Page 1

W at e r R o w B at h s Kieran Dick-Doyle

Year

four, semester two


C ontents

Introduction Manifesto Brief Schedule of Accommodation Section A - Formattive Analysis - Ancient Bathing - Bath house in the Industrial Revolution - Contemporary Bathing - The Steamie - Arlington Baths - Govanhill Baths - Area Appraisal - Site Appraisal - Precedence mood board “light, water + form” - Synthesis of concept Section B Concept Design - Site Layout - Building Configuration/ Concept Explantion - Key Requirement Functional Areas Section C Built form - Location Plan - Location Model - Plans - A-A Section - B-B Section - C-C Section - South West Elevation - North West Elevation - North East Elevation - South East Elevation

2

Section a

pg.

4 5 pg. 6 pg. 6 pg.

pg.

7 13 pg. 15 pg. 17 pg. 18 pg. 19 pg. 20 - 31 pg. 32 - 33 pg. 34 - 35 pg. 36 pg.

pg.

37 - 39 pg. 40 - 45 pg. 44 - 51 pg.

52 pg. 53 pg. 54 - 58 pg. 60 pg. 61 pg. 62 pg. 63 pg. 64 pg. 65 pg. 66

Secrion D - IN USE - Bathing Spaces - Community Spaces Section E Structural Explanation - Structural Frame - External Structure - Construction Considerations - Pool Construction - Window + Wall Construction - External Materials Section F Environmental explanation - Environmental Considerations - Level 00 Water + Air Environment - Level 01 Water + Air Environment - Primary Building Services - Lighting Paths

pg. pg.

67 68

pg.

69 pg. 70 - 71 pg. 72 pg.73 pg.74 pg.75 pg.

76 pg. 77 pg. 78 pg. 79 pg. 80


I ntroduction

Section a

Water

Across the Globe

The healing properties of water have been utilised by mankind for millennia. Water is known as the bringer of life, essential for good health and cleanliness. Spaces that harbour water are often places of utmost calm, allowing peace and serenity to wash over the user providing time and space for reflection, rehabilitation or meditation.

Throughout history, places that allow direct interaction with water have manifested into places of worship, social interaction, entertainment and leisure over and above their main function as places to wash oneself. Above all these spaces have provided access to a function, their users may not otherwise have had. And though modern interpretations of swimming pools and leisure complexes have focused on recreation and ‘fun’, the potential for a shift in orientation to wider ranging facilities is very tangible.

The Waterfall - Man’s First Shower Water always played an important role in civilization, not just as element of survival, but in culture as well. It has manifested itself in myths and legends in the form of creatures, deities, heroes, and people. Most civilisations have hithertho developed different ways of creating physical contact with water, often the path they have chosen reflects the philosophy and culture of the people. Spirituality, Hygiene, Therapy and Socialising fascinatingly have always been evident in such places. For millenia, watering holes, springs, rivers, oceans, lakes, ponds and waterfalls were man’s bathing space.

Closer to Home Glasgow has a close and fond memory of ‘Steamies’ – localised wash houses that were first established in 1876 to serve the city’s population as a place to wash themselves and their garments. Catering for washing and bathing facilities that typical households would not have access to, these local ‘Baths’ became centres for social interaction as mothers cleaned family clothes and gossiped about life, workers washed and caught up with friends and fathers taught their children to swim. Although their use and popularity fell into decline and eventual dis-use by the late 20th century, many of their benefits would still be gratefully felt throughout communities today.

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Section a

MANIFESTO

A Bath house intervention within the community of Govan should be first and foremost accessible for all. It should have

the possibility to provide entertainment and recreation to younger children and adolescents while also catering to adults who may wish the use the space for fitness or relaxation. Any project would create the prospect of employment in the area and potentially skills education for young people. The building would revive the nostalgic notion of a ‘Steamie’ and would provide a laundrette for local families to use, access to washing facilities for those in need, and a food space or café. The space could have use for exhibitions or local events. Any design therefore has the distinct potential to become a community ‘hub’, perhaps drawing from a central location and enhancing the local building and urban fabric in a positive way. Cumulating into a vision of a successful future for Govan. A connection with the water of the River Clyde is important as this building could form a strong link between the town and the water’s edge – something that has been missing for a long time. The orientation of the building should also anchor an otherwise unstructured area of the town centre. Materials should be simple and design should be of high standard and easily identifiable to local people. Considered mass and form for the building could create a unique design that local people can be proud of and happy to call ‘theirs’. The composition of spaces will use texture and light to create beautiful places to use, while access and circulation between areas will be easily accessible and usable for all functions and users of the building.

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B rief +

accommodation

The project concerns the design of a Bath House, to be sited within a selected masterplan of the District of Govan, to the west of the City of Glasgow. This project will complement your previous design from Semester 1, and must be conscious of its relationship with its partner - in addition to its own unique responsibilities to context and programme. Through research and intense investigation, referencing appropriate precedents, you should propose a new paradigm for bathing on your site. The ensuing dialogue your architectural proposal will have with your hospice design will be enriched by the wider conversation with Govan, the River Clyde, the City of Glasgow and the culture of healing with water itself. “Water, air, and cleanness are the chief articles in my pharmacy.” Napoleon Bonaparte “Water is the driving force of all nature.” Leonardo da Vinci

Section a

We will develop design proposals to a scale of 1:200 and 1:100 demonstrating an understanding of spatial organisation, programme response and structural and environmental systems, Each site comes with its own set of challenges and site-specific needs. It is therefore important to consider how your design proposal relates to issues of daylight and lighting, urban design impact and the buildings form, massing and the exterior dialogue to its context. In particular, you should investigate the relationship between the quality of the architecture and its impact on the user’s experience. Important also, will be varying scales required to meet the needs of those users. The building should be approximately 3,200m2 (including circulation). External space is a requirement but it is at your discretion what the extent and location of this is.

Internal Accommodation • Entrance & Reception (100m2) • Offices (75m2) - (For Management, Staff and Facilities Management) • Gift Shop (For towels etc.) (25m2) • Salon (Hair & Beauty etc.) (50m2) • Waiting Area (50m2) • Restaurant & Kitchen (300m2) • Changing Rooms & WCs (250m2) • Shower Rooms & WCs (150m2) • 10 Treatment Rooms - Including Physiotherapy & Hydrotherapy facilities (200m2) • Gymnasium (500m2) and 4 no. Massage Rooms (50m2) Steam Rooms/Saunas/Saunarium/Turkish Baths (200m2) • Indoor Bath/Outdoor Bath/Fire Bath/Ice Bath (600m2) • Main Spa Pool/Bath (600 m2) • Rest Space (50m2) • Utility Rooms (25m2) • Plant Room (150 m2) • Refuse Area (25m2) External Accommodation • Outdoor Pool/Bath • 50 Car Parking spaces • Landscaping (incorporating connection to Hospice project)

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A ncient B athing

Section a

Ancient History

Thermae

Balneae

Although evidence for formal bathing places can be seen dating to the 2nd millenium BC, it was the Greeks who initiated an institution of communal showering. They developed plumbing systems that allowed them to pump water in and out of buildings.

Derived from the Greek word for ‘heat’, These imperial sized palace like structures included bathing facilities among other functions and served whole communities or towns. They were built by successive emperors each trying to out do the previous in building the most magnificent example of bathing. They were highly subsidised that meant anyone could use them, leading to a place where classes and sexes intertwined. Was considered on of the few Roman spaces to be ‘outside the law’ - leading to ilicit business also happening there. These vast places often residide in places of exercise and included facilities such as libraries, gymnasium, gathering spaces and arenas.

Perhaps is the Roman equivalent of the more modern sense of a bath. The word derives from ancient greek Balneum or Balineum. These terms in Roman society came to mean a singular bath or a ‘bathing vessel’ - of the type a prominent statesman or wealthy civilian would have in their own house. In comparison to the grand and lavish Thermae, the Balineum is recognised for its small size or limited number of users. Although as personal baths became more sumptuous or extravagant, the plural Balneae was adopted. Balneae are most appropriately described as baths of/for the people due to their humble size, personal access or use of them and their diminuitive stature of construction.

The Greeks were among the first to create public baths in the effort to provide water for the masses and promote cleanliness. The baths were part of the gymnasium centers which promoted sport and education; after strenuous exercise in the gymnasium it was essential to bath before entering the discussion halls. Over time these baths became synonomous with the human form and were particularly places where people could gather to admire physical beauty and parade their own physical beauty in front of the gods. Little remains of Greek bath houses following the Roman sacking of Athens in the 1st century BC but their ideological approach, engineering prowess and spatial layout can be seen in the remains of Roman bath houses throughout Europe.

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“when the inward heart had been cooled to refreshment they stepped into the bathtubs smooth-polished, and bathed here, and afterthey had bathed and anointed themselves with olive oil they sat down to dine”


Section a

7


C irculation

and

P rogramme

Section a

Baths of Caracalla - Thermae Antoninianae Rome, Italy Built 212-216AD

Plan

Apodyterium - Primary entrance point (Undressing room) = A Tepidarium - Warm room heated by hypocaust = T Unctorium - Annointing room (rubbing of oils + scraping of skin) = U Sudatorium - Vaulted sweating room = S Caldarium - Hot room heated by hypocaust = C Frigidairum - Cold room for cold bath or plunge = F Natatio - Casual swimming pool = N Palaestra - Exercise ground or Gymnasium = P

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Bath Arrangement

Ciculation Strategy

Composed of structured elements around which a journey through bathing rooms is formed. Semi-cicular exedrae and rectangular and round halls link on to each other through vaulted archways. The seperation of male and female elements along the axis of symmetry is broken only for a communal bathing pool at the bottom of the axis.


J apanese B athing

Section a

Japan’s location as a series of volcanic islands creates an abundance of natural springs all over the country, historically regardedm as sacred gifts from the gods and the earth. The origin of Japanese bathing is ‘Misogi’, which translates to the ritual purification of bodies with water. Misogi, was open to everyone.Many bhuddist temples had saunas and bathing spaces, which were available for anyone to use for free. Although many high ranking officials and military personal had personal bathing spaces installed in their private residence. The bathhouse as an integrated social or leisure attraction, more than the humble need to bathe, became prominent in the 17th century, transitioning into places for the working classes who wanted a place where they could shed problems and connect with friends. Originally men and women bathed together and families would bath together with their children; there was no shameseen in nudity. These spaces quickly developed into a juxtaposition of japanese culture. Crossing the threshold one moved from the rigours of the japanese hierarchal class system and into a place where everyone was equal. For the Japanese, bathing is generally taken at night, and is seen to heal the wounds incurred during the day and relaxes the bather for sleep.

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I slamic B athing

Turkey is perhaps most recognised for the development of bathing in the arab world, although ‘Hammams’ - which in Arabic means “spreader of warmth” - are common throughout the islamic world. The Hammam is very closely related to the ancient Greek and Roman bath practices; it too was a place for both physical and spiritual purification and utilized a sequence of hot and cold bathing, with an emphasis on the submerging of the body within water as opposed to being surrounded by ambient steam. Other differences though, included the gymnasium space being supplemented by massage areas and and the exedrae by music and contemplation rooms. By contrast to the classical GraecoRoman bath houses, where plethoras of extra uses were incorporated into the facility, Hammams are designed primarily around the non-activity of the user. It is customary before praying for Muslims to perform ablutions. The two Islamic forms of ablution are ‘ghusl’, a full-body cleansing, and ‘wudu’, a cleansing of the face, hands, and feet with water. Hammams serve both these functions and are therefore often strategically placed close to Mosques.

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Section a


C irculation

and

P rogramme

Section a

Typical Islamic Hamam Istanbul, Turkey Built 1584

Plan

Primary entrance (Undressing room) = A Warm Room = B Hot Room = C Very small bathing alcove = D

Bath Arrangement

Ciculation Strategy

Lavishly domed and furnished although simply organised. Ciculation follows three main sections; cold, lukewarm and hot. Traditionally, the bath house is split into a male and female section with mirroring circulation. Movement is intended to be easy as the building serves to form a stress release from the rigours of the working day.

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B athing

and the industrial revolution

-

A resplendant art nouveau design makes Volskbad (the People’s Baths) one of Europe’s most beautiful swimming pools. Opening in 1901, this ‘bathing temple’ sits on the Isar River in the heart of Munich. Local engineer Karl Müller, designed the facility to meet the needs of the people at a time when baths and showers in your own home was a rare luxury. Müller donated the baths to the city of Munich on the condition that it built another pool for the poor. The complex provides swimming . Taking a dip in the Müller’schen Volksbad plays to experience of bathing culture in the original sense. A small swimming pool (18 x 11 m), was originally segregated for use only by women, is today a small warm pool used mainly by casual bathers. A large 31-meter former men’s pool, which used to be segregated only for men now forms the large main pool hall. In addition to normal bathing, there is also a Roman steam room and sauna.

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muller ‘ sche volksbad

Section a


Section a Karl Mueller Public Bath house Munich, Germany Completed 1901

Plan

Entrance = E Ticket office = T Mens/womens waiting room = W m/w Mens/womens tub bath = TB m/w Mens/womens swimming bath = SB m/w Dressing and cooling = D/C Light court = LC Turkish bath = TB Restaurant = R

Bath Arrangement

Ciculation Strategy

The plan forms a large public bathing structure intended to be clean and efficient but while retaining an extranvagence and luxury with high vaulted arches and large columns. The rooms are organised in a concise way, with 2 main swimming baths located off a central circulation and facility core. Several smaller pools are located adjacent to this core, as well as a restaurant.

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C ontemporary

bathing

- T herme V als

by peter zumthor

Built over a thermal spring in the Graubunden Canton in Switzerland, Therme Vals is a hotel and spa designed to create a complete sensory experience. The building takes the form of a cave or quarry like structure. Working with its natural surroundings the bathing spaces lie buried into the hillside beneath a grass roof structure. The space was designed for visitors to relax and attempt to reconnect with the art and practice of Bathing. A combination of light and shade, open and enclosed spaces and linear elements creates a highly sensuous atmosphere throughout the building, while the quarzite material present thoughout the complex results in spaces of dignity and respect. The underlying informal layout of the internal space is a carefully modelled path of circulation which leads bathers to certain predetermined points but lets them explore other areas for themselves. The perspective is always controlled. It either ensures or denies a view. “The meander, as we call it, is a designed negative space between the blocks, a space that connects everything as it flows throughout the entire building, creating a peacefully pulsating rhythm. Moving around this space means making discoveries. You are walking as if in the woods. Everyone there is looking for a path of their own.� - Peter Zumthor

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Section a


Thermal Vals - Peter Zumthor GraubĂźnden, Switzerland Completed 1996

Plan

Defragmentated Spaces This spaces created were designed for visitors to rediscover the ancient practice of bathing. The combinations of light and shade, open and enclosed spaces and linear elements make for a sensory experience. The underlying informal layout of the internal space is a carefully modelled path of circulation which leads bathers to certain predetermined points but lets them explore other areas for themselves. The perspective is always controlled. It either ensures or denies a view.

Section a

Bath Arrangement

Ciculation Strategy

Changing rooms = CR Shower/special baths = S/SB Toilets = T Turkish shower/sweat stone = TS Fire Bath = FB Outdoor bath = OB Indoor Bath = IB Rest area = RA

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T he S teamie

Section a

Public Baths originated from a communal need for cleanliness, and although bathing is principally for the washing of one’s self, it also holds a preventatitve measure in disease and illness transmission. From the 1840s, hydrotherapy (hydropathics) was established across Europe and throughout the British Empire, which invloves the use of water for pain-relief and treating illness. The public desire for such facilities necissitated the opening of communal swimming and bathing facilities

“Ma wee maw used to take me to the Summerton Rd baths... now demolished a few years ago she washed in the steamie while me and my little brother swam, i remeber the the big dryers and all the chit chat the women used to do wi their turban heid and lumpy roller scarfs on.�

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A rlington B aths

Section a

Arlington Baths are the oldest bathing facilities in the United KIngdom - originally designed by architect John Burnett andw completed in 1870. The complex featured a single storey building, which accommodated the pool, two bathing areas and two changing rooms. In 1875 a small extension was added to facilitate a new Turkish suite, and 18 years later, a second extension created space for a reading room and pool room. In 1902, a first floor extension was added to one side of the building, giving it the form it has today. The construction featured a plenum system used to heat the building. This system, in which heated air is passed through the building by convection via ducts built into the fabric, originates from the Roman hypocaust. As somewhat of a unique design at the time, the system worked in the saturated atmospheres of swimming pools extremely well because it encouraged ventilation. Following the award of a National Lottery Grant, the building was partially refurbised in the year 2000.

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G ovanhill P ool C ommunity S upport + R egeneration

Govanhill Baths is Glasgow’s last surviving Edwardian public bathhouse. The building, designed by A.B. Macdonald, originally contained public baths, a wash house, and three swimming pools. The wash house, at the rear of the building, was converted to a launderette in 1971. But since its closure in 2001, the baths has been the site of a variety of events meant to campaign for and promote awareness, including theatre and musical performances, art installations, and a skate-park. These events have helped to galvanise action to reopen the pool. In 2012, the smallest of the three pools, the “teaching” pool, was reopened and locals were interviewed expressing relief and recounting long memories of the bath house. NORD developed a three-step plan through extensve community interaction to transform the building with Turkish and sauna suites, an allotment, a community café and music venue.

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Section a


K ey

design sites shown within current

scale

: 1:10000 @A3

G ovan

Section a

19


O pen scale

20

space

: 1:10000 @A3

Section a


H ealth F acilities : 1:10000 @A3

Section a

scale

YOGA CLUB

THE EDGE GYM

DOLCE SPA ANYTIME FITNESS

T H E A R L I N G TO N B AXTHS

SMILE QUEST

PERSONAL TRAINER GLASGOW

NORTH WOODSIDE LEISURE CENTRE

15 ROYAL TERRACE DAY SPA GLASGOW MEDISPA

CHAKRAFIT SHANTI YOGA

VIRGIN ACTIVE POOLS

DRUMOYNE CLUB

SPA IN THE CITY

MARK MOONEY SWIM SCHOOL

OCEAN SPA ALLURE AESTHETICS

CLUB MOTIVATION

ELITE GYM

SUPERHERO FITNESS ZUMBA WITH KAREN

NUFFIELD HEALTH CLUB

REVIVE WELLBEING SPA

NEW LIFE PESONAL TRAINING

KEY

- SWIMMING POOLS - SPA OR HEALTH SUITE JUDO CLUB

GLASGOW BELLAHOUSTON CLUB

PALACE OF ART

- GYM OR WELBLBEING

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L iving scale

assistance facilities

Section a

: 1:3000 @A3

AGENDA CLEANING SERVICES

GOVAN HOUSING LTD

DOMOCLEAN GLASGOW

GOVAN & CRAIGTON INTEGRATION NETWORK

KEY - FOOD BANKS

- LAUNDRETTES THE UNITY CENTRE

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S ocial

environment

Greater Govan is located south of the River Clyde and west of the city centre area, it has a population of 13,509.

Section a

Although the largest demographic population demographic in Govan is 16-64 year olds, 25% of this group are not in employment and 20% are not in education, employment or training. More than a third of working age people left scholl with only basic qualifications. Due to these figures, the percentage of local children living in poverty is as high 35%. The town fabric hasn’t recovered from the decline in shipbuilding, this is evident in the levels of disused or vacant plots.

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Section a

The overall population of Greater Govan stayed roughly the same between 1996 and 2012. There was a decrease in the 0-15 and 65 and over age groups, with an increase over the period in the 16-44 and 45-54 age groups. The percentage of the total neighbourhood population from a minority ethnic group increased from 2% in 2001 to 9% in 2011, but remained below the Glasgow average from 2001 to 2011.

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Women in Greater Govan live, on average, eight years longer than men. The estimates of both male and female life expectancy in Greater Govan are below the Glasgow average. Life expectancy for both males and females has risen in recent years in Greater Govan, but has stayed consistently below the Glasgow average.


G lasgow

landmarks

Section a

25


G ovan

26

landmarks

Section a


Urban fabric analysis

Boundaries within Urban Fabric

Section a

Primary + Secondary Routes

Boundary of industrial ground

Main roads

Boundary of residential area

Secondary Roads

Boundary of vacant land

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SWOT analysis

Weaknesses + Threats

Section a

Strengths + Opportunities

Opportunity to improve residential facilities

Under utilised public space Vacant land Govan road Urban boundary at river’s edge

Sports and leisure development opportunity Remnant historical urban fabric Opportunity for strong new center to Govan Visitor link to north bank of river

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M asterplan D evelopment

Section a

Following analysis of the layout of Govan, investigating the urban fabric and understanding the problems and characteristics of the area, a masterplan has been developed to better make use of key spaces and to propose a coherent future for the area. The strategy focuses around the adaption of the centre of Govan into a new civic square, formed within a quad of new retail and commercial buildings. This square will be served by better transport links along Govan road to a fully integrated transport hub. A redeveloped Water Row to the immediate north of the square will serve as the avenue down which visitors to the area. The development of this street will rekindle the historic feeling of a connection to the river and across the river.

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S emester 1

masterplan move

-

Semester 1 attempted to address the longitudinal axis that forms the perpendicular orientation of historic Water Row. It did this by ‘firming up’ this elevation with a series of buildings culminating in a sharp corner site at the edge of the water. The design of these buildings serve as understated to compliment surrounding residential areas and so as not to detract from the grand scale of Govan Old Parish Church located near by. Controlling this axis creates an organised counter balance that allows a more fluid and free-form curve to develop on the opposite side of the road. This completion of the Water Row avenue opens up to a mouth at the river’s edge, providing views to the rest of the city and forms a wide and welcoming invitation to visitors wishing to access Govan from North of the river.

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reinstating long axis of water row

Section a


L ocation

plan

-

existing as per proposed masterplan

Section a

31


site analysis

Natural Environment

32

Section a

Urban Environment

Prevailing wind blows south easterly down the axis of the river

Primary views from site boundary

Exposed northern edge of site with sparceprotection from the elements

Direct relationship with open public space

Shadows over bearing the site from neighbouring buildings

Prevalent urban edge of Water Row

Optimum building orientation to maximise solar gain

Noise pollution from surrounding environment

Approximate sun path over course of a generic day

Adjacent buildings that provide shelter/cast shadows/interfere with views


light

-

water

-

form

Section a

33


Section a

34


S ynthesis

of concept

The evolution of bathing over time has highlighted that spaces through are designed to each form a stage of a journey – with a start, a middle and an end – that the user experiences over the course of their stay The path is orientated by cultural approach to washing and their preference in the order that cleansing occurs in. The journey is reflected by the layout of spaces as well as the level of grandeur and opulence of internal decoration within each room, pool or area. The layout of this in turn informs on materiality and aesthetic as well. The notion of bathing spaces have been celebrated collectively as a place to show off one’s body, a place to connect with yourself or nature, and a place where everyone is equal. A complex that provides facilities that whole communities can use naturally becomes a cultural hub, as many people occupy it for different reasons at the same time. Contemporary Govan presents economic challenges and a social environments that necessitates a place where simple daily functions like eating, cleaning and

Section a

exercising can be accessed within easy reach of residential areas. Analysis of local amenities highlights that there is currently a void within the local area of facilities that can accommodate these needs, which suggest that creating a space offering such uses would be popular and highly sought after. The concept will establish a dynamic edge to Water Row, facilitating a unique building within the local urban context that residents can be proud to call their own. The surrounding public space will be incorporated into the scheme where possible to provide new urban facilities for local people to use every day. The introverted nature of bathing and washing places suits the site, as excessive views and direct natural light are not primary concerns. However choice views and fenestration positions will be made use of in certain areas, with community rooms and eating spaces will face back towards the town drawing in, where possible, west, south and east sunlight. The entrance to the building will address the existing Govan Square to create an obvious approach to enter the building.

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S ite

layout

-

initial resposne to site

The initial response to the site was to look at the site as a single entity - a building in the round - which accepted the site boundary constraints as the endge of its mass, with occupation happening within.Holes and voids would then be punctured through this mass to create internal spaces. The approach revolved around lifting the majority of functions of the building above ground level so an open plan community space could inhabit the space instead, with market, cafe, shops. washing and entertainment all happening within proximity to each other.

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Section ab


S ite

layout development

-

understanding adjacencies

Section ab

1.

2.

3.

5.

7.

6.

4.

37


Section ab

The layout initially evolved through an understanding of adjacencies that the building should include. Firstly these adjacencies included uses that seemed appropriate to aspects of the buildings perimeter, examining which elevations of approaches suggested different intimacies with the surrounding urban context. Once an undertsanding of context was gained the ground floor started to evolve through key decisions outlining which spaces could occupy which areas. The key point of friction was allowing maximum or even enough light into certain areas of the scheme. Large light wells would have been required for certainh configurations of rooms. As a result, the most functional arrangement seemed to be to have primary use around the perimeter walls with an internal ‘street’ or ‘open space’ creating a focal point to the building. The dynamic curve of Water Row is offset by two straight axis to a point in the site at the far south east end. This helped inform the layout still further as it gave a reason organise spatial arangement around a structured ‘spine’ down one side of the building. This spine then forms a single building or element of the design with a second smaller structure counter balancing it in the opposite corner of the site.

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Looking at the building around an organised spine allowed the building to evolve in a natural way. A clear seperation of uses between wet and dry areas informed the massing that the building would take - two distinct structures, joined by central circulation. The wet areas gravitated towards the curved axis as this promotes a fluid interpretation of the interior space from the exterior form. Once free from the constraints of pool and wet area design, community orientated spaces can organise themselves efficiently within a structured orthogonal form counterbalancing the fluidity opposite it. This seperation in function in turn facilitated the aesthetic evolution of the building as a whole.


B uilding

configuration

-

key diagramatic moves

Section ab

The Site

Organisational Approach

The sheer size of the site initially is surprising given the relatively confined urban location with buildings on 3 of 4 sides. Each elevation is long to the extent that a singular mass along it would potentially look ovesized and intimidating, dominating the surrounding context.t

The curve of the site forms the dominant architectural feature, from which the rest of the building will evolve around. The wedge shape’s two elongated sides which meet in a point at the south east corner are organisational tools to for structured spaces around, offsetting the fluid shape of the curve.

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Section ab

40

Seperation of Function

Massing

The seperation in use between wet and dry creates a distinct diagram in planning. The arrangement of the dry spaces follow a common sense approach of orthogonal space planning within two parallel external walls . At this stage, wet areas loosely arrange themselves individually within the curved boundary prior to an internal layout being defined.

Seperating the uses completely creates two seperate forms, engaging the urban fabric of govan with a new public area. This ‘street’ suggests shop fronta, outside eating spaces and interaction of people using facilities. A public square to the south east is created from remnant space following massing decisions, this area benefits from all-day sun and shelter from the prevailing wind blowing down the clyde.


M assing

investigation

Section ab

Following analysis of form, it was considered that an exposed street may not be appropriate public space for Govan. Aside from this, the street did not lead anywhere, culminating in an undefined space facing a masterplanned rsidential building. Finally a lack of a defined entrance was identified with comments suggesting the buidling had no discernable front or back door.

41


Section ab

42

Response to Massing

Modifications to the Form

Extending the fluid form to ‘touch’ its orthogonal sibling creates a an obvious and inviting central orientation point between the two buildings. An evnue is formed to the south, providing a clear main entance approach while access is maintained from the north but to more of a residential scale. The height of the orthogonal building is extended to accommodate the shedule of rooms required in the brief, resulting in a pure tall form next to a pure small curved form

Two modifications are made to the pure form in accordance of contextual factors. 1. An instep of the elevation at ground level is a natural intervention to give greater visibility and access to the main entrace. space. 2. The upper form of the buildng is pushed back into the depth of mass ofthe building to allow light into the church windows located to the immediate south of the sitelarge. This also serves to remove the feeling closeness to surrounding context experienced by users within that space


Section ab

Complete Concept

A canopy ties the two forms together ‘under one roof’ to create a coherent and strong conceptual image. This canopy is formed as one continuous structure, extending out from the tower to form the roof of the fluid form and provide external shelter to the surrounding public spaces. It is designd to be thick to enhance the concept of pure form. The fluid form sits somfortable underneath while the tall form punctures the structure to sit dominantly above. Square holes further permeate the structure drawing shafts of light into the public spaces below.

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K ey

functional areas

- E ntrance

The entrance and orientation space to a complex building has to be within convenient reach of all facilities on offer, but first and foremost should be welcoming and easy to navigate through The entrance space takes the form of a sweeping invitation into the rest of the building’s spaces. Natural light from above and a measure of permeability and transparency between spaces. Large and free open space encourages random interaction and serves not to define the space into a strict function

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Section ab


K ey

functional areas

-

community spaces

Section ab

Corridors flooded with natural light offer enjoyable spaces to inhabit. Using borrowed natural light to lighten offices spaces set into the interior of the building allows ordered and otherwise potentially boring space to feel special.

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K ey

functional areas

- P ool D esign

Developing an understanding of the type of pool spaces resulted in a clearer direction for the design to evolve in. In sticking with a community inclusive approach, a selection of spaces surrounded by a clear and efficient circulation strategy was required. This

46

Section ab

incorporated how the entrance to the pool spaces functions and how people disperse from there on into the ‘world of wet’


K ey

functional areas

-

pool design

Section ab

Spatial organisation, depth, shape, hieght, position, number in a row, journey between pools, space between pools and number of people one pool of water can accommodate were all in consideration to achive the correct balance between water and floor ratios.

47


K ey

48

functional areas

-

pool design

Section ab


K ey

functional areas

-

wet area plan organisation

Section ab

Layout of rooms and spaces within a fluidic orientated building creates new dynamics to consider when forming adjacencies of rooms and uses. Planning the layout of what is ‘the key’ area or zone of the building is a long and patient process. The shape of the plan would not look appropriate or content in itself unless it was ‘perfect’. Compromises can be accounted for to continue the theme of the building but the complexities in attempting to find the correct layout meant some large compromises were required. These included; - reducing the level of changing spaces - reducing area of pools available - reducing amount of open and usable space A large part of the process involved abandoning the function of spaces at times in attempting to undertsand the better understand the how the shapes, arcs and swirls fit together.

49


Section ab

50


S ite P lan - 1:1250 @ A2

Section ac

51


Section ac

52


L evel 00 P lan - 1:200 @ A2

Section ac

External Spaces:

A

a.

Terraced Public Seating b. Grass Square c. Hard Landscape With Benching d. Flowerbed Surround e. Public Benching Room Schedule: 1. Reception 2. Bench 3. Glazing into Pool Hall 4. Entrance to Spectator Seating 5. Stair to Spa Level 6. Riser 7. Store 8. First Aid Room

11 10

12

23

9

13 22 21 19

B

8

14

Wet Areas 9. Vanity Lobby 10. Male + Female W/C’s 11. Village Changing 12. Disabled and Family Changing 13. Lockers 14. ‘Wet’ Lift 15. Pre-Swim Showers 16. Sauna 17. Main Pool hall 18. Spectator Seating 19. Pool Store 20. ‘Wet’ Stairs 21. Post Swim Showers 22. Bench 23. Cold/Children’s Pool

15 7 6 20

16 26 5 2

1

3

C

17

27

28

4

24

18

25

29

31

30 e

32

c b

d

A

B

33

a

C

Dry Areas 24. Gym Manager’s Office 25. Vending Units + Breakout Space 26. Female Change + W/C’s 27. Male Change + W/C’s 28. General Plant + Store 29. Vertical Circulation 30. Gym Hall 31. Gym Store 32. Fitness Classroom 33. Escape Stair

53


L evel 01

plan

- 1:200 @ A2

Section ac

A Room Schedule:

4

5

7

14

7

2

14

B

13 8

9

3

15

6

12

Wet Areas 1. Vertical Circulation 2. Quick Changing Facilities + Staff Base 3. Female W/C 4. Male W/C 5. Rest Area 6. Hammam 7. Treatment Rooms 8. Corridor With Skylight Above 9. ‘Wet’ Stairs 10. Void Above Main Pool 11. Unisex steam Rooms 12. Cold Room 13. ‘Wet’ Lift 14. Massage Rooms 15. Riser 16. Corridor With glazed internal

1

11

window to skylight above and light well below

16 23

C

20

16. Void Above Entrance

21

Dry Areas 17. Vertical Circulation Core 18. Dry Riser 19. Community Classroom + Gallery Space 20. Tea Prep 21. General Storage 22. Male + Female W/C’s 23. Ice Bath 24. Physiotherapist Office 25. Treatment Room 26. Community Dance Hall 27. Escape Stair 28. Cleaner’s Store 29. Laundrette 30. General Storage 31. Quick Change Facilities

22 10

24

19

1

17

25 25 25 25 26

54

A

B

31

30

29 28 27

C


L evel 02

plan

- 1:200 @ A2

Section ac

A Room Schedule: 1. Vertical Circulation Core 2. Dry Riser 3. Male + Female W/C’s 4. General Offices 5. Facility Manager’s Office 6. Restaurant 7. Escape Stair 8. Kitchen 9. Kitchen Stores 10. Void Over Classroom

B

10

C

3

4

2

5 1 6

9. 8

7

A

B

C

55


L evel 03

plan

- 1:200 @ A2

Section ac

A 1. Vertical Circulation Core 2. Wet Air Handling 3. Rainwater Storage Tank 4. General Storage Space 5. Dry Air Handling

B

2

3

C

1

4

5

A 56

B

C


B asement

plan

- 1:200 @ A2

Section ac

A

5

1. Vertical Circulation 2. Access Corridor 3. Store 4. Thermal Store 5. Cold Pool Balance Tank 6. Cold Pool Basin 7. CHP Plant Pumps etc 8. Vertical Circulation 9. Main Pool Balance Tank 10. Main Pool Basin 11. Pool Filtration System 12. Plant Water Services 13. Water Treatment Plant 14. Plant Air Handling

4 3

6 14

2

B

7 13

1

12

8

11 9 10

C

A

B

C

57


Section a

58


S ection a - a - 1:200 @ A2

Section c

59


S ection b - b - 1:200 @ A2

60

Section c


S ection c - c - 1:200 @ A2

Section c

61


S outh W est

62

elevation

- 1:200 @ A2

Section c


N orth

west elevation

- 1:200 @ A2

Section c

63


N orth

64

east elevation

- 1:200 @ A2

Section c


S outh

east elevation

- 1:200 @ A2

Section c

65


In

use

-

key wet spaces

REST SPACE

A perfectly oval room with polished concrete walls and oak benches, naturally ventilated through opening windows offering north light and views across the river and beyond

66

Section d

GLAZED LIGHT WELL

A curved glass centre piece to the circulation area on the 1st floor to penetrate down to grpund floor changing spaces. Perimeter of light well is glazed floor to ceiling on the 1stt floor, and a bench shaped in the form of the well sits below it ground level Shapes would be discernable to the floor below through an opaque glass panel that casts light into the changing area

FRIGIDARIUM

Kept at a constant 10-12 degrees this room allows rest and recuperation from the intense humidity of the steam room next door. A large central skylight casts a single shaft of light into the middle of the room, contrasting to cold cast concrete walls and benches

PRE-SHOWERS

Large open plan space devoted to preparation to swimming or moving upstairs to the facilities of the spa. Blue tiles clad the walls and floors forming an identifiable change in textures when moving from semi wet spaces to pool area

STEAM ROOM

Timber clad semi circular space with a low ceiling and high thermal mass concrete walls. Temperature is retained at a manageable 40-50 degrees, but humidity reaches close to 100%

MAIN POOL

25m x 13.5m competition pool with removeable diving boards and wsmall spectators stand


In

use

-

key dry spaces

PUBLIC SPACE

Benches, trees, planters and hard standing form a perimeter edge to the building proiding sheltered areas for social interactions and resting spots. Large curtain walling provides a view into the pool hall beyond.

Section d

DANCE STUDIO

Multipurpose community room with sprung timber floor and mirrored walls to cater to local dance groups. Grafitti art feature wall pinted by local children/adolescents.

GYM

General use gym facilities with space for free weights, machines, stretching and excercises and stamina workouts. Accompanied by a single hireable classroom and store. Feature walls accommodate contemporary motivational

PHYSIO SUITE

6 bed physiotherapy facility run by a member of the community.

COMMUNITY/GALLERY SPACE

Large double height classroom with high level north facing windows and pinnable wall space at low level. Polished concrete finish diffuses natural light, while the exposed structure of the space frame reduces the volumous feel to the space.

SHOWER/WASH FACILITIES

Fully accessible changing and washing facilities for use by members of the community. Tiled in vibrant colours with textured finishes to provide a sensory showering experience

RESTAURANT

Top floor restaurant offering views over the heart of Govan, towards Old Parish Church and over the river towards the Transport Museum

67


S tructural

frame

The structural approach for the concept is as integral to the exterior aesthetic as it is to the fundamental aspects of load bearing and structural stability. The canopy - through which the building’s forms lie under and protrude through - carries three distinct roles within the function of the building. 1. The frame carries its own load as well as dynamic external weather loads as it acts as an external canopy over the immediate urban landscape that surrounds the building 2. The frame also forms the roof structure to the wet areas of the swimming pool and spa. Ideally creating a seamless continuation along one plane from the exterior to the interior of the building 3. Finally the structure acts as the load bearing frame supporting the second floor and overall stability of the tall eastern part of the scheme Solution A composite structural approach combines cast-in-situ reinforced concrete external walls with an extensive primary structural steel frame. The scheme is set out along an organised grid of 4m x 4m ‘anchored’ along the western edge of the orthogonal from which spaces within this ‘ordered’ area of the building are neatly arranged. Two cast concrete cores - one comprising stairs and a lift shaft at the centre-east of the building, and one a separate escape stair to the south east corner - rise up through all 4 floors. Complimentary to this, a series of load bearing in-situ concrete walls form structural compartments on each floor - minimising excessive span lengths. The fluid layout of the wet facilities incorporate two concrete load bearing ‘inhabited walls’ - one each side of the axis of a central open space. These extend upwards to the roof carrying vertical loads and also minimising requirement for long spans. The primary frame follows the organised grid over ground, first, third and fourth floors. On the second floor a prestressed steel space frame structure extends out from the orthogonal form, covering the extents of the site as a canopy. This frame is made up of 1200mm x 300mm pratt trusses intersecting at right angles every 4m in adjacent directions to match the perimeter edge which carries a substructure and external cladding system 68

Section e


E xternal S tructure

Section e

A double layer space frame consists of parallel top and bottom lattice grids interconnected at node points by inclined members with diagonal supporting members providing lateral support. The three way structural rigidity of this frame negates flexural stress while also allowing for exceptional tensile and compressive strength. The canopy structure’s maximum length at any one point in the scheme is 100m end to end and close to 75m along the opposite perpendicular axis. This is broken down into spans of varying lengths to serve the different functions of the building, meaning the loads of each function get absorbed into the overall whole of the structure. The structure connects to the concrete load bearing structure in two main ways. level

00 structural

grid

level

02 structural

grid

1. At the intersection with the concrete wall of the tall building, the frame punctures through the concrete wall from inside to outside, this puncture takes the form of a cast ‘pocket’ formed during initial construction of the wall. The frame sits on a steel base connection plate which is pinned back to the concrete wall below with steel bolts. The underside of the space frame will carry the external roof envelope build up on externally exposed spans and forms the ceiling of internal spaces. 2. The frame rests on the concrete walls of the smaller building that incorporate the swimming spaces. The frame sits in a cast ‘slot’ formed during construction of the wall which negates lateral movement. A steel base connection plate is bolted to the concrete, onto which the frame is attached. The soffit of the external canopy meets the top of the cast concrete wall to form the envelope enclosure, while the frame continues over the wall and into the interior space. In this configuration the space frame forms the primary roof structure, with steel deck roof build up on the upper face and composite panel system forming the internal face of the pool hall soffit.

level

01 structural

level

03 structural grid

grid

69


E xternal S tructure

Section e

Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin Mies van der Rohe

Aircraft Hangars Orvieto, Italy, by Pier Luigi Nervi

70


C onstruction

Section e

considerations

Roof Enclosure A ‘warm roof’ construction approach will negate the possibility of condensation forming within the space between soffit and underside of suspended ceiling, this area will also be mechanically ventilated. High levels of rigid insulation - 220mm on top of a steel roof deck and below the ballast of a flat roof system - thermally insulate the internal areas from colder temperatures , below that a composite panel system will provide moisture and temperature resistance to the varying conditions of the pool environment and dry areas. All suspended ceilings will be suspended from the underside of the structural frame while services in the cavity above ceiling level will be fixed directly to the underside of the roof structure. Glazing - General High performance double glazing units to be used across all aspects of the building. Majority of glazing to be non-openable to facilitate efficiency of MVHR systems throughout the building. Brushed and stainless steel propriety framed units to be used in all areas for resistance against rot. and an integral thermal strip Glazing - Pool Hall Areas of glazing have been restricted to key areas of the pool hall to minimise cold radiation, and throughout the building Vacuum insulated double glazing units will be used to maximise thermal efficiency of the building. These aspects of glazing are toughened and laminated to structurally reflect body impact and ball/object impact in case of water based sports carried out within the pool hall. Glazing - Spa Spaces Double glazed units with centre pivot openings will be used for the only fenestration aspects of the spa space which is located to the north of the layout - incorporating the ‘rest space’. This is to accommodate natural ventilation to allow occupants comfort in their relaxing environment. These centre pivot windows will also facilitate users to open fully the glazed unit, turning the area into an internal/external space. Glazing - Curtain walling Area of curtain walling to the west of the main pool hall formed from

a secondary support structure attached back to the cast concrete walls. Secondary supporting frame formed from hollow steel members - diameter 150mm - at 4m centres horizontally and 2.2m centres vertically. Steel will be coated in a corrosion resistant dark grey paint to complement the cast concrete of the wall structure and to reduce glare. Where contact with the structural walls occurs, vapour control layers and moisture barriers to be used to negate the humid or otherwise warm internal temperatures penetrating the external envelope. Roof Lights - General Roof lights occur in only the 1st floor wet areas within the spa spaces. These glazing units are, at their maximum, 3.5m in diameter spans. All will feature stainless steel proprietry framed units with integrated moisture control and thermal barriers. Roof Lights Hammam In this case, the roof lights take the form of a series of small circular opening beneath a larger roof opening. These opening are at the widest 100mm in diameter so are not subject to great thermal loss . Roof Lights - Frigidairum A single circular roof light of 3.5m diameter sits centred on the room. Thermal efficiency of this rooflight is not required as a necessity as the room itself is likely to be maintained at a colder temperature than surrounding rooms and the external environment. Internal Walls - general Internal walls with will be 150mm partitions, allowing for 40mm of plasterboard on either face with sound, impact and thermal insulation within the cavity to accommodate seperate environments between gym/activity halls/offices/changin rooms/swimming areas and general public areas. Internal Walls - Retaining Select walls throughout the orthogonal and fluid buildings to be cat in situ concrete to form the perimeter of cores or structural compartments.

Acoustics - Community spaces (Dry) All internal partition walls will feature acoustic insulation strips (5mm) within the cavity between insulation layer and the plasterboard panel to negate impact and verbal noise penetration between spaces that serves different functions within the building. Acoustics - Entrance Foyer (Dry) Due to high extents of glazing (7m) on either side of the entrance foyer, acoustic treatment to the underside of the soffit will be incorporated through use of perforated panels. Furniture within the space, such as desks and chairs will also be constructed in soft materials to further absorb excess noise. Acoustics - Pool Hall (Wet) The acoustic treatment within the pool hall must manage the conflict between potentially hot and humid conditions with effectively controlled noise and reverberation levels. Control of ambient and background noise from building services (heating/ventilation/ electrical) must be managed to accommodate comfortable conditions for users and ease of hearing lifeguard signals, coaches instructions or evacuation orders. The underside of the soffit within this space will be incorporate perforated acoustic panelling. Fixed and Unfixed Pool Equipment The pool hall will accommodate competition use therefore requiring adequate provision of equipment to accommodate such events. - automatic timing pads to be fixed as non-removable elements of the pool wall. - diving boards and starting platforms to be removable, stored in the pool store and fixed when needed to the north end of the pool. - water polo goals to be removable and stored in the pool store - backstroke warning flags and posts to be permanent and fixed suspended from the soffit above - lane ropes to be removable and stored in pool store

71


P ool

Section e

construction

1. Pool Edge Construction - Ceramic tile and grout - Waterproofing layer - Cast in-situ Concrete basin - Water protection strip

10mm 450mm 10mm

2. Pool-side Floor Construction Light grey slip resistant slate tile 15mm Mortar bed 15mm Screed w/ under-floor heating pipes 80mm Plastic sheeting separation layer 1mm Impact sound absorbing insulation 40mm Concrete Slab 200mm Rigid thermal insulation 200mm Ground build up 40mm (Sand) (Coarse gravel) (Backfilled earth)

The pool tank will consist of a monolithic concrete tank cast in situ to form a highly stable structure . This structure will inherently form a suitable waterproofing basin but will incorporate a grout and ceramic tile system at the waters edge to guarantee water tightness. The mass of the concrete basin creates a durable and long term pool facility. With care and efficient maintenance, a cast concrete pool can be expected to last over 100 years. Minor maintenance will be required in re-grouting the tile work and replacing finishes over time. Maintaining a quality of pool water, wave action and chemicals used will further increase the likely longevity of the pool. Possible re-tiling and finishes upkeep could be expected to be required after a period of 25 years following opening. Although a sturdy form of construction, the initial process of building and curing the basin takes time which can impact building programme and An ‘undercroft’ system housing general plant but also ballast tanks and stores facilitates a clean look of the pool at user level, with all mechanics of operation hidden below ground.

72


T ypical pool 1.20@ a 2

wall

+

window detail

Section e

1. Window Construction Cast in situ concrete lintel block 150mm Rigid thermal insulation 50mm Coloured plastic panel bolted to concrete sill 10mm Brushed Steel window surround 165mm x 6.5mm Aluminium box section frame bolted to concrete frame 100mm x 75mm Double glazed sealed unit 60mm X 60mm

2. Wall Construction Reinforced fair faced concrete w/ water repellent treatment Water resistant rigid thermal insulation Reinforced fair faced concrete Anti-fungal polished plaster finish

220mm 100mm 220mm 5mm

Feng Shui Swimming Pool, Paris, Mikou Studio

73


M aterial

choices

-

Walnut timber window surround 50mm to contrast warmth to the otherwise cold and stark facade treatment.

Dark brushed steel external window surround 200mm. Transluscent glazing at high level to minimise glare within the pool hall.

Cast in situ fair faced concrete wall, with aesthetic of timber formwork evident on face. Ribbed and textured surface allows for a tactile and dynamic front to busy street edge. 74

Section e

external

Pre-plated standing seam zinc cladding panel of varying thicknesses attached to end plate of space frame forms a string division between masses of concrete below and above. Walnut brie-soleil spaced at 300mm centres along south west facing glazing to control solar penetration into community work spaces. Clear fixed glazing panels behind. Same function occurs on gym windows on the floor below.

Curtain wall system, 7m tall to allow maximum light into double height entrance foyer underneath canopy. Slatted walnut public bench.


E nvironmental

Energy Implications Wet areas of swimming pools, hot areas and cold areas in spas and the associated services required to make these spaces continually habitable to users require significant amounts of energy to function, therefore consideration has been taken in considering size and scale of rooms to efficiently relate suitable feel and scale with the energy required to heat/light/ventilate the space. The building envelope has also been designed with the efficient occupation and use of spaces in mind. General Energy Usage An energy strategy that efficiently covers the whole life usage of the building, incorporating heating, ventilation and lighting while also paying attention to the aesthetic, orientation, form, layout and internal appearance is a complex requirement. The typical energy profile of a pool building shows only a small amount of energy goes actually towards the simple ‘running’ of the facility, the majority of energy is absorbed by heating the various spaces associated and their respective environment control systems:

General Power Water heating Lighting Fans and pumps Space heating

Section f

considerations

- 5.5% - 25% - 6.5% - 10% - 53%

Energy Strategy - Orientation The building has been designed along a primarily north south axis,

therefore its is possible to draw an abundance of direct sunlight into the main pool hall. This also acts as a design feature to allow maximum enjoyable light into community spaces and restaurant. North light has been taken advantage of in key areas such as a community classroom and gallery space on Level 02 and the rest space within the Spa facilities. These areas benefit from indirect sunlight but also have the added value of views across the river towards Partick, the Riverside Transport Museum and back towards the city centre. Energy Strategy - Building Services Throughout the building spaces have been designed to be as clean and free from evidence of mechanical systems that operate the building. This approach has been implemented to make the spaces approachable and enjoyable to community residents who may have misgivings if spaces appear to be uninviting. These services are hidden across the building within 1800mm service space above suspended ceiling levels Energy Strategy - Thermal Envelope Within environmentally challenging areas of the building, such as the pool hall, sauna, hammam and cold room, an enhanced thermal envelope will feature greater insulation depths, specialised material and surface finishes to prevent penetration through into the building’s structure.

within back of house and staff only areas. Spaces also appropriate for such low energy lighting could be general toilets and changing, corridors, kitchen and community halls - Direct lighting will be used where possible, indirect lighting although creating pleasant atmospheres - is inefficient in energy to light produced ratio - Zoning of plant to specific areas and frequency of use - Variable speed control of pumps and fans within water and air handling systems to adjust turnover rate according to occupancy rates and air/water quality. - Low water usage general appliances - Power factor correction - Use of a building and energy management system - Low consumption taps and flushes for toilets and and urinals - Automatic shower controls - Rainwater harvesting and grey-water harvesting Water Quality Water will be maintained to acceptable hygeine levels through the use of UV processing during the filtration process.

Energy Strategy - General Occupation + Use - High efficiency LED lighting will be incorporated wherever possible

75


L evel 00

Section f

water and air environments

Cold plunge pool/kids pool

Water temp `= 31°C

Changing areas Air temp = 22-25°C Air changes = 10 p/h

Sauna Air temp = 80-95°C Air changes = 3-8 p/h Humidity = 5-30%

Spectator areas Air temp = 25°C Air changes = 10 p/h

Main swimming pool Water temp = 29°C

Pool hall Air temp = 30°C Air changes = 4-10 p/h Humidity = 60% approx

76


L evel 01

Section f

water and air environments

Turkish Bath Air temp = 40°C Air changes = 10 p/h Humidity = 80-100% Rest area `Air temp = 22-25°C Air changes = 10 p/h Humidity = 30%

Massage rooms Air temp = 20-22°C Air changes = 10 p/h Humidity = 80% Frigidarium Air temp = 8-10°C Air changes = 10 p/h

Laconium Air temp = 65°C Air changes = 10 p/h Humidity = 15-20%

Circulation Space Air temp = 25°C Air changes = 10 p/h Humidity = 30-40%

Treatment rooms Air temp = 20-22°C Air changes = 10 p/h Humidity = 60%

77


P rimary

Section f

building services

Mechanical ventilation Mechanical ventilation

Natural ventilation

Section A-A CHP plant situated in basement close to goods lift and in line with central axis of building to maximise efficient services layout.

Section C-C

78

Ballast tanks straddle the north eastern edge of the main pool, accessible from at one end of the basement plant room. Pipes carrying supply, extract and overflow water run around the circumference of the remaining sides of the pool, with drains set equal centres above.

Water associated plant facilities are situated as close as feasible to pool hall and pool structure to minimise travel distances and inefficiencies in route between plant, pumps, tanks and pool.

Air handling services run between the members of the structural space frame, hidden from view in the pool space by the underside of the composite ceiling panels.

A small heat exchanging unit sits above the sauna and steam rooms within the spa spaces to efficiently recycle heat escaping from these hot environments. Vertical service risers allow ducting and pipework to travel unobstructed from the basement plant space, into the pool hall and further into the rest of the building.

Primary air handling plant is located within the top floor of the taller structure. This handles all aspects of air handling for the building, including pool and spa spaces. Two segregated MVHR units allow for air passing through the dry areas to be controlled separately from air passing through wet areas.


lighting paths

Section f

Natural day lighting paths

Artificial lighting paths 79


80


81

Profile for Kieran Dick-Doyle

Year 4 Semester 2 - WaterRow Bath House  

A design booklet illustrating the research, ideas, design evolution and outcome of a Studio project to design a public 'bath house' in Govan...

Year 4 Semester 2 - WaterRow Bath House  

A design booklet illustrating the research, ideas, design evolution and outcome of a Studio project to design a public 'bath house' in Govan...

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