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December 1860

Volume 1, Issue 1

CONTENT

Samurais in San Francisco

Pg 1: “Samurais in San Francisco” -By Kimberly L (Researcher)

Pg 2: Advertisements and Photos -By Rasul M (Leader) & Stephen F (Drawer)

Pg 3: “Japan trade in America” & a Advertisement -By Kenny L (Researcher) & Kimberly L Pg 4: Political Cartoons

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and Work Cited List -By Stephen F & Kimberly L

- By Kimberly Liao 1


A d v e r t i s e m e n t s P h o t o s

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Japan trade in America

Wo you hear that?

That is the sound of the Kanrin Maru, a Japanese warship that came from Japan on March 17 1860. In the warship which contains samurai escorts. One week later the USS Powhatan arrived containing the Japanese Embassy. President Millard Fillmore ordered Matthew C. Perry to establish diplomatic relations with Japan. He was sent to Japan and bought gift with him such as whiskey, muskets, and books. Before Japan was considered closed door but now it is open doors. The closed door shows that Japan blocked its trade

Advertisement for steamer Eliza Anderson (September 1860 )

everyone but however they still made trade with the Chinese and the Dutch. Perry eventually succeeded in the negotiation and thus we begin the trade. We sold them items such as apples, telecommunications equipment, rice, copper, etc. I believe that we should continue this trade. We have gained a lot of money from the Japanese. Out exports in Japan is gaining rapidly and we are taking a great income. However we’re not just exporting items. We are taking some of their imports as well, such as silk, rice, and paper. Interestingly enough, Japan also produced outstanding porcelain. In Japan there are harbors that are used as supply stations. We also obtain a coaling station for us to mine coal. Japan is the perfect place to trade with because it’s the fastest way to get to from San Francisco. This is perhaps the main reason why we want to open Japan’s door. This is why we should trade with Japan. Hopefully throughout these years we will continue to have peace with Japan. We will prosper for many years with this trade.

- By Kenny Li 3


P o l i t i c a l C a r t o o n s t h e 1 8 6 0 s

i n - By Stephen Fung

Abraham Lincoln was elected as the 16th president of the United States on November 6, 1860.

W o r k

C i t e d

L i s t

Griffiths, Ben. “Commodore Perry's Expedition to Japan.” Grifworld.com 2005. 15 February 2010. <http://www.grifworld.com/perryhome.html>. “The First Japanese Embassy to the United States.” Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania 8 February 2010. <http://www.lhup.edu/rsandow/1860embassy.htm>. “Kanrin Maru 150th Anniversary Celebration.” Kanrin-maru150.com 8 February 2010. <http:// www.kanrin-maru150.com/>. Griffiths, Ben. "Commodore Perry's Expedition to Japan ." Grifworld.com 2005. 2 February 2010. <http://www.grifworld.com/perryhome.html>. Scott, Theodore. "7 Political Cartoons of Abraham Lincoln." 1776mag.com 18 February 2009. 2 February 2010. <http://www.1776mag.com/7-political-cartoons-of-abraham-lincoln/>. “U.S. TRADE POLICY WITH JAPAN: ASSESSING THE RECORD.” Clinton4.nara.gov 12 April 1996. 15 February 2010. <http://clinton4.nara.gov/WH/EOP/CEA/html/tradeupdate.html>.

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