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CONTENTS

SUMMER/FALL 2017

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28 32

FEATURES

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In Every Issue

Adjusting to a New School Starting or changing schools is stressful for the whole family; here’s how to make the transition easier for everyone.

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Countdown to College Get the jump on college readiness with this guide to planning from middle school through senior year.

Managing Homework Homework is more demanding for students than ever: learn how to apply the “work smarter, not harder” principle to studying at home.

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6 How to Use This Guide 10 Critical Communication 16 Headmaster’s Corner

Dean Fusto of Brandon Hall School

18 Special Needs Resources 38 Independent School Guide Boarding School Directory 75  83  Public Schools by County 91  Educational Resources Tutoring, summer camps and activities, field trips and more

97 Advertiser Index


HOW TO

Use This Guide Find an Independent School in

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1

Easy Steps!

Metro Atlanta Area Map To search for independent schools by region or neighborhood, turn to page 36 and use the color-coded map to direct you to each region’s page number.

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Education At a Glance

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Region Maps and Listings

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Once you’ve selected your region of interest, the charts beginning on page 38 include a comparison of features for each school in that region, along with the page number for each school’s ad.

Divided into regions of Atlanta, the color-coded maps beginning on page 41 provide each school’s location and page number for their ad.

Advertiser Index To find a school or resource by name, turn to the advertiser index on page 97 to find the appropriate page number.

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We gratefully thank our advertisers for their support of the Atlanta School Guide. Publisher/President PATRICK KILLAM Editor MICHELLE BOURG Marketing & Promotions JEFF THOMPSON Account Directors LACEY JAMES HEATHER KEARNS Contributing Writers MICHELLE BOURG

TO ADVERTISE CALL

770-992-0273 Space closing for Winter/Spring 2018 issue: October 13, 2017 Atlanta School Guide, Summer/Fall 2017, Volume 12, Issue 2. Published bi-annually by Killam Publishing, Inc., 200 Market Place, Suite 230, Roswell, GA 30075. Atlanta School Guide assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. Information may have changed since press time, so please verify all information when contacting a school or educational resource. Reproduction in whole or in part of any elements of this publication is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. © 2017 Killam Publishing, Inc. For additional copies, further information or advertising, please contact:

KILLAM PUBLISHING, INC. P: 770-992-0273 F: 844-706-1545 info@killampublishing.com www.atlantaschoolguide.com


Promoting total wellness of all children With over 10 years experience, board certified and a bilingual staff, we offer a full scope of general pediatric services from birth through age 21. We also collaborate with patient-centered medical home services including: Speech therapy, Occupational therapy, Music therapy, Counseling, play therapy, nutrition services and much more! Getting ready for back to school? Call to schedule your child’s school physical and help with IEP/504 plan coordination. M.D., Viswandham, trician Dr. Madhuri dia -Certified Pe ard Bo P. .A. F.A

11125 Jones Bridge Rd., Ste. 100, Alpharetta, Ga, 30022

770-615-7000 www.dare2carepediatrics.com

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Critical Communication

Trends and Happenings in Georgia Education What You Need to Know to Stay Up to Date With Atlanta and Georgia Education Atlanta Schools Make National “Best” List Thirty-four metro Atlanta independent and public schools have been named among the best high schools of 2017 by U.S. News and World Report. DeKalb School of the Arts, Walton High School in Cobb County, and Fulton Science Academy High School are the three top Atlanta schools on the list.

2017 list of the city’s top places to work. Woodward Academy ranked first among large employers, while Wesleyan School, Pace Academy, The Schenck School, Davis Academy, Springmont, St. Martin’s Episcopal School and Cornerstone Preparatory Academy were recognized among the city’s top small and mid-sized employers.

Gwinnett Schools Wins National Recognition Gwinnett County Public Schools has been named Advanced Placement District of the Year by the College Board for its efforts in getting more students to take AP courses, and for students’ improved AP exam performance.

Georgia To Oversee Challenged Schools Georgia’s new First Priority Act gives the state more power to intervene in its lowest-performing schools. Under the plan, the “chief turnaround officer” will report to the governor-appointed state Board of Education, and will employ“coaches” to assist these districts in establishing plans for improvement with authority to turn failing districts over to non-profit private managers after three years.

Independent Schools Among Best Workplaces Several metro Atlanta independent schools were recognized in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s 10

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APS to Close Schools The Atlanta Board of Education approved plans to close two elementary schools, Whitefoord Elementary School and Adamsville Primary School, for the upcoming 2017-18 school year. Miles Intermediate School will also become an elementary school under the plan. Genesis Innovation Academy to Open Genesis Innovation Academy, a charter school in Atlanta for students entering kindergarten through sixth grade, is set to open for the 2017-18 school year. Founded by Dr. Gavin Samms, an alumnus of Harvard University and Georgia Tech, the school will have single-gender classrooms for boys and girls. Cristo Rey Raises More Than $30 Million Cristo Rey Atlanta Jesuit High School recently com-


pleted its 14-month capital campaign, “Building Futures, Changing Lives.” The campaign raised $30.2 million, exceeding its original goal of $25 million. The money will be used to convert a seven-story building into a school with high-tech labs, classrooms, a chapel, an auditorium, a competition-sized gym and other features. Georgia Schools to Enrich Arts Education Georgia School Superintendent Richard Woods has indicated that the state plans to invite arts educators to give input on arts curriculum guidelines for the state’s schools. He also states that Georgia is working on potential grants for

schools that endeavor to offer students more choices in arts education. Systems Recognized for Music Education Cobb, Fulton and Gwinnett County public schools were among six Georgia school systems recently honored by the National Association of Music Merchants Foundation. The awards are given annually to school districts that demonstrate a commitment to music education through funding, staffing and other measures. Baldwin, Clarke and Putnam were the other Georgia systems recognized. Westminster Hosts Chinese Exchange Students The Westminster Schools

welcomed nine students from Beijing 101 High School over the Chinese Lunar New Year, from January 28 through February 10. Each student lived with a Westminster student family during the two-week visit, which is an annual school event. Metro Students Win State Innovation Grants Learning clubs at Drew Charter School and Dr. M.H. Mason Elementary School were recently awarded grants from the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement. The Innovation Fund Tiny Grants went to Drew Charter’s Media Arts and Science Club to purchase handheld mobile devices, and to Mason’s Terra Club to buy equipment and supplies for its gardens. Cumberland, Pace Partner for Mentorship Cumberland Academy of Georgia, which serves students in grades 4-12 with autism, Asperger’s and other learning disabilities, recently announced plans to partner with Pace Academy to start an afterschool mentoring program. Student volunteers from Pace Academy will provide weekly tutoring and mentoring services to Cumberland students. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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Critical Communication

Education 101

Terms to Know in Your Search for the Right Educational Experience for Your Child CHARTER SCHOOL  A tax-supported public school that is independently run, allowing for greater educational choice for parents in the community. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING  An educational approach using applied, hands-on methods of learning. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB)  A specifically designed comprehensive academic program emphasizing traditional disciplines while instilling a global perspective in its students.

MAGNET SCHOOL  A public school that offers a specific or enhanced curriculum designed for students of special interest or ability. MONTESSORI  A school following the principles developed by Dr. Maria Montessori focusing on the unique individuality, self-reliance and independence of children. SPECIAL NEEDS A school or program for children who have mild to moderate learning differences. It usually features smaller class sizes, individualized attention and multisensory learning methods.

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ACCREDITATION  Official certification that guarantees a school provides an education of a reasonably high quality. Schools must prove levels of quality and maintain continuous standards of improvement. ACT An alternative to the SAT, this national college admissions examination consists of subject area tests in English, Mathematics, Reading and Science, with an optional 40-minute writing test. ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS (AYP) A measure of year-to-year student achievement on statewide assessments as required by the No Child Left Behind Act.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION  Education that applies to children from birth to age 8, focusing specifically on their development, including physical, emotional, sensory, communicative, cognitive and social needs.

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT A federal law passed in 2001 designed to ensure that all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a high-quality education and meet state academic standards of proficiency.

GEORGIA MILESTONES Tests designed to measure how well students in grades 3 through 12 acquire the skills and knowledge outlined in the state-adopted content standards.

PSAT  A standardized test that offers students practice for the SAT Reasoning Test and allows them to qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Program.

HOPE SCHOLARSHIP (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally)  A scholarship in Georgia, funded by the Georgia Lottery, that rewards academically achieving students with financial assistance to attend a degree, diploma, or certificate program at eligible public and private Georgia colleges and universities.

SAT  This standardized test measures the critical thinking, writing and mathematical reasoning skills of students planning to attend college. SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS TEST (SSAT) The admissions test that many independent and private schools require students to take in order to be considered for enrollment.

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Critical Communication

Deciphering Associations and Organizations Many local and national organizations work to bring out the best in summer camps and public, private and boarding schools by identifying schools that meet certain standards through accreditation. These groups also set policies, research educational advancements and offer services to the educational communities both in Atlanta and in Georgia. The following are just some of the associations and organizations you should know in your search for the best educational experience for your child. AdvancED www.advanc-ed.org The parent organization for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, AdvancED advances education excellence through accreditation and school improvement.

the professional development needs of boarding schools and provides information to potential students and their families.

The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS) www.boardingschools.com This organization of 300 boarding schools serves 14

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) www.acsi.org ACSI strives to enable Christian educators and schools worldwide to teach effectively using Christ-centered curricula and programs.

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Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) www.ami-global.org Recognizes schools that strongly adhere to Montessori principles and practices. Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools (AAAIS) www.aaais.org Although not an accrediting agency, AAAIS is an affiliation of independent schools and operates under analogous principles and a common code of ethics. Department of Education (DOE) www.gadoe.org A statewide, policy-driven organization governing the public school system of education in Georgia for grades K-12, the Georgia DOE operates under the direction of the state superintendent of schools. Georgia Accrediting Commission (GAC) gac.coe.uga.edu GAC offers five levels of approval: provisionally accredited, accredited annually, accredited, accredited fully and accredited with quality. Georgia Association of Christian Schools (GACS) www.gacs.org Uses generally accepted indicators of quality, voluntary self-improvement and peer review to measure Christian schools.


Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC) www.gapsec.org This state organization of independent schools for students with learning disabilities maintains a code of ethics and shares information about programs at member schools.

Georgia School Boards Association (GSBA) www.gsba.com The GSBA provides leadership and services to Georgia’s 180 elected boards of education, developing processes and programs to help local school boards continuously improve and use data effectively.

Georgia Charter Schools Association (GCSA) www.gacharters.org A membership organization whose mission is to be an effective advocate and service provider for all charter public schools in Georgia.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) www.naeyc.org The NAEYC focuses on the quality of educational and developmental services for children, from birth to age 8, including day care and pre-K centers.

Georgia Independent School Association (GISA) www.gisaschools.org An association of private, independent and parochial schools throughout the state whose mission is to advance excellence and collaboration among private, independent and parochial schools. Georgia Professional Standards Commission (PSC) www.gapsc.com A state organization responsible for setting and applying high standards for the preparation, certification and licensing of Georgia public educators, as well as conduct of teachers and staff.

National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) www.nais.org This association values and works to maintain the independent nature of each member school by promoting high standards of educational quality and ethical behavior. National Association of Private Special Education Centers (NAPSEC) www.napsec.org Represents private specialized education pro-

grams and their leaders by promoting high-quality programs and services for individuals with disabilities and their families. National Christian School Association (NCSA) www.nationalchristian.org An organization that accredits member schools, overseen by a board of administrators from Christian schools and universities. Southeastern Association of Boarding Schools (SABS) www.sabs.org An organization committed to promoting boarding education opportunities in the Southeastern United States. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) www.sacs.org Member schools meet research-based standards and maintain continuous school improvement and quality assurance. Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS) www.sais.org Members meet quality standards, receive peer evaluation and implement a school plan focused on strategic improvement.

For more information about these and other organizations and associations that ensure quality education among camps and schools, visit the websites of the Georgia Department of Education (www.gadoe.org) or the U.S. Department of Education (www.ed.gov). www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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Headmaster’s Corner

Dean Fusto PHOTO: James Heflin, School for International Training

President, Brandon Hall School

Dean Fusto has been president of Brandon Hall School since 2016. A recipient of a National Endowment of the Humanities Fellowship, he holds an M.A.T. from the SIT Graduate Institute and an M.A. from Columbia University Teachers College. Previously, he served as head of upper school and assistant head of school at the Bement School in Deerfield, MA.

What is your educational philosophy? There is nothing more important than being a constant positive force in the lives of students. I believe in the goodness of kids and know that they are capable of amazing things when we provide them with a dynamic learning environment and equip them with a growth mindset that prepares them to navigate all academic, social, and life challenges successfully. What do you love most about your job? There is never a day without surprises and challenges. Working with students, teachers and families is joyful work. I have never been bored in 25 years of teaching and leading schools. No two days are ever alike, and every encounter gives me a chance to help someone and learn something. How can parents best contribute to the education process? Parents are crucial allies and partners. They contribute in many ways including 16

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being an active presence at school events, reaffirming school mission as ambassadors, working with teachers to help their children thrive, and providing a window into the lives of their children that the school would not otherwise have. What advice would you offer parents about their children’s education? Stay involved in your kids’ school lives. Engage them in conversation about what they are studying and encourage them to talk about their personal, academic, athletic, artistic and college goals. THE ESSENTIALS: BRANDON HALL SCHOOL Emphasis: To provide a challenging college preparatory experience enhanced in technology.

Tuition: $27,000 - $59,100

Year Founded: 1959

Location: 1701 Brandon Hall Drive, Atlanta, GA 30350

Grades: 6-12 
 Students: 170 Avg. Class Size: 8

Accreditations or Affiliations: SACS/SAIS

Contact: 770-394-8177, brandonhall.org


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room setting. Others may teach average or even above-average learners while also offering additional programs and classes for students with learning differences.

him or her evaluated by a mental health professional. A diagnosis is crucial in order to address the child’s educational needs.

After a Diagnosis: What’s Next? How to Tell if Your Child Has a Special If your child is diagnosed with a learnNeeds Situation ing disability and attends public school, First, it’s important to identify your child’s talk with the principal, school counselor issues. Students who exhibit average or or another administrator about developabove-average intelligence but often ing an Individualized Education Program seem distracted and don’t perform well (IEP). All public schools are required to in a traditional classroom create an IEP for students setting may be struggling with learning disabilities with dyslexia, Asperger’s who meet special educasyndrome, ADHD or some A professional tion requirements. An IEP other disorder that affects is a document that specievaluation is their ability to learn effecfies your child’s learning tively. Also, disruptive or crucial in order situation and educaaggressive children may tional needs and outlines to evaluate be exhibiting frustration a course of action for brought on by a learning teachers and other proyour child’s disability. fessionals to follow to educational If you suspect your child help make sure your child may have a learning dislearns to the best of his or needs. ability, it’s critical to have her ability. u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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Critical Communication If you feel your local public school isn’t the right environment for your child, or simply want to explore all your options, there are many quality independent schools in the metro Atlanta area devoted to helping children with special needs and learning issues. Visit the Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children’s website (www.gapsec.org) or our listings for special needs schools on page 98 to help you with your search.

needs education. Independent special needs schools can offer more individualized instruction and a more structured and predictable environment, and are likely to address nonacademic issues such as social skills and self-esteem. As you begin searching for the right school for your child’s situation, here are some questions to keep in mind: • Will your child fare better in a school that focuses on his or her specific learning disability, or would you rather that he or she be able to interact with students with a wide range of learning capabilities? • Does the school serve a specific age range, or work with students on all grade levels? Many students with learning disabilities have trouble transitioning to new schools.

How Do I Find the Right School? All special needs schools are not the same. The first step is to identify those schools that can address your child’s specific learning difficulty, and offer the level of special needs instruction that you (and perhaps a professional) feel is best for your child. You may be more comfortable enrolling your child in a school that focuses specifically on his or her issue, or you may want a more diverse environment where he or she can interact with many different kinds of students. Familiarize yourself with the different options offered by each kind of school. Traditional indeIdentify those pendent schools that offer special needs schools that programs as part of a can best larger curriculum can offer that kind of enviaddress your ronment, but may have larger class sizes than child’s specific schools that specialize learning in specific learning disabilities. These kinds of difficulty. schools may also focus more on academics than on the therapeutic aspects of special 20

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Critical Communication • D  oes the school offer a variety of extracurricular activities, including arts and sports programs? •  Is the school accredited? If so, by which organizations? • Is the staff certified to instruct special needs children, or those with your child’s specific learning difficulty? • Does the school focus more on academics or on addressing the child’s therapeutic needs? Financial Assistance Many independent special needs schools participate in the Georgia Special Needs Scholarship program (GSNS), a school choice program available to special needs students attending Georgia public schools. The program offers funds to off-

set tuition and fees at participating private schools authorized by the State Board of Education. According to the Georgia Department of Education, scholarship amounts range from $2,500 to $13,500, with an average amount of around $6,000. The Quality Education Expense Credit program provides another scholarship option. Donations are made to an organization known as a Student Scholarship Organization (SSO), which uses the money to award scholarships to students in pre-K through grade 12. Many schools also offer their own scholarships or tuition assistance programs as well. Contact individual schools for details. For more information on special needs schools and resources, please see our listings on page 98.

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• Goddard School Crabapple creative traditional learning ~catering to the family and the child • Learning on the Log Programs special needs with special care in an unique therapy gym environment

• Math and Science tutoring for children grades 3-12 Dr. David Orloff PhD Professor (ret.) GA Tech Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L, FAOTA CEO/Executive Director Children’s Special Services, LLC

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COMMON SPECIAL NEEDS TERMS Asperger’s Syndrome: A developmental disorder on the autism spectrum, characterized by high intelligence, impaired social skills and repetitive patterns of behavior and interest.

Individualized Educational Program (IEP): A written statement that outlines the needs of a public school student with learning disabilities and creates a customized plan for meeting those needs.

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): A strain of ADHD (see below) marked by a difficulty maintaining focus or concentration and frequent or consistent fatigue. ADD differs from ADHD in that hyperactivity or impulse-control issues are markedly decreased.

Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): The federal law that governs how states and public education agencies that accept funding under the law address the educational needs of students with disabilities.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A chronic condition that includes hyperactivity, impulsive behavior and difficulty keeping one’s attention focused.

Learning Disability: A neurological condition that affects how one processes information.

Autism: A developmental disorder that affects the ability to communicate and interact with others, accompanied by rigid, repetitive behavior patterns. Dyslexia: A learning disability that impairs one’s ability to read. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC): An organization of independent schools serving students with learning disabilities and differences. Georgia Special Needs Scholarship (GSNS): A school-choice scholarship program for special needs students being served by an IEP in Georgia public schools.

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ADJUSTING TO A HOW TO MAKE YOUR CHILD’S TRANSITION EASIER BY MICHELLE BOURG

As the old saying goes, “Nothing is constant except change.” All change requires some adjustment, from a new baby to a rescheduled dental appointment. This can be difficult for adults, let alone for children, who thrive on routine and have fewer coping skills.

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F

rom preschool to college, starting or changing schools is a dramatic—and a potentially traumatic— milestone for a youngster. School is the place where children establish an identity and relationships outside the family circle—changing schools requires them to establish them over again. Plus, we’re human: the unfamiliar is scary. Be Present One of the most important things you can do to help your children—and yourself—negotiate any life change is to maintain a calm presence. Children pick up on your feelings, so it’s important to communicate a positive attitude. If you’re anxious, young children especially may interpret this to mean that school is not a good place. Don’t overhype it, but convey the feeling that this is an adventure and your enthusiasm will be infectious. Spend extra time with your child, even if it’s just watching TV together. Encourage, but don’t push, him to talk about any

concerns he may have. When you can’t be physically present, check in with a call or text. A good way to help your child feel positive about the situation is to give them a voice in decisions whenever appropriate. Whether it’s selecting a school or selecting an outfit for the day, asking her opinion on things that affect her directly lets her feel that she’s part of the process and not just a pawn in the game. The transitions to junior high and then to high school are times when this presence is especially needed, but tricky to pull off unobtrusively. The situation is particularly fraught: bigger schools, new classmates, shifting social expectations, and dating dynamics can make both of you feel like it’s a whole new planet. There’s also growing pressure to excel academically, with students eventually making decisions about their futures and many contending with college admissions. With all of this going on, it’s no surprise that one in four high school freshwww.atlantaschoolguide.com

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men reports feeling extreme stress. Ironically, this is also the age at which your child is less likely to admit vulnerability or confide in you. It’s crucial to “hold on loosely” while watching for warning signs like changes in behavior, eating habits or grades before major problems develop. It’s a tough balancing act, but teens do appreciate knowing their parents are available and paying attention. Be Prepared The key to making a change successfully is preparation. Especially if you’re changing school systems, the curriculum and culture are likely to be slightly different. Find out what’s been covered, and if there are areas that your child is unfamiliar with, arrange for extra study or tutoring so he won’t be behind. Be sure to read over the materials you receive from the school, such as parent and student handbooks, to familiarize yourself with policies and deadlines. The best source of inside information is someone who’s been there, so reach out to other parents: Whether you’re new in the neighborhood or your child is moving up within the system, they’ll have useful insights to share. As the big day looms, go over the logistics. Have a dress rehearsal: Take your child to the bus stop or drive them to school. Attend an orientation or arrange a tour so you can both see where the classrooms, cafeteria, restrooms and other facilities are. Meet the teachers and encourage your child to ask questions. 26

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Preparation is key to a successful change. Will your child have a locker for the first time? Get a combination lock and let him practice so he’s not frantically twirling the dial during the homeroom bell. The day before, go over the supplies list twice and make sure you’ve got everything. Get outfits, backpacks, and other necessities ready so in the morning you’re not frazzled looking for shoes. Preparation is especially critical for children with ADHD, ASD issues, anxiety or learning disabilities, who especially need routine and structure. You may want to do more than one “dry run” of a new routine. Many such children are visual


are in flux, a familiar routine is reassuring for everyone and shifts the focus to the things that need to be relearned. Maintaining a set bedtime is especially important; tired kids (and adults) deal less well with stress.

learners and respond better to having information presented in picture form. Another tool is the Social Story™, a short description of an activity or situation that gives specific information about what to expect in that situation and why. Special education teachers can assist with creating these stories; resources are also available online. A fun way to prepare your tyke for preschool or kindergarten is to read them books that take place in school and then play “school” together with them as the teacher. This helps establish school as a fun place and demystifies the teacher’s role in your child’s mind. While your child is adjusting to changes at school, try to keep things on an even keel at home. When some areas of life

Be Patient As in any period of adjustment, patience is essential. Just like adults, kids can get cranky or sad when stressed. Some moodiness is normal and developmental regression, such as a bed-wetting incident, may occur. If things don’t improve after a few weeks, consult with a teacher or counselor about your child’s classroom behavior and get advice on seeking professional help if necessary. And don’t neglect yourself; the tension can rub off on you. You’re experiencing a life change too, and you can weather it better—and help your child best—if you take care of yourself. So have that morning latte or take a walk. It’s hard to predict how a child will respond to changes in their daily routine, and their reactions may differ on different occasions. Being flexible, prepared and staying attentive to your child will help both of you negotiate life and school transitions successfully. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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GETTING READY FOR COLLEGE HOW TO HELP YOUR CHILD GET A HEAD START BY MICHELLE BOURG

Attending college has long been a cornerstone of the American dream, and the majority of students hope to do so. But the path to getting there is a winding and long one: educators and college admissions officers recommend that planning for college begin when a child reaches sixth grade. For modern families, the three keys to navigating the path to college successfully are proactivity, organization, and communication.

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Off to a Good Start: Middle and Junior High School In Georgia, the concept of proactivity has been mandated with the BRIDGE (Building Resourceful Individuals to Develop Georgia’s Economy) Act, which helps students select a focused study plan by providing career counseling and regularly scheduled advisement beginning in sixth grade. (For more information, see the Georgia Department of Education website at www.gadoe.org). Students begin by taking the Career Cluster Inventory and creating a GCIS (Georgia Career Information System) portfolio to track their BRIDGE activities. During the spring of their eighth grade year, students must select a career area and draft a corresponding course of study called an IGP (Individual Graduation Plan) in consultation with parents, counselors and teachers. Parents should communicate with their children about school performance and its impact on a future career by dis-

cussing possible career interests and helping them to develop good study habits, identifying academic areas that need improvement. The PSAT 8/9 offers a snapshot of a child’s academic strengths and weaknesses so families can create a plan of action.

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Staying the Course: Ninth and Tenth Grades As high school begins, parents and students should establish a good relationship with the guidance counselor and work with him or her to select prerequisite courses for advanced-level work. If any subjects are giving difficulty, additional help should be sought in order to be up to speed going forward. It’s critical to maintain grades and test performance, as colleges look at a student’s entire high school career. Sophomore year is when the first standardized placement tests are taken; 10thgraders may take the PSAT 10 or the ACT prerequisite PLAN test. Qualified stuwww.atlantaschoolguide.com

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dents should look into the MOWR (Move On When Ready) program, which enables qualified Georgia high school students to take college courses and receive both high school and college credit. Co-curricular participation is one of the most memorable parts of the high school experience and a key factor in college admissions. Students should try some out now and find one or two they will enjoy long-term. This is also a good time to begin satisfying the community service graduation requirement. Parents should monitor their child’s schedule to ensure that academics and co-curriculars remain in balance. While the nitty-gritty of financial planning is still in the future, during freshman year families should start to discuss financial aid, scholarships and the student’s responsibilities, if any. A good place to start is by visiting the website of the Georgia Student Finance Commission (www.gafutures.org) for information. By the end of the year, Georgia ninthgraders must complete a supervised investigation of at least three potential careers and record them in their GCIS 30

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portfolio. The summer between ninth and tenth grade is when research into college options should begin, with a file kept on each school to compare later. Over summer break, students should make a list of desired criteria to guide their college explorations and intensify their research into different schools.

3

The Home Stretch: 11th and 12th Grades In junior year, the pace for college-bound students intensifies dramatically, and life will seem like a non-stop parade of deadlines. Standardized tests begin with the PSAT in October, and it takes discipline to balance studying for tests, keeping up with regular coursework, extracurricular activities and volunteer or employment responsibilities. Regular family meetings will keep everyone on the same page—making a weekly pizza date to talk things over will also carve out some quality de-stressing time. Using a family


on jobs or internships, students need to finalize their list of schools and visit as many as possible, begin crafting application essays, organize financial aid info, and consider applying early decision to the top schools on the list. As senior year begins, students and their families have to hit the ground running. The SAT (and if applicable, the ACT) must be taken as soon as possible; it’s important to check the SAT subject test schedule, as some tests are only given on select dates. There may be final campus visits to make even as the essay and application process is in full swing, and it’s imperative to maintain grades and class rank, as colleges scrutinize these carefully. As the year progresses, students must track acceptances, and if placed on a waitlist for their top choices, consider applying to schools with later deadlines. organization phone app Financial aid Parents will also be such as Cozi or even a busy, as financial aid large-format wall calenapplications are applications are timedar makes keeping track time-consuming consuming and must be of test dates and applicacompleted as soon as tion deadlines easier. and must be possible. If their son or Now is the time to becompleted as daughter has applied to gin evaluating colleges in earnest. Under BRIDGE, soon as possible. both public and private schools, it will be necesGeorgia students must investigate at least three postsecondary sary to complete both the FAFSA (Free institutions and record the information in Application for Federal Student Aid) and their GCIS portfolio by the end of junior the (College Scholarship Service) Profile year. Using the list of personal criteria and to determine aid eligibility. As accepthe school information they’ve gathered, tances are received, families will need students should make a ranked list of po- to compare the aid packages offered as tential schools and make appointments they work together towards a final decito visit several. It’s also a good point to sion. It’s been a long road, but as the portbegin requesting letters of recommendation from respected mentors. Meanwhile, folio is finally closed with the entry “Colparents should begin reviewing the finan- lege,” at last it’s time to raise a toast at the graduation party and savor the accial picture and making a budget. The summer between junior and se- complishment. All too soon it will be time nior year is critical; in addition to working to shop for those dorm supplies. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

31


TAKE THE STRESS OUT OF

HOMEWORK HOW TO HELP YOUR CHILD HANDLE THE WORKLOAD BY MICHELLE BOURG 32

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


study space that’s easily accessible by parents but situated away from distractions, and with space to spread materials out. Kids’ bedrooms often hold distractions such as TV or toys and are a few steps removed from quick parental access, so a laptop at the dining room or kitchen table Some kids like may be best, at least for younger children. to come straight Next, set up a study home and start their time. Some kids like to come straight home and homework, others start while they’re still need to unwind first. in “school mode;” others need to unwind first. Whatever the preferred time is, it should be reasonably close to the same time every day; our minds learn to adapt to functions done on a set schedule, and it’s also a good way to begin to learn time management. Within that set time, experiment with how to prioritize the work load: some kids prefer to start with demanding subjects while they’re relatively fresh and allot extra time to them, while others want to get ack in the day, homework was the easier work out of the way first. Scan something kids could do before the day’s assignments together and plan dinner—a page of math problems a schedule based on both your child’s and maybe a chapter of reading, done study style and the amount of work aswith the radio or TV on and with plenty signed in each subject. Children often of time left over for other things. Not any need guidance with this, but giving them more: it’s a more rigorous academic land- some input on how they’d like to work scape, and homework is a continuation goes a long way towards a positive attiof a demanding workload. Helping kids tude about the work itself. Once the books are cracked, be availmanage the demands of homework efficiently for maximum educational benefit able to clarify instructions or suggest an approach to a problem, but let your child is now a priority for the whole family. The first step to productive homework do the work. Meanwhile, observe their management is to create a designated progress and note what’s challenging

B

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

33


and what’s not demanding enough. If there are consistent patterns, talk to the teacher to create a solution as a team. When study time is over, review the work with your child. Praise effort and progress, and review problem areas together to brainstorm on how to improve. Inevitably, your child is going to be stumped and need help. When that happens, don’t lead your child down the wrong path by trying to be an expert in an unfamiliar subject. It’s tempting to just Google it, but be careful about online resources. Checking the reliability of sources not only helps your child learn to use media responsibly, but also teaches them the most important skill they can ever have: how to learn. 34

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017

Possibly the hardest part of homework for parents is knowing when to call for reinforcements. Dennis Freeman, co-founder of In-Home Tutors Atlanta, says there are several scenarios in which a family can benefit from some personal help, primarily “When the child is clearly struggling and it’s gone beyond the parent’s capabilities,” noting that 7th- and 8th-grade math is typically the upper limit for many parents. When children actively resist homework, have chronic difficulty getting organized, or are dealing with issues such as ADHD, family relationships can suffer as parents get caught up in the stress. Children often respond differently to someone outside their circle, and in these


and parents as well. cases, a homework coach Possibly the Also, just about all famihelps with academics but lies are typically juggling also helps keep the child hardest part multiple schedules; having organized and on track, of homework someone there to focus on which can make homework less of a burden and just for parents is schoolwork helps everyone meet the demands and maybe, even fun. “Having knowing when gives them back time to be a less emotionally attached together as a family. third party can take a lot of to call for For help with locating a stress out of the housereinforcements. qualified tutor that meets hold,” Freeman says. your individual needs, a There has been more of an increased focus on standardized good first step is contacting your child’s testing in recent years; more stringent school. Other parents may be able to standards called the Georgia Milestones give referrals as well. Homework will probably never be were introduced here in 2014 and a new edition of the SAT was released in 2016. high on your child’s list of things to do, Freeman says that his service has seen but by working together with them and increased demand as a result of these their teachers, and calling in help when developments and also that a tutor can appropriate, you can make sure they provide practice and review for the tests, work smarter, not harder, to get the most allay concerns and reassure both students out of it with a minimum of tears.

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

35


36

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017

5

1

For features of independent schools, turn to Education At a Glance on pg. 38. For public school system information by county, turn to pg. 83.

2 3

REGIONS FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

metro atlanta area map

N


Alpharetta, Brookhaven, Cumming, Dunwoody, Flowery Branch, Johns Creek, North Fulton, Northeast Atlanta, Peachtree Corners, Roswell

Ansley Park, Athens, Dacula, Decatur, Midtown, Morningside, Northeast Atlanta

p.60 REGION 3: Atlanta East

p.51 REGION 2: Atlanta North/Northeast

Alpharetta, Buckhead, Crabapple, East Cobb, Marietta, Roswell, Sandy Springs

p.41 REGION 1: Atlanta North/Northwest

Page | Region | Neighborhoods Fairburn, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Metro-Atlanta, South Fulton

Downtown, Kennesaw, Marietta, Powder Springs, Smyrna-Vinings

p.70  REGION 5: Atlanta West

p.66 R  EGION 4: Atlanta South/ Southeast/Southwest

4

 utoring, Summer Camps and Activities, T Field Trips and Education Programs.

p.91 Educational Resources

p.83 Public School County Guide

Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia

p.75 Boarding Schools

Additional Education Sections

S


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

APPLICATION DEADLINE

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

260

12

167 1,160 13-20

54

190

10

16

100

8

• Dec. 4 Rolling

UNIFORM

27

AP/IB COURSES

AVG. CLASS SIZE

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

# STUDENTS

REGION 1: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHWEST

42

Atlanta Girls’ School

43 47

2 21

404-845-0900

Atlanta International School

404-841-3840

The Cottage School

770-641-8688

Cumberland Academy of Georgia Fulton Science Academy Private School

21

GRACEPOINT School

404-835-9000 678-366-2555 678-709-6634

3

High Meadows School

770-993-2940

43

Holy Spirit Preparatory School

678-904-2811

45

Johnson Ferry Christian Academy

678-784-5231

42

Mill Springs Academy

770-360-1336

47

Mt. Bethel Christian Academy

770-971-0245

44

Pace Academy

404-262-1345

44

Porter Academy

770-594-1313

48

Saint Francis School

770-641-8257

50

Springmont School

404-252-3910

48

Swift School

678-205-4988

49

Village Montessori School

770-552-0834

46

The Walker School

770-427-2689

50

The Weber School

404-917-2500

51

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

# TEACHERS

41

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian E = Episcopal J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian PR = Protestant Reformed Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

$24,465 6-12th $21,0003K-12th $24,000 $18,5004-12th $25,450 4-12th $23,900 PG $11,000- PK$13,000 12th $20,500

1-8th

$6,350- PK3$19,400 8th $6,5102-12th $24,065 $3,900K-12th $4,500

Toddler8th

$26,300

1-8th

JK-12th

5-8

C

57

390 18-22

80

570 12-22 RC

44

400 12-16

56

350

11

67

640

18

126 1,105 12

22

75

10

70

733

14

21

270

22

260

12

• •

1-12th

$5,000- 18mo$13,000 8th $12,420- PK3$22,770 12th

18

83

Pre 1st12th PK-8th

455

60

10

165 Varies

123

923

12

44

238

16

50

300+

16

32

150

8

25

175

14

36

311

14

12

80 Varies

50

409

18

70

400

15

115

480

15

$26,700 9-12th

• Nov. 12 Jan.

$23,958 1-12th $9,950$14,430 $23,630$27,225 $19,923$20,748 $14,000$21,000 $13,200 $22,800

58 26

Dec. Jan. 31 Appt. Rolling

• •

B

Open

Appt. Rolling Oct.

Call

Nov. Mar. 17

Nov.

Sept. Rolling

Oct.

• •

ND

Appt.

July 1

Feb.

Appt. Feb. 1

Sept. Rolling

Oct. Feb. 24 Appt.

Call

Appt. Rolling Oct. Rolling Oct.

J

Feb.

Appt. Rolling

REGION 2: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHEAST

59

Atlanta Academy

678-461-6102

77

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

52

Bridgeway Christian Academy

770-751-1972

58

Cornerstone Christian Academy

770-441-9222

56

Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia

770-814-8001

55

Lanier Christian Academy

678-828-8350

52

McGinnis Woods Country Day School

770-664-7764

54

MJCCA Preschools

678-812-3833

38

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

$9,700$15,160 $27,000$59,100 $3,000$11,500 $10,075$12,826 $650$1,275 $4,930 $10,935 $9,200$12,950 $4,114$15,541

PS-8th

6-12th P3-8th

K-8th 8wks6y

K-12th Infant8th 6wksPK

Summer/Fall 2017

• • • •

J

Rolling

• Ongoing Rolling •

Nov. Rolling

Oct.

Appt. Rolling

Nov. Ongoing

Appt. Rolling

C

C

Oct.

Call

Appt. Rolling


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

Northwoods Montessori School

770-457-7261

56

Perimeter School

678-405-2345

53

The Piedmont School of Atlanta

404-382-8200

54

Pinecrest Academy

770-888-4477

59

Wesleyan School

770-448-7640

69

Woodward Academy

404-765-4000

60 62

APPLICATION DEADLINE

58

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

678-336-3443

30

240 14-30

• Onging Rolling

24

180 18-30

• Ongoing Rolling

23

154

15

July Rolling

JK-12th

77

685

18

Jan. Feb. 27

12mo12y

5

93

20

K-8th

54

550

14

$24,750

K-HS

5

15

8

$7,490$16,750 $16,700$23,210 $16,950$26,800

PK312th

84

828

20 or Less

138 1,150 16

K-12th PK-12th

365 2,701 16

PS-8th

28

K3-12th

8wks15y InfantPK

3yr-8th

UNIFORM

678-208-0774

Mount Pisgah Christian School

AP/IB COURSES

Montessori Kids Academy

57

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

53

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

770-777-9131

14mo15y 14mo9y 18mo6th

AVG. CLASS SIZE

Montessori at Vickery

# STUDENTS

8

$7,000$11,000 $7,000$10,000 $10,000$12,000 $14,950$19,995 $11,110$15,635 $5,466$11,643

# TEACHERS

770-205-6277

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

8

PRESCHOOL

PAGE

GRADES/AGES

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian E = Episcopal J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian PR = Protestant Reformed Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Appt. Rolling P

Nov.

Call

Sept. Rolling

RC

• Jan. 28 Rolling

C

Nov.

Feb.

Oct.

Feb.

REGION 3: ATLANTA EAST Arbor Montessori School

404-321-9304

61

Athens Academy

706-549-9225

8

Atlanta Montessori International School

404-325-6777

65

Canterbury School

404-522-5659

64

The Children’s School

404-873-6985

23

The Cloverleaf School

404-474-3904

63

The Friends School of Atlanta

404-373-8746

65

Greater Atlanta Christian School

770-243-2000

62

Hebron Christian Academy

770-963-9250

$9,800$19,100 $8,800$18,200 $11,000$18,000 $13,000$17,000 $13,500$21,990 $26,000 $13,400$21,200 $16,565$20,900 $9,450$11,550 $8,000$15,000 $18,100$19,200

285

26

130

955

15

40

245 6-30

Ongoing Rolling

17

85

Appt. Rolling

54

370 13-24

13

23

6

174

K-7th

Appt. Rolling

10

Appt. Feb. 23

Appt. Rolling

3y-8th

38

11

Q

PS-12th

204 1,800 16

C

67

912

18

ND

27

150

12

C

40

240

Max. 12

K-12th

61

Heritage Preparatory School

404-815-7711

63

Midtown International School

404-542-7003

66

REGION 4: ATLANTA SOUTH/SOUTHEAST/SOUTHWEST

PK-8th K-10th

68

Arlington Christian School

770-964-9871

$5,775$9,125

PK412th

67

The Bedford School

770-774-8001

$19,250

1-9th

67

Counterpane Montessori School

770-461-2304

$13,000 3y-18y

8

100 Varies

68

Strong Rock Christian School

678-833-1200

82

875

69

Woodward Academy

404-765-4000

$5,900PK-12th $12,100 $16,950PK-12th $26,800

365 2,701 16

34

225 14-16

28

147

Nov.

Call

Oct.

Rolling

Call

Rolling

Oct.

Feb.

N/A Rolling

C

10

17

Nov. Rolling

C

Nov. Rolling

Appt.

Call

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

Oct.

Feb.

Education At a Glance Continued on Page 40 u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

39


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

APPLICATION DEADLINE

UNIFORM

• Varies Varies Varies C

AP/IB COURSES

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

AVG. CLASS SIZE

6wks2nd

# STUDENTS

Infant-K

# TEACHERS

Call $7,800$14,500 $5,000$14,680 $5,845$9,600 $2,450$6,748 $1,555$6,250 $3,599$17,902 $8,850$12,350 $6,715$8,730

Call

Call

REGION 5: ATLANTA WEST

71

Atlanta First Day School

404-333-0270

7

Benjamin Preparatory School

770-436-5200

74

Center Academy

770-333-1616

73

Covenant Christian School

770-435-1596

74

First Baptist Christian School

770-442-3254

74

Midway Covenant Christian School

770-590-1866

72

Mount Paran Christian School

770-578-0182

5

The SAE School

678-239-3200

72

St. Joseph Catholic School

770-428-3328

75

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

PHONE

KINDERGARTEN

SCHOOL

PRESCHOOL

70

GRADES/AGES

PAGE

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

*KEY: Religious Affiliation: B = Baptist C = Christian E = Episcopal J = Jewish ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian PR = Protestant Reformed Q = Quaker RC = Roman Catholic

16

90

12

C

Appt. Rolling

6

48

16

ND

Appt. Rolling

17

211

12

PR

Oct.

15

124 15-18

C

Jan. Rolling

K3-8th

27

300

PK312th

100 1,115 7-17

PK-12th

55

325 12-15

54

475

25

4-12th K4-8th

2y-5th

K-8th

15

Jan. Rolling

Oct. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

Oct. Rolling

P ND

Call

RC

BOARDING SCHOOLS

21

The Academy at SOAR

828-456-3435

77

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

78

Eagle Hill School

413-477-6000

76

Forman School

860-567-8712

81

George School

215-579-6547

81

Massanutten Military Academy

540-459-2167

79

Missouri Military Academy

573-581-1776

$54,000 7-12th

4

32

8-10

$27,0006-12th $59,100 $53,1308-12th $74,952 9-12th $73,730 & PG $39,0009-12th $57,550 $8,800- 6-12th, $45,000 PG

32

150

8

56

210

6

66

210

8

86

540

14

25

100

10

Appt. Rolling

36

190

10

Call

Rolling

7-12th

125

543

15

Call

Rolling

8-12th

30

120

10

E

Appt. Rolling

7-12th

55

370

13

C

Oct. Jan. 16

15

100

6-8

Appt. Rolling

60

400

10

$36,300 7th-PG $16,225$36,235 $18,400$48,900 $45,400$55,900 $24,500$47,200

78

Riverside Military Academy

770-538-2938

82

St. Margaret’s School

804-443-3357

80

The Stony Brook School

631-751-1800

77

The Vanguard School

863-676-6091

82

Woodberry Forest School

540-672-3900

$55,600

860-928-6575

$14,500- 9-12th $47,000 & PG

76

The Woodstock Academy

40

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

6-12th 9-12th

Summer/Fall 2017

98 1,000 17-22

Appt. Rolling

• •

• Ongoing Rolling

• •

Oct.

Q

• •

C

Rolling

Jan. Rolling Oct. 29 Jan. 15

Sept. Jan. 15

Oct. Rolling


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHWEST

1

42

GION RE

49 21

44 3 48 48

46

47 45 47

2 47

50 21

50 43 42 44

43

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta Girls’ School 42 Atlanta International School 43 The Cottage School 47 Cumberland Academy of Georgia 21 Fulton Science Academy Private School 2 GRACEPOINT School 21 High Meadows School 3 Holy Spirit Preparatory School 43 Johnson Ferry Christian Academy 45

Mill Springs Academy Mt. Bethel Christian Academy Pace Academy Porter Academy Saint Francis School Springmont School Swift School Village Montessori School The Walker School The Weber School

42 47 44 44 48 50 48 49 46 50

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Marietta Beautiful parks, charming streets, 19th-century Victorian homes and historic sites make Marietta a desirable place to call home. Residents enjoy the vibrant downtown square, with its many restaurants, antique shops and happenings.

Woodstock Located in Cherokee County, Woodstock is, as locals say, “where modern amenities meet old Southern charm.” Historic Olde Towne pays a continual tribute to Woodstock’s pioneers through vintage shops and good old-fashioned Southern hospitality. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

41


BUCKHEAD • ALPHARETTA 42

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


BUCKHEAD www.atlantaschoolguide.com

43


CRABAPPLE • BUCKHEAD 44

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


EAST COBB


MARIETTA


MARIETTA • ROSWELL www.atlantaschoolguide.com

47


ROSWELL 48

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


ROSWELL

“Free a child’s potential and you will transform him into the world.” - MARIA MONTESSORI

We are committed to: Fostering independence, self-discipline, and responsibility Maintaining traditional AMI principles and curriculum Nurturing your child from toddler through the adolescent years Treating parents as partners in education AMI CERTIFIED, SACS ACCREDIATED 18 MOS. - MIDDLE SCHOOL HALF-DAY & ALL-DAY CLASSES - AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Open House first Wednesday of each month October-March 9:30-10:30.

1610 Woodstock Rd. • Roswell, GA 30075 • www.vmschool.com • 770-552-0834

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

49


SANDY SPRINGS 50

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHEAST

8 55 8 54 53 52 52 59

56

77 54

57 58

56 69 59

58

53

Independent Schools

Schools Page Atlanta Academy 59 Brandon Hall School 77 Bridgeway Christian Academy 52 Cornerstone Christian Academy 58 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia 56 Lanier Christian Academy 55 McGinnis Woods Country Day School 52

2 GION RE

MJCCA Preschools 54 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs 8 Montessori at Vickery 8 Montessori Kids Academy 53 Mount Pisgah Christian School 57 Northwoods Montessori School 58 Perimeter School 56 The Piedmont School of Atlanta 53 Pinecrest Academy 54 Wesleyan School 59 Woodward Academy 69

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Alpharetta Offering exceptional shopping, entertainment and dining, Alpharetta also boasts many awardwinning parks and numerous housing options.The city is also home to a 12,000-seat outdoor concert venue, the Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre.

Chamblee This DeKalb County suburb attracts diverse residents, thanks to its International Village, a 394-acre neighborhood that is home to people representing more than 30 countries. Chamblee’s Antique Row is the South’s largest antiques area. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

51


ALPHARETTA

BRIDGEWAY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Equipping students to know, grow and go. Pre-3 through 8th grade • ACSI and AdvancED Accredited • Afforable Tuition • Low Student-Teacher Ratio • Half and Full Day Kindergarten Program • Competitive Athletic Program • Rich Fine Arts • Arrowsmith Cognitive Program

Schedule a Tour Today! 770-751-1972 • www.bridgewayca.org 4755 Kimball Bridge Road, Alpharetta, GA 30005

for infants through 8th grade

Ask about our middle school program

Call for a tour or join us for an Open House 770-664-7764 • www.mcginniswoods.org 52

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


BROOKHAVEN • CUMMING

Serving children grades Pre-K to High School with learning and social challenges.

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

53


DUNWOODY • CUMMING 54

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


FLOWERY BRANCH


JOHNS CREEK

Sowing the Seeds of Organic Learning

56

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


NORTH FULTON


PEACHTREE CORNERS • NORTHEAST ATLANTA 58

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


PEACHTREE CORNERS • ROSWELL www.atlantaschoolguide.com

59


ATLANTA EAST

3 GION RE

62

65

ATHENS

61

62 63 8 23 61

MONROE

65

64

63

Independent Schools Schools Page Arbor Montessori School 62 Athens Academy 61 Atlanta Montessori International School 8 Canterbury School 65 The Children’s School 64

The Cloverleaf School The Friends School of Atlanta Greater Atlanta Christian School Hebron Christian Academy Heritage Preparatory School Midtown International School

23 63 65 62 61 63

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Decatur A great mix of history and modernity, Decatur is home to more than 200 shops, restaurants, galleries and performance venues located along tree-lined streets. Events take place throughout the year at the city’s historic downtown square. 60

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017

Stone Mountain With a revitalized downtown and a variety of familyoriented activities, Stone Mountain has much to offer. The city’s four city parks, as well as Stone Mountain Park, make this one of the cleanest and “greenest” areas in Metro Atlanta.


ANSLEY PARK • ATHENS www.atlantaschoolguide.com

61


DECATUR • DACULA 62

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2017


DECATUR • MIDTOWN www.atlantaschoolguide.com

63


MIDTOWN


MORNINGSIDE • NORTHEAST ATLANTA

65

www.atlantaschoolguide.com


ATLANTA SOUTH • SOUTHEAST • SOUTHWEST

4 GION RE

EAST POINT

68

69

DEKALB

Carrolton

67

67

68

Independent Schools Schools Page Arlington Christian School 68 The Bedford School 67

Counterpane Montessori School Strong Rock Christian School Woodward Academy

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NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE East Point The up-and-coming East Point area combines the charm of a small town with conveniences of a big city. Residents enjoy the city’s prime location near Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, MARTA and Downtown Atlanta. 66

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Fairburn Less than half an hour from Atlanta, Fairburn is filled with historic buildings and boasts a peaceful, smalltown atmosphere. The city is home to the annual Georgia Renaissance Festival and the local campus of Georgia Military College.


FAIRBURN • FAYETTEVILLE www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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METRO-ATLANTA


BARTOW

ATLANTA WEST

5 GION RE

72

74 72

74 74 73

7

5

FULTON

71

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta First Day School 71 Benjamin Preparatory School 7 Center Academy          74 Covenant Christian School 73

First Baptist Christian School Midway Covenant Christian School Mount Paran Christian School The SAE School St. Joseph Catholic School

74 74 72 5 72

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Acworth Just 35 miles northwest of Atlanta, Acworth is convenient to the city while offering its own unique smalltown appeal. Its historic downtown is a charming mixture of past and present. Surrounded by Lake Acworth and Lake Allatoona, this thriving city is a popular destination for fishing, boating and many other recreational activities. 70

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Douglasville A quick trip west of Atlanta on I-20, Douglasville has easy access to all that Atlanta offers—including Six Flags, 10 minutes away—but plenty of its own charm, too. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Downtown Douglasville’s historic district is an outstanding example of a turn-ofthe-century southern railroad town.


DOWNTOWN


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SMYRNA-VININGS


KENNESAW • POWDER SPRINGS • SMYRNA

1968

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BOARDING SCHOOL DIRECTORY

T

here are many benefits of a boarding school education. Boarding schools are an option for students seeking a more independent learning experience. Because students generally live on campus, learning takes place in and out of the classroom almost on a 24-hour basis. When selecting a boarding school, it is important to visit the school campus, but representatives from many boarding schools visit Metro Atlanta throughout the year—contact each school for specific dates.

Boarding Schools Schools Page The Academy at Soar 21 Brandon Hall School 77 Eagle Hill School 78 Forman School 76 George School 81 Massanutten Military Academy 81

Missouri Military Academy Riverside Military Academy St. Margaret’s School The Stony Brook School The Vanguard School Woodberry Forest School The Woodstock Academy

79 78 82 80 77 82 76

www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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CONNECTICUT 76

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FLORIDA • GEORGIA www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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MASSACHUSETTS • GEORGIA 78

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MISSOURI

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NEW YORK


PENNSYLVANIA • VIRGINIA www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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VIRGINIA 82

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PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

SPOTLIGHT ON METRO ATLANTA’S SCHOOL SYSTEMS

A

variety of improvements and innovative programs in Georgia’s public school systems have resulted in many stellar elementary, middle and high schools across the Metro area. Different school systems feature specialized programs and academic opportunities, such as magnet, charter, vocational or alternative schools to suit their respective students, parents and communities. However, despite variations in programming and academic offerings, all public schools must offer the core curriculum as determined by the Georgia Board of Education. Here is a county-by-county guide to Metro Atlanta’s public school systems. For more information about the Georgia Department of Education, call 404-656-2800 or visit www.gadoe.org. u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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BARTOW ADAIRSVILLE WHITE

BARTOW CARTERSVILLE

Number of Schools Elementary 12 Middle 4 High 3 1 Career Academy Total # of Students: 13,560 Student Spending: $8,684

EMERSON

Board of Education 770-606-5800 www.bartow.k12.ga.us

CHEROKEE CHEROKEE

CLAYTON

CLAYTON

2016 Average SAT: 1426 Top 3 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Woodland 1463 Adairsville High 1404 Cass High 1395

What’s New Kingston Elementary celebrated its first science fair competition in March, with 19 students demonstrating projects that included solar ovens, chemical reactions, and fruit cell batteries. The first place winner received tickets to the Tellus Museum in Cartersville. Number of Schools Elementary 24 Middle 7 High 6 Alternative 1 1 Evening Virtual School 1 Centers 4 Total # of Students: 41,536 Student Spending: $8,293

Board of Education 770-479-1871 www.cherokeek12.net

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 505.4 (M) 518.9 (S) 512.0 (SS) 508.9 5th: (ELA) 508.7 (M) 515.3 (S) 507.1 (SS) 503.3 8th: (ELA) 508.8 (M) 504.3 (S) 484.9 (SS) 509.3

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514.5 (M) 527.6 (S) 512.5 (SS) 517.1 5th: (ELA) 521.5 (M) 528.0 (S) 527.0 (SS) 512.4 8th: (ELA) 530.2 (M) 517.3 (S) 496.5 (SS) 521.7 2016 Average SAT: 1577 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Woodstock High 1603 Cherokee High 1586 Creekview High 1577 Sequoyah High 1575 Etowah High 1564

What’s New River Ridge High School music students will ring in 2019 in London: the marching band scored its second invitation to participate in the London New Year’s Day parade and the chorus was invited to the London International Choral Festival. Number of Schools Elementary 34 Primary 2 Middle 15 High 10 Virtual 1 Alternative 2 Performing Arts Center 1 Adult Education 1 Charter 2 Magnet 6 Open Campus 1 Total # of Students: 54,317 Student Spending: $7,894

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 480.0 (M) 495.0 (S) 489.2 (SS) 488.5 5th: (ELA) 491.4 (M) 488.8 (S) 487.4 (SS) 489.8 8th: (ELA) 502.2 (M) 484.9 (S) 464.9 (SS) 492.9 2016 Average SAT: 1284 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score M.E. Stilwell School of the Arts 1452 Elite Scholars Academy 1408 Forest Park High 1304 Morrow High 1295 Jonesboro High 1293

Board of Education 770-473-2700 www.clayton.k12.ga.us

What’s New Forty-nine seniors were selected as Scholar-Athletes from high schools across the county for their expertise in the classroom, on the field of play and in their respective communities.

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COBB

Board of Education 770-426-3300 www.cobbk12.org

COWETA COWETA

Number of Schools 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 64 3rd: (ELA) 515.4 (M) 522.3 (S) 511.1 (SS) 506.2 Elementary Primary 2 5th: (ELA) 524.9 (M) 520.0 (S) 512.0 (SS) 506.2 Intermediate 2 8th: (ELA) 530.0 (M) 517.5 (S) 497.1 (SS) 516.7 Middle 24 High 16 2016 Average SAT: 1520 Charter 2 Learning Centers 1 Top 5 Schools by Average Special Education Centers 1 2016 SAT Score Virtual Academies 2 Walton High 1730 Lassiter High 1654 Total # of Students: Pope High 1648 114,410 Wheeler High 1635 Student Spending: Kennesaw Mountain High 1610 $8,893 What’s New Kennesaw Elementary School teacher Emily Adams has been honored as the Southern District Elementary Physical Education Teacher of the Year by The Society of Health and Physical Education Educators. Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 6 High 3 Charter & Career Academy 1 Alternative 3 Centre for Performing and Visual Arts 1 Total # of Students: 22,019 Student Spending: $8,567

Board of Education 770-254-2800 www.cowetaschools.net

DEKALB

DEKALB

Board of Education 678-676-1200 www.dekalbschoolsga.org

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 506.5 (M) 520.3 (S) 513.3 (SS) 511.5 5th: (ELA) 510.7 (M) 516.6 (S) 516.8 (SS) 506.7 8th: (ELA) 525.6 (M) 531.2 (S) 515.0 (SS) 519.0 2016 Average SAT: 1497 Top 3 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Northgate High 1531 East Coweta High 1495 Newnan High 1456

What’s New All three of the county’s high schools have been recognized as state AP Honor Schools, meaning they offer instruction and testing in at least two AP math courses and two AP science courses. Number of Schools Elementary 76 Middle 19 High 22 Charter 14 Magnet 4

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 490.5 (M) 499.3 (S) 496.3 (SS) 492.5 5th: (ELA) 500.7 (M) 492.9 (S) 488.9 (SS) 489.2 8th: (ELA) 501.3 (M) 492.5 (S) 482.5 (SS) 492.9

Total # of Students: 101,014 Student Spending: $9,952

Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score DeKalb School of the Arts 1670 Chamblee Charter High 1647 Dunwoody High 1610 Lakeside High 1547 DeKalb Early College Academy 1513

2016 Average SAT: 1352

What’s New DeKalb County will begin using Peachjar to send digital flyers directly to parents. Parents will register their children online for sports, enrichment programs, and community events, reducing paper usage and copy costs by thousands of dollars. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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COBB


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

DOUGLAS

DOUGLAS

Board of Education 770-651-2000 www.douglas.k12.ga.us

FAYETTE FAYETTE

Number of Schools Elementary 20 Middle 8 High 5 Centers 3 Total # of Students: 26,267 Student Spending: $8,621

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 501.6 (M) 516.1 (S) 514.4 (SS) 506.2 5th: (ELA) 511.4 (M) 511.7 (S) 520.3 (SS) 506.6 8th: (ELA) 514.0 (M) 513.2 (S) 504.9 (SS) 506.6 2016 Average SAT: 1361 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Douglas County High 1478 Alexander High 1410 Chapel Hill High 1328 1278 Lithia Springs High New Manchester High 1251

What’s New Douglas County Schools will be the first district in Georgia to offer computer science classes to all grade levels from K-12. It will phase in the Computer Science for All initiative over the next three years. Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 5 High Alternative 1 Open Campus 1

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 528.4 (M) 537.7 (S) 532.8 (SS) 531.1 5th: (ELA) 533.1 (M) 536.4 (S) 545.8 (SS) 527.3 8th: (ELA) 538.6 (M) 542.1 (S) 542.4 (SS) 535.8

Total # of Students: 20,152 Student Spending: $9,145

Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score 1654 McIntosh High Starr’s Mill High 1622 Whitewater High 1535 Sandy Creek High 1469 Fayette County High 1456

2016 Average SAT: 1567

Board of Education 770-460-3535 www.fcboe.org

What’s New Nineteen students will attend the 2017 Governor’s Honors Program (GHP), a four-week program of college- and professional-level coursework and experience in a given field.

FORSYTH

Number of Schools Elementary 21 Middle 10 High 5 Non-Traditional 2 Virtual 1 Charter/Evening 1

FORSYTH

Total # of Students: 44,529 Student Spending: $7,866

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 543.0 (M) 554.6 (S) 532.9 (SS) 534.3 5th: (ELA) 549.2 (M) 560.3 (S) 547.8 (SS) 535.5 8th: (ELA) 549.4 (M) 557.3 (S) 415.6 (SS) 543.3 2016 Average SAT: 1584 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score 1645 South Forsyth High Lambert High 1627 West Forsyth High 1543 North Forsyth High 1525 Forsyth Central 1511

Board of Education 770-887-2461 www.forsyth.k12.ga.us

What’s New The county’s middle schools received a total of 13 medals in nine categories at the recent Georgia Science Olympiad tournaments, “academic track meets” of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, competitions.

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Number of Schools Elementary 59 Middle 19 High 18 Charter 10 Alternative Schools 3 Virtual Campus 1 Total # of Students: 95,428 Student Spending: $10,072

FULTON

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 515.2 (M) 524.1 (S) 515.3 (SS) 508.7 5th: (ELA) 522.6 (M) 521.8 (S) 517.0 (SS) 506.9 8th: (ELA) 523.6 (M) 512.6 (S) 498.2 (SS) 510.7 2016 Average SAT: 1502 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Northview High 1810 Johns Creek High 1730 Alpharetta High 1714 Chattahoochee High 1709 Cambridge High School 1678

Board of Education 470-254-3600 www.fultonschools.org

What’s New The Roswell High School Hornet Battalion of JROTC scored above a 96 on a recent major inspection, earning the designation of Honor Unit with Distinction (HUD).

GRIFFINSPALDING

Number of Schools Elementary 11 4 Middle High 2 Alternative 2 Center 1

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 484.4 (M) 499.4 (S) 497.4 (SS) 498.1 5th: (ELA) 497.9 (M) 501.3 (S) 504.1 (SS) 496.7 8th: (ELA) 495.5 (M) 488.6 (S) 481.1 (SS) 490.4

Total # of Students: 9,828 Student Spending: $8,957

Top 2 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Spalding High 1422 Griffin High 1317

2016 Average SAT: 1366

Board of Education 770-229-3700 www.spalding.k12.ga.us

What’s New The district recently sponsored two sessions of a Social Media Safety Seminar to discuss with parents ways to keep kids safe as they navigate the internet.

GWINNETT

Number of Schools Elementary 80 Middle 29 High 21 Alternative 2 Charter 2 Open Campus 1 1 Virtual School Special Education 3 Center 1 Career/Technical 1

GWINNETT

Total # of Students: 180,235 Student Spending: $8,377

Board of Education 678-301-6000 www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 514.4 (M) 525.2 (S) 517.4 (SS) 515.7 5th: (ELA) 521.0 (M) 525.2 (S) 518.3 (SS) 512.7 8th: (ELA) 527.5 (M) 507.5 (S) 473.2 (SS) 528.7 2016 Average SAT: 1503 Top 2 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology 1870 North Gwinnett High 1649 Brookwood High 1572 1561 Mill Creek High Parkview High 1553

What’s New Sycamore Elementary students created a “mini mall” with students taking turns “working” and “shopping” in the stores to learn about earning, saving and spending. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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FULTON


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

HALL HALL

Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 High 6 11 Charter Total # of Students: 27,916 Student Spending: $8,265

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 495.9 (M) 512.3 (S) 502.3 (SS) 502.2 5th: (ELA) 498.7 (M) 505.9 (S) 501.3 (SS) 500.0 8th: (ELA) 510.0 (M) 513.2 (S) 491.2 (SS) 511.7 2016 Average SAT: 1414 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score North Hall High 1494 Flowery Branch High 1459 Chestatee High 1439 Johnson High 1375 1336 East Hall High

Board of Education 770-534-1080 www.hallco.org

What’s New New zones will create a seventh high school and new middle school in 2018-2019, impacting Johnson and Flowery Branch High Schools and South Hall and Davis Middle Schools.

HENRY

Number of Schools Elementary 27 Middle 11 High 10 Charter 2 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Virtual School 1

HENRY

Total # of Students: 42,125 Student Spending: $8,330

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 501.5 (M) 512.2 (S) 505.0 (SS) 504.1 5th: (ELA) 509.7 (M) 504.9 (S) 500.4 (SS) 499.6 8th: (ELA) 515.5 (M) 497.9 (S) 499.0 (SS) 502.4 2016 Average SAT: 1371 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score Union Grove High 1514 1489 Ola High Eagles Landing High 1417 Locust Grove High 1404 1377 Woodland High

Board of Education 770-957-6601 www.henry.k12.ga.us

What’s New Henry County Schools Superintendent Rodney Bowler has announced his retirement effective Sept. 29. A replacement has not been named.

PAULDING

Number of Schools 19 Elementary Middle 9 High 5 Alternative 1

PAULDING BRASWELL

278

Total # of Students: 28,759 Student Spending: $8,506

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 511.5 (M) 522.1 (S) 510.9 (SS) 504.4 5th: (ELA) 514.2 (M) 513.5 (S) 515.8 (SS) 510.8 8th: (ELA) 515.3 (M) 503.4 (S) 515.8 (SS) 519.9 2016 Average SAT: 1391 Top 5 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score North Paulding High 1464 Paulding County High 1393 1365 East Paulding High South Paulding High 1345 1332 Hiram High

Board of Education 770-443-8000 www.paulding.k12.ga.us

What’s New All five of the county’s high schools have been named AP Honor Schools by state superintendent Richard Woods. The various schools were honored in four of six possible categories: STEM Access and Support Schools, AP STEM Schools, AP STEM Achievement Schools, and AP Humanities Schools.

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LE RO CK DA

Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 4 High 3 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Magnet 1 Open Campus 1 Virtual School 1 Total # of Students: 16,311 Student Spending: $9,311

2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 505.4 (M) 518.9 (S) 516.0 (SS) 513.5 5th: (ELA) 510.6 (M) 512.1 (S) 516.3 (SS) 504.5 8th: (ELA) 514.6 (M) 501.6 (S) 505.3 (SS) 509.7 2016 Average SAT: 1321 Top 3 Schools by Average 2016 SAT Score 1345 Rockdale High Heritage High 1337 Salem High 1239

Board of Education 770-483-4713 www.rockdaleschools.org

What’s New Rockdale County students brought home 60 awards and recognitions from the 69th annual Georgia Science and Engineering Fair (GSEF) held March 30 - April 1 in Athens.

ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 404-802-3500 50,837 www.atlanta.k12.ga.us Student Spending: $14,713 Number of Schools 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Primary 4 3rd: (ELA) 494.5 (M) 504.9 (S) 498.0 (SS) 499.8 Elementary 45 5th: (ELA) 502.2 (M) 500.4 (S) 497.4 (SS) 497.5 Intermediate 2 8th: (ELA) 502.5 (M) 487.7 (S) 481.0 (SS) 494.6 Middle 10 6th Grade Academy 1 2016 Average SAT: 1364 High 10 Charter 19 Top 5 Schools by Average Alternative 4 2016 SAT Score Evening School 1 1595 Grady High Open Campus 1 Adult Education Center 1 North Atlanta High 1476 1370 Carver Early College Maynard Jackson High 1318 Benjamin Mays High 1239 What’s New Teams from Carver, Grady, Jackson, North Atlanta, and Washington High Schools all competed in qualifying FIRST Robotics tournaments across Georgia.

BUFORD CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 770-945-5035 4,423 www.bufordcityschools.org Spending per Student: $9,536 Number of Schools 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Elementary (K-1) 1 3rd: (ELA) 534.9 (M) 536.6 (S) 531.0 (SS) 537.5 Academy (2-5) 1 5th: (ELA) 523.8 (M) 542.0 (S) 542.0 (SS) 528.2 Middle 1 8th: (ELA) 537.4 (M) 537.3 (S) 540.7 (SS) 542.7 High 1 2016 Average SAT: 1530 What’s New The Buford High School girls’ and boys’ basketball teams are both state champions. The Wolves also won the GHSA AAAAA Traditional State Wrestling Championship and the Lady Wolves captured their tenth consecutive softball state championship. www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

CITY SCHOOLS OF DECATUR

Board of Education 404-371-3601 www.csdecatur.net Number of Schools Elementary 5 Middle 1 4th & 5th Grade Academy 1 High 1 Career Academy 1 Early Learning Center 1

Total # of Students: 4,714 Student Spending: $11,546 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 542.8 (M) 544.1 (S) 541.3 (SS) 537.1 5th: (ELA) 550.5 (M) 548.1 (S) 544.4 (SS) 528.6 8th: (ELA) 552.9 (M) 532.4 (S) 545.5 (SS) 536.7 2016 Average SAT: 1571

What’s New The Decatur High School team took second place in the National Economics Challenge Quiz Bowl in March. The team, all of them freshmen, received the highest individual scores in the school’s division.

GAINESVILLE CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-536-5275 www.gcss.k12.net Number of Schools Elementary 6 Middle 1 High 1

Total # of Students: 8,394 Student Spending: $7,935 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 481.1 (M) 499.0 (S) 491.3 (SS) 491.3 5th: (ELA) 493.2 (M) 495.0 (S) 493.4 (SS) 495.6 8th: (ELA) 499.7 (M) 509.1 (S) 483.9 (SS) 501.1 2016 Average SAT: 1399

What’s New The School Board sought feedback on two restructuring proposals: To turn all CSD K-3 schools into K-2 schools, turn the 4th- and 5th-grade academy into a 3-5 school and build a second K-2 to keep the current K-3 configuration while building a new 4-5 academy.

MARIETTA CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education Total # of Students: 770-422-3500 9,087 www.marietta-city.org Student Spending: $10,271 Number of Schools Elementary 7 2016 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: Sixth Grade 1 3rd: (ELA) 511.0 (M) 522.5 (S) 515.3 (SS) 509.9 Middle 1 5th: (ELA) 516.9 (M) 516.8 (S) 515.5 (SS) 504.7 1 8th: (ELA) 513.7 (M) 502.0 (S) 505.6 (SS) 519.3 High Alternative 1 Magnet 1 2016 Average SAT: 1431 What’s New Marietta City Schools (MCS) placed in the Top 10 U.S. School Districts in Digital Technology for medium-sized school districts (2,500 – 15,000 students) in the nation in the 13th annual Digital School Districts Survey by the Center for Digital Education and the National School Boards Association (NSBA).

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EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES Ways to Enhance your Child’s or Student’s Learning

Index

Tutoring & Study Skills 92 Summer Camps & Activities 92 Field Trips & Education Programs 94 www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES • TUTORING 92

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS 94

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www.atlantaschoolguide.com


FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Reach youR TaRgeT MaRkeT more effectively!

Advertise in Atlanta School Guide and get results.

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Summer/Fall 2017


ADVERTISER INDEX Boarding Schools Brandon Hall School...........................................77 Eagle Hill School.................................................78 Forman School ...................................................76 George School....................................................81 Massanutten Military Academy ........................81 Missouri Military Academy.................................79 Riverside Military Academy ..............................78 St. Margaret’s School..........................................82 The Stony Brook ................................................80 The Vanguard School.........................................77 Woodberry Forest School..................................82 The Woodstock Academy..................................76

Early Education Arbor Montessori School...................................62 Atlanta Academy................................................59 Atlanta First Day School.....................................71 Atlanta Montessori International School............8 Benjamin Preparatory School..............................7 Canterbury School..............................................65 The Children’s School.........................................64 Counterpane Montessori School......................67 First Baptist Christian School.............................74 The Friends School of Atlanta...........................63 Greater Atlanta Christian School.......................65 High Meadows School.........................................3 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....56 McGinnis Woods Country Day School.............52 MJCCA Preschools.............................................54 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............8 Montessori at Vickery...........................................8 Montessori Kids Academy.................................53 Mount Paran Christian School...........................72 Northwoods Montessori School........................58 Pinecrest Academy.............................................54 Porter Academy..................................................44 Springmont School.............................................50 Strong Rock Christian School............................68 Village Montessori School.................................49 The Walker School..............................................46 Woodward Academy..........................................69

Field Trips & Education Programs Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (INK)..........96 LEGOLAND Discovery Center Atlanta.............94

Lookout Mountain Attractions...........................94 Mayfield Dairy Farm...........................................95 The Rock Ranch..................................................95 Southeastern Railway Museum..........................96 Zoo Atlanta .........................................................93

Independent Schools Arbor Montessori School...................................62 Arlington Christian School.................................68 Athens Academy.................................................61 Atlanta Academy................................................59 Atlanta First Day School ....................................71 Atlanta Girls’ School...........................................42 Atlanta International School .............................43 Atlanta Montessori International School............8 The Bedford School...........................................67 Benjamin Preparatory School..............................7 Bridgeway Christian Academy..........................52 Canterbury School..............................................65 Center Academy ................................................74 The Children’s School.........................................64 Cornerstone Christian Academy.......................58 The Cottage School...........................................47 Counterpane Montessori School......................67 Covenant Christian School................................73 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................21 First Baptist Christian School ..........................74 The Friends School of Atlanta...........................63 Fulton Science Academy Private School............2 GRACEPOINT School........................................21 Greater Atlanta Christian School.......................65 Hebron Christian Academy ...............................62 Heritage Preparatory School.............................61 High Meadows School.........................................3 Holy Spirit Preparatory School..........................43 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....56 Johnson Ferry Christian Academy....................45 Lanier Christian Academy..................................55 McGinnis Woods Country Day School ............52 Midtown International School...........................63 Midway Covenant Christian School..................74 Mill Springs Academy .......................................42 MJCCA Preschools.............................................54 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs ...........8 Montessori Kids Academy.................................53 Montessori at Vickery...........................................8 Continued on Next Page u www.atlantaschoolguide.com

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ADVERTISER INDEX (Continued from Previous Page) Mount Paran Christian School...........................72 Mount Pisgah Christian School.........................57 Mt. Bethel Christian Academy...........................47 Northwoods Montessori School........................58 Pace Academy....................................................44 Perimeter School................................................56 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................53 Pinecrest Academy.............................................54 Porter Academy..................................................44 The SAE School....................................................5 Saint Francis School...........................................48 Springmont School.............................................50 St. Joseph Catholic School ...............................72 Strong Rock Christian School............................68 The Suzuki School...............................................35 Swift School.........................................................48 Village Montessori School.................................49 The Walker School..............................................46 The Weber School..............................................50 Wesleyan School.................................................59 Woodward Academy..........................................69

Montessori Schools Arbor Montessori School...................................62 Atlanta Montessori International School............8 Counterpane Montessori School......................67 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....56 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs............8 Montessori Kids Academy.................................53 Montessori at Vickery...........................................8 Northwoods Montessori School........................58 Village Montessori School.................................49

Resources & Services Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates.................9 Caron Treatment Centers ..................................17 Dare 2 Care...........................................................9 Georgia Association for Play.............................35 Georgia Lottery........................ Inside Back Cover Pay it Forward Scholarships............... Back Cover The School Box...................................................49

Special Needs & Learning Difficulties The Academy at SOAR......................................21 The Bedford School...........................................67

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Center Academy.................................................74 Children’s Special Services.................................22 The Cloverleaf School........................................23 The Cottage School...........................................47 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................21 GRACEPOINT School........................................21 Mill Springs Academy........................................42 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................53 Porter Academy..................................................44 Squirrel Hollow Day Camp.................................93 Swift School.........................................................48

Summer Camps & Activities Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education......17 Atlanta Riding Club............................................92 Squirrel Hollow Day Camp ................................93 U.S. Space & Rocket Center: Space Camp®.....13 Zoo Atlanta..........................................................93

Tutoring & Study Skills In-Home Tutors of Atlanta.................................92


Atlanta School Guide | Summer/Fall 2017  

Atlanta’s leading education resource provides a wealth of information for parents and educators.