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ALL NEW!

FREE ✱ THE FOSTER-TO-ADOPTION OPTION ✱ BROKEN CRAYON MELTDOWN ✱ STANDUP COMEDY FOR KIDS ✱ GOING NUTCRACKERS

DEC 11 / JAN 12

Contest!

Find all the kids splashing in this issue and win passes to Jay Peak’s Pump House water park! V OL.1 8 NO.1 1 / 1 2

Ski Tips Teaching your kids to ski

Double issue


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Kids VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

kidsvt.com


VOL.18 N O.11 /12

DEC. 2011 / JAN. 2012 A Vermont Nanny & Elder Care Agency

DEPARTMENTS From the Kids VT Staff ............................................5 See and Say ......................................................................7 Birthday Club..................................................................47 Use Your Words: Essay ..........................................51

s 3AFE LOVING AND PROFESSIONAL IN HOME CAREGIVERS s 0ROFESSIONAL SCREENING AND STRICT RECRUITMENT PROCESS

FAMILY

Fostering Families

EAT. LEARN. PLAY

... ...................................................................................

The Kids Beat ..................................................................10 Ask Dr. First: Swallowed Objects...................12 Fit Families: Taking the Plunge.......................13 The Librarian Likes ....................................................13 Home Cookin’: Soup’s On! ....................................14 Out to Eat: Big Picture Theater and CafÊ..........................................................15 Go Ask Dad: Holiday Celebrations ..............16 The Art of... Standup Comedy ..........................17 In Season: Spruce It Up ........................................28

s &ULL TIME PART TIME TEMP

EVENT AND SITTER SERVICES

18

Need a little help around the Holidays?

An award-winning Vermont program provides another adoption option

!SK US ABOUT OUR ON CALL BABYSITTERS AND GROUP CHILD CARE STAFF

SPORTS

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Mention this ad and take 10% OFF ANY SERVICE

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Tips for teaching kids to ski

www.babiestoboomersvt.com 802-540-0433

CALENDAR Daily Listings ..................................................................30 Ongoing Events.............................................................42 Playgroups.........................................................................32 Story Times.......................................................................34

WE’VE GOT THEM COVERED

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11/1/11 6:35 PM

FROM THE FIRSTTHEM LAYER COVER WE’VE GOT

HANDS-ON

ON THE COVER

Crafting With Kids: Recycling Crayons........44 The Party Planner: Cool Crafts .......................46 Puzzle Page ......................................................................48 Coloring Contest .........................................................49

TOTHE THEFIRST LASTLAYER TO THE LAST FROM

Learning to ski at Okemo Resort in Ludlow, Vermont. Photo by Justin Cash.

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS colby@kidsvt.com cathy@kidsvt.com don@kidsvt.com kate@kidsvt.com maryellen@kidsvt.com rhonda@kidsvt.com kristi@kidsvt.com judy@kidsvt.com

ext. 77 ext. 74 ext. 71 ext. 73 ext. 78 ext. 75 ext. 72 ext. 76

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 400+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont.

Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

• •

Š 2011 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

Production Manager Designers

Circulation Manager Deputy Web Editor Office Manager

SHOP OUR WEBSITES www.yellow-turtle.com www.kidskiandrain.com VISIT THE STORE Red Barn Shops, Mountain Road, Stowe 802-253-4434 • 800-439-4435 FOLLOW US BECOME A FAN

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING, RAINWEAR AND SKIWEA

Contributing Writers: Stina Booth, Erik Esckilsen, Kristin Fletcher, Megan James, Sarah Tuff, Cindy Morgan, Ken Picard, Katrina Roberts

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Photographers: Stina Booth, Justin Cash, Andy Duback, Matthew Thorsen, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

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Illustrators: Mo Oh, Rev. Diane Sullivan

SHOP OUR WEBSITES



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Editorial in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy.

Proofreaders

Pamela Polston Paula Routly Meredith Coeyman Kate O’Neill Justin Gonyea Celia Hazard Andrew Sawtell Rev. Diane Sullivan Steve Hadeka Tyler Machado Cheryl Brownell

KIDS VT

P.O. Box 1184 Burlington, VT 05402 802-985-5482 kidsvt.com

Copy Editors/Godparents

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

Colby Roberts Cathy Resmer Don Eggert Kate Laddison Maryellen Apelquist Rhonda Forcier Kristi Batchelder Judy Beaulac

KIDSVT.COM

Publisher Executive Editor Creative Director Managing Editor Calendar Writer Account Executive Account Executive Marketing & Events Director

11/28/11 11:50 AM


Announcing...

Green Mountain Gymnastics new

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Monday, December 26th 5-9pm

Trampoline demos. Reduced rate intro certification sessions. Registration for our Grand Opening Holiday Camp. (12/27-12/30, 6pm-8pm. All are welcome.)

Complete with 3 trampolines!

CALL TO RESERVE

a space in our “Freestyle” Holiday Camp.

Northern Vermont’s

ONLY

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KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

“Freestyle” Center!

New Location in Williston!

260 Avenue D, Williston (off Industrial Ave.)

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12/1/11 9:52 AM

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12/1/11 12:54 PM


Discover our GIGANTIC

Children’s Department Store

Milestones IT MAY NOT seem so to others, but I think of New Year’s Eve as a family holiday. If you ignore the late hours and carousing, and focus on the event as a milestone marker, you’ll see what I mean. New Year’s is all about turning the corner on the year, and parents do love to mark time. We celebrate all manner of firsts: first smile, first step, first tooth, first day of school. And we are constantly nostalgic for the past. I’ve kept a tiny pair of mud-encrusted Robeez that my son, Oliver, last wore as a 2-year-old digging in our garden. I can’t wash, trash or pass them along. I’m fascinated by the last day/first day of the year. I love taking stock and thinking ahead. When you have kids, New Year’s is a great time to review and resolve. How’d your holidays go? Are you going to sit down for more family dinners? Spend fewer hours in front of the TV? Will you make time for a regular date night? This New Year’s marks the first year of Seven Days parenting Kids VT. With a new look, the magazine has tackled topics as varied as religion, maternity manners, gifted education and drive-in movies over the past 12 months. Kids VT also launched a new website and revamped the online calendar this year. Our “Camp & School Fair” was a hit, and we made it to a Lake Monsters game, Burlington’s Kids Day, the Shelburne Farms Harvest Festival and other community events. We’ve got big plans for the coming year, including projects and events with local organizations and regular content about financial literacy and childcare. My resolution: to find out what you think. Ultimately, Kids VT is your baby, too, and we want to know if we’re raising it right. Drop us a line sometime. KATE LADDISON, MANAGING EDITOR kate@kidsvt.com

Find the Perfect Gift for the children in your life. Conveniently located just minutes from the big box stores in Williston • High quality kids stuff • Incredible selection • Great prices!

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A Children’s Department Store

ANDREW SAWTELL, DESIGNER

STINA BOOTH, WRITER/ PHOTOGRAPHER

PAULA ROUTLY, PUBLISHER

Children’s Wear • Footwear Baby/Nursery • Books • Toys

64 Harvest Ln, Williston, VT ~ 802.764.1810 1/2 mile from Tafts Corners Across from the New England Federal Credit Union

HOURS: MON-THU 9:30-7 • FRI 9:30-8 • SAT 9:30-7 • SUN 10-6 WWW.BUTTEREDNOODLES.COM

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RHONDA FORCIER, ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

KIDS VT

I got a skateboard one year, because I was going to be Michael J. Fox from Back to the Future and grab the backs of cars to get around town. (Never happened.)

My Raleigh three-speed. I was very specific about what I wanted: It had to be blue with whitewall tires. Lo and behold, Santa didn’t get the memo. The bike arrived with yellowwall tires! I spent all day in the garage, crying. That was the last bike my parents bought me. And I still have it!

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KRISTIN FLETCHER, WRITER

It’s a toss-up. Either my Easy Bake Oven or Baby Wet-n-Care. Baby was a great doll who presented weird spots on her bottom as soon as I fed her a bottle. As a young girl, feeding her was far more fun than changing diapers. My mom would demonstrate her amazing patience and help clean the doll again and again without (too) much complaint.

KVT

KIDSVT.COM

A Voltron-transforming camera. Two of the coolest machines in the world — Voltron, defender of the universe, and a 110-mm-cartridge film point-and-shoot camera — combined into a single device. I was mesmerized by its ability to change shape and take awesome still-life photos of my action figures and toy trucks. No doubt the impetus for a lifelong interest in photography.

A turntable console with AM/FM radio when I was 10. It was the biggest present under the tree that year, ergo I WIN!

*

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12/1/11 11:41 AM


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presenTs VermonT’s own chrIsTmas TraDITIon

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DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

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11/18/11 11:53 AM


SEE AND SAY

Q:

What’s your family’s favorite way to spend a winter afternoon?

Bring it on, Jack Frost. Kids VT readers aren’t afraid to get outside and enjoy the winter weather. More than half the respondents in our poll said they prefer to play outdoors than to sit fireside.

COLORING CONTEST

The winners of our three $25 gift certificates to Texas Roadhouse are…

Thanks for last month’s interactive coloring-contest submissions. More than ever before you added signs, thought bubbles, trees, animals, houses and threedimensional embellishments to your artwork. Keep up the good work.

HONORABLE MENTIONS LOVELY LINES Kathryn Deibler, 10, Essex Junction BEST BEES AND BUTTERFLIES Kaila Sheltra, 5, Swanton

56%

Playing outdoors

25%

Indoor activities, such as watching a movie or reading

13%

Vacationing somewhere warm

6%

Something else

TOP TEXTURE, OUTSTANDING OUTLINES Mae’Jeannette LaVallee, 10, Winooski OH, SO ORANGE! Lainey Buckpitt, 4, St. Albans

Dyllan Bushey, 3

4 and under

MILTON

“Mr. Turkeyball”

BRINGING THE BLUE Brayden Sylvester, 3, St. Albans EDGY EDGES Audrey Van Leuven, 4, St. Albans PURPLE THAT POPS Kyla Abair, 3, St. Albans BEST TURKEY SHIRT Vanessa Dykstra, 11, New Haven THOUGHT-PROVOKING THOUGHT BUBBLES Brian Eustis, 9, Essex Junction BEST INCORPORATION OF HER OWN NAME Reese Staples, 8, Fairfax

5 to 8

SNOWY HILLS Jayden White, 8, Bristol

Marissa Johnson, 6

POP POLKA DOTS Casondra Dykstra, 9, New Haven

VERGENNES

AHEAD OF HIS TIME Dustin Magnan, 18 months, Swanton

“The Happy Turkey”

P.S. Thanks to Sophie for the suggestion to incorporate a horse into the coloring contest!

“Cluck Taylor” Samantha Aikman, 7, Richmond

These count as six!

Count the kids to win a prize

“Bock-Chicka Awesome!” Casondra, 9, New Haven “Gobble Doodle Do” Emily Cuetop, 9, St. Albans

See a slide show of all the winning submissions at kidsvt.com. Find this month’s contest on page 49. The deadline is January 15.

Speak Up! Kids VT wants to publish your rants and raves.

Emma McSalis, 10

9 to 12

WILLISTON

“Turkey Day”

Your comments should

Email us at feedback@kidsvt.com or send a letter to Kids VT, PO Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402. We also reprint comments we receive via Facebook and Twitter, with permission from the authors. Kids VT reserves the right to edit for accuracy and length.

KIDS VT

• be no more than 250 words long, • respond to Kids VT content, and • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

Count the kids splashing on the pages of this month’s issue and you could win a set of four free passes to the Pump House at Jay Peak Resort. Add up the kids, then tell us how many you found at kidsvt.com or by writing to us at Kids VT, PO Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402. We’ll choose winners from the correct responses among the entries. Enter by 5 p.m. on January 16 for a chance to win.

“Purple Turkle” Kyla Abair, 3, St. Albans KIDSVT.COM

Contest!

TOP TITLES

7


Believes in the Magic of a Wish... Do you?

We grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy. Andrew Ha

ley

fairy tale h for a Disney solutely Andrew’s wis w’s trip was ab ities. re nd A ! e u tr activ me experience cajoyed many characters and funw.

DECEMBER / JANUARY KIDSVT.COM VT VTDECEMBER 20112011 / JANUARY 2012 2012 kidsvt.com 8 46KidsKIDS

amazing. He en en performed in an Idol Sho Andrew ev

In fulfilling wishes, the Make-A-Wish Foundation® emphasizes not the illness, but the joy that a wish-cometrue can bring. The child’s immediate family is included in the wish experience so special, happy memories can be cherished by all. During a time that is often stressful, all

Haley’s wish c ame true on h er twelfth birth Discovery Co day at ve in Orlando Florida where able to meet a s h e was nd many memorie swim with the dolphin s s of her amaz ! She has ing en this photo of a

counter includ ing y the Dolphin.

kiss from Rox

wishes are fulfilled carefree – all expenses are covered. Just like each wish child, each wish is unique. Wishes range from visiting the Walt Disney World® Resort to meeting a favorite celebrity to getting a computer. Just look at the faces to see the magic of a wish.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation® of Vermont has granted nearly 600 wishes. Wish referrals can be made by the wish child, a parent, legal guardian, or medical professional working with that child.

This advertorial made possible by:

and

As Vermont’s only independent statewide community bank, we understand the importance of supporting the remarkable efforts and energy of The Make-A-Wish Foundation of Vermont.


e

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Help Make Wishes Come True Today!

Donate online at www.vermont.wish.org or by mail to: Make-A-Wish 100 Dorset Street Suite 14 South Burlington, VT 05403 Name Address Phone:

Email: Card #:

Payment Method: checks made payable to

Make A Wish Foundation of Vermont

Mastercard

Check

Visa

Expiration Date: Security Code:

Kids VT KIDS

YES, I would like to receive your monthly e-newsletter

City, State, Zip

December 2011 kidsvt.com DECEMBER 2011 / /January JANUARY2012 2012 KIDSVT.COM

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THE Vermont’s Oldest & Most Experienced Childcare Placement Agency

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Call For All Your Childcare Needs for the Holidays and Beyond! Mention this ad for 10% off! • Full & Part Time Nannies • Babysitters & Event Sitters • Temporary Nannies Available • Gift Certificates Available Our childcare providers have undergone an intensive screening process.

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BEAT

B Y K AT E L AD D I S ON & C AT H Y RE S M E R

BOOKS

Catting Around In a new book by Vermont author Reeve Lindbergh, a quiet-loving cat escapes from his home and works his way across town to find his owner at the library, a purr-fect spot for HOMER, THE LIBRARY CAT. Lindbergh, who is the daughter of Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, lives in the Northeast Kingdom. She got the idea for the book when a librarian’s tabby escaped from the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. “The trials of Homer and his adventures across town were a topic for daily discussion as we continued to look for him,” says Lindbergh. Homer’s tour takes him down busy sidewalks, to the fire station and through the rail yard until he ends up at the library, where he shares his stories with the children there. Only a few lines of Reeve’s rhyming text grace each watercolor-illustrated page, which makes the book appealing for young readers who enjoy seeing and hearing a story develop. — K.L. ‘HOMER, THE LIBRARY CAT’: By Reeve Lindbergh, illustrations by Anne Wilsdorf, Candlewick Press, 32 pages, $15.99.

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11/14/11 11:07 AM

Christ the King School

10

KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

3 years old to 8th Grade 136 Locust Street Burlington, VT 862-6696 www.cksvt.org glatcheran@cksvt.org facebook.com/cksvt

We are proud of our Faith Filled Environment & Academic Excellence Art Music PE French Technology Licensed After-School Program Athletic & Enrichment

Opportunities COME TO OUR OPEN HOUSE DURING CATHOLIC SCHOOLS WEEK! Monday, January 30–Friday, February 3 9:00a.m. to 2:00p.m. each day. Call 862-6696 to schedule a tour.

Now is the perfect time to register your child for Pre-School or Pre-Kindergarten or to explore all that CKS has to offer your family!

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11/25/11 1:22 PM

TECHNOLOGY

Lily iPad Looking for a word game to engage the kids during the holiday drive to Grandma’s? Download SWAMP TALK, an app for the iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch, designed by Montpelier-based Tertl Studos. Described by one reviewer as “the freakishly addictive offspring of Scrabble and Tetris,” Swamp Talk invites players to make words using letters that drop, one at a time, from the top of the screen. The letters land above a frog on a lily pad, who croaks each time the player makes a word. The longer the word, the more points it’s worth. The newly created words disappear, making room for more letters. If the letters pile up, unused, they fall into the swamp, and the frog eventually jumps away. Game over. Tertl founder Chris Hancock has years of experience creating electronic educational tools, but Swamp Talk is his team’s first mobile game. Trust me: It won’t be their last. Swamp Talk is, in a word, A-W-E-S-O-M-E. — C.R. SWAMP TALK: Download from the Apple App Store, $1.99. Recommended for players ages 10 and up.


A Healthy Planet Begins with Healthy Communities

FOOD & DRINK

Cuppa Kids A Warren family is brewing up a new line of teas for kids. Amy and Jesse Carst often drink tea and wanted to share the relaxing ritual with their children. Their tiny tea testers liked the idea, but not the taste. So the Carsts began blending ingredients that would be pleasing to young palates. After many in-home tasting sessions, they settled on three, each of which is named for a song: “A Little Night Music” smells like warm apple pie, “Le Boogie à Vélo” is vanilla mint, and the iced-tea mix “Barengeburi-Bubuland” is billed as “berry berry good.” All are caffeine-free and sweetened with stevia leaves. Although she’s not a musician, Amy Carst says she wants to instill a love of music and arts in her children, and the GROOVE TEA PROJECT helps. Ten percent of the profits from the Carst’s song-titled teas support music and arts programs around the globe. — K.L.

A Healthy Body Begins with a Healthy Spine!

It all begins with you RUSHFORD FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC 100 Dorset Street, Suite 21 • 860-3336 www.rushfordchiropractic.com

GROOVE TEA PROJECT: Teas sold in tins containing 16 sachets, $12. Available online or at local stores including the Warren Store, Red Hen Bakery & Café in Middlesex, Homeport on Church Street in Burlington and Harvest Market in Stowe. Info, 4482789, groovetea.com.

Picture This

Pump It Up

11

JAY PEAK’S PUMP HOUSE: Day passes are $35 for adults and $25 for children ages 4-14; kids three and under get in free. Info, 988-2611, jaypeakresort.com.

KIDS VT

No need to leave Vermont to play at an indoor water park. Jay Peak Resort’s new PUMP HOUSE opened in November with four translucent, colored fiberglass water slides, a wading pool, a whirlpool and surfing wave, all surrounded by a meandering river for inner-tube rides. Jay Peak is close to cornering the market on H20 with snowy ski hills, skating in the Ice Haus and now liquid entertainment in the water park. The retractable glass roof over the 50,000-squarefoot space lets in lots of light, and with 84 degree water, the Pump House is going to be the place to be come February. Adventurous kids who weigh more than 88 pounds can try the 60-foot free fall at the start of La Chute — the only indoor AquaLoop in the Western Hemisphere. Although the other slides also have height and weight minimums, even wee water lovers can have fun slipping down the minislides, plunging through pour-down from the big Jay Peak bucket or shooting some aqua hoops. — K.L.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

BEFORE BIRTH BONDING: Packages from $99 to $219. 4049 Williston Road, Suite 1, South Burlington. Info, 497-0872, beforebirthbonding.com.

ENTERTAINMENT

KIDSVT.COM

Can’t wait nine months to see your baby? Drop by BEFORE BIRTH BONDING in South Burlington for one of their 3- or 4-D ultrasounds. With a 3-D picture, features such as skin, eyebrows, noses and ears are visible in the still, four-color image. With 4-D, expectant parents watch a video of the ultrasound and see their baby’s real-time hiccups, kicks and thumb sucking. “It’s just so special that you get a glimpse of what your child looks like,” says Hollie Barclay, a maternity nurse at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington who opened the franchise business with her husband in November. The ultrasounds are nondiagnostic and not covered by insurance. Barclay said the experience — watching him or her move while hearing the heart beat and blood woosh — establishes an early bond between parents and baby. Another service BBB offers is a Sonostream, which allow family members separated by distance to watch a live, 4-D ultrasound via the internet. — K.L.

9/22/11 11:28 AM

FILE: SHAWN CORROW

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MATERNITY

Healthy People Begin with Healthy Bodies

EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

Healthy Communities Begin with Healthy People

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11/29/11 9:38 AM


CK

A NDY D U

BA

Vermont Skating Academy

A Basic Skills Skating Badge Program at the Essex Skating Facility Skating Director, Renee Deeghan rdeeghan@ccsuvt.org

Our programs are open to children of all ages. Registration Schedule: Fri, Jan. 27, 6-7 pm Sat, Jan. 28, 10-11 am 11 Week Session Open Registration for Both Dates

Children’s Lessons Wed., Thur. & Fri. Adult Lessons, Sun. 5:45 - 6:45 pm

Ice skate rentals available

878-1394 www.essexrink.com

Handmade Gifts Are The Best Gifts!

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✱ ASK DR. FIRST

What should parents do when their kids ingest something they shouldn’t?

KIDS EXPLORE THEIR WORLD THROUGH TASTE, TOUCH, SOUND AND SMELL — often, unfortunately, by stuffing things into their mouths, ears and noses. Especially during the holidays, floors tend to be littered with choking hazards, from runaway cranberries to Christmas tree ornaments. It may be important to act quickly, advises Dr. Lewis First, chief of pediatrics at Vermont Children’s Hospital at Fletcher Allen Health Care. But that’s not always necessary. In some cases, parents — and their kids — can breathe easy knowing “This, too, shall pass.” KIDS VT: What object are kids most likely to swallow? LEWIS FIRST: About 30,000 children each year swallow coins. Usually kids between six months and four years of age are the leading culprits in swallowing things that are not necessarily nutritious but interesting to put into their mouths. The good news is, if something is the size of a quarter or smaller, more than 90 percent of the time it will get through the narrowest passage, which is the exit from the stomach, and pass onward and outward.

11/28/11 10:35 AMKVT: Do parents need to monitor the

object as it moves though the body? LF: Maybe one in 10 children who swallow something smaller than a quarter will have it get hung up in the

needs to be removed immediately at the hospital. KVT: What can that do to the body? LF: Combined with the chemicals inside the battery leaching out, the battery can destroy the lining of the esophagus, stomach and digestive system; cause perforations, infection and shock; and even be life threatening. KVT: What about small magnets? LF: When a child says he swallowed a magnet, you don’t know how many went down. Sometimes there are multiple magnets in small toys. So seek medical attention and get an X-ray and try to identify if there’s more than one magnet down there. If there are, those magnets need to be removed. They can stick to

12

KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012 KIDSVT.COM

You can use a toilet paper roll as a gauge: If that toy is small enough to pass through that roll, it’s probably too small for children under 4.

Create something special for Mom, Dad, Grandparents, Teachers and Friends. Bracelets • Necklaces • Earrings Bookmarks • Key Rings Zipper Pulls • Wine Charms

21 Taft Corners Shopping Center Williston • 288-9666 • www.beadcrazyvt.com Birthday Parties • Repairs Instruction is Always Available Class schedule online.

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esophagus or trachea. Normally in those cases the problem is not subtle: Your child will have difficulty breathing, won’t be able to talk, may be gasping, their color changes from red to blue, and they’ll appear very panicked. That’s an emergency, and families need to seek immediate help. The rule of thumb is, if it’s anything but a disc battery and your child is asymptomatic, parents should wait at least a few hours before getting an X-ray, to let the object move through the stomach. KVT: Why are disc or button batteries so problematic? LF: When a disc battery lodges in the nose or food pipe, the battery presses against the moist walls of the esophagus or stomach generating a small current, which then causes erosion of the esophagus or stomach lining. That can begin within two hours. So the battery

10/25/11 10:48 AM

each other through the wall of the bowel and paralyze the bowel, possibly leading to an obstruction, irritation, infection or other complications. KVT: How can parents gauge the size of objects that are safe for small kids? LF: If you’re giving an infant or toddler a toy and can’t find a small-parts tester in the store, you can use a toilet paper roll as a gauge: If the toy is small enough to pass through that roll, it’s probably too small for children under 4. Toys for infants and toddlers should be at least 1 3/4 inches in diameter and 2 1/2 inches in length. KVT: What are some of the more unusual objects you’ve seen pass through kids? LF: Safety pins and objects from workbenches, such as nails and screws. Sometimes insects can crawl inside

ears. A child will know there’s something in their ear, and for parents, most kids aren’t going to be cooperative. The best thing parents can do if there’s something up a nose, in ears or swallowed is to talk to their doctor or seek emergency help so they can provide appropriate advice and possibly sedation, rather than having a child jump back while trying to remove a bead from the nose or ear and have it go farther inside. KVT: Any advice for heading off problems before they occur? LF: Parents need to put their spare change in a piggy bank. When it comes to food, raw carrots, grapes, hot dogs or anything quarter-size or larger that can obstruct an airway should be cut into pieces no larger than a half inch to make them Send them to easier for ideas@kidsvt.com. kids to swallow and digest. Don’t rush your children when they eat and don’t let them run around with food in their mouths.

Got questions for Dr. First?

KVT: When kids swallow coins or other objects, do parents need to monitor their back end or listen for that telltale plunk in the toilet? LF: They don’t. Once the object is past the stomach, which usually takes six to 12 hours, it’ll usually take anywhere from a few days to a week or two to come out. Keep in mind, there’s also a risk of your kids getting radiation they don’t need, so talk to your doctor first about when is the most appropriate time to get an X-ray to ensure the coin has moved onward. Our 911 system can instruct families on the fundamentals of the Heimlich maneuver. But most of the time, everything will come out fine in the end.  — KEN PICARD


Sponsored by:

✱ FIT FAMILIES

B Y ST INA B O OT H

Taking the Plunge

EAT. LEARN. PLAY. Like the Y on Facebook for resources on how your family can become healthier!

✱ THE LIBRARIAN LIKES 1-year-old Finn Matheson and his mom, Robin

LIBRARIAN: Christine Demarais, youth services director, Fletcher Free Library BOOK: The Lost Conspiracy, by Frances Hardinge

STINA BOOTH

AGE RANGE: 12 and up

Demarais’ summary: Set on a tropical

exercises to get the babies excited for swim time. Who knew there was a pool version of “Wheels on the Bus” where babies are the wipers swishing through the water? Kids in the class ranged in age from 6 months to about 3 years, and Lukas gives lots of individual attention to help parents get babies of different ages paddling at their own

Who knew there was a pool version of “Wheels on the Bus”?

Infant & Parent Swim: Six to eight week sessions meet once a week. YMCA membership not required to register

Who it’s best for: Kids who like a mystery. This story involves a murder mystery with supernatural overtones.

COST: $60 with membership, $100 without

Why parents will love it: It’s an intriguing read, even for adults. “Not everything is explained right away,” says Demarais, “and I had to keep turning pages to figure it out.” 

WHAT YOU NEED: Bathing suit, swim diaper, towel GET A SCHEDULE: www.gbymca.org

KIDS VT

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“Fit Families” is a monthly feature that offers easy and affordable ways to stay active. Got an idea for a future FF? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com. Stina Booth is a writer and photographer living in Fairfield.

“The Librarian Likes” features a different librarian and book each month. Got an idea for a future LL? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANU-

speed. Celia has spent time at the beach and had a few swim classes already, so she was happy and engaged by the other kids. I didn’t think the class would be much of a workout for me, but I was surprised when, later that day, I found I was sore from all the squats and baby lifts in waist-high water. Lukas’ sessions are designed to get babies used to the pool at a young

age. “It sets the stage for a lifetime of healthy activity,” says Jane Dunbar, who until recently was the Y’s director of communications. Once they’re confident in the pool, young swimmers may graduate to the Y’s Pike classes for kids ages 3 to 5. You can energize the family during the Y’s Open Swim times, too, on weekdays, evenings and weekends. The times vary, so check the Y’s website for schedules. Celia and I would happily swim and sing our way through this class again. It was fun, the time flew by, and Celia got a chance to socialize with other cool pool kids her age. 

KIDSVT.COM

BABY, IT’S COLD OUTSIDE, but the Program Pool at the Burlington YMCA rarely drops below 84 degrees. It’s the winter equivalent of a day at the beach. I recently brought my 9-monthold, Celia, to one of the Y’s infant and parent swim classes. It was our first trip to the Y, and we found the lobby bustling with daycare traffic and people headed to various classes. Once signed in, we found the kid-friendly locker room, complete with low-set drinking fountains and short lockers. There was a line for the changing table, but plenty of bench space to get Celia tucked into her swim diaper. About 10 other babies — and their parents — hopped right into the invitingly warm water to start splashing. After getting the kids into the water, the class worked through songs and circle dances that led up to encouraging kids to “jump” in, safely sliding from the pool’s edge to parents’ open arms. Instructor Jess Lukas enthusiastically led the class through dances and

island with dramatic beaches and dormant volcanoes, this young-adult book features two sisters who are part of a shunned minority group. It turns out that they may also be part of the island’s oracle caste, “The Lost.” These individuals possess spirits with only a tenuous connection to their bodies, traveling disembodied to later report what they see and hear. The sisters, Haithin and Arilou, are unknowingly drawn into a conspiracy. They have to unravel a complicated web of lies to save themselves.


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Soup’s On! THERE’S NOTHING LIKE SOUP on a chilly day. For lunch, it’s a tummy-warming alternative to the same-old-sandwich routine. Or serve it for dinner with grilled cheese sandwiches or salad and crusty bread. Homemade soup is a cinch to make, especially colorful carrot soup that has the added bonus of using up any random root veggies left in the fridge. Made with just a handful of ingredients, this soup is economical, vitamin rich and creamy, without containing any dairy products. SERVES 4-6

CARROT SOUP Hamburger or Cheeseburger Eddie Spaghetti Made with marinara or butter. $5 | add meatballs for $1.5

KIDS MENU

Grilled Cheese Texas toast with cheddar & american cheese. Served with a side of hand-cut fries. $5

Chicken Tenders

Personal Pie Comes with cheese & choice of 1 topping. $6 | add additional toppings for $.75

Pizza Roll Fresh baked dough wrapped with mozzarella, herbs & choice of pepperoni or broccoli. $6

1 large onion, diced 2 stalks celery, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 4-5 cups low-sodium chicken stock 4-5 cups carrots, chopped into 1-inch chunks 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, minced (or more to taste) 1 teaspoon turmeric (optional) salt and pepper

0:60

Steps the kids can help with: • Scrubbing the veggies • Measuring ingredients • Dumping ingredients into the soup pot • Ladling soup into the blender or food processor, with an adult’s help

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Free-range chicken tenders. Served with a side of hand-cut fries. $6

PT farms all-natural grass-fed beef. Served with a side of hand-cut fries. $6.5

1. In a large, heavy-bottom soup pot over medium heat, sauté onion, celery and garlic in olive oil until soft and translucent. 2. Blend in flour and enough chicken stock to make a smooth paste. 3. Add the rest of the chicken stock, carrots, ginger and turmeric. Bring to a boil. 4. Reduce heat and simmer for about 30-45 minutes, until carrots are cooked through and soft.

KIDS VT

6. Return puréed soup to pot to reheat, adding more stock if a thinner soup is desired.

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5. Purée soup in small batches using a blender or food processor.

7. Season to taste with salt and pepper.  k4t-HealthyLiving1211.indd 1

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EAT. LEARN. PLAY. ✱ OUT TO EAT B Y CINDY M O RGAN

Big Picture Theater and Café 48 Carroll Road, Waitsfield, 496-8994 chose a booth with a picture-window view of the mountains. By the time we left, the place was packed. I can only imagine what it’s like during ski season; Sugarbush and Mad River Glen are just up the road. As soon as we sat down, we ordered a trio of the fresh, glazed doughnuts made daily by the Very Small Donut Company. “It’s like a breakfast appetizer,” my son observed. I only got one bite before the plate was empty. Licking sugar glaze off my fingers, I wished we had ordered six instead of three. I took in the décor as I sipped my good, strong cup of coffee. I am a sucker for cute old-timey cafés like the Big Picture, places with mismatched chairs, tin signs advertising coffee for 5 cents, pies in the bakery case and heavy creamware coffee mugs. While the coffee, doughnuts and décor were everything I could ask

I later found a napkin-wrapped sausage link stuffed in my purse.

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

BREAKFAST IS THE IDEAL MEAL to eat out with children. It’s inexpensive, everyone can find something they like on the menu, and even mediocre breakfast foods can be improved with ketchup or maple syrup. The only potential downside to Saturday breakfast at a restaurant is waiting for a table with two hungry 9-year-olds. That’s why we set out early for the Big Picture Theater and Café in Waitsfield. “Do they have eggs Benedict?” my daughter asked me in the car. For her, eggs Benedict is the ne plus ultra of breakfast foods. “No,” I told her, “but they do have doughnuts. And if you go for dinner, you can see a movie while you eat.” “Then why aren’t we going for dinner?” “Because then you can’t get the doughnuts.” When we arrived at 8:45 a.m., the restaurant was almost empty, so we

FAMILY-FRIENDLY AMENITIES: Three high chairs and two booster seats. No kids menu at breakfast, but a large á la carte section for smaller eaters. On Fridays, the Big Picture Theater and Café shows old cartoons during lunch in the cinema lobby. OUR BILL FOR FOUR: $51.26, including tip. for, our meals were less impressive. The pancakes and French toast were average, but improved by a liberal dosing of Vermont maple syrup. My daughter, denied her eggs Benedict, was further disappointed when her over-easy eggs arrived over hard. Our server took them back and, within a few minutes, a very apologetic shortorder cook brought her new ones. My son loved every bite of his

breakfast. He inhaled his scrambled eggs, breakfast potatoes and bacon, and then moved on to my pancakes. He must have run out of room at some point, because I later found a napkinwrapped sausage link stuffed in my purse. The Big Picture was worth the early wake-up, but next time I think we’ll go for dinner and a movie. Let’s hope the popcorn is as good as the doughnuts. 

“Out to Eat” is a monthly family-friendly restaurant review. Where should we eat next? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com. Cindy Morgan is a freelance writer who recently moved with her family from California to Shelburne. KIDSVT.COM

EVERY CHILD IS UNIQUE K (4.5 yr. old) - 6th grade OBSERVATION MORNING

Wednesday, December 14

Contact us to schedule a visit.

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355-7023 or www.theschoolhouse vt.org

KIDS VT

Ask about our school vacation camps and daily afterschool program.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

THE SCHOOLHOUSE


✱ GO ASK DAD

Q:

How do you celebrate the holidays with your kids?

ALFONSO CAPONE, FAIRFIELD, PROFESSOR

CRAIG CHEVRIER, HINESBURG,

Children: sons Abram, 17, Wilson, 12, and Leo, 10; daughter Olive, 15

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The things that mean most to me are the traditions — religious, cultural and family — that help connect me to things that I value most. We do a lot of things at the end of the year. Oh, 50 percent of the time I’m derided for these things, but if I were to skip one, my family would be disappointed. Every year I start a bonfire on the 21st of December (the solstice). Some years I’m out there in the wet and the cold, and the fire won’t start, but the kids come out, and they’d feel bad if I didn’t build it. Every year I make a fruitcake. Even if they don’t eat it, they’d be terribly disappointed if I didn’t make one. We get a Christmas tree from Larry’s Tree Farm, and it has to be Larry’s Tree Farm. If somebody’s missing, we just have to wait until everybody can be together. Because we spend Christmas Day with my wife’s family in New Hampshire, we open gifts on New Year’s Day at home. No matter how many people we spend the holidays with, New Year’s Day is reserved for our family. There will be periods when the kids will be sometimes more and sometimes less enthusiastic about these things. 12:10 PMSticking with them year by year is important because they’ll get the importance of family. They’ll appreciate it in the end.

MICHAEL RAPAPORT, BURLINGTON, PHYSICIAN

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KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Children: son Miles, 12; stepson Cole, 8; stepdaughter Giovanna, 10; daughter Juliet, 7

OPEN GYM

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I’m learning new meanings of the holidays with a 4-year-old around, rediscovering things like Santa Claus, Frosty the Snowman and Rudolph, and all the songs that go along with those things. He’s really excited, and it’s contagious. For an agnostic like me, who’s been almost opposed to the holidays for so many years, it’s kind of nice to have the spirit of Christmas back. We try to make it about Brendan and staying home and enjoying one another more than anything else. We’re definitely going along with Santa and stockings on Christmas morning. On the other hand, we try to make it not religious. For me as a kid, Christmas was quasi-religious. There were a lot of Jesus and angels around. [My son] certainly doesn’t get that. He doesn’t get the nativity. He doesn’t get church. But we fought the Santa Claus thing in year one, and, frankly, there’s no winning that battle. The other thing I’ve learned is that it’s a lot easier to sit back and let it happen than get glum about it and boo-hoo the commercialism.

For an agnostic like me, who’s been almost opposed to the holidays for so many years, it’s kind of nice to have the spirit of Christmas back.

The holidays mean the getting together of family, celebrating the importance of family and also the spirit of giving — celebrating each other and giving gifts to people you care about. I try to pass on that it’s not all about the getting. It’s about the giving, and it’s a time to reflect on the year. My mother, a Unitarian, celebrated Christmas in our home growing up, and I remember my father, who was Jewish, saying that he celebrated Santa Claus and the spirit of giving. I have said that to my kids. For me, it’s never been a religious holiday. It has been a family holiday. Sometimes we’ll try to get the kids to make presents for each other, and they enjoy that, so that’s not a hard sell. It’s kind of fun to have one day a year when the kids get showered with presents. It’s fun to see their excitement. As a parent, you enjoy seeing how happy they are, but you do have to be careful to balance that and not have that be an expectation.

16 Tigan St • Winooski 655-3300 www.regalgym.com

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WEB MARKETING STRATEGIST

Child: son Brendan, 4

ADAM BLUESTEIN, BURLINGTON, JOURNALIST Children: daughter Violet, 8; son Sammy, 6

Because my wife and I are both freelancers, we don’t have a regular schedule and vacations and stuff. So what we try to do, between Christmas and New Year’s, is to really take that time off and ideally not go anywhere. Being Jewish helps with that, so not having the expectations of doing a lot of family stuff with grandparents and other family members makes it a really good time for us just to be together and actually relax and do fun things. On Christmas Day, we try to go someplace with a pool for the kids and maybe a hot tub for us. It’s a special, quiet day to do something fun with the kids that’s luxurious and relaxing. That’s how we start it off, and then we do all the regular stuff that Vermonters like to do during the holiday period. We have a lot of non-Jewish friends, and they’ll often invite us to different celebrations, which is great. Our kids definitely have a sense of their own identity, and I think they’re curious and interested in what all the kids celebrating Christmas are doing.  — INTERVIEWS COMPILED BY ERIK ESCKILSEN

“Go Ask Dad” is a monthly feature in which we ask fathers to answer a question. Got a question, or a pop you’d like to hear from? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com. Erik Esckilsen is a freelance writer and Champlain College instructor. He lives in Burlington with his wife and twin daughters, and their dog.


EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

REAL FUN!

✱ THE ART OF…

MATTHEW THORSEN

Standup Comedy

Real Science.

B Y MEG A N JA MES

WHAT YOU’LL NEED All standup requires is paper, a pencil and a sense of humor. But for younger hams who want to try out some basic comedic theater, Spark Arts is offering some workshops that might prepare them for the stand-up spotlight. In one, 8- to 12-year-olds brush up their basic theater skills by creating their own version of a well-known fairy tale and performing it for their parents.  In another, also for kids 8 to 12, Hartswick leads short-form improv games, which teach them how to stay in character, listen to each other and develop comedic timing. Spark Arts, 180 Flynn Avenue, Burlington Info, 373-4703, facebook.com/sparkartsvt

SAVE all year Montshire Membership! • Unlimited visits for 12 months • Savings on education programs • Early registration and savings for Summer Camp • Savings in the Museum Store

Starting in January, he’ll begin teaching kids age 12 to 17 the art of standup comedy at Spark Arts, the Burlington Open Daily 10-5 performing-arts studio he recently opened with his wife, Natalie Miller. In addition to comedy classes, the pair will offer voice lessons, acting classes, improv nights and more. Museum of Science Hartswick first tried standup three years ago at a Flynn montshire.org • 802.649.2200 Center class taught by local comedian Josie Leavitt. “I was interested, but totally terrified to try it,” he says, “because I Exit 13 I-91, Norwich, VT wasn’t hiding behind a costume or a musical instrument.” He loved it. Since then, Hartswick has worked to start a 11/18/11 11:18 AM Burlington standup scene, and his 13-year-old daughter has k8v-Montshire1211.indd 1 caught snippets of his act. “She’s snarky and sarcastic,” Hartswick says with pride. And she’s heard enough of (the cleaner parts of ) her dad’s routine to catch the comedy bug. When she begged him to teach her to put on her own shows, he caved; he loved the idea of introducing kids to standup. Hartswick has taught kids improv comedy before, and he’s taught adults NATHAN HARTSWICK HAS A SIMPLE standup, but this course will be his first foray into list of instructions for the kids in his standup for kids. Vermont’s only certified Anybody can be a good comic, Hartswick believes. All forthcoming standup comedy class: “Support each other. you need to do is “change the way you look at stuff,” he says. Laugh if it’s funny. Be nice if it’s not. Do your homework.” Irish Dance School! It helps to be observant, especially of conflict, and to write What the class isn’t about: “Criticizing each other’s All Ages…All Levels succinctly. In the class, kids will write and perform their own material. That’s my job,” he writes in the overview he material in front of each other. distributes to students at the beginning of each course. Did you enjoy watching Miller adds that standup can be a great equalizer. “Some It’s a joke, of course. What Hartswick actually offers kids Riverdance? kids might not think they can sing or play an instrument,” in class is “pointed feedback,” such as “Add a pause here,” or Why not learn “Here’s where I thought that joke was going…” To Hartswick, she says. “But they can talk about anything.” And anything some of the steps! can be funny, if you look at it through the right lens. it’s all about encouraging kids to find their own voice. Standing up in front of other people teaches kids Offer an adult the opportunity to try standup comedy, and Call now for a spot in important life skills, too, such as public speaking, confidence most are likely to break into a cold sweat. Kids are another and finding the humor in everyday life — even when nobody story — especially the hammy, sarcastic types. our Fall/Winter program! else laughs. “We all fail every day of our lives as adults,” says Hartswick was one of those. He grew up on the Northeast Hartswick. “It’s really important that [kids] get a chance to Kingdom barn-turned-stage where his mother, Nancy Classes offered in fail safely.” Hartswick, ran the Vermont Children’s Theater. His Williston & Middlebury For both Hartswick and Miller, working with the “walltrumpeter sister, Jennifer, now plays with Trey Anastasio. flower kids” is their favorite. “To see them come out of their Thirty-four-year-old Nathan is one of Burlington’s most shells…” says Hartswick. “That’s why I do what I do.”  prominent standup comics. Beth Anne McFadden T.C.R.G. “The Art of...” spotlights creative skills that enrich kids’ lives. Got a class or teacher to recommend? (802) 999-5041 Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com. Megan James is a staff writer at Seven Days. www.mcfaddenirishdance.com

Montshire

KIDSVT.COM

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDS VT

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ILLUSTRATION: MO-OH

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012 KIDSVT.COM


FAMILY

FOSTERING FAMILIES

An award-winning Vermont program provides another adoption option

Kids enjoy the Lund Family Center’s annual adoption picnic.

FIXING A BROKEN SYSTEM

Vermont wasn’t always at the forefront of foster-child adoption. In 1999, the state had 396 kids in state custody, most of them in foster care, who were legally available for adoption. Meanwhile, the Lund Family Center — Vermont’s oldest non-profit adoption agency, which is also a residential treatment facility for pregnant women — was importing foster children from other states to meet the instate demand for adoptable children.

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KIDS VT

First, though, they had to endure a torturous process during which her biological mother’s parental rights were terminated. They were in the midst of that ordeal when another fostering opportunity came their way: a twoweek-old baby boy, Isaac. The Truzanskys brought the infant home and spent six months feeding, diapering and bonding with him. Although Beth and Tracy knew there was a chance Isaac might go back to his birth family, “it was heart wrenching” when it happened, Beth says. Preschooler April still draws a baby brother when asked to illustrate her family tree.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

might have social, behavioral or developmental problems. And until birth families’ parental rights have been legally terminated, they have the right to change their minds and reclaim a child on track for adoption. That can be heartbreaking for families who have grown attached to children they had hoped to adopt. Beth Truzansky and her partner Tracy have experienced all the variations on the foster-to-adopt theme. They signed up to be foster parents, knowing the risks involved, and were matched with their foster daughter, April, whom they eventually adopted.

Tracy was still grieving when she called the caseworker one day, to ask about Isaac’s welfare. Although the caseworker had promised herself she wouldn’t, she told Tracy about another child. The Truzanskys jumped at the chance to foster a second daughter. “We had just deconstructed the crib and here we were, four hours later, putting it back together again,” says Beth. Were they ready? “It felt like she was meant to be there,” she says of the little girl, whose adoption proceeded much more quickly than April’s because her parents voluntarily relinquished their rights to claim her. “It’s been a phenomenal journey,” says Beth.

KIDSVT.COM

FAMILIES TURN TO ADOPTION for many reasons. Some have hit a biological barrier: trouble getting pregnant or carrying a baby to term. Others want to help a child in need or to grow their own family tree in a different way. Whatever the motivation, it’s harder to adopt a child today than it was years ago. Access to family planning services and the destigmatization of single motherhood have resulted in fewer U.S.-born infants available for adoption. And fears of fraud and human trafficking have led some foreign countries to discontinue the practice; international adoptions in the U.S. have declined to their lowest rate since 1994. Vermonters adopted 30 kids from other countries last year, compared to 86 a decade ago. The result: More families are exploring the foster-to-adopt option, which allows children whose birth parents are unable or unfit to care for them to become part of a more functional family. Here in Vermont, an award-winning public-private partnership called Project Family facilitates the process, with a special emphasis on kids formerly considered “unadoptable.” Foster-care adoption has a lot to recommend it: It’s local, cost-effective and can strengthen communities in which some children lack parental love and guidance. But there are risks involved, too. Children in the system

COURTESY OF CAT CUTILLO

BY K AT E LAD D I S O N


Fostering Families

CONTINUED FROM P. 19

Vermont Adoption Registry Lund Family Center Founded in 1893 as a “Home for Friendless Women,” the Burlington-based LFC offers residential counseling for pregnant mothers as well as extensive adoption services. It partners with the Vermont Department for Children and Families on the state’s awardwinning Project Family program.

Info, 864 7467, lundfamilycenter.org

Friends in Adoption Vermont-based, licensed Friends in Adoption offers free information to pregnant women and couples, connects people trying to adopt with potential adoptees, and performs home studies.

The Vermont Adoption Act of 1996 established a registry to make it easier for adoptees, adoptive and birth families to access information about Vermont adoptions. Discoverable information includes non-identifying facts as well as a noncertified copy of the adoptee’s original birth certificate.

Info, 241-2122, dcf.vermont.gov/fsd/ vermont_adoption_registry

Info, 800-982-3678, friendsinadoption.org

Wide Horizons for Children

Angels’ Haven Outreach A licensed, private adoption agency, Monkton-based Angel’s Haven provides homestudy services in Vermont.

Info, 453-5450, angelshaven.org

ADOPTION RESOURCES

in Vermont

Based in Waltham, Mass., with an office in Monkton, Wide Horizons is an adoption agency that facilitates both international and domestic adoptions.

Info, 453-2581, whfc.org

BY KAT E L AD D I SON

Vermont Foster and Adoptive Family Association This nonprofit organization meets regularly with board members from all over Vermont to ensure adoptive and foster families have access to resources such as education training. It supports these families through recognition programs and legislative advocacy.

Many agencies offer services for people thinking about adoption — from pregnant mothers to prospective adoptive families. Agencies must be licensed to handle the associated legal proceedings required in Vermont, but many organizations offer other services, such as pre- and post-adoption counseling, foster-child advocacy, and “home studies” — the process by which experts determine whether a family is properly equipped to adopt a child. Here is a list of Vermont-specific adoption resources.

Info, 864-7467, vfafa.org/index.html

Easter Seals Vermont This non-profit agency helps people with disabilities, but some of its programs support foster, birth and kinship parents struggling with children who have suffered physical and emotional abuse. Easter Seals also provides respite and advocacy services for adoptive families when school issues arise.

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DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012 KIDSVT.COM

Info, 223-4744, vt.easterseals.com

Vermont Catholic Charities Casey Family Services Part of the Marylandbased Annie E. Casey Foundation, Casey Family Services’ Vermont division connects foster families with children and offers adoption and postadoption services.

Info, 655-6688, caseyfamilyservices.org

A part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington, Vermont, Catholic Charities provides post-adoption services related to search and reunion issues.

Info, 658-6110, 773-3379, vermontcatholic.org/index.php

Vermont Children’s Aid Society

Bethany Christian Services

This private, Winooskibased nonprofit organization, founded in 1919, provides postadoption support services and counseling.

This licensed, private adoption agency is national but has an office in Vergennes. A Christian mission directs its work with kids and families around the world.

Info, 877-6500, bethany.org

Info, 655-0006, vtcas.org

Vermont Adoption Consortium Comprised of agencies and organizations around the state, this group meets regularly to share information about and improve Vermont’s adoption processes.

Info, 985-0158, vtadoption.org


family

courtesy of cat cutillo

You cannot fear where the children have come from

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Camp Sangamon & Camp Betsey Cox Pittsford, Vermont Brother-Sister camps in a rustic setting.

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Camp Betsey Cox 866.213-4717 campbetseycox.com

Kids VT

Camp Sangamon 888.345.9193 campsangamon.com

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Say what? but “change is hard,” Audette notes, That was the reaction of Diane especially when you’re dealing with a Dexter, the adoption chief at Vermont’s bureaucracy. Lund’s first step was to Department for Children and Families establish a relationship with the DCF (DCF), during a Vermont Adoption workers. It was all about persistence, Consortium meeting more than 10 she says. years ago. Audette and the Project Family “Look at this list!” she exclaimed, staff began trekking to the 12 regional holding up a report showing nearly 400 DCF offices around the state, offering children in need. their services. Some Project Family The list was news to Wanda Audette, staff work alongside DCF personnel, the Lund Family Center’s director of helping to answer phones or attend adoption services. According to the meetings. Others drop in as “visitors” state, she told Dexter, no Vermont to get updates and help with specific children were available. challenges. Whatever works. Audette and Dexter, both adoptive A foster family can’t accommodate parents themselves, recognized a major a child because the house is too small? problem. No one had connected the dots Project Family finds a builder to donate between Vermont an addition. A child families looking being adopted by an to adopt children out-of-state family — even older would be re-traumachildren — and tized by returning to Vermont children Vermont for a court in desperate need hearing? Project of families. The Family facilitates next spring, they a way to hold the pulled together a adoption proceedteam and applied ings using Skype. for a federal grant When Project to build a solution. Family’s federal From that grant ran out, the three-year grant state picked up came Project Family, a the program — both an partnership between acknowledgement of its DCF and Lund that success and a key to its changed the way the sustainability. In October, state handles adoptions. the U.S. Department DCF administers of Health and Human many state services, Services awarded Dexter such as child support and Audette a national and protection, foodAdoption Excellence Wanda Audette, stamp programs, foster Award, citing several The Lund Family programs and adoption. measurable accomplishcenter Previously, a DCF ments. Among them, caseworker would be assigned to a child Project Family has shortened the when he or she came into state custody. average length of time between a child’s Then, another DCF staffer — an adoption entry into state custody and adoption, social worker — would take over the from four years to less than two. Studies case to find a family, begin the adoption show the longer a child spends in process and then go to court to make it temporary care, the greater the negative official. impact on his or her development. In the new system, Project FamilyContributing to that time frame is Lund Center staff review children’s the waiting period between termination cases as soon as they enter the foster of parental rights and adoption. Project system. DCF controls the front end of Family has got it down from 26 months the process, while the Lund Center helps to between four and six. Dexter’s goal: with the back end. The goal is to seek 90 days. “The state makes a lousy reunification with the birth family while parent,” she says. developing an alternate adoption plan. Another surprising statistic: In short, Project Family pairs the Since its inception, Project Family DCF’s experience in caring for abused has found adoptive homes for 329 and neglected children with Lund’s older youths who, due to their age and adoption expertise. fostering families p. 22 » It may not sound revolutionary,


fostering families continued from p. 21

circumstances, would previously have been deemed “unadoptable.” Probate Court Judge Susan Fowler oversees a large percentage of Vermont adoptions each year from her bench in Chittenden County. Praising Project Family, she proclaims, “It was massive, what they did.”

ch-ch-changes

Diane Dexter and her daughters.

The state makes a lousy parent. Must be a Member of Rally’s Round Up to attend. Sign up to become a member online or at any home athletic event.

Kids VT

december 2011 / January 2012 KidsVT.com

courtesy of the Lund famiLy center

The systemic changes Project Family has engendered aren’t all that’s changed in Vermont adoption. The Green Mountain state has steadily expanded the definition of “family” as it relates to adoption eligibility. “We’ve been ahead of the curve in terms of allowing adoptions by good people regardless of their sexual orientation,” says Fowler, noting that Vermont is as progressive about adoption as it is about many social and political ideas. The same goes for single or divorced

daycare for years before she decided she was ready to adopt. She and her husband have grandchildren the same age as the foster sisters they hope to make a permanent part of their family, just in time for Christmas — a 9-monthold and 2-year-old twins. After her own children were grown, Thibault says, “I just didn’t feel like I was making that much of a difference anymore. I love the fact that I can help these kids.” Before their birth mother relinquished her parental rights, Thibault maintained regular contact with her. That’s another huge trend in contemporary adoption: Experts see the birth family-adoptive family connection as a key to success, both for the family and the child. Thibault and her foster kids visited their birth mother and they shared photos and mementos. Their relationship was strong enough that the original

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diane dexter, Vermont department of children and Families adoptive parents, older families — and relatives. Where the court might have once avoided tapping family members to care for a niece, nephew or grandchild, there’s more appreciation now for “kinship care” — a fancy term for guardianship by extended family. All of the above have become more acceptable adoption options. Lori Thibault raised her own biological family and ran a home-based

mom waived her visitation rights during the Thibault summer vacation. The families kept in contact via twiceweekly calls. “It’s a very emotional and painful thing to give away a child, no matter how convinced you are it’s the right thing to do,” Fowler says. “So to get the sense that these people will love the child, and to have some contact, is huge.” It’s paying off for Thibault. She


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Lund Family Center Staff at this year’s adoption picnic. K16t-sharppark1211.indd 1

Project Family pairs the DCF’s experience in caring for abused and neglected children with Lund’s adoption expertise. retained the first names the birth mom gave her twins, but they didn’t have middle names, so she asked the woman for ideas. The mom’s suggestion to Thibault: “I have faith in you, so let’s go with that.” Faith. This kind of interaction would not be conceivable — or possible, for that matter — 50 years ago. Vermont’s 1996 rewrite of state adoption law gives adoptees, adoptive parents and birth families greater access to information about adoptions taking place in Vermont. More openness, agency collaborations and connecting birth parents with adoptive parents — the trends, as Fowler sees them, are challenging old stigmas. There’s a practical result, too: Only 8 percent of Vermont adoptions fail, compared to the national average of 15 percent.

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Kids VT

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december 2011 / January 2012

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As the Truzanksys learned, adopting a foster child is not all warm and fuzzy. Project Family’s “dual-track permanency planning” requires foster folks to be prepared for at least two scenarios. “What we’ve asked them to do,” says Dexter, “is take a child in and love them as if they were their own, and then help them to go home to their own home. And when that’s not possible … we ask those people to step up and become that child’s ‘forever family.’” While it may be tempting to condemn or avoid discussing an abusive or neglectful parent, both Dexter and Audette speak of the need to honor a child’s roots. During training for adoptive families, attendees are taught to celebrate

the child’s past. “You cannot fear where the children have come from,” Audette says. She encourages families to talk to fostered or adoptive children about being thankful to their birth parents. Why thank them? Audette tells adoptive parents to say: “They gave you what no one else could, the gift of life.” As children grow, they naturally explore who they are, where they came from and who they will become. Kids who get the sense that they came from a bad place, a bad family, may see themselves as bad. Tracey Lee braced herself for the worst when she and her husband went to pick up their soon-to-be-adopted son from his foster family. But she had reason to be hopeful. The little boy had the same name — Connor — they had in mind for the son they couldn’t conceive after C-section complications. Like most adoptive parents, they called on their heads and hearts to conclude that their “constructed” family was meant to be after eight years of miscarriages. But in recounting their first meeting with Connor, Lee tries hard to remember her doubts. Would he cling to his foster mom? Would he scream or cry? Should she have brought her 10-year-old son? Lee needn’t have worried. She says that when the door swung open, the two-year-old ran out with his boots on the wrong feet. He promptly threw himself into her husband’s arms, shouting “Daddy! You finally came!” K

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JUSTIN CASH

OUTDOORS

Slide Rules Tips for teaching kids to ski

So whether it’s your backyard, your driveway, a sledding hill or a ski resort, make sure there’s a short distance between the skiing area and shelter. Cochran’s Ski Area in Richmond fits the bill. Michael WoodLewis taught his 4-year-old to ski there last winter. “We didn’t need much,” he says. “It was a great environment, on a great scale: affordable and informal.”

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SLIDE RULES P. 26»

KIDS VT

Yeah, obviously. But even the fanciest ski resort — with Elmo himself operating the heated carpet conveyor — is going to look like the DMZ when you have to schlep yourself, your gear, your child and your child’s gear across three parking lots, up four flights of stairs and over two football fields of snow before the skiing can begin.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

Pick the right ski area.

And some parents are reluctant to leave Most very young children alone on the slopes — even with a pro. “I felt that Vermonters my daughter would have been really at age 3, to ski with someone aim to get their scared, she didn’t know,” says Koran Cousino children skiing of Starksboro. Employing Yankee frugality and determination, however, plenty of as soon as Green Mountain parents are teaching their children how to ski — maybe not biologically before they walk, but at 2, 3 or 4. Here are some of the lessons they were willing to possible. pass along.

KIDSVT.COM

LAST WE CHECKED, none of Vermont’s hospitals — from Northwestern to Brattleboro Memorial —was giving out tiny pairs of skis to newborn babies along with those pink-and-blue swaddling blankets. But they might as well be. Many Vermonters aim to get their children skiing as soon as biologically possible. However, most ski schools don’t accept kids in diapers. It can be a long, expensive, backbreaking trip to the ski resort.

BY S A R A H T UF F


OUTDOORSSS SS JUSTIN CASH

Slide Rules

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DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

CONTINUED FROM P. 25

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Pack heat.

Bending over your child while he snowplows down the mountain is backbreaking.

Dress in layers.

worry about the gym.” She’s right. You’ll be bending, lifting, squatting and, yes, sweating.

As in, hot chocolate. Leslie Dunn of Jericho kept a thermos of it nearby when she was teaching her kids to ski. A nearto-hand mug of Swiss Miss can save not only money, but also time: fewer trips inside to warm up. Many a ski instructor also swears by stuffing pockets with marshmallows — not for the cocoa, but as an incentive to keep kids skiing. It can also be gummy bears or stickers — just something that won’t melt when you’re sweating like a fry cook in July, even though it’s January and 10 below. Which brings us to…

“It sounds so stupid, but everybody has to be physically comfortable,” says Dunn. For the kids, that means extra long undershirts that will stay tucked in and prevent pants from filling up with snow. For the parents, it means you should probably wear a T-shirt under all that. When Olympic gold medalist Barbara Ann Cochran teaches parents how to teach their kids to ski, she warns them: “You’re going to get a good workout. Don’t 11/25/11 12:03 PM

Slow them down. Bending over your child while he snowplows down the mountain is backbreaking. But watching him go downhill fast — toward the lift line — can be bone breaking. While leashes and harnesses may be a no-no in other realms, they’re OK on the hill. Dunn saved money by

using a simple rope as a harness. “I would pretend that they were the powerboat and I was the water-skier,” she says. “So I never had to stop them.” You can apply the same advice to yourself. “I wanted my daughter to be brave and get everything immediately,” says Cousino. “Sometimes I had to step back and just let her figure things out for herself, with no instruction.” Cousino urges other parents to take frequent breaks, too. “It’s a lot of work to undress and dress again, but I got more out of my daughter when we went inside and had a little snack. It became a little routine for us, and she loved it.”

Get a wedgie. Eric Morris of Shelburne taught other people’s kids to ski at Beaver Creek, Colorado, for six years before going to work on his own. Alexandra and Jacob each hit the slopes at 3. “One of the best ways to get your kids moving is to ski backward holding onto their tips,” he says. “Not good on the back.” He recommends a $10 device to avoid


Show, don’t tell.

Plead the Fifth Fifth grade is a pretty sweet time. Chances are your child has reached the double-digits and knows all about the Bill of Rights. One “right” unique to Vermont is a free winter of skiing at every resort in the state. Yep, that’s right. Free. Ski Vermont’s Fifth Grade Passport Program provides coupons for free lift tickets and cross-country trail passes at participating resorts, good from December 1 to May 1. Just mail in an application, along with proof of your child’s fifth-grade status and a $10 processing fee, to Ski Vermont in Montpelier. Find more information, along with the application, at skivermont. com/events-and-deals/ program-passport.

a lot of pain — for you and your child — by keeping the tips of your child’s skis together. Known as an edgie wedgie, or easy wedge, it’s a short bungee cord with a tiny clamp on either end.

Williston’s Heidi and Steve Willoughby are hardly ski fanatics. Though they grew up skiing, Heidi stopped when she was in fourth grade and her family moved to Florida. Steve gave it up when he moved to Minneapolis. But when the couple moved to Vermont, they got their kids to Cochran’s when they were 4 and 3. “Once the kids learned to ski, it was important to keep going,” they write in an email. “But we kept it short at first. Just a few hours with a nice break in the middle. We just get out and enjoy skiing regularly as a family … it’s an easier process if you start when your children are young.” Likewise, Wood-Lewis is determined to have his whole family on snow not because one of them might be the next Ted Ligety or Lindsey Vonn, but because it provides active fun during Vermont’s long winters. “We want our kids to be culturally literate here in Vermont,” he says.

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Sarah Tuff lives in Shelburne with her husband and their two children, ages 2 and 4.

KIDS VT

When all else fails? Enroll the kids in a traditional ski school. “Trying to teach Matthew to ski was a colossal failure,” says Catherine Collette of Shelburne, relaying stories of then-3-year-old Matthew falling off a carpet conveyor, and her husband, Andy, falling on Matthew as they tried to get off the chairlift. She’s now signed up her son for lessons at Smugglers’ Notch. “This year, I’m letting a stranger do the dirty work.” 

6/16/11 12:37 PM

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

Set up an obstacle course of cones to teach turns; or scatter rubber ducks on the snow and suggest your child pick them up. You have to develop stopping skills to pull it off. The more fun and lighthearted, the better, according to Shelburne’s Rick Gibbs, who taught his 3-year-old Talia to ski two years ago at Stowe. Barbara Ann Cochran agrees. “If you enjoy your children, you’ll enjoy teaching them how to ski,” she says. “Maybe not 100 percent of the time; it’s not easy, but it’s bonding.”

Take the long view.

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KIDSVT.COM

Play games.

Let’s say your child has learned the basics. He can stop, turn, get back up when he falls and ride a lift. Now what? “You can talk to a 6-year-old about turns, wedges, French fries, etc., until you’re blue in the face,” says Morris. “Or you can show them.” The trick here is to secretly recruit other kids to do the teaching. “Kids really learn faster and better from other kids than adults; we’re just too tall and big,” explains Morris. “The best way to teach a kid to ski is to put them behind another kid slightly better than them for a few runs. Now that Alexandra can rip, I just have Jake follow her.”

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IN SEASON

Spruce It Up THE GREEKS AND ROMANS

were among the first to bring evergreen boughs inside during the winter months — evidence that humans have long appreciated the many benefits of cut conifers. Harvesting your own boughs, wreaths or trees is a great family activity, provided everyone dresses warmly. Advance research on varieties guides the selection process: Fraser, balsam or spruce? A sled helps haul the greens — and the kids — out of the woods. Also, check with your local municipality or solid waste district for information about “treecycling” options after the holidays are over.

Anderson Tree Farm

Larry’s Tree Farm

Paines Christmas Trees

Trout Brook Tree Farm

Bakersfield Tree Farm

Meadown Ridge Farm

Peter Lyon and Family

Upper Valley Tree Farm

Balsam Acres

Moffatts Tree Farm

Purinton Family Tree Farm

1495 Mt. Philo Road, Charlotte 425-3048 Route 36, Bakersfield 827-3042

36 Elmore Road, Worcester 223-7028

Breezy Hill Acres

3325 Pine Hill Road, Newport 334-6585

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DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Chapin Christmas Tree Farm 129 Chapin Road, Essex Junction 497-1698

Dave Russell’s Christmas Tree Farm

1248 Route 116, Starksboro 453-2208

Far View Tree Farm

Route 108, Bakersfield 827-6123 18 Merritt Road, Middlesex 223-4258 1252 Wild Branch Road, Craftsbury 586-6900

Mount Vista Christmas Tree Farm

Mount Vista Road, Underhill 878-4170

Murray Hill Farm

865 Guptil Road, Waterbury Center 244-6437

Northern Vermont Christmas Trees

766 Lapland Road, Waterville 644-2257

1879 Bayley-Hazen Road, East Hardwick 563-2028

Nutcracker Tree Farm

Fontaine Tree Farms

Ober Hill Tree Farm

2029 Orton Road, Greensboro Bend 533-7195

510 Sperry Road, Cornwall 462-2366 217 Tree Farm Road, Johnson 635-2100

4904 Laporte Road, Morrisville 888-5632 34 Jericho Road, Essex Junction 584-3020 190 Pond Road, Huntington 434-4385

Quinlan Tree Farm

41 Amber Lane, Williston 878-8804

Red Sled Christmas Tree Farm 1731 Route 74 West, Shoreham 897-8031

Richmond Tree Farm

1898 Kenyon Road, Richmond 434-2651

Russell Dairy and Tree Farm 1248 Route 116, Starksboro 453-2208

Sharp Farm

Cobble Hill, Milton 879-3507

Tester’s Vermont Christmas Trees 2317 Roaring Brook Road, Barton 525-3814

33 Church Street, Bristol 453-3034 Upper Pleasant Valley Road, Jeffersonville 434-4762

Urie’s Tree Farm

1694 Old Stage Road, Williston 878-8066

Werner Tree Farm

429 Painter Road, Middlebury   388-7781

White’s Tree Farm

255 Jericho Road, Essex 899-4977

Woolsey’s Christmas Trees 206 Jordan Road, Charleston 723-4849

Yuletide Memories

Maple Hill Road, Barton 754-9360

Zeno’s Tree Farm

5296 Route 116, Starksboro 453-2543 


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Due to our publishing schedule, events for December 1-5 were only published online.

Christmas Classic

Arts

Catamount Winter Concert: The University of Vermont’s select choir shares the spirit of the season. All ages. Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, 12:15-1 p.m. Free. Info, 864-0471. Holiday Violins: This mini-concert features advanced students from Carolyn Bever’s Violin Studio. All ages. University Mall, South Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-1066, ext. 11. Movies at Main Street Landing: Holiday favorites such as A Christmas Story and It’s a Wonderful Life are among the classics shared during this series. Main Street Landing, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Donations encouraged for Lund Family Center. Info, 540-3018.

Community

Coats for Kids: Chittenden County families donate their gently used winter wear to help their neighbors keep warm. Drop-off boxes are located at the Customer Service Desk. University Mall, South Burlington. Free. Info, 863-1066, ext. 11. Pet Pics: Families bring their four-legged friends along for pictures with Santa. Burlington Town Center, 6 p.m. Info, 312-729-4404.

THE NUTCRACKER:

Talking With Your Mentee: Mentors learn tools for difficult conversations. A light dinner is provided. Preregister. Heritage Aviation, South Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free.

Saturday, December 17, 2 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, December 18, 1 and 6:30 p.m. Flynn Center for the Performing person. Ten percent

CALENDAR BY MARYELLEN APELQUIST

6 TUESDAY

Vermont Ballet Theater’s student dancers play snowflakes, angels, dolls and candy canes in Tchaikovsky’s THE NUTCRACKER, which debuted in 1892 on a stage in St. Petersburg, Russia. Little ones are transported to the Land of Sweets, where the Sugar Plum Fairy reigns. A great introduction to an old art form, the festive ballet is as much a part of the holiday as “A Charlie Brown Christmas” and The Messiah.

Burlington. All ages.

Sponsored by:

DEC / JAN

CALENDAR

Arts,

Health & Fitness

$21-$33

Baby Party: Moms-to-be and their supporters get the lowdown on infant-related topics ranging from nutrition to child development. Preregister. Copley Hospital, Morrisville, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-8116.

discount for

children and seniors. Info, 878-2941, flynntix.org, vermontballettheater.org.

KIDS VT

30

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: Kids get their craft whenever the mood strikes them. All ages. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, Free. Info, 388-4097.

Classes

NEW SECTION!

Standup Comedy for Teens Who says standup comedy is just for adults? In this fun class, students will learn to “think like a comedian,” using stories from their lives to develop 3 minutes of material. Great for building self-esteem in a supportive environment. Final performance for family & friends. Instructed by Nathan Hartswick. Ages: 13-16. Wednesdays, 4 – 5:30 p.m., January 4 – February 8. Deadline to register is December 21. Fee: $130. Spark Arts, 180 Flynn Ave., Burlington, VT. Information: Nathan Hartswick, 373-4703, nathan@ sparkartsvt.com. List your class or camp here for only $15/month! Submit the listing by the 15th at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com

Books for Children: Burlingtonians donate preschooler-friendly texts during this annual gift campaign. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Free. Info, 865-7216. Craftacular Tuesdays: Kids get caught up in low-tech projects. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665. COURTESY OF VYOA

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Library & Books

Creative Tuesdays: Crafters use their imagination and recycled materials. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Hand in Hand: Do-gooders get together to plan community projects and help the environment as part of this service club for kids. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4097. Music With Robert: Families enjoy a sing-along. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

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Nature & Science

Science & Stories: Winter Trees: Little ones learn about evergreens. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386.

7 WEDNESDAY

Arts

Candy-Cane-Making Demo: Families make holiday memories as they watch candy makers in action, or they can get in on the fun and make twisted treats of their own. Preregister to participate. Laughing Moon Chocolates, Stowe, 11 a.m. Free to watch. $6 person to make your own. Info, 253-9591. Music in the Meeting House: Raphael strums, sings and sneaks in basic music theory — all while emphasizing good fun, taking turns and motor skills. Ages 3-5. Colchester Village Meeting House, 12:30-1 p.m. Free. Info, 879-7576. VYOA Auditions: Young musicians are invited to try out for the Vermont Youth Orchestra Association. Various times. Preregister. Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Free. Info, 655-5030.

Community

Coats for Kids: See December 6. Pet Pics: See December 6.

Education

Cookie Decorating: Budding bakers doll up treats with sprinkles, frosting, sugar and nuts. Panadero Bakery, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 863-8278. High School Morning Preview: Interested students and their families visit Waldorf classrooms, meet faculty and enjoy a welcome tea. Lake Champlain Waldorf High School, Charlotte, 8:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-2827. Kids Cook Up Stories: Little ones read a story and bring it to life through cooking. For prekindergarten-age children. LACE, Barre, 10 a.m. $3 suggested donation. Info, 476-4276. Social Thinking: Meetings focus on socialskills development for kids with nonverbal learning disabilities, Asperger’s syndrome and high-functioning autism. Call for times. Ages 6-17. Preregister. Maple Leaf Clinic, Wallingford. Info, 446-3577.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: Basketball-loving high school students spend the afternoon dribbling, shooting and scoring. Preregister. St. Albans City Hall, 2:30-3:45 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266. Breast-Feeding-Mom Support: New mothers get to know each other during this informative and informal session. Children welcome. Trinity Episcopal Church, Rutland, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 747-8665. Kids Open Gymnastics: Tykes tumble and jump while adults connect with other families.


DECEMBER CALENDAR Snack is provided. River Arts, Morrisville, 1011:30 a.m. $5 child, $8 two children, $10 three or more children. Info, 888-1261.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Books for Children: See December 6. Lego Afternoons: Kids create freely from big buckets of building blocks. Parents encouraged to send a snack; popcorn provided by library. Ages 6 and up. Lincoln Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2665. Movin’ & Groovin’ With Christine: Tots let loose to the rhythms of rock and world music. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Solstice Craft: Kiddos celebrate the return of the sun by crafting a stained-glass candleholder. Ages 5 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 865-7216. Story Time With Mrs. Claus: Santa’s wife shares tales and tasty treats. Kids and parents are encouraged to wear PJs. All ages. University Mall, South Burlington, 6:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 863-1066, ext. 11.

Tree Lighting & Train Hop: Hands-on play stations include the Hogwarts Express and Edible Candy Caboose. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

8 THURSDAY

Arts

baby-friendly volume. Palace 9, South Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Call for prices. Info, 864-5610. Network and Nibble: Franklin Grand Isle Support Parents come together. LaQuinta Inn, St. Albans, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 800-800-4005, ext. 201. Pet Pics: See December 6.

Movin’ & Groovin’: Little ones jump, tumble, dance, climb, march and more during this session designed to build confidence and coordination. Ages 18 months-4. Preregister. Purple Crayon Productions, Woodstock, 10:15-11:15 a.m. $12 child. Info, 457-3500.

Health & Fitness

Pollywog Drop-in Art: Tots get their art fix with a variety of craft materials, from homemade play dough to colorful ribbons. Ages 6 months-5 accompanied by adult. Burlington City Arts Center, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $6 child/parent pair, $5 BCA member child/parent pair. Info, 865-7166.

Stroller Strolling: Families walk and roll down the recreation path. This informal, drop-in program ends when the weather gets too chilly. Fairfax Community Park & Recreation Path, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-1941.

VYOA Auditions: See December 7.

Community

Coats for Kids: See December 6. Mommy Matinee: Parents and their wee ones catch a flick with dimmed lights and

Hot Mama Workout: Kids are welcome while moms squeeze in some fitness. Preregister. City Hall Gymnasium, St. Albans, 9-10 a.m. Free if preregistered. $10 drop-in. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Books for Children: See December 6. Gingerbread House Design: Kids transform graham crackers into holiday art. Ages 6 and up. Preregister. St. Albans Free Library, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Highgate Youth Advisory: Kids in grades 5-8 plan projects with the Crossroads After School Program. Highgate Public Library, 3-4:45 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. Lego Club: Building-block lovers get busy. All ages. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Middle School Planners & Helpers: Students help redesign the YA Room and lend a hand with other cool projects. Grades 6-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:40 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Origami in the Afternoon: Kids practice the art of paper folding with a pro. Grades 4-8. Cobleigh Public Library, Lyndonville, 3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 626-5475.

Nature & Science

Bears, Oh My!: Wee ones walk, talk and eat like they’re furry and four-legged. Ages 3-5 with adult. Preregister. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 10-11 a.m. $8 member adult with child, $4 additional child; $10 nonmember adult with child, $4 additional child. Info, 434-3068.

STOWE WINTER CARNIVAL: Monday, January 16, through Sunday, January 29. Elementary School. All ages. Free for spectators; some entry fees to participate. Info,

Gingerbread Village: Budding builders use sugar, spice and sound construction techniques to create a tiny-but-tasty town. Grades K-2. Preregister. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 3-4:30 p.m. Call for price. Info, 253-8358. Preschool Clay Drop-in: Kids craft cool stuff using the wheel or working by hand. Preschool ages. Burlington City Arts Center, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $6 child. Info, 865-7166. VYOA Auditions: See December 7.

Vermont Valley Lights: This luminous festival features seven towns throughout Mount Snow Valley: Readsboro, Whitingham, Halifax, Jacksonville, Wilmington, Dover and Wardsboro. Stops for cocoa breaks and restrooms are featured. All ages. 5 p.m. Free. Info, 464-8092. Wassail Weekend on the Farm: History lovers celebrate the holidays like it’s 1890 with traditional music, sleigh rides, an ornament craft and more. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 457-2355.

Education

Kids in the Kitchen: Quick Breads: Little bakers learn the basics, then customize their loaves with extras such as chocolate chips and dried fruits. All ages with adult. Preregister. Healthy Living Natural Foods Market, South Burlington, 3:30-5 p.m. $20 child. Info, 863-2569, ext. 1.

Fairs & Festivals

Woodstock Wassail Weekend: Holiday festivities throughout town include an equestrian parade, theater and musical performances, home tour, craft fair, and more. Various locations, Woodstock, various times. All ages. Call for prices. Info, 457-3555.

Health & Fitness

Adventures With Parker T. Bear: A friendly grizzly leads a hike, complete with snacks and an outdoor activity. A different trail is explored each week; call for location. Ages 2-5. 9:30-11 a.m. $6 resident child, $10 nonresident child. Info, 846-4108. Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Books for Children: See December 6. Footwear Fun: Kids hide their shoes and hope to find them filled with candy and other treats, just like on St. Nicholas Day. Ages 5-12. Lincoln Library, 3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2665. Lego Fun: Budding builders share blocks. Grades K and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Movie Night: Families curl up to watch Disney’s A Christmas Carol. Kids are encouraged to wear their PJs and bring a blanket. All ages. Preregister. Highgate Public Library, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970.

10 SATURDAY

Arts

Candy-Cane-Making Demo: See December 7. Family Art Drop-in: Crafters, painters and other art lovers work together in the First Floor Gallery. All ages. Burlington City Arts Center, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. Gingerbread-House Decorating: Kids and parents doll up wee dwellings. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, noon-3 p.m. $35 family. Info, 864-0123. 10 SATURDAY, P. 33

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777-5510, stowewintercarnival.com.

Family Clay Drop-in: Parents join kids for some work on the wheel. All ages. Burlington City Arts Center, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $6 nonmember, $5 member; punchcard available; prices include one fired/glazed piece, $5 additional piece. Info, 865-7166.

Pet Pics: See December 6.

KIDS VT

Various Stowe locations. Kids Carnival Kaos: Saturday, January 21, 1 to 3 p.m., Stowe

Candy-Cane-Making Demo: See December 7.

Family Dive-in Movie: Film fans bring their swimsuits and towels for an evening at the pool. Call for movie title. All ages with adult. The Edge, Essex, 6-8 p.m. Info, 846-4108.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

Snow-inspired sports and art draw Vermont families year after year to the STOWE WINTER CARNIVAL. The two-week festival helps stave off the post-holiday winter doldrums with ice carving, ski racing, live music, youth hockey, “snowvolleyball” and “snowgolf” tourneys. Don’t miss Kids Carnival Kaos, a festival within the festival, featuring games, dancing, a bounce house, and visits from Big Bird and Spider-Man.

Arts

Coats for Kids: See December 6.

KIDSVT.COM

The Greatest Stowe on Earth

9 FRIDAY

Community


Playgroups MONDAY Burlington Early-Months Playgroup: This mother-infant group for moms and their first babies during the first few months after birth includes baby massage, lullabies and information sharing. VNA Family Room. St. Joseph School, Burlington, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420. Fathers Group: Dads and their kids socialize indoors and out. Ages 6-12 with adult. O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 862-9622. Isle La Motte Playgroup: Free play, stories, crafts and a provided snack. Isle La Motte School, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Jeffersonville Hometown Playgroup: This playtime sponsored by Lamoille Family Center gives children a place to have fun and meet new friends while parents socialize and learn about local resources for families. Follows school calendar. All ages. Cambridge Elementary School, Jeffersonville, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 885-5229. Morristown Hometown Playgroup: Children play and meet new friends while parents socialize and learn about family resources in the area. Follows school calendar. Morristown Graded Building, Morrisville, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Swanton Playgroup: Tykes enjoy free play, stories, songs, crafts and a provided snack. Mary S. Babcock School, Swanton, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

KIDSVT.COM DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012 KIDS VT

Johnson Baby Chat: Babies and their caregivers socialize. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, fourth Tuesday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Middlebury Playgroup: Kids of all ages join friends for free fun. Middlebury Baptist Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171. Milton Playgroup: All ages. New Life Fellowship Church, Milton, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 893-1457. Montpelier Tulsi Morning Playgroup: Featuring botanically inspired storytelling, this playgroup inspires kids with art projects and games. Ages infant-8. Tulsi Tea Room, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 223-0043. South Hero Playgroup: Free play, crafts and songs entertain children and their grownup companions. South Hero Congregational Church, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. St. Albans Playgroup: Children and their caregivers socialize and play. St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, St. Albans, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Worcester Playgroup: Children get in on some playgroup fun with friends. All ages. Doty Memorial School, Worcester, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 229-0173.

Williston Music With Raphael: Kids sing, dance and clap their hands to folk music. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Limit is one session per week per family. No session December 26. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

WEDNESDAY

Winooski Fathers and Children Together: Dads do dinner and playtime with their kids. First graders and under. Winooski Family Center, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 655-1422.

Charlotte Playgroup: Hula-hoops, tunnels, mats, kiddie cars and more make playtime fun. Ages birth-5. No sessions December 14 and 28. Charlotte Central School, 12:15-1:15 p.m. Free. Info, 764-5820.

TUESDAY

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Hardwick Playgroup: Children get out and play while parents meet. Hardwick Elementary School, 8:15-10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 652-5138.

Alburgh Music and Movement: Kids get moving and grooving in the gym. Footwear that doesn’t mark is required. Alburgh Community Education Center, every other Tuesday, 9:15-10 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Bristol Playgroup: Young families get to know each other. All ages. Bristol Baptist Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171. Burlington Family Play: BFP’s Big Room features activities for parents and children ages birth-5. Moms and dads may work on their GED or high school diploma, take ESL classes or parenting workshops. The Baby Room focuses on child development, baby signs and baby massage. Sessions run simultaneously. St. Joseph School, Burlington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420. Burlington Fathers and Children Together: Dads and kids share family time. VNA Family Room. St. Joseph School, Burlington, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420.

Burlington Family Play at Ethan Allen: This group includes indoor and outdoor activities for parents and children ages birth-5. Ethan Allen Homestead Museum, Burlington, 9 a.m.1 p.m., 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420.

Enosburg Playgroup: Kids enjoy circle time, free play and a craft. Snack provided. American Legion, Enosburg Falls, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 933-6435. Essex Welcome Baby Playgroup: Parents and their babies make new connections. Essex Junction Teen Center, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 872-9580. Fairfield Playgroup: Kids and their caregivers play, sing, share stories and a snack. Bent Northrup Memorial Library, Fairfield, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Hinesburg Playgroup for Dads: Pops and their tots share food and playtime. Annette’s Preschool, Hinesburg, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420. Montgomery Playgroup: Free play, songs, stories, crafts and a snack are provided for children and their adult caregivers. Montgomery Town Library, fourth Wednesday of every month, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

Call ahead! Times and dates subject to change based on holiday schedules. Vergennes Playgroup: All ages. Congregational Church of Vergennes, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171. Williston Baby-Time Playgroup: Baby play for infants and toddlers. No playgroup on the first Wednesday of the month or on December 21. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-3659. Winooski Open Gym With Princess: Kids let loose with free play before sharing cupcakes and stories with royalty. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Winooski, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $12 child. Info, 655-3300. THURSDAY Burlington EvoMamas Playgroup: This relaxed group fosters community, support and friendship in the transition between pregnancy and motherhood. Evolution Physical Therapy and Yoga, Burlington, second and fourth Thursday of every month, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-9642. Burlington Family Play: See Tuesday. Burlington Family Play at Ethan Allen: See Wednesday, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Fletcher Playgroup: Kids play and interact with games, toys, arts and crafts, and other resources in the school gym. Bring a snack. Fletcher Elementary School, Cambridge, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Georgia Playgroup: Kids and their adult caregivers unwind with stories, songs, crafts and free play. Snack provided. Georgia Youth Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

Submit your February events by January 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Johnson Hometown Playgroup: Children play and meet new friends while parents socialize and learn about local family resources. Follows school calendar. United Church of Johnson, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Milton Playgroup: See Tuesday. Montgomery Infant Playgroup: This playtime for little ones lets parents meet and talk. Ages birth-2 with caregivers. Montgomery Town Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Morrisville Baby Chat: Babies play while parents learn about developmental expectations. Local specialist in child health available. First Congregational Church of Morrisville, first Thursday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Richmond Welcome Baby Group: Newest community members play and socialize. Richmond Free Library, second Thursday of every month, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Williston Music With Raphael: See Monday, 10:30 a.m. Winooski Playgroup: Stories, songs and playtime. Ages birth-5 with caregiver. O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 655-1422. FRIDAY Burlington Crawlers, Waddlers and Toddlers: Tots and parents learn, play and share in the VNA Family Room. St. Joseph School, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 999-5100.


DECEMBER

CALENDAR

10 SATURDAY (CONTINUED)

Ornament Making: Families craft holiday decorations. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $15 family. Info, 864-0123. Essex Center Playgroup: Schedule varies due to Essex Community Players’ schedule. Memorial Hall, Essex Junction, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6751. Fairfax Playgroup: Tykes enjoy circle time, crafts and snacks in addition to free play. BFA Fairfax, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Ferrisburgh Open Gym: All ages. Ferrisburgh Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171. Hometown Playgroup Stowe: Children meet new friends for playtime while parents socialize and learn about local family resources. Follows school calendar. Stowe Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Montgomery Tumble Time: Little ones expend some energy with toys and plenty of room to run in the gym. Montgomery Elementary School, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Shelburne Playgroup: Tots bring a toy to share and a snack, and play with other kids and parents. Trinity Episcopal Church, Shelburne, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-2382. St. Albans MOPS: Child care is provided during this gathering for mothers with children ages birth-6. Church of the Rock, St. Albans, third and first Friday of every month, 8:45-11 a.m. Free. Info, 891-1230. Swanton Late-Morning Playgroup: Families round out their morning routine with free play, stories, songs, crafts and a snack. Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Swanton, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. SATURDAY Fairfax Open Tot Gym & Infant Playtime: Kids slide, jump, swing, tumble and more during this free-play session. Babies have space to bop around and explore in an area all their own. BFA Fairfax, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 524-6393. Franklin Playgroup: Little ones share stories, songs and crafts. Ages birth-6. Franklin Central School, second Saturday of every month, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

South Burlington Tots and Tykes Open Gym: Open, unstructured playtime in the gym. Ages 1-5 with caregivers. Chamberlin School, South Burlington, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 846-4108.

Williston Music With Raphael: See Thursday; December 17 only. 

Learn more about our school and our holistic approach. Call to RSVP.

Spaces available in our Preschool Program for 2011-12.

Sing for Joy: Maiden Vermont, a multigenerational women’s chorus, shares the spirit of the season. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury. All ages. 7:30 p.m. $15 adult, $10 student, $12 senior. Info, 382-9222. VYOA Auditions: See December 7.

TO SEE US IN ACTION, WATCH THE VIDEO ON OUR WEBSITE OR COME IN FOR A TOUR!

1186 S. Brownell Rd. • Williston • (802) 863-4839 • BellwetherSchool.org 8h-bellweatherschool1111.indd 1

11/23/11 12:25 PM

Woodstock Film Series: Movie fans catch a flick on the farm’s big screen. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 3 p.m. $10 adult, $6 child. Call for member and package prices. Info, 457-2355.

Community

Breakfast With Santa: Kids join the Clauses for a morning meal, crafts, cookie decorating and more. Ages 3-10. Preregister. Gardener’s Supply, Williston, 8:30 & 10 a.m. $10 child. Info, 658-2433. Coats for Kids: See December 6. Holiday Railroad: The Polar Express comes to life on the Green Mountain Railroad. White River Junction Train Station. All ages., 10 a.m. $23 adult, $18 child, free for babies in laps. Info, 356-2730. Pet Pics: See December 6. Sibshops: This group provides support to boys and girls who have siblings with special needs. Ages 7-12. HowardCenter Child, Youth and Family Services, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 800-800-4005, ext. 217. Touch of Vermont: This holiday gift market features goodies from across the state, including raffle prizes. All ages. Montpelier City Hall, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 310-1725. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9. Victorian Holiday: Merry-makers celebrate the season with wagon rides, teas, gift making, caroling, crafting and more. Various locations, St. Johnsbury. All ages. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. Info, 748-7121. Wassail Weekend on the Farm: See December 9.

k8h-HappyTrails1111.indd 1

11/8/11 11:35 AM

performing arts classes at the Flynn Center | winter/spring 2012

Education

Chocolate Delights: This holiday class covers confections. Milton Town Office Community Room, 10 a.m.-noon. $25 Milton resident. Info, 893-4922.

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Fairs & Festivals

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Winter’s Eve Celebration: Families frolic with 18th-century music, dance and historic reenactments. All ages. Ethan Allen Homestead Museum, Burlington, 4-7 p.m. $5 adult, $3 child, free for children under age 6. Info, 865-4556. Woodstock Wassail Weekend: See December 9.

Health & Fitness

REGISTER NOW! Call 802-652-4548 or visit www.flynncenter.org/flynnarts for a brochure. Classes begin the week of January 16.

10 SATURDAY P. 36 k4t-Flynn#21211.indd 1

11/18/11 11:51 AM

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Postnatal Yoga: Moms and their brand-new babies connect through movement and breathing exercises. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, 10:45-11:45 a.m. $10 mom/baby pair. Info, 778-0300.

KIDS VT

Tots & Tykes Gym Time: The pint-size set is free to play while parents socialize. Ages 1-5 with adult. Chamberlin School, South Burlington, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 846-4108.

Wednesday, January 25 • 6 pm

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

North Hero Tumble Time: Children and their caregivers play and share a snack. North Hero Elementary School, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

OPEN HOUSE

KIDSVT.COM

Morrisville Weekend Baby Chat: This playgroup is for the youngest members of the community and their caregivers. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470.

Saturday Drama Club: Kids help Very Merry Theatre produce a show in just three hours. All ages. Preregister. Pay-by-the-day program. Very Merry Theatre, 333 North Winooski Avenue, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $15 child (or whatever you can afford). Info, 863-6607.

Winter Parent


Story Times MONDAY Books and Beyond: This program combines children’s literature and hands-on activities for fun science learning and exploration. Ages 3-5 and their parent or caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, December 12, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m., January 9, 10:15-11 a.m. . Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Bristol Toddler Story Time: Introduce your little one to the library and children’s books with activities and music. Lawrence Memorial Library, Bristol, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2366. Burlington Stories With Megan: Enjoy a funfilled preschool story time with rhymes, songs and books. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Essex Drop-in Story Time: Little ones relax with a mid-morning story. All ages. Essex Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Marshfield Story Time: Read-aloud tales with a cross-cultural theme catch the ear of youngsters. Ages birth-6. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. Milton Infant Story Time: Little ones enjoy lap time, songs and stories. Ages birth-18 months. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Richmond Pajama Time: Stories with Douglas while decked out in your bedtime best. Ages 2-6. Richmond Free Library, 6:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. St. Albans Story Time: Book hounds hear stories, sing songs and play. Ages birth-6 and their caregivers. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Stories With Megan: Fun-filled story time features multicultural songs and rhymes. Ages 2-5. Group does not meet December 26 or January 16. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Stowe Monday Morning Story Time: Little lit lovers share stories and songs in the community room. Stowe Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145.

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KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Waterbury Toddlers-n-Twos: Active stories designed for kids ages 18-36 months and their caregivers. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: Early readers get together for group book time; snack and juice provided. Ages 1-7. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810.

Branch Library. Free. Info, 476-5118. Burlington Stories With a Twist: Kids and their caregivers join a preschool educator as she brings science and nature to life with stories, songs and crafts using a unique style of teaching to engage ECHO’s youngest visitors. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 324-6386. Colchester Toddler Story Time: Stories for tots. Ages 18 months-3. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

rhymes and more for little ones. Ages 3-5. Preregister. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, Wednesdays, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Essex Toddler Story Time at Brownell: Simple stories, songs and fingerplays for the toddler crew. Ages 18 months-3 with adult. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Fairfax Preschool Story Time: Kids and their caregivers enjoy an hour of stories, songs and crafts. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 242-9000. Grand Isle PJ Story Time: Curl up in your PJs with a good book. Ages birth-6. Grand Isle Free Library, first Tuesday of every month, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Highgate Toddler and Preschool Story Time: Kids listen to stories and songs, shake out their sillies, and make a craft. Follows school calendar. Ages birth-preschool. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970.

TUESDAY

Hinesburg Toddler Story Time: Kids listen to engaging stories. Ages 3 and under. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, first and third Tuesday of every month, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 482-2878.

Barre Kids Story Hour: Bookworms show up for tall tales. Kids under 3 meet at 10 a.m., ages 3-5 meet at 10:30 a.m. East Barre

WEDNESDAY Colchester Pajama Story Time: Little ones (and big ones, if they so desire) wear their PJs to the library and enjoy stories, cookies and milk. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, third Wednesday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-7576.

Call ahead!

Hinesburg Preschool Story Time: Ages 3-5. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 482-2878, carpentercarselibrary@ gmavt.net.

Barre Children’s Story Hour: Tots tune in for audible prose. Ages 2-5. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-7550.

Woodstock Toddler Story Time: Ages 2-5. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295.

East Middlebury Preschool Story Hour: Kids get silly Times and dates subject with stories and to change based on songs. Follows school holiday schedules. calendar. Ages birth-5 with caregiver. Sara Partridge Community Library, East Middlebury, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-7588. admission (donations welcome). Info, 434-2167. Essex Story Time at Brownell: Stories, songs,

Woodstock Baby Story Time: Ages 6 months-2. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295.

Alburgh Story Hour: Little ones enjoy stories, songs, crafts and snacks. Ages 2-5. Alburgh Community Education Center, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 796-6077.

Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: SeeMonday.

Huntington Story Time in the Nestlings Nook: Stories about birds are followed by a nature walk, crafts or music, depending on the weather. Intended for preschoolers, but all ages welcome. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, second Tuesday of every month, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free with

Lyndonville Baby/Toddler Story Time: Connect with library friends and enjoy stories, songs, storyboards and finger plays. Ages birth-3 and caregivers. Cobleigh Public Library, Lyndonville, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 626-5475. Milton Preschool Story Time: Books, songs and crafts entertain tykes. Ages 3-5. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Montpelier Story Time: Join us for great books, singing, crafts and fun. Follows school calendar. Preschool age. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-4665. Reading With Frosty and Friends: Kids share tales with pooches from Therapy Dogs of Vermont. All ages. Preregister. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Richmond Story Time: Tall tales and simple stories. Ages 2-6. Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. Shelburne Story Time With Webby: Lively readings of children’s books related to museum collections, with new stories offered each week. Intended for preschoolers, but all welcome. Shelburne Museum, 10:30-11 a.m. Free with admission. Info, 985-3346. South Burlington Tiny-Tot Time: Wee ones join Miss Meg for songs and stories during this literacy-based program. Ages 3 and under. No sessions December 13, 20 or 27. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Williston Story Hour: Wee ones share stories and crafts. Ages 3-5. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Highgate Toddler and Preschool Story Time: See Tuesday, 11:15 a.m. Lyndonville Preschool Story Time: Enjoy stories, the letter of the day, a focus on one of six early-literacy skills each week, songs, crafts and friends. Ages 3-5 and families. Cobleigh Public Library, Lyndonville, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 626-5475. Middlebury Baby and Toddler Story Hour: Stories encourage literacy in young readers. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4097. Middlebury Stories With Shoopie and Lily: Read to a therapy dog. Preregister. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4097. Montgomery Story Hour: Listen to stories, do a craft and share a provided snack. Montgomery Town Library, second Wednesday of every month, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Montpelier Story Time: Kids gather for great books, singing, crafts and fun. Follows school calendar. Preschool age. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-4665. Richford Story Hour: Join your friends and make new ones during this story hour for preschoolers. Preregister. Arvin A. Library, Richford, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 848-3313. Shelburne Teddy Bear Story Time: A bear-y good time with books and stories. Ages 3-5. Vermont Teddy Bear Company, Shelburne, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-1643. South Burlington Story Time: Staff read newly released board books and old favorites. Ages 1-3. Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. Swanton Story Hour: Come listen to stories and songs, and do an easy craft. Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 868-7656. Warren Story Hour: Toddlers and preschoolers share stories, games and toys. Warren Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 496-3913. Waterbury Baby Lap Time: Story time designed for babies birth to 18 months with songs and simple rhymes. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: See Monday.


Dec/jan

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Thursday Barre Kids story hour: Snacks and activities follow an hour of tales. , 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 476-4276. Bristol Preschool story Time: Explore early literacy skills with reading, music, movement and projects. Lawrence Memorial Library, Bristol, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2366. colchester Preschool story Time: Stories, crafts and other activities for preschoolers. Ages 3-6. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, Mondays, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. Franklin story Time: Preschool story time filled with fun crafts, silly songs and stories. Haston Library, Franklin, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. middlebury Preschool story hour: Stories, songs, rhymes and a craft. Follows school calendar. Ages 3 and up. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4097. shelburne story Time With mary catherine Jones: The musician and storyteller brings stories, songs and rhymes to the library. All ages welcome. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. south Burlington Baby story Time: Infants are introduced to the wonders of language with nursery rhymes, songs, finger plays and board books. For children who are not yet walking. Preregister. No story time December 22 and 29. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. st. albans story Time: Book hounds hear stories, sing songs and play. Ages birth-6 and their caregivers. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Vergennes story Time: Themed stories with American Sign Language and an activity. Preschool ages. Bixby Memorial Library, Vergennes, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 877-2211. Westford story Time: Stories and activities utilize early-literacy concepts. Ages birthpreschool. Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-5639. Williston story Time at Buttered Noodles: See Monday. Friday

huntington story Time: This early-literacy hour features rhymes, books and music for wee ones up to age 5. Huntington Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 434-4583.

south Burlington story Time adventures: Tots listen to stories, sing songs, play games and create with a variety of materials that Mr. Monkey has hiding in his tree house. Intended for ages 30 months and up; children who are able to sit, listen and safely create with small materials. No session December 16-30. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Waterbury Preschool story Time: A time for great stories, puppets and fun songs. Ages 3-6. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. Williston story Time at Buttered Noodles: See Monday. Williston Toddler Time: Early-literacy skills are taught through stories, rhymes, songs and simple crafts. Ages 1-3 with adult. Preregister. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. saTurday african adventures story Time: Kiddos go on safari through books. All ages. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, December 3 and 10, 10:30-11:30 a.m., and December 10, 10:3011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4097. colchester saturday stories: Children of all ages enjoy great picture books. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. saturday drop-in story Time: Kids check out a weekly selection of music and books. All ages. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. shelburne Teddy Bear story Time: A bear-y good time with books and stories. Ages 3-5. Vermont Teddy Bear Company, Shelburne, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-1643. south Burlington saturday story Time: Staff read newly released books that will resonate with children up to grade 2. Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

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south Burlington second-saturday stories: Families share stories with Miss Meg, then explore and create with a mix of materials. South Burlington Community Library, second Saturday of every month, 10:15 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 652-7080.

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Woodstock story Time: Little literati enjoy great reads. Ages 3-7. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295. K

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Williston

Kids VT

Lincoln children’s story Time: Songs, crafts and other activities for children. Ages birth-5. Lincoln Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2665.

montpelier story Time: Kids crack open great books and enjoy singing, crafts and fun. Follows school calendar. Preschool age. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

December 2011 / january 2012

Enosburg story hour: Listen to stories, craft something cool, even take a field trip. Preregister. Enosburg Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 933-2328.

(reg $49.95)

KidsVT.com

Burlington Pint-size science & stories: This program focuses on a different science topic each week. Children are encouraged to ask questions, make predictions, and test their ideas. Ages 3-7 with adult caregiver. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 324-6386.

$29.95

milton Toddler story Time: Toddlers tackle tall tales and enjoy songs and crafts. Ages 18 months-3 years. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644.

11/17/11 3:02 PM


10 saturday (Continued)

Prenatal Yoga: Moms-to-be explore meditations, postures and breath work tailored to their minds and bodies during pregnancy. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, 9-10:30 a.m. $10 person. Info, 778-0300.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Books for Children: See December 6. Canine Therapy: ChocolateLab Sara loves to listen to kids read. Grades K and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Holiday Railroad: See December 10.

Fairs & Festivals

The Realities of Cooties!: Kiddos climb aboard the FACT ambulance and learn about sneezes and scabs from Vermont Children’s Hospital staff. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386. Woodworking Demo: Bird lovers check out carvings in progress and guess which feathered friends will be added next to the museum collection. All ages. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 1 p.m. Free with admission. Info, 434-2167.

11 SUNDAY

Arts

‘A Christmas Carol’: Charles Dickens’ classic tale of Ebenezer Scrooge is a family favorite. All ages. Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, Burlington, 7 p.m. $15-$42 ticket. Info, 863-5966. Holiday Concert & Sing-Along: Friends and neighbors make merry with the Milton Community Band. All ages. Milton Junior-Senior High School, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1398. Nowell Sing We Clear: The vocals are front are front and center in this pageant of midwinter carols. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 4 p.m. $20 adult in advance, $25 at the door, $10 child, free for ages 5 and under. Info, 388-4964. VYOA Auditions: See December 7.

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9. Wassail Weekend on the Farm: See December 9.

courtesy of circus smirkus

Gearing Up: Little engineers create machines to explore how gears work. Ages 9 and up. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

kidsvt.com

Family Holiday Concert: Merrymakers sing along with Brass Act and the Milton Community Band. All ages. Milton Junior-Senior High School, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4922.

Holiday Movie: Families catch a festive flick. All ages. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

Family Fun Night: Kids and parents snowshoe by the light of the moon, then cozy up to a campfire to meet some forest creatures. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $10 nonmember, $8 member. Info, 359-5000.

December 2011 / january 2012

Coats for Kids: See December 6.

Pet Pics: See December 6.

Color Mixing: Little ones combine primary colors to create new hues. Intended for preschoolers. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

Kids VT

Breakfast With Santa: Kids get a little face time with the jolly old elf over scrambled eggs and pancakes. Picture taking available for additional fee or with donation to toy drive or food shelf. All ages with adult. Preregister and pick up tickets at Milton Family Community Center. Sweet Pea Cafe, Milton. 9 & 10:30 a.m. $10 child. Info, 893-1457.

Fun With Mr. K: This Exordium Adventures program teaches kids to make treats for their feathered friends. Grades K-4. Preregister. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970.

Nature & Science

36

Community

Coolidge Holiday Open House: See spotlight, page 40. Woodstock Wassail Weekend: See December 9.

Library & Books Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Books for Children: See December 6.

Nature & Science

About Air: Kids create mini-parachutes to learn how air resistance slows down falling objects. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Skulls: Science lovers explore skeletal remains of local wildlife. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Sundays for Fledglings: Kids hike, create, explore, carve, act, write and investigate the lives of birds, their habitats and their neighbors. Intended for kids in grades 1-4, but all welcome. Preregister. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 2 p.m. Free with admission. Info, 434-2167.

First Night A substance-free New Year’s Eve celebration for all ages, First Night Burlington features a wide range of performing arts and activities in more than 20 downtown venues. Circus Smirkus, fireworks, Dancing Dragons Parade and performances by the Vermont Youth Orchestra and Very Merry Theatre are just a handful of the acts entertaining the wee crowd. First Night Burlington also publishes a handy “Family-Friendly Users Guide” to the festival, highlighting the best places to eat, park and find a potty. First Night Burlington: Saturday, December 31, noon to midnight. Various locations. All ages. $18 adult, $5 child, $39 family. Info, 863-6005, firstnightburlington.com.

12 MONDAY

Library & Books

Community

Arts

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6.

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Monday Mall Magic: Magician Adam Wilber shows his stuff in the JCPenney court. All ages. University Mall, South Burlington, 6:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 863-1066, ext. 11.

Legos & Chess: Gamers go old school with building blocks and knights, rooks and pawns. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

VYOA Auditions: See December 7.

May’s Music & Movement: Kids and their caregivers don their dancing shoes for a turn on the floor with May. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

Community

Coats for Kids: See December 6. Pet Pics: See December 6. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See December 8. Prenatal Yoga: Moms in the making practice postures, meditations and breath work tailored to pregnancy. Drop-ins are welcome. Yoga Mountain Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. Call for rates. Info, 778-0300.

Williston PJ Story Time: Kiddos get cozy in their jammies for stories, crafts and a bedtime snack. All ages. Preregister. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 876-7147.

13 TUESDAY

Arts

Coats for Kids: See December 6.

Education

Building a Better IEP: This workshop for parents explores the Individualized Education Program process. Free pizza and salad are provided. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 800-8004005, ext. 225. Kids in the Kitchen: Gingerbread Houses: Budding architects craft fanciful dwellings of sweets and make gingerbread men, too. All ages with adult. Preregister. Healthy Living Natural Foods Market, South Burlington, 3:30-5 p.m. $20 child. Info, 863-2569, ext. 1.

Library & Books

Holiday Violins: See December 6.

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6.

Movies at Main Street Landing: See December 6.

Craftacular Tuesdays: See December 6.

VYOA Auditions: See December 7.

Creative Tuesdays: See December 6. Game On!: Kids learn new games or play old faves. All ages. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

Submit your February events by January 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.


Hand in Hand: See December 6. music With Robert: See December 6.

Nature & Science

calenDar

Community

coats for Kids: See December 6. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

14 WEDNESDAY

Library & Books

candy-cane-making demo: See December 7. music in the meeting House: See December 7. VYoA Auditions: See December 7.

Community

coats for Kids: See December 6. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Education

Burlington La Leche League: Moms bring their questions, babies and older kids, too, to this breast-feeding support group. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228.

stroller strolling: See December 8.

Holiday Gift making: Teens lead younger kids in the art of making and wrapping presents. Grades K-5. Preregister. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3 & 4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books

Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6. Family movie Night: Lightning McQueen fans get their fix during this screening of Cars 2, rated G. Free popcorn and soda are provided. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Hogwarts Reading society: This club is for peeps who are pumped about Harry Potter and other fantasy series. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4097. Lego Afternoons: See December 7.

story Time With mrs. claus: See December 7.

15 THURSDAY

Arts

movin’ & Groovin’: See December 8.

VYo Winter concert: The theme of peace is explored through different musical traditions and perspectives. All ages. Mahaney Center for the Arts. Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. $8 adult, $6 senior, $5 student. Info, 443-6433.

Community

k8h-UrbanSalon1211.indd 1

11/28/11 1:24 PM

If your kids are a size …

coats for Kids: See December 6. Parents Night out: Moms and dads drop off the kids for games, movies, crafts and snacks. Edmunds Middle School, Burlington, 6-9 p.m. $10 child. Info, 864-0123. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Education

History for Homeschoolers: Lessons cover the lives of Vermonters in the 1800s, including photos and stories from the Civil War. Ages 6-12. Vermont History Museum, Montpelier, 2 and 7 p.m. $5 student, $4 member student and for families with three or more children participating. Info, 828-2180.

Health & Fitness Adventures With Parker T. Bear: SeeDecember 9. Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6. movie magic: Cars 2, popcorn and soda make for family fun. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. songs & stories With matthew: Adventurestorytelling musician shares songs with kids. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Pollywog drop-in Art: See December 8. 16 FRidAY, p. 38

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medium

large

then they need flu vaccines. Flu protection is recommended in sizes 6 months through 18 years. The flu can be a serious disease for children of all ages, causing them to miss school, activities, or even be hospitalized. CDC and doctors recommend flu vaccination for everyone 6 months and older. For more information, visit HealthVermont. gov or dial 2-1-1

37

VYoA Auditions: See December 7.

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Kids VT

‘The christmas Revels’: This interactive holiday production makes merry with Queen Elizabeth and country folk. All ages. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H. 7 p.m. $23$33 adult, $11-$15 child. Info, 603-646-2422.

Preschool clay drop-in: See December 9.

December 2011 / january 2012

‘The Polar Express’: This magical evening includes a reading of Chris Van Allsburg’s book, a visit with one of Santa’s reindeer, cocoa and cookies. All ages. Preregister and specify boarding time. Highgate Public Library, 6 & 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970.

Family clay drop-in: See December 9.

KidsVT.com

movin’ & Groovin’ With christine: See December 7.

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Arts

‘The christmas Revels’: See December 15, 7 p.m.

Health & Fitness

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16 FRIDAY

Kids cook Up stories: See December 7.

social Thinking: See December 7.

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origami in the Afternoon: See December 8.

candy-cane-making demo: See December 7.

observation morning: Prospective families check out what this elementary school has to offer. The Schoolhouse, South Burlington, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 355-7023.

We recycle and donate up to 100 percent of every load and run our fleet on bio-diesel.

Holiday open House: Families celebrate the season with Santa, snacks, crafts and more. All ages. St. Albans Free Library, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

cookie decorating: See December 7.

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Hot mama Workout: See December 8.

Highgate Youth Advisory: See December 8.

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Health & Fitness

Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6.

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mommy matinee: See December 8.

science & stories: Elusive moose: Curious tots investigate the lives of these mysterious creatures. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386.

Arts

Goodbye Junk. Hello Relief! SAVE

December


16 friday (Continued)

Teen Movie Night: Films for the teen set are screened in the library. Drinks and popcorn are provided; teens are asked to bring a snack to share. Grades 7 and up. Lincoln Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2665. Wii-tastic!: Gamers check out the new “Lego Star Wars” in addition to Wii classics such as “MarioKart.” Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

17 SATURDAY

Arts

Candy-Cane-Making Demo: See Decembe r 7.

‘The Nutcracker’: See spotlight, page 30. Winter Illuminations: See December 17.

Community

Christmas at the Farm: See December 17, 5 p.m. Coats for Kids: See December 6.

Library & Books

Saturday Drama Club: See December 10.

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6.

VYO Winter Concert: See December 16, St. Michael’s College, Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $12 adult, $7 student.

Nature & Science

Christmas at the Farm: Festive doings include crafts, tours and sleigh rides. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 457-2355. Coats for Kids: See December 6. Tea With Santa: Mr. Claus shares a nosh with the community. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. $10 family. Info, 864-0123. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Education

Butter Making: Kids shake cream into yummy spread at City Market’s booth during the Burlington Farmers’ Market. All ages. Memorial Auditorium, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 861-9757.

kidsvt.com

‘The Christmas Revels’: See December 15, 1 and 5 p.m.

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Community

December 2011 / january 2012

Arts

Family Art Drop-in: See December 10.

Winter Illuminations: This holiday performance features the Northern Vermont Ballet and 802 Quartet. Refreshments are available before and after the show. Ages 6 and up. Preregister. BFA Performing Arts Center, St. Albans, 8 p.m. $10-$15 person. Info, 393-8655.

Kids VT

18 SUNDAY

‘The Christmas Revels’: See December 15. ‘The Nutcracker’: See spotlight, page 30.

38

Woodworking Demo: See December 10.

Ornament Workshop: Beeswax and pinecones are used to craft holiday decor. Milton Town Office Community Room, 10 a.m.-noon. $12 Milton resident. Info, 893-4922.

Health & Fitness

Postnatal Yoga: See December 10. Prenatal Yoga: See December 10.

Library & Books Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. That’s a Wrap: Kids create their own gifts for any occasion. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

Nature & Science

Build It Better: Young scientists explore the world of batteries and electric energy during this hands-on workshop. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

©thinkstock.com/jupiterimages

Youth Night: Teens and tweens hang out with movies, snacks, crafting and more. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

Hoopster Gliders: Kids create a craft that flies. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

Micro-Explorations: Kiddos use microscopes and realize there’s more to see than meets the naked eye. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Mirror, Mirror: Science fans learn about symmetry and reflection while creating cool and complex images. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

Happy Trails to You If you’ve never donned skis or snowshoes, winter sports can be intimidating. Winter Trails Day is designed to allay fears and inspire a passion for winter exercise. In conjunction with the National Winter Trails program, Winter Trails Day introduces novices of all ages to cross-country skiing and showshoeing with the help of professionals from Nordic centers across the country, including some here in Vermont. Their advice is free, and so is the equipment.

Sundays for Fledglings: See December 11.

19 MONDAY

Arts

Winter Trails Day: Saturday, January 7. Mountain Top Inn & Resort, Chittenden. All ages. Free. Preregister. Info, 483-6089, snowlink.com, mountaintopinn.com.

Monday Mall Magic: See December 12.

Community

Coats for Kids: See December 6. Families Together Holiday Celebration: Members brainstorm ideas and speakers for the coming year. Call for location, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 373-5382. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Education

Getting There: Life After High School: Topics range from skipping school to drug abuse during this program for parents and caregivers of youth who are having a tough time becoming adults. Vermont Family Network, Williston, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-800-4005, ext. 228.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See December 8. Prenatal Yoga: See December 12.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Holiday Craftacular: Preschoolers craft cards and gifts. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 388-4097.

20 TUESDAY

Arts

Holiday Violins: See December 6.

Movies at Main Street Landing: See December 6.

Community

2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386.

Coats for Kids: See December 6.

21 WEDNESDAY

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Arts

Education

Candy-Cane-Making Demo: See December 7.

Kids in the Kitchen: Snowmen: Little bakers make men of cookie dough then decorate them with marshmallows and coconut. All ages with adult. Preregister. Healthy Living Natural Foods Market, South Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. $20 child. Info, 863-2569, ext. 1.

Music in the Meeting House: See December 7.

Library & Books

Education

Community

Coats for Kids: See December 6. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6.

Cookie Decorating: See December 7.

Craftacular Tuesdays: See December 6.

Social Thinking: See December 7.

Creative Tuesdays: See December 6. Music With Robert: See December 6.

Health & Fitness

Nature & Science

Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Science & Stories: Winter Solstice: Daylight hours are dwindling and kids find out why. Ages

Submit your February events by January 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Kids Cook Up Stories: See December 7.

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Lego Afternoons: See December 7. Movin’ & Groovin’ With Christine: See December 7.


calenDar

story Time With mrs. claus: See December 7.

Library & Books

22 THURSDAY

Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6.

Arts

Nature & Science

Pollywog drop-in Art: See December 8.

Community

magnetic moments: Budding scientists experiment with magnets. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

mommy matinee: See December 8.

Woodworking demo: See December 10.

coats for Kids: See December 6. steam Heat: This holiday extravaganza explores classic flicks and the music that fired them up. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury. All ages. 7 p.m. $10 person, $5 ages 12 and under. Info, 382-9222. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9. Winter solstice celebration: Grade schoolers from Orchard Valley Waldorf School present an evening of song, dance, drama, poetry and more. All ages. Montpelier High School, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 456-7400.

Health & Fitness

Hot mama Workout: See December 8. stroller strolling: See December 8.

Library & Books

Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6. Highgate Youth Advisory: See December 8. Lego club: See December 8. origami in the Afternoon: See December 8.

23 FRIDAY

Arts

candy-cane-making demo: See December 7. Family clay drop-in: See December 9. Preschool clay drop-in: See December 9.

Community

coats for Kids: See December 6. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Health & Fitness Adventures With Parker T. Bear: See December 9. Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books

Community

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

802.658.3992 e www.discovermaterchristi.org

26 MONDAY

Community

christmas at the Farm: See December 17. coats for Kids: See December 6.

WAkkA WAkkA (NeW YOrk) AND NOrDlAND VisuAl THeATre (NOrWAY)

Prenatal Yoga: See December 12.

Fri & sat

open House: Trampoline testers check out the new training center. Green Mountain Gymnastics, Williston, 5-9 p.m. Info, 652-2454.

jan 6 & 7 | 8 pm the moore theater

Library & Books Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6.

Nature & Science

magnetic moments: See December 24. Playing Telephone: Kids craft paper-cup phones and explore the properties of sound waves. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

“a visually stunning and emotionally soaring creation.” Backstage

hop.dartmouth.edu | 603.646.2422 | Dartmouth College | Hanover, NH

27 TUESDAY

Arts

k6h-Hopkins1211.indd 1

movies at main street Landing: See December 6.

Community

11/18/11 11:49 AM

Introducing our redesigned website at:

christmas at the Farm: See December 17. coats for Kids: See December 6.

Community

creative Tuesdays: See December 6.

craftacular Tuesdays: See December 6.

Nature & Science

color mixing: See December 10. Hoopster Gliders: See December 17, 3 p.m.

December 2011 / january 2012

Woodstock Film series: See December 10.

Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6.

Health & Fitness

(A Puppet Odyssey)

Hot mama Workout: See December 8.

Library & Books

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

baby universe

Health & Fitness

Arts

coats for Kids: See December 6.

hopkins center for the arts

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

christmas at the Farm: See December 17.

mater christi is a private catholic school for all faiths that is discovering personal greatness in pre-school through grade 8 students. we offer an afterschool enrichment program and a beautiful campus next to fahc & uvm.

Time to move: Little ones let loose with games that are all about motion. Ages 6-12. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 9 a.m.-noon. $10 child. Info, 864-0123.

24 SATURDAY saturday drama club: See December 10.

Visit our Open House on January 31 from 8:30 to 11:00, or call to schedule a personal tour of Mater Christi School, including our state-ofthe-art science lab. Let the future begin now.

25 SUNDAY

KidsVT.com

Anytime craft: Holiday decorations: See December 6.

thinking about how to transform your child’s future? We are, too.

©Ambient Photography

December

We’ve launched a new and improved Kids VT website. • User-friendly calendar of events • Comprehensive list of family resources • New tools to customize your experience.

Kids VT

Postnatal Yoga: See December 10.

Become a member – we’d love to hear from you!

Prenatal Yoga: See December 10.

39

28 WednesdAY, p. 40 6h-newwebsite.indd 1

12/1/11 3:35 PM


power of air during this hands-on session. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

28 WEDNESDAY

Arts

Art Safari: Tots dive into stories and art activities related to the museum’s collections. Ages 3-5 with adult. Preregister. Shelburne Museum, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $5 child. Info, 985-3346.

31 SATURDAY

Arts

Diversity Rocks!: Young musicians from around the globe share their talents as part of substance-free First Night Burlington. Burlington City Hall, 2 & 3 p.m. First Night Burlington admission. Info, 863-6005.

Music in the Meeting House: See December 7.

Community

Christmas at the Farm: See December 17. Coats for Kids: See December 6.

Saturday Drama Club: See December 10.

Time to Move: See December 26.

Community

Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9. ©THINKSTOCK.COM/STEVE MASON

Education

Cookie Decorating: See December 7. Kids Cook Up Stories: See December 7. Social Thinking: See December 7.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Lego Afternoons: See December 7. Movin’ & Groovin’ With Christine: See December 7.

Nature & Science

About Air: See December 11. Full of Hot Air: Families build and launch their own hot-air balloons and learn about the effects of heat on an object’s density. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10:30 a.m. & 2 p.m. $20 family. Info, 649-2200. Optical Tops: Kids discover how rotation can create optical illusions. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

29 THURSDAY

Arts

Pollywog Drop-in Art: See December 8.

Community

Christmas at the Farm: See December 17.

40

KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Coats for Kids: See December 6. Mommy Matinee: See December 8. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Education

School’s Out Taco Bar: Little Mexican food lovers man the kitchen — making tortillas from scratch, prepping the fixings and, of course, chowing down. Ages 10 and up. Preregister. Healthy Living Natural Foods Market, South Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $35 child. Info, 8632569, ext. 1.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See December 8. Stroller Strolling: See December 8.

Submit your February events by January 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Presidential Holiday Take the whole family back to the year 1872 during the COOLIDGE HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. The village of Plymouth Notch is the backdrop for this Christmas event featuring the bedecked birthplace of the Vermonter president, old-time music, sleigh rides, craft demonstrations, children’s activities, lunch and more. History buffs are also invited to tour the Aldrich House, post office, 1924 Summer White House and Plymouth Cheese Factory. COOLIDGE HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Saturday, December 11, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site, Plymouth Notch. All ages. Free. Info, 672-3773, historicvermont.org.

Christmas at the Farm: See December 17. Coats for Kids: See December 6. First Night Sing-Along: New Year’s revelers make merry through family-friendly songs. All ages. First Congregational Church, Burlington, noon-12:40 p.m. First Night Burlington admission. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Fairs & Festivals

First Night Burlington: See spotlight, page 36.

Health & Fitness

Postnatal Yoga: See December 10. Prenatal Yoga: See December 10.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6.

Nature & Science

Look at Life: Budding biologists use a microscope to compare plant and animal cells. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. New England Wildlife: Nature lovers learn about animals living in our area. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Woodworking Demo: See December 10.

Library & Books

Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Highgate Youth Advisory: See December 8. Lego Creations: Young builders make a masterpiece for display at the library. Ages 5 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Origami in the Afternoon: See December 8.

Nature & Science

Mirror, Mirror: See December 18. Skulls: See December 11.

30 FRIDAY

Arts

Family Clay Drop-in: See December 9. Preschool Clay Drop-in: See December 9.

Community

Christmas at the Farm: See December 17. Coats for Kids: See December 6. Vermont Valley Lights: See December 9.

Education

Kids in the Kitchen: Sushi: Little chefs visit Japan during this culinary adventure with sticky rice and nori. All ages with adult. Preregister. Healthy Living Natural Foods Market, South Burlington, 3:30-5 p.m. $20 child. Info, 863-2569, ext. 1.

Health & Fitness Adventures With Parker T. Bear: See December 9. Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books Anytime Craft: Holiday Decorations: See December 6. Book vs. Movie: Film fans watch The Tale of Despereaux on the big screen, then compare the movie to the book. All ages. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

Nature & Science

January 1 SUNDAY

Health & Fitness

FirstRun Fun Run: Young runners start the New Year with a run through downtown Burlington, either a half-mile or mile-long course. All ages. Free. Costumes encouraged. Memorial Auditorium, Burlington, 11:05 a.m. Info, 863-8412.

Nature & Science

About Air: See December 11. Optical Illusions: Young minds discover that things are not always what they seem during this science-based session. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Sundays for Fledglings: See December 11.

2 MONDAY

Sound Science: Curious kids experiment with sounds and how they travel. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

Health & Fitness

Straw Rockets: Science lovers discover the

Prenatal Yoga: See December 12.

Hot Mama Workout: See December 8.


january calenDar 3 TUESDAY

Arts movies at main street Landing: See December 6.

Library & Books

craftacular Tuesdays: See December 6. creative Tuesdays: See December 6.

Nature & Science

science & stories: snow!: Kids get the lowdown on snow and build a snowman — indoors. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386.

4 WEDNESDAY

Burlington, 7 p.m. $15 suggested donation. Info, mrksustc@together.net.

Community

First Friday Family dance: Supper kicks off a wholesome evening of live music and dancing. All ages. Worcester Town Hall, 5:30-10 p.m. $5 person, $8-$12 family. Info, 229-0173.

Health & Fitness

Adventures With Parker T. Bear: See December 9. Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids open Gymnastics: See December 7.

7 SATURDAY

k8h-SternCenter1211.indd 1

Arts

Arts

Woodstock Film series: See December 10.

Education

ski swap: Skiers and boarders shop for new and used equipment. Ski Rack, Burlington, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Free to browse. Info, 800-882-4530.

Kids cook Up stories: See December 7.

Winter Trails day: See spotlight, page 38.

social Thinking: See December 7.

Nature & Science

music in the meeting House: See December 7.

cookie decorating: See December 7.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Breast-Feeding-mom support: See December 7. Kids open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books

Hogwarts Reading society: See December 14.

Health & Fitness

All About Fingerprints: Kids get up close and personal with their prints, exploring what makes them unique. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

8 SUNDAY

Health & Fitness

Lego Afternoons: See December 7.

ski swap: See January 7, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

movin’ & Groovin’ With christine: See December 7.

Nature & Science

5 THURSDAY

Arts

Pollywog drop-in Art: See December 8.

Community

mommy matinee: See December 8.

Health & Fitness

Hot mama Workout: See December 8.

Leafcutter Ants: Nature fans examine the secret life of insect fungus farmers during this hands-on investigation. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. mirror, mirror: See December 18, 3 p.m.

9 MONDAY Hot mama Workout: See December 8.

Education

Food for Thought: Teen volunteers chow down on pizza and work on library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

open House & Panel: Current students and alumni discuss their high school experience. Lake Champlain Waldorf High School, Charlotte, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 985-2827.

Highgate Youth Advisory: See December 8.

Library & Books

Family clay drop-in: See December 9.

• Playmobil • Mighty World • Calico Critters • Bruder • Groovy Girls • Thomas the Tank

• Micro Scooters • Green Toys • Plan Toys • Corolle • Automoblox

$5 off any purchase of $20 or more!

Game on!: See December 13.

Nature & Science

science & stories: snowflakes: Kids explore unique properties of flakes and craft a oneof-a-kind piece of art. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386.

TOYS • FURNITURE • SHOES • CLOTHING FEEDING & SAFETY • ONLINE REGISTRY FREE GIFT WRAPPING & PARKING

*Limit one per customer per visit. No cash value. Not valid with other sales/discounts/offers. Not valid on purchase of gift cards. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Some restrictions apply.

GIFT CARDS

also avail able online at kidstown. com

11 WEDNESDAY

Education

Burlington La Leche League: See December 14.

11 WednesdAY p. 42

10 Farrell Street, So. Burlington • 865-6870 Open Mon-Thu 10-6, Fri - Sat 10-7, Sun 11-6 k4t-Kidstown1211.indd 1

11/28/11 10:51 AM

41

Young Tradition Vermont Reunion: YTV alumni return from around the world to share an evening of music and dance. FlynnSpace,

begin here here.

Kids VT

Preschool clay drop-in: See December 9.

Kids Town features a large selection of quality toys, creative games, fun stocking stuffers, and plenty of holiday cheer. We’ve got everything you need to make their holiday wish list come true.

Arts

Happy Holidays

December 2011 / january 2012

Library & Books

6 FRIDAY

11/25/11 12:08 PM

KidsVT.com

10 TUESDAY

origami in the Afternoon: See December 8.

k8h-OGE1211.indd 1

Brands Include:

Health & Fitness

stroller strolling: See December 8.

Homeschoolers Book Group: Readers share thoughts on recent reads. Ages 8 and up. Preregister. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

11/29/11 5:27 PM


11 WEDNESDAY (CONTINUED)

15 SUNDAY

Health & Fitness

Community

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

12 THURSDAY

Health & Fitness Library & Books

Library & Books

Lego Club: See December 8.

‘Martin’s Big Words’: See January 14.

Science Magic: Kids learn tricks using stuff found around the house. Grades 3 and up. Preregister. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Nature & Science

13 FRIDAY

Education

History for Homeschoolers: See December 16.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books

Book vs. Movie: Film fans watch Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone on the big screen, then compare the movie to the book. All ages. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

14 SATURDAY

Arts

Celtic Winter Gathering: This celebration of Scottish Highland dancing features a competition with performers from all over New England, refreshments, and drumming and dance workshops. Ages 5 and up. All Souls Interfaith Gathering, Shelburne. 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Free to watch competition. Fees for tea, workshops and evening performance. Info, 999-0632.

Community

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Sleigh-Ride Weekend: Families cruise the farm the old-school way and visit the farmhouse. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 457-2355.

KIDS VT

Health & Fitness

Winter Adventures: Get set for games, races and other snow-based fun. All ages. Free Intervale Community Farm, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 863-8412.

Hot Mama Workout: See December 8.

42

Sleigh-Ride Weekend: See January 14.

Education

Open House: Interested families check out the school’s programs. Saxon Hill School, Jericho, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0182.

Library & Books

‘Martin’s Big Words’: This film features stories from the African-American tradition and a biography of Martin Luther King Jr. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Nature & Science

Creeping Colors: Science lovers explore the capillary action of water and how it affects color. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Magnetic Moments: See December 24.

Optical Illusions: See January 1. Who Sank the Boat?: Newbie boat-builders craft a vessel, then see how much weight it can hold before sinking. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

16 MONDAY

Community

Sleigh-Ride Weekend: See January 14.

Fairs & Festivals

Stowe Winter Carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See December 8.

17 TUESDAY

Fairs & Festivals

Stowe Winter Carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Nature & Science

the cold stuff through activities and crafts. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386.

18 WEDNESDAY

Fairs & Festivals

Stowe Winter Carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids Open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Library & Books

Jiggity Jog: Kids let music move them via song, instrument and dance. Ages 2-5. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Sign a Story: Calling all babies and toddlers: Join Amy as she reads stories while signing key words. Ages birth-4. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Youth Night: See December 16.

Hogwarts Reading Society: See December 14.

21 SATURDAY

19 THURSDAY

Education

Fairs & Festivals

Stowe Winter Carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See December 8.

Nature & Science

Winter Mysteries: Small sleuths investigate what Vermont animals do during the colder months. Ages 3-5 with adult. Preregister. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 10-11 a.m. $8 member adult with child, $4 additional child; $10 nonmember adult with child, $4 additional child. Info, 434-3068.

20 FRIDAY

Fairs & Festivals

Stowe Winter Carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Open House at The Children’s School: Parents meet teachers and explore the facility. Free. The Children’s School, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Info, 862-2772.

Fairs & Festivals

Stowe Winter Carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Nature & Science

Fossils: Science enthusiasts handle fossilized remains and use clues to guess their origins. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Skulls: See December 11.

22 SUNDAY

Fairs & Festivals

Stowe Winter Carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Science & Stories: Ice: Kids get the skinny on

Ongoing Events BRATTLEBORO MUSEUM & ART CENTER

FAIRBANKS MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM

‘VT Kids Design Glass’: This exhibit features creatures imagined by grade schoolers and sculpted by local artists. Sculptures will be auctioned off, the proceeds supporting BMAC’s work with kids. Info, 257-0124

‘Wildflower Table’: This living exhibit reflects the abundance and diversity of flowers, grasses, berries, ferns and evergreens found in the Northeast Kingdom. Kids are introduced to more than 400 species displayed throughout the year, in both fruit and flowering stages. Info, 748-2372

COLLINS-PERLEY SPORTS COMPLEX Ice Time: Skaters and hockey players get their fix. Call or visit website for schedules. Info, 527-1202 ECHO LAKE AQUARIUM AND SCIENCE CENTER ‘Grossology: The Impolite Science of the Human Body’: Back by popular demand, Grossology is a fun, colorful and informative exhibit grounded in the theory that the best way to get kids interested in science is to present it in terms they find most appealing — snot, vomit, gas and scabs. Exhibit ends January 8. Info, 864-1848

INDEPENDENCE PETTING FARM Animal Menagerie: Rain or shine, families visit, pet and feed a variety of animals at this educational, hands-on farm. Open daily, year round. Info, 948-2429 JACKSON ARENA Let’s Go Skating!: Sharpen your skates and dig out your hockey gear. Jackson Arena is open for public skating and stick time. Call and watch for the skate schedule in the Stowe Parks & Recreation e-newsletter; sign up by emailing recreation@townofstowevermont.org. Info, 253-6148

LEDDY PARK/PAQUETTE ARENA Public Skating: An Olympic rink provides plenty of space for skaters of all skill levels. Times and dates subject to change, especially during school vacations. Info, 862-8869 PBS KIDS GO! This writing contest showcases little ones’ original stories and illustrations. The deadline for entries is March 16, 2012, and a winner and honorable mention from each grade level will be selected. Grades K-3. Free. Info, 655-4800. VERMONT INSTITUTE OF NATURAL SCIENCE NATURE CENTER Through the Eyes of Raptors: Kids who explore the natural world through the eyes of raptors are usually amazed by these efficient predators. Bird programs cover the mechanics of flight, seasonal migration and conservation issues. ‘Raptors up Close’: Little nature lovers discover the fascinating lives of birds in this exhibit featuring touchable artifacts and hands-on materials. Kids learn how hundreds of birds are rehabilitated each year and the fundamentals of how raptors are trained. Info, 359-5000


january calenDar Nature & Science

ditties. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

Hoopster Gliders: See December 17.

28 SATURDAY

23 MONDAY

Education

Gearing Up: See December 10.

Fairs & Festivals

stowe Winter carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Health & Fitness

Hot mama Workout: See December 8.

Library & Books

imagination Vacation: medieval Times: Creative kids make a scene complete with knights, castles and princesses. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 388-4097.

24 TUESDAY

Fairs & Festivals

stowe Winter carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Nature & Science

science & stories: Tracks: Children learn to look for the clues that animals leave behind in the snow. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386.

Winter Family open House: Prospective students and their parents check out a Waldorf education during tours, a presentation and crafts for little ones. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 985-2827.

Fairs & Festivals

shelburne Winterfest: Snow lovers enjoy a day of play, including sledding, sleighing and snacks. Shelburne Farms, noon-3 p.m. Donations encouraged for Shelburne Parks & Recreation Department. $2 sleigh ride. Info, 985-8686. stowe Winter carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Nature & Science

Earth and space day: Curious kids and their families explore our place in the universe through a series of activities. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

25 WEDNESDAY

Wild dogs of the Winter Woods: Families explore the world of Vermont’s wild canines. Preregister. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 10 a.m.-noon. Center admission. Info, 434-3068.

Arts

29 SUNDAY

Art safari: See December 28.

Education

Winter Parent Open House: Parents learn about the school and its holistic approach. Free. The Bellwether School, Williston, 6 p.m. Info, 863-4839.

Fairs & Festivals

stowe Winter carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Health & Fitness

Fairs & Festivals

ice on Fire Festival: The community pays tribute to winter with a parade, games, theater, singing and storytelling, and a bonfire. All ages. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 2-5 p.m. $1-$5 suggested donation. Info, 223-0577. stowe Winter carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Nature & Science

About Air: See December 11.

Kids open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Kitchen chemistry: Kiddos explore chemistry with household products. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Museum admission. Info, 649-2200.

26 THURSDAY

30 MONDAY

Fairs & Festivals

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7.

stowe Winter carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Hot mama Workout: See December 8.

Library & Books 27 FRIDAY

Fairs & Festivals

stowe Winter carnival: See spotlight, page 31.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See December 7. Kids open Gymnastics: See December 7.

Nursery Rhyme music & movement: Local music wonder May Podushnick shares a few

Education

open House: Prospective students and parents explore classrooms and chat with students and staff. All ages. Preregister. Mater Christi School, Burlington, 8:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 658-3992.

MVP Health Care is proud to support wellness in all its forms by helping our whole community build a healthier future.

Nature & Science

science & stories: Beavers: Kids learn about the life and lodge of these dam builders. Ages 2-6. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 877-324-6386. K

submit your February events by January 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Kids VT

Library & Books

31 TUESDAY

43

w w w.mv p hea lt hc a re.com k2v-MVP1211.indd 1

December 2011 / january 2012

Lego club: See December 8.

Hot mama Workout: See December 8.

Living well is the goal. As individuals. And together.

KidsVT.com

Health & Fitness

for a healthy community

11/29/11 5:23 PM


HANDS-ON

STEPS 1 & 2

STEPS 3

✱ CRAFTING WITH KIDS

44

KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Recycling Crayons OPEN A FRESH BOX OF CRAYONS, lean in and take a deep whiff of that new-crayon smell. Ahhh. There’s nothing as satisfying as those neat rows of perfect points. But what if your kid’s crayons are broken nubs, worn down by heavy coloring? You can make it all better with a little oven treatment. Mix together the old, toosmall stubs and melt them down. The resulting implements — multicolored, reconstituted crayons shaped like bottle caps — look good enough to eat. — KATE LADDISON

instructions 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

materials

Peel the paper off the crayons. (If the paper stubbornly • crayons resists peelings, soak the crayons in cold water for • a heavy knife about 10 minutes.) • a muffin or mini-muffin tin Chop the crayons into smallish pieces. • foil or glassine muffin-tin liners Place the chopped bits of crayons into the lined muffin cups. Bake the crayons in a 250-degree oven for 15-20 minutes, or until the wax is melted. Allow the tin to cool, then remove the crayons from the tin and the liner. Go color like crazy.

You could also use candy molds to make crayons in fantastical shapes, but you’ll need to line the molds or consign them to crayonmaking permanently. Using full-size muffin tins results in colorful chunks that little hands will grab and grip easily. With older kids, experiment with other oven-safe household items for molds — tin cans, glass jars — and you can play with color mixing as well. 

Share your fun craft ideas with us! Send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.


HEALTHY FAMILY FUN THIS WINTER GREATER BURLINGTON YMCA

Kids Nights Out Family Gym Family Swim Winter Vacation Camps Holiday parties, overnights and more!

Photo: Jay Silveira/ J&E Productions

5 Days for the Price of 3 Buy a Powder Pass for just $199 for adults, $179 for youth/college/senior, and you’ll get four lift tickets that you can use any day this season with no blackout dates. As a bonus, purchase your Powder Pass before December 23rd and you’ll receive an extra 5th lift ticket that can be used any time through December 25, 2011. That’s a total of

BURLINGTON 266 College St. 802-862-9622 WINOOSKI 32 Malletts Bay Ave. 802-655-9622 Financial assistance is available

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gbymca.org 11/29/11 9:34 AM

five lift tickets for less than the price of three! *

Act fast! Prices go up after December 23rd. boltonvalley.com

kidsvt.com December 2011 / January 2012 Kids VT

*Comparison based on Adult holiday retail ticket price of $69.

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HANDS-ON ✱ THE PARTY PLANNER BY KAT RIN A ROBE RTS

Cool Crafts for Cozy Celebrations

Winter tends to drive celebrations indoors, where it’s warm and dry. But Mother Nature can still play a role. Here are some easy, inexpensive craft projects that bring the outside in.

For ages 3 and up: Snowy Handprint Tree Supplies: Regular, 8.5 x 11-inch white paper • Light-blue construction paper • Washable brown paint • Glue stick • Scissors • Granulated sugar

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Cut the white paper in half horizontally. Make it a curvy cut, to simulate rolling hills. Glue the resulting white cut-out to the bottom of the lightblue paper. Paint a child’s hand with brown paint and have the child spread out his or her fingers and press the palm and fingers onto the paper. Then, have the child use a finger to paint a tree trunk under the handprint. Once the tree has dried, use the glue stick to apply glue to the branches and snowy field. For a snowstorm, make dots on the blue paper with the glue stick. Sprinkle granulated sugar on all gluey areas. Lift the paper and tap its edges to shake off the excess sugar.

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KIDS VT

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

For ages 5 and up: Sparkling Ice Crystals Supplies: Six 12-inch-long white, iridescent pipe cleaners • Clear or sunburstcolored tri-beads • Fishing line Cut six pipe cleaners in half to create 12 pieces. Gather 11 pieces together and tightly wrap the last pipe cleaner around the middle of the bundle; twist the ends to secure it. Bend the bundled pipe-cleaner pieces, spreading them into a sphere. Thread beads onto each

pipe-cleaner half and use fishing line to hang this never-melting ice crystal as a holiday decoration.

For ages 8 and up: Retro Trash-Bag Wreath Supplies: Wire hanger • Bow • White kitchen trash bags (four per wreath) Cut the white trash bags horizontally into 2-inch wide strips. Cut those strips into six-inch pieces. (To save time, this step could be done before the party.) Elongate the triangular part of the hanger, shaping the wire into a circle. Tie each strip of bag onto the hanger, centering the knot so that equal amounts of strip are on either side of the knot. Use as many strips as you’d like, depending on how full of a wreath you’re aiming for. Finish with a bow and use the hook for hanging. 

Katrina Roberts is a realtor who lives in Monkton with her husband and their three daughters.

Got an idea for the Party Planner? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.


Birthday club

Sponsored by Zachary’s Family Fun center in South burlington

Congratulations to these December/January Birthday Club winners:

every month, birthday kids win prizes, and their picture appears in Kids VT to make their birthdays extra special!

★A Nonprofit, Parent Cooperative Preschool for 3-5 year-olds ★Experienced, nurturing teachers ★Beautiful, bright classrooms and play yard ★Serving families in Chittenden County for nearly 40 years!

Join us for our OPEN HOUSE, January 21, 10am-Noon Meet our teachers and parents and explore our wonderful facility!

11/23/11 1:14 PM

OPEN HOUSE

Sat., January 14, 2012 9:30-11:30am

Registration dates for the 2012/13 School Year: Jan 16-20 current families Jan 23-27 siblings and alumni Jan 30-Feb 3 new families

samantha lives in barre and turns 8 in December. She likes gymnastics, skiing and ice skating.

Samantha wins a birthday party for eight at Zachary’s Family Fun Center!

173 Patchen Road, South Burlington • www.tcsvt.org

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7 Redmill Drive, Jericho

Grand Prize Winner

The children’s School 862-2772

For more information: www.saxonhillschool.org saxonhillregistrar@gmail.com

802-879-0182

Accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs

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Adelaide lives in northfield Falls and turns 4 in December. She likes to hike, garden, snowshoe, paint and read.

ANY $25 ORDER

• SO. BuRliNgtON 864-9817 •FAMilY FuN cENtER 860-4386 • MiltON 893-6111

• MAllEttS BAY 862-7900 • WAtERBuRY 244-5650 • RichMOND 434-4002

Please present coupon when ordering. Not valid with other offers.

To enter your kids, submit information using the online form at kidsvt. com/birthday-club.

ANY lARgE PiZZA

• SO. BuRliNgtON 864-9817 •FAMilY FuN cENtER 860-4386 • MiltON 893-6111

• MAllEttS BAY 862-7900 • WAtERBuRY 244-5650 • RichMOND 434-4002

®

Celebrate your Birthday at the Vermont Teddy Bear Factory!

All parties include: • A private tour • A Make a Friend for Life® Bear for each child

Please present coupon when ordering. Not valid with other offers.

$5

1/26/11 3:09 PM

• Private party space staffed by a Vermont Teddy Bear Ambassador. • Newly refurbished 900 sq.ft. private party space

iN FREE tOKENS for Zachary’s

Family Fun center with purchase of large pizza, cheesy breadsticks, & pitcher of soda

ZACHARY’S FAMILY

FUN CENTER

Valid at Zachary’s South Burlington location only. Please present coupon when ordering. Not valid with other offers.

Parties available seven days a week!

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5/24/11 6:28 PM

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The Vermont Teddy Bear Company 6655 Shelburne Road, Shelburne, VT (802) 985-1627 • birthdayparties@vtbear.com

Kids VT

Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled in our Kids VT birthday club.

$3 OFF

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KidsVT.com December 2011 / January 2012

Join the club!

7/19/11 6:31 PM

Emily lives in bristol and turns 12 in January. Her favorite sports are softball and field hockey, and she loves playing the piano.

$5 OFF Tyoka lives in milton and turns 10 in January. He loves to snowboard in the winter and swim in the summer.

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HANDS-ON

BY JAN BUCKNER WALKER

answers p. 50

PUZZLE PAGE

Kids Across/Parents Down

Enjoy fun time with mom, dad or your favorite grown-up. The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for adults.

Things We Loved in the 2000s Kids Across

Parents Down

6. Smile!: By the end of 2010, more than one out of every two cell phones included a ______

3. As demonstrated by TV’s “Glee,” it’s song’s longtime partner

1. The pop rocker who had a big hit with “Girlfriend” in 2007: _____ Lavigne

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

48

Kids VT

December 2011 / January 2012

kidsvt.com

Riddle Search — Let’s Study

Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: How can you eat and study at the same time?

Absorb Brush up on cram determine discover examine get learn

master memorize plunge into read review scan soak up take in

7. Soft stuff on the outside of your Zhu Zhu Pet

4. Launched in 2005, this video game series can bring out one’s inner rock star: Guitar ____

9. On the internet, it’s the mark that comes before “com”

5. One annoying fad we’re glad got away: Big Mouth Billy ____

11. Invented in 2002, these rubbery shoes are full of holes

7. What Jared gained when he lost over 200 pounds in the 2000s

13. An average teen by day, Miley Stewart becomes pop star Hannah _______ at night

8. Cell phone user’s se lected serenade

15. Unwanted email 16. Funny face: Taylor Swift wore a ____ moustache in 2008 and 2010

12. Strictly classified: This online outfit made millions of job seekers and garage sale buffs go paperless

17. In 2001, Apple invented this little gadget to bring music to your ears

14. Trendy attire that might inspire one to lose lbs: ______ jeans

18. After more than 50 years, the company that makes Silly Putty still fills more than 20,000 _____ a day

15. Fast-paced serial socializing for singles: _____ dating

20. Talent on TV: Simon Cowell says he loved being a judge on ________ ____, which began in 2002 (2 wds) 23. This little dessert covered with frosting is just enough for one

Riddle Answer:

___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

2. Hooray for Bollywood: Location of 2008’s “Slumdog Millionaire”

24. What you put your Heelys on when you’re ready to roll

10. In the 2000s, chai emerged as the hottest craze in ___

17. High-end theater concept beloved by 3-D fans 19. Gates’ 2007 offering left many with Windows stressing 21. Alma mater for “Today” anchor Matt Lauer: abbr. 22. Singer Ricky Martin’s autobiography, released

© 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media Services, Inc.


COLORING CONTEST! Send us your work of art by January 15. You could win a $25 gift certificate to Texas Roadhouse! Be sure to include the info at right in your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 4 and younger, (2) ages 5-8, and (3) ages 9-12. The best artwork will be featured on kidsvt.com, and winners will be named in the February issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, PO Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ KIDS EAT FREE every Monday night with adult purchase.

Artist _____________________________________ Age _______________________________________ Town _____________________________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012 KIDS VT

49


DANCE

D R O P - IN CLASSES

CLASSES

FOR EVERYONE!

Inspiring dancers, bringing art to life

SUPERIOR CLASSICAL BALLET TRAINING VAGANOVA & BALANCHINE METHOD • Tots Ages 2 1/2 to 3 years • Children’s Intro to Dance, Ages 4-5 • Children’s Intro to Ballet, Ages 6-7 • Classical Ballet & Pointe, Ages 8 & up Beginner to Professional • Teen and Adult Ballet, Beginner to Advanced • Hip Hop, Jazz & Tap Ages 5 & up • Modern • Pilates & Yoga • Body Transformer classes • Summer Classes & Camps • Performance Opportunity: “Vermont’s Own Nutcracker” at the Flynn Center for the Arts & “Spring Performance” at Memorial Auditorium.

n t’s Ow ermon cker, VClasses Nutcra begin 7 & 18 September Dec. 1 lyn6! F n! e h at t

W

“Simply the Best” PHOTOS BY KIRSTEN NAGIBA

O

Submit your info by the 15th of the month online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com Try our Drop-in Clay and Drawing classes for Kids, Teens, Families and Adults.

Main Office

• Winner of Reader’s Choice Award “Best Ballet School” Alexander Nagiba, Director

T

List your event for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar.

802-878-2941

• Official School of Vermont Ballet Theater

Register NOW Online www.vbts.org or by calling 878-2941

S GR EAT AR T CL AS SE NT ME IT MM CO NO W/

L

O C A T

I

Essex Campus 21 Carmichael St. • Unit 203 Essex, VT • 802-878-2941

O

N

S

Planning a kids event?

“The Dance Shop” at VBTS 802-879-7001 www.vbts.org info@vbts.org

Ask about our new Savings Card. For more info visit: B U R L I N G T O N C I T YA R T S . O R G or call 865.7166

!

Shelburne Campus 4066 Shelburne Road

calendar

at Shelburne Commons

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JOIN US!

Reminder

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Join the fun at RunVermont’s events for kids! These events are FREE to Ready, Set, Run! participants.

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3/25/11 8:24 AM

This issue’s contest gives you a chance to win a set of four free passes to the Pump House at Jay Peak Resort! See page 7 for details!

FirstRun Fun Run

KIDSVT.COM

January 1, 2012, 11:05am 1/2-mile and 1-mile course through downtown Burlington Costumes encouraged!

Winter Adventures

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012 KIDS VT

50

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS (SEE P. 48)

January 15, February 5, and March 11, 2012, 10am-2pm Games, races & other snow-based activities at the Intervale, Burlington. Ready, Set, Run! is looking for group leaders! For more information contact Joy at (802) 863-8412 or joy@runvermont.org.

Learn more and register now at

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11/29/11 5:25 PM

RIDDLE ANSWER: JUMBLES EAT ALPHABET SOUP GET, PICK, SUNK, TENT RIDDLE ANSWER: What can cats have that dogs can’t —KITTENS


USE YOUR WORDS

Dancing Lessons

Zumba SalsaadultPilates classes

What I’ve learned from The Nutcracker B Y K R I S T I N F L ET C H ER

The goal is to make extreme exertion look effortless.

Monday - Friday 7:00 am to 5:30 pm for children ages 6 weeks - Pre-K Full-time and part-time openings Richmond 434-3891

Berlin 229-2869

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12/13/10 6:05 PM

(802) 475-2022

www.lcmm.org Let the Museum Come to You This Winter!

Kids’ Books & Gifts from our Online Museum Store store.lcmm.org

All Winter Long... • Education Programs Classroom Outreach

Community Presentations

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• Free Online Curricula www.lcmm.org

KIDS VT

Kristin Fletcher is a former sports editor for the St. Albans Messenger and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus who lives in Cabot. She has two children, 13 and 9, and works for Re-Bop Records.

Early Childhood Programs designed specifically for the developmental needs of children.

DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012

My daughter began dancing with Moving Light when she was 5. She’s 13 now and has switched her focus from ballet to modern. The leads in The Nutcracker are high school juniors and seniors, but they look much older, and more sophisticated, to me. You can tell a lot about the expertise of the dancers by watching their faces during the show. The best ones betray no hint of effort or concentration despite the difficulty of the steps they are executing and the thousands of prescribed movements that go into each piece of choreography. Proper form alone takes years to master. Dancers hold themselves with their torsos lifted, while energy is sent down through the feet. Many perfectly timed steps combine to form the fancy footwork. That precision extends to the fingers, to the tilt of the head and, of course, to the point of the toe. As the dancers progress from the little Polichinelles, scooting loosely from under Mother Ginger’s skirt in their colorful clown hats, to middle-school-age candymakers who open the second act, they begin to train their expressions. They may be smiling onstage, but you can tell from their faces that it’s yet another stage direction. There’s a lot to remember out there. Then they take over as rats and soldiers and, in the Land of Sweets, as marzipan and flowers. The music carries them from step to step. Their faces are serene. Offstage, though, it’s a different story. Slick with sweat, they gasp for air as they race through a costume change for their next entrance. Sometimes they’re pleased; other times they’re critical, shaking their heads at a missed step or improper move. Then they step back onstage and their faces are serene again, radiating pure beauty. The goal is to make extreme exertion look effortless. I think about them a lot this time of year. Like the dancers, with their feet grounded and their limbs extending beyond where the body ends, I often feel like I’m working in opposition to myself. I make grand plans and end up frustrated when I can’t pull them off to perfection, especially during the holidays. Then I remember the darkened wings of the stage, the countless hours of preparation that turn persistence into magic and how grace comes from not worrying about the next step. I reach for the peace in knowing that my imperfect presence is enough, and I set my face to joy. 

KIDSVT.COM

FOR THE PAST FOUR YEARS, Tchaikovsky has provided the soundtrack to my holiday season. It’s not enough that pieces from The Nutcracker are used incessantly in commercials at this time of year; as a participant in a production of the ballet, I’m hearing it all the rest of the time, too — even in my dreams. Moving Light Dance Company, based in central Vermont, will bring The Nutcracker to life for the fifth year on December 17 and 18 at the Barre Opera House. I’ve been part of the cast since the beginning. I won’t be performing in the show this year, but I’ll be working backstage —  directly below the stage, actually —  coordinating the makeup room and helping the dancers get into character. I got involved with Moving Light because my daughter started taking dance classes. I took tap and jazz when I was younger, but by eighth grade I’d moved on to team sports. I don’t remember wishing I’d continued, but when my daughter, Emily, started taking dance classes at Moving Light, I remembered how much fun it was. I volunteered as a backstage mom, then as the makeup lady for semiannual productions. I also took dance classes myself. When Moving Light’s director asked me to join the first-act Christmasparty scene for the inaugural Green Mountain Nutcracker, I didn’t hesitate to say yes. One year, I was a party guest; later one of the hosts. Tryouts and rehearsals start for the dancers in mid-September. The oldest girls in the program take regular classes and typically spend up to seven hours on Sundays rehearsing for the show. I loved seeing it come together each year, but also cursed myself for making the commitment, which forced me to scale back my own plans for the holiday and spend the days before Christmas in a mad scramble. I’ll miss the adrenaline rush of the opening bars of the overture, but not the frenzy of production week: leaving the house at 8 a.m. for a regular workday and not returning home until 10:30 at night. Some parents can roll with that kind of schedule disruption — easy going ones and the ones who are experts at planning ahead. I become preoccupied with feeding times and bedtimes and find myself starting countless sentences with, “If I were a better mom…” and ending them with “my kids would not be eating Cool Ranch Doritos for dinner.”

11/25/11 12:11 PM


A View of a Lifetime!

Actual Images From the Womb.

$20 OFF

Any 3D/4D Ultrasound Package. Call between Dec. 9-23 to book your appointment. Appointment must be before Feb. 1, 2012 to receive discount.

LOCATED IN THE BURLINGTON AREA

(802) 497-0872

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11/25/11 11:56 AM

Profile for Kids VT

Kids VT - December 2011 – January 2012 - Double Issue  

The Foster-to-Adoption Option, Broken Crayon Meltdown, Standup Comedy For Kids, Going Nutcrackers, Teaching Your Kids To Ski

Kids VT - December 2011 – January 2012 - Double Issue  

The Foster-to-Adoption Option, Broken Crayon Meltdown, Standup Comedy For Kids, Going Nutcrackers, Teaching Your Kids To Ski

Profile for kidsvt
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