14,400 12th $18,300PK-12th $28,800

68

Eagle’s Landing Christian Academy

770-957-2927

67

Harvester Christian Academy

770-942-1583

69

Landmark Christian School

770-306-0647

36

Our Lady of Victory Catholic School

770-306-9026

Strong Rock Christian School

678-833-1200

Woodward Academy

404-765-4001

71

Oct. Rolling

• March Rolling •

Oct. Rolling

Jan. Rolling

REGION 4: ATLANTA SOUTH/SOUTHEAST/SOUTHWEST

70 Counterpane Montessori School

70

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

404-321-9304

68

352 2,635 16

UNIFORM

Arbor Montessori School

66

REGION 3: ATLANTA EAST

60

65

AP/IB COURSES

58

$18,300PK-12th $28,800

# TEACHERS

404-765-4001

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

Woodward Academy

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

71

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist CC = Catholic C = Christian E = EpiscopaL J = Jewish M = Methodist ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker SA = Seventh-Day Adventist

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

72

REGION 5: ATLANTA WEST

7

Benjamin Preparatory School

770-436-5200

75

Center Academy

770-333-1616

76

Covenant Christian School

770-435-1596

73

The Cumberland School

678-426-1600

1-9th

$7,800- 6wks$14,500 2nd $5,0004-12th $14,680 $6,692K4-8th $10,694 $4,920K3-12th $9,990

• Ongoing Rolling

n/a

18

• •

• Appt. Rolling

• Sept. Rolling

• Nov. Rolling

• Appt. Rolling

Jan. Rolling

Oct. Feb. 28

• Appt. Rolling •

• Appt. Rolling Visit • Website Call • Oct. Rolling

Education At-a-Glance Continued on Page 42 u


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

77

# STUDENTS

AVG. CLASS SIZE

KINDERGARTEN

APPLICATION DEADLINE

678-305-3000

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

770-428-3328

Whitefield Academy

13-15

UNIFORM

St. Joseph Catholic School

96 290300

AP/IB COURSES

74 75

14

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

770-578-0182

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

Mount Paran Christian School

9-12th

# TEACHERS

770-590-1866

74

$6,750$8,000 $1,800$7,000 $3,874$19,623 $7,099$9,230 $10,900$24,000

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

25

PHONE 404-799-0337

PRESCHOOL

SCHOOL Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy Midway Covenant Christian School

73

GRADES/AGES

PAGE

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS *KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist CC = Catholic C = Christian E = EpiscopaL J = Jewish M = Methodist ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker SA = Seventh-Day Adventist

SA

• Appt.

Call

Jan. Rolling

Nov. Rolling

Oct. Apr. 24

Oct. Jan. 31

K3-8th

32

15

P

PK312th

127 1,100

12

C, ND

50

445

25

C

82

853

17

C

K-8th PK412th

BOARDING SCHOOLS

85

Baylor School

423-267-5902

80

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

78

Canterbury School

860-210-3800

80

Darlington School

706-235-6051

81

The Fessenden School

617-630-2300

78

Forman School

860-567-1802

86

Foxcroft School

540-687-4340

84

The Knox School

631-686-1600

79

North Broward Preparatory School

954-247-0179

81

Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

706-746-7720

83

Saint Stanislaus

228-467-9057

84

The Stony Brook School

631-751-1800

82

Worcester Academy

508-754-5302

85

Wyoming Seminary

570-270-2100

42

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

$25,440$51,810 $27,000$52,850 $45,000$65,000 $11,690$52,820 $60,900$71,100 $64,255$78,600 $54,000

116 1,050

14

• Nov.

28

135

8

• Ongoing Rolling

60

325

12

Oct.

147

723

15

Appt. Rolling

90

328

12

68

233

8

30

178

10

Appt. Feb. 1

30

159

12

• Feb. Rolling

15

• Appt. Rolling

Oct.

Nov. Rolling

6-12th 6-12th 9-12th & PG PK-12th

5-9th 9-12th & PG 9-12th & PG 6-12th & PG PK312th

$15,500$50,350 $24,200$32,650 $9,105PK-12th $60,380 $8,4507-12th $29,050

$57,800 7-12th $55,000- 6-12th $68,000 & PG $26,400- 18mo$54,900 PG

Summer/Fall 2019

Varies 1,600 90

CC

Call

Call

• Appt. Rolling

600

12

P

33

376

25

C

66

402

15

C,ND

90

590

14

113

821

14

• •

M

Rolling

Feb. 1

Oct. Jan. 31

• •

Oct.

Oct.

Feb. 1

Appt. Rolling


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHWEST

25

48

1

44

GION RE

50

47

51 52 49

2 51

20 50 47 45 46

46

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta International School 46 Big Blue Marble Academy 25 Blessed Trinity Catholic High School 50 The Cottage School 51 Cumberland Academy of Georgia 20 Fulton Science Academy Private School 2 High Meadows School 51 Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School 50

Holy Spirit Preparatory School Lyndon Academy Mill Springs Academy Pace Academy Porter Academy Saint Francis School Springmont School The Walker School

45 48 44 46 47 52 47 49

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Roswell With its mix of stately neighborhoods and new developments, its quaint downtown area and miles of trails that meander through forests and along the Chattahoochee River, Roswell attracts many families and nature-loving residents to its city limits.

Sandy Springs Newbie, Sandy Springs became its own city in 2005, and multitudes of boutiques, bars and restaurants line Roswell Road, its main thoroughfare. Residents also enjoy the community’s many family-centered events held throughout the year. atlantaschoolguide.com

43


ALPHARETTA


BUCKHEAD


BUCKHEAD 46

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019


BUCKHEAD • CRABAPPLE atlantaschoolguide.com

47


HOLLY SPRINGS


MARIETTA


ROSWELL • NORTH BUCKHEAD 50

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019


ROSWELL atlantaschoolguide.com

51


ROSWELL 52

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2019


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHEAST

8 8 54 54 57

56 55 71

80 3

57 8

55

2 GION RE

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta Academy 57 Brandon Hall School 80 Bridgeway Christian Academy 54 Endeavor Montessori 8 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia 55 McGinnis Woods Country Day School 54

MJCCA Preschools Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs Montessori at Vickery The Piedmont School of Atlanta Wesleyan School William & Reed Academy Woodward Academy

3 8 8 55 57 56 71

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Norcross Founded in the late 1800s as a resort town for wealthy Atlantans, Norcross is Gwinnett County’s second oldest city. Today, with over 8,000 residents, it is a quiet city filled with upscale yet charming residential and retail developments.

Cumming Called the “Gateway to Leisure Living,” Cumming offers the best of small-town living, but in recent years, it has seen rapid commercial and residential development, attracting many new residents with its prime location near the magnificent Lake Lanier. atlantaschoolguide.com

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ALPHARETTA 54

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Call for a private tour Teachers deliver a regular-education curriculum combining: • Georgia Standards and National Core • Differentiated Instruction • Community-Based Experiences • PE, Art, Foreign Language, Theatre and Culinary Arts • Technology in every classroom

Rolling Admissions. Fully Accredited GAC. Now accepting students for 2019-20

Sowing the Seeds of Organic Learning

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BROOKHAVEN • JOHNS CREEK

Serving children in grades Kindergarten to High School with language, learning and social challenges.


JOHNS CREEK


PEACHTREE CORNERS • ROSWELL

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ATLANTA EAST

3 GION RE

59

59 63

61

60 5 108

ATHENS

WATKINSVILLE

65 61

64 62

64 61

60

Independent Schools Schools Page Arbor Montessori School 60 Athens Academy 59 Atlanta Montessori International School 5 Canterbury School 64 Choice Educational Academy 62 Connections School of Atlanta 61

The Friends School of Atlanta 60 Hebron Christian Academy 59 Killian Hill Christian School 63 Midtown International School 108 Saint Thomas More Catholic School 61 THRIVE Christian Academy 65 Westminster Christian Academy 64

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Stone Mountain More than just a mountain park, Stone Mountain also refers to a charming community of antique shops, art galleries and restaurants. Residents of Stone Mountain enjoy natural scenery and miles of walking and biking paths available in the nearby park. 58

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Lawrenceville Strolling the brick-paved sidewalks in the revitalized historic downtown of Lawrenceville, you’ll feel instantly at home. Chartered in 1821, the city has gone through many changes over the years but has maintained its gracious small-town Southern charm.


ATHENS • DACULA atlantaschoolguide.com

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DECATUR 60

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DECATUR • INMAN PARK atlantaschoolguide.com

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LILBURN


LILBURN


WATKINSVILLE • MORNINGSIDE

Grades K - 8th

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STONE MOUNTAIN


ATLANTA SOUTH • SOUTHEAST • SOUTHWEST

4 GION RE

EAST POINT

67

71

DEKALB

Carrolton

69

68

68

70

36

70

69

Independent Schools Schools Page The Bedford School 68 Counterpane Montessori School 70 Eagle’s Landing Christian Academy 68 Harvester Christian Academy 67

Landmark Christian School Our Lady of Victory Catholic School Strong Rock Christian School Woodward Academy

69 36 70 71

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Newnan Established in 1828 and home to more than 30,000 residents, Newnan is one of the fastest-growing cities in Georgia. It has many new residential developments and boasts six historic districts on the national register filled with stately Southern homes. 66

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College Park College Park is home to a small-town main street and the busiest airport in the world—Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The city is attracting young professionals and families by combining the historic elements with new developments.


DOUGLASVILLE


FAIRBURN • EAGLE’S LANDING 68

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FAIRBURN & PEACHTREE CITY


LOCUST GROVE • FAYETTEVILLE 70

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METRO-ATLANTA


BARTOW

ATLANTA WEST

5 GION RE

74 74

25 75 76 75

7

73

FULTON 73

Independent Schools Schools Page Benjamin Preparatory School 7 Center Academy          75 Covenant Christian School 76 The Cumberland School 73

Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy Midway Covenant Christian School Mount Paran Christian School St. Joseph Catholic School Whitefield Academy

73 25 74 74 75

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Kennesaw Home to the popular Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, the city of Kennesaw takes pride in its excellent recreation opportunities and parks, rich history and thriving downtown. Kennesaw State University is well known for academic programs in business, education, and nursing. 72

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Smyrna With its unique charm, the city of Smyrna offers many fresh, trendy lifestyle options, and the Market Village plays host to numerous restaurants, bars and upscale shops. Known as the “Jonquil City,” because of the thousands of jonquils that flourish in gardens and along the streets in early spring.


AUSTELL • DOWNTOWN ATLANTA

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MARIETTA • KENNESAW 74

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SMYRNA-VININGS

1968

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SMYRNA-VININGS


BOARDING SCHOOL DIRECTORY

T

here are many benefits of a boarding school education. Boarding schools are an option for students seeking a more independent learning experience. Because students generally live on campus, learning takes place in and out of the classroom almost on a 24-hour basis. When selecting a boarding school, it is important to visit the school campus, but representatives from many boarding schools visit metro Atlanta throughout the year—contact each school for specific dates.

Boarding Schools Schools Page Baylor School 85 Brandon Hall School 80 Canterbury School 78 Darlington School 80 The Fessenden School 81 Forman School 78 Foxcroft School 86

The Knox School North Broward Preparatory School Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School Saint Stanislaus The Stony Brook School Worcester Academy Wyoming Seminary

84 79 81 83 84 82 85

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CONNECTICUT 78

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FLORIDA


GEORGIA 80

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GEORGIA • MASSACHUSETTS atlantaschoolguide.com

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MASSACHUSETTS


MISSISSIPPI


NEW YORK 84

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PENNSYLVANIA • TENNESSEE atlantaschoolguide.com

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VIRGINIA

Looking for a better way to reach your target audience? Advertise in Atlanta School Guide and get results.

Call to reserve your space in our next issue!

770-992-0273

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PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

SPOTLIGHT ON METRO ATLANTA’S SCHOOL SYSTEMS

A

variety of improvements and innovative programs in Georgia’s public school systems have resulted in many stellar elementary, middle, and high schools across the metro area. Different school systems feature specialized programs and academic opportunities, such as magnet, charter, vocational, or alternative schools to suit their respective students, parents, and communities. However, despite variations in programming and academic offerings, all public schools must offer the core curriculum as determined by the Georgia Board of Education. Here is a county-by-county guide to metro Atlanta’s public school systems. For more information about the Georgia Department of Education, call 404-656-2800 or visit www.gadoe.org. u atlantaschoolguide.com

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What is our mission? Developing Scholars who are Change Agents, Critical Thinkers and Global Citizens How will we accomplish our mission? Rigorous Instruction Data-driven Instruction Experiential Learning Service Learning Projects Spanish in all Grades 5th/6th Grade Global Academy Strong Stakeholder Involvement Who are we? We are the International Academy of Smyrna! Visit our website: http://www.iasmyrna.org/

Now Enrolling

Contact ias.admissions@iasmyrna.org

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The Academic Focus for the International Academy of Smyrna 2019-2020


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

BARTOW ADAIRSVILLE WHITE

BARTOW CARTERSVILLE EMERSON

Board of Education 770-606-5800 bartow.k12.ga.us

CHEROKEE CHEROKEE

Number of Schools Elementary 12 Middle 4 High 3 Career Academy 1 Transitional Academy 1

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 510 (M) 524 5th: (ELA) 515 (M) 518 8th: (ELA) 510 (M) 508

Total # of Students: 13,524 Student Spending: $8,955

Top 3 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Woodland 1051 Cass High 1050 Adairsville High 1033

What’s New Based on results from last year’s AP course offerings and exams, Adairsville, Cass, and Woodland high schools were once again named AP STEM Schools by the Georgia Department of Education. Woodland High School earned an additional designation of AP STEM Achievement School. Number of Schools Elementary 23 Middle 7 High 6 Alternative 1 Evening 1 Virtual School 1 Centers 4 Total # of Students: 42,275 Student Spending: $8,704

Board of Education 770-479-1871 cherokeek12.net

CLAYTON

CLAYTON

2018 Average SAT: 1046

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 520 (M) 541 5th: (ELA) 527 (M) 534 8th: (ELA) 528 (M) 514 2018 Average SAT: 1122 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Woodstock High 1134 Etowah High 1128 Creekview High 1127 Cherokee High 1115 Sequoyah High 1111

What’s New The Cherokee County School Board approved the appointment of five new principals to fill vacancies for next school year, as well as a new head football coach for Creekview High School. Number of Schools Elementary 34 Primary 2 Middle 13 High 10 Alternative 1 Performing Arts Center 1 Adult Education 1 Charter 1 Magnet 5 Open Campus 1 Total # of Students: 54,532 Student Spending: $8,772

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 481 (M) 507 5th: (ELA) 493 (M) 492 8th: (ELA) 498 (M) 484 2018 Average SAT: 962 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Perry Career Academy 1077 Elite Scholars Academy 1060 Charles Drew High School 1058 M.E. Stilwell School of the Arts 1034 Morrow High School 1025

Board of Education 770-473-2700 clayton.k12.ga.us

What’s New The Clayton County Board of Education approved a relaxation in the high school dress code for most students in grades 9-12 in exchange for higher academic expectations.

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COBB

Number of Schools Elementary 63 Primary 2 Intermediate 2 Middle 24 6th Grade Academy 1 High 10 Magnet High Schools 6 Charter 1 Learning Centers 1 Total # of Students: 115,086 Student Spending: $9,110

Board of Education 770-426-3300 cobbk12.org

COWETA COWETA

DEKALB

DEKALB

Board of Education 678-676-1200 dekalbschoolsga.org

2018 Average SAT: 1107 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Walton High School 1262 Lassiter High School 1204 Alan C. Pope High School 1203 Kennesaw High School 1172 Wheeler High School 1147

What’s New Six students from the Cobb County School District recently earned first-place medals at the Georgia Student Technology Competition. An additional nine students placed second. Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 6 High 3 Charter & Career Academy 2 Alternative 2 Centre for Performing and Visual Arts 1 Special Education 1 Total # of Students: 22,164 Student Spending: $8,794

Board of Education 770-254-2800 cowetaschools.net

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 518 (M) 527 5th: (ELA) 527 (M) 522 8th: (ELA) 530 (M) 518

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 513 (M) 523 5th: (ELA) 520 (M) 518 8th: (ELA) 526 (M) 532 2018 Average SAT: 1082 Top 3 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Northgate High 1109 East Coweta High 1089 Newnan High 1044

What’s New Two Coweta County teachers have been named as Veterans of Foreign Wars 2018-19 Georgia Teachers of the Year for exemplary commitment to teaching U.S. history, citizenship and patriotism. Number of Schools Elementary 68 Middle 17 High 19 Charter 5 Magnet 3 Centers, Special Education and Alternative 26 Total # of Students: 101,856 Student Spending: $9,862

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 485 (M) 503 5th: (ELA) 499 (M) 497 8th: (ELA) 499 (M) 492 2018 Average SAT: 998 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Chamblee Charter High 1172 DeKalb School of the Arts 1142 Lakeside High 1136 Dunwoody High 1131 DeKalb Early College Academy 1111

What’s New Two DeKalb County School District high school students have earned entry into the prestigious Coke Scholars Class of 2019. Both will receive a $20,000 college scholarship as well as inside-out leadership training. atlantaschoolguide.com

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COBB


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

DOUGLAS

DOUGLAS

Board of Education 770-651-2000 douglas.k12.ga.us

FAYETTE FAYETTE

Number of Schools Elementary 20 Middle 8 High 5 Centers 3 Charter 1

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 503 (M) 519 5th: (ELA) 515 (M) 514 8th: (ELA) 518 (M) 509

Total # of Students: 26,537 Student Spending: $8,671

Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Chapel Hill High 1056 Alexander High 1033 Douglas County High 1029 Lithia Springs High 979 New Manchester High 937

2018 Average SAT: 1005

What’s New Twenty-seven Douglas County schools will now serve a free evening meal after school hours to students still on campus for the B.A.S.E. After School Program or other approved academic activities. Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 High 5 Alternative 1 Open Campus 1

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 533 (M) 545 5th: (ELA) 539 (M) 536 8th: (ELA) 543 (M) 543

Total # of Students: 20,089 Student Spending: $9,750

Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score McIntosh High 1210 Starr’s Mill High 1172 Whitewater High 1134 Sandy Creek High 1091 Fayette County High 1053

2018 Average SAT: 1142

Board of Education 770-460-3535 fcboe.org

What’s New Six members of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) chapter at Starr’s Mill High earned top scores in their competitions and are advancing to the national level.

FORSYTH

Number of Schools Elementary 21 Middle 10 High 6 Non-Traditional 2 Virtual 1 Charter/Evening 1

FORSYTH

Total # of Students: 46,326 Student Spending: $8,221

Board of Education 770-887-2461 forsyth.k12.ga.us

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2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 545 (M) 561 5th: (ELA) 550 (M) 565 8th: (ELA) 549 (M) 558 2018 Average SAT: 1167 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Lambert High 1221 South Forsyth High 1201 West Forsyth High 1149 Forsyth Central 1113 North Forsyth High 1112

What’s New Members of the Forsyth County Board of Education unanimously approved an $85 million bid from Carroll Daniel Construction to build East Forsyth High School, to be located off Jot Em Down Road and Claude Martin Drive, and slated to open in the fall of 2021. Summer/Fall 2019


Number of Schools Elementary 59 Middle 19 High 18 Charter 10 Alternative Schools 3 Virtual Campus 1 Total # of Students: 95,647 Student Spending: $10,609

FULTON

Board of Education 470-254-3600 fultonschools.org

GRIFFINSPALDING

Board of Education 770-229-3700 spalding.k12.ga.us

GWINNETT

GWINNETT

2018 Average SAT: 1091 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Northview HS 1275 Chattahoochee HS 1240 Johns Creek HS 1224 Alpharetta 1212 Cambridge 1184

What’s New The Budget Services Department of Fulton County Schools has been honored with the Government Finance Officers Association Award for Best Practices in School Budgeting for fiscal 2017-2018, one of just six districts nationwide to win this award. Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 4 High 2 Alternative 2 Career Academy 1

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 481 (M) 504 5th: (ELA) 492 (M) 497 8th: (ELA) 501 (M) 491

Total # of Students: 9,881 Student Spending: $9,465

Top 2 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Spalding High 1011 Griffin High 933

2018 Average SAT: 974

What’s New The Griffin-Spalding Board of Education voted 4-0 to approve two new school administrators and two new central office administrators for the 2019-2020 school year, including a principal for Anne Street Elementary, an assistant principal for Griffin High School, a new Director of Student Services, and a new Director of Special Education. Number of Schools Elementary 80 Middle 29 High 20 Alternative 4 Charter 2 Open Campus 1 Virtual School 1 Special Education 2 Center 1 Career/Technical 2 Total # of Students: 182,548 Student Spending: $8,538

Board of Education 678-301-6000 gwinnett.k12.ga.us

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 512 (M) 529 5th: (ELA) 524 (M) 526 8th: (ELA) 517 (M) 508

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 519 (M) 534 5th: (ELA) 527 (M) 529 8th: (ELA) 528 (M) 500 2018 Average SAT: 1102 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology 1364 North Gwinnett High 1200 Brookwood High 1154 Parkview High 1150 Mill Creek High 1148

What’s New McClure Health Sciences High School opens this fall with a curriculum and facility that mirror real-life medical schools, giving students knowledge and skills to succeed in health sciences. atlantaschoolguide.com

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FULTON


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

HALL HALL

Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 6 High 6 Magnet 11 Alternative 1 Career 2 Total # of Students: 28,008 Student Spending: $8,505

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 497 (M) 515 5th: (ELA) 510 (M) 511 8th: (ELA) 492 (M) 500 2018 Average SAT: 1054 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score North Hall High 1109 Flowery Branch High 1072 Johnson High 1064 Chestatee High 1042 West Hall High 1013

Board of Education 770-534-1080 hallco.org

What’s New Nine Hall County students have been selected from more than 3200 applicants as finalists or alternates for the Georgia Governor’s Honors Program for the summer of 2019.

HENRY

Number of Schools Elementary 26 Middle 11 High 10 Charter 2 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Virtual School 1

HENRY

Total # of Students: 42,146 Student Spending: $9,016

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 495 (M) 510 5th: (ELA) 506 (M) 505 8th: (ELA) 513 (M) 492 2018 Average SAT: 1010 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Union Grove High 1110 Ola High 1071 Woodland High 1051 Eagles Landing High 1022 Stockbridge High 1016

Board of Education 770-957-6601 henry.k12.ga.us

What’s New Winter End of Course performance data shows that Henry County students increased the percentage of those scoring in the Proficient and Distinguished levels in six of the eight tested courses.

PAULDING

Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 9 High 5 Alternative 1 Career 1

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 512 (M) 524 5th: (ELA) 518 (M) 517 8th: (ELA) 500 (M) 511

Total # of Students: 29,154 Student Spending: $8,770

Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score North Paulding High 1059 South Paulding High 1046 Paulding County High 1032 East Paulding High 1027 Hiram High 1019

PAULDING BRASWELL

278

2018 Average SAT: 1040

Board of Education 770-443-8000 paulding.k12.ga.us

What’s New AdvancED, the national organization that accredits school systems, colleges and universities, has renewed the district’s accreditation for five years. The evaluation of the district was overwhelmingly positive: it received a score of 353 out of a possible 400 points, ranking it among the highest-performing districts for all institutions evaluated by AdvancED.

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LE RO CK DA

Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 4 High 3 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Magnet 1 Open Campus 1 Virtual School 1 Total # of Students: 16,265 Student Spending: $9,941

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 498 (M) 515 5th: (ELA) 512 (M) 505 8th: (ELA) 509 (M) 501 2018 Average SAT: 995 Top 3 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Rockdale High 1023 Heritage High 992 Salem High 937

Board of Education 770-483-4713 rockdaleschools.org

What’s New Heritage and Rockdale County High Schools have been named 2019 Advanced Placement Honors Schools for offering rigorous college-level classes to their students.

ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Board of Education 404-802-3500 atlantapublicschools.us

Number of Schools Elementary 44 Intermediate 3 Middle 11 High 11 Charter 18 Alternative 5 Virtual 1 Total # of Students: 51,063 Student Spending: $15,625

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 492 (M) 513 5th: (ELA) 504 (M) 508 8th: (ELA) 504 (M) 492 2018 Average SAT: 997 Top 5 Schools by Average 2018 SAT Score Grady High 1128 North Atlanta High 1085 Charles R. Drew Charter High 1058 Carver Early College 1020 Maynard Holbrook Jackson High 955

What’s New Grady High School’s award-winning debate team, the Jesters, competed at Valdosta High School for the Georgia Forensics Coaches Association (GFCA) Varsity State Speech and Debate Championships, where they captured their 10th consecutive state title.

BUFORD CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-945-5035 bufordcityschools.org Number of Schools Elementary (K-1) 1 Academy (2-5) 1 Middle 1 High 1

Total # of Students: 4,690 Student Spending: $9,621 2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 542 (M) 559 5th: (ELA) 536 (M) 550 8th: (ELA) 544 (M) 552 2018 Average SAT: 1142

What’s New The Buford High School Literary team won the Georgia High School Association State Literary Meet, securing their eleventh consecutive state championship. BHS is the only school in the history of GHSA to win eleven consecutive victories in Literary. atlantaschoolguide.com

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ROCKDALE


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

CITY SCHOOLS OF DECATUR

Board of Education 404-371-3601 csdecatur.net Number of Schools Elementary 5 Middle 1 4th & 5th Grade Academy 1 High 1 Early Learning Center 1

Total # of Students: 5,105 Student Spending: $11,026 2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 552 (M) 554 5th: (ELA) 551 (M) 542 8th: (ELA) 553 (M) 532 2018 Average SAT: 1162

What’s New City Schools Decatur is on track to finish its new upper elementary school on Talley Street in July, serving grades 3-5. The school board’s next priority for the district is likely to be strategizing how to finance and implement the building of a new Early Childhood Learning Center to accommodate the growing enrollment needs for young students.

GAINESVILLE CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-536-5275 gcssk12.net Number of Schools Elementary 6 Middle 1 High 1

Total # of Students: 8,287 Student Spending: $8,714 2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 480 (M) 508 5th: (ELA) 495 (M) 499 8th: (ELA) 481 (M) 496 2018 Average SAT: 1000

What’s New The Gainesville City Schools Student Success Center is on track to open during the 2019-2020 school year. It will be housed at Gainesville High School, and is designed to be a hub for student resources as the district seeks to “educate the whole child.” Families will have access to counseling, therapy, college and career counseling, and academic support.

MARIETTA CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-422-3500 marietta-city.org Number of Schools Elementary Sixth Grade Middle High Alternative Magnet Early Learning

Total # of Students: 9,183 Student Spending: $10,545 7 1 1 1 1 1 1

2018 Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 509 (M) 522 5th: (ELA) 517 (M) 518 8th: (ELA) 510 (M) 504 2018 Average SAT: 1072

What’s New All Marietta City School bus drivers and monitors attended a three-day training to become certified by the American Heart Association in CPR, first aid and Stop the Bleed. WellStar Kennestone Hospital has partnered with MCS by providing Stop the Bleed Kit for each of the district’s school buses, making Marietta City Schools the first in the nation to equip its fleet with these kits.

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EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES Ways to Enhance your Child’s or Student’s Learning

Index

Tutoring & Study Skills 98 Summer Camps & Activities 98 Field Trips & Education Programs 100 atlantaschoolguide.com

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES • TUTORING 98

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES


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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS • SUMMER CAMPS


FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS


FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS


FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS

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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS

GoT a Fabulous

Field Trip? Let teachers and parents know how to find it!

Call today to advertise in our next issue.

770-992-0273

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Atlanta’s Leading Education Resource


ADVERTISER INDEX After-School Programs

Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education......37 Children’s Museum of Atlanta.........................104 Elachee Nature Center.....................................104 Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta..... Inside Back Cover LEGOLAND Discovery Center Atlanta...........103

Boarding Schools

Baylor School......................................................85 Brandon Hall School...........................................80 Canterbury School..............................................78 Darlington School...............................................80 The Fessenden School.......................................81 Forman School....................................................78 Foxcroft School...................................................86 The Knox School.................................................84 North Broward Preparatory School...................79 Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School.........................81 Saint Stanislaus...................................................83 The Stony Brook School.....................................84 Worcester Academy...........................................82 Wyoming Seminary............................................85

Catholic Schools

Archdiocese of Atlanta.......................................33 Blessed Trinity Catholic High School................50 Holy Spirit Preparatory School..............................45 Our Lady of Victory Catholic School.................36 St. Joseph Catholic School................................74 Saint Thomas More Catholic School.................61

Early Education

Arbor Montessori School...................................60 Atlanta Academy................................................57 Atlanta Montessori International School............5 Benjamin Preparatory School..............................7 Big Blue Marble Academy.................................25 Canterbury School..............................................64 Counterpane Montessori School......................70 The Cottage School...........................................51 Endeavor Montessori...........................................8 The Friends School of Atlanta...........................60 Fulton Science Academy Private School............2 Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School.....................50 Lyndon Academy................................................48 McGinnis Woods Country Day School.............54 MJCCA Preschools...............................................3 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............8 Montessori at Vickery...........................................8 Mount Paran Christian School...........................74 Porter Academy..................................................47 Strong Rock Christian School............................70 The Walker School..............................................49 Woodward Academy..........................................71

Field Trips & Education Programs

ArtsBridge Foundation.....................................100 Bodies the Exhibition.......................................101 Callanwolde Fine Arts Center..........................106

Children’s Museum of Atlanta.........................104 College Football Hall of Fame........................102 Elachee Nature Center.....................................104 LEGOLAND Discovery Center Atlanta...........103 Lookout Mountain Attractions.........................103 Southern Museum of Civil War & Locomotive History.. 104 Zoo Atlanta .........................................................99

Independent Schools

Arbor Montessori School...................................60 Archdiocese of Atlanta.......................................33 Athens Academy.................................................59 Atlanta Academy................................................57 Atlanta International School..............................46 Atlanta Montessori International School............5 The Bedford School...........................................68 Benjamin Preparatory School..............................7 Big Blue Marble Academy.................................25 Blessed Trinity Catholic High School................50 Bridgeway Christian Academy..........................54 Canterbury School..............................................64 Center Academy.................................................75 Choice Educational Academy...........................62 Connections School of Atlanta..........................61 The Cottage School...........................................51 Counterpane Montessori School......................70 Covenant Christian School................................76 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................20 The Cumberland School....................................73 Eagle’s Landing Christian Academy..................68 Endeavor Montessori...........................................8 The Friends School of Atlanta...........................60 Fulton Science Academy Private School............2 Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy.................73 Harvester Christian Academy............................67 Hebron Christian Academy................................59 High Meadows School.......................................51 Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School.....................50 Holy Spirit Preparatory School..........................45 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....55 Killian Hill Christian School................................63 Landmark Christian School................................69 Lyndon Academy................................................48 McGinnis Woods Country Day School.............54 Midtown International School........... Back Cover Midway Covenant Christian School..................25 Mill Springs Academy........................................44 MJCCA Preschools...............................................3 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............8 Montessori at Vickery...........................................8 Mount Paran Christian School...........................74 Our Lady of Victory Catholic School.................36 Pace Academy....................................................46 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................55 Porter Academy..................................................47 Saint Francis School...........................................52 St. Joseph Catholic School................................74 Saint Thomas More Catholic School.................61 Springmont School.............................................47 Continued on Next Page u atlantaschoolguide.com

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ADVERTISER INDEX (Continued from Previous Page) Strong Rock Christian School............................70 The Suzuki School...............................................36 THRIVE Christian Academy................................65 The Walker School..............................................49 Wesleyan School.................................................57 Westminster Christian Academy.......................64 Whitefield Academy...........................................75 William & Reed Academy..................................56 Woodward Academy..........................................71

Montessori Schools

Arbor Montessori School...................................60 Atlanta Montessori International School............5 Counterpane Montessori School......................70 Endeavor Montessori...........................................8 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....55 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............8 Montessori at Vickery...........................................8 Springmont School.............................................47

Public & Charter Schools

Atlanta Classical Academy.................................89 Georgia Cyber Academy...................................88 International Academy of Smyrna.....................89 International Charter School of Atlanta............89

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Resources & Services

Archdiocese of Atlanta.......................................33 Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates...............13 Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta..... Inside Back Cover My Eye Dr..............................................................9

Special Needs & Learning Difficulties

The Bedford School...........................................68 Center Academy.................................................75 Children’s Special Services.................................37 Connections School of Atlanta..........................61 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................20 Mill Springs Academy........................................44 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................55 Porter Academy..................................................47

Summer Camps & Activities

Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education......37 Elachee Nature Center.....................................104 Generation Infocus.............................................98 Squirrel Hollow Day Camp...............................100 U.S. Space & Rocket Center: Space Camp......15 Zoo Atlanta..........................................................99

Tutoring & Study Skills

In-Home Tutors of Atlanta.................................98


Profile for Killam Publishing, Inc.

Atlanta School Guide | Summer/Fall 2019  

Atlanta’s leading education resource provides a wealth of information for parents and educators.

Atlanta School Guide | Summer/Fall 2019  

Atlanta’s leading education resource provides a wealth of information for parents and educators.