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Children’s Mental Health Ontario

Annual Report 2013


Table of Contents 1 3 5 8 10 11

Mission, Vision, Goals and Values A Year in Review Policy Development Engagement with Allies Accreditation Youth Engagement

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Advocacy Knowledge Exchange Shared Services for Members Children’s Mental Health Week Parent and Family Education and Awareness Campaign Change the View

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Communications and Media CMHO Member Agencies CMHO Board of Directors CMHO Staff Statement of Revenue and Expenses


A Message from the Board Chair and CEO Much of Children’s Mental Health Ontario’s work in 2012-13 aimed to fulfil our two-part mandate in support of the major transformation that is underway for Ontario’s community-based child and youth mental health system. The five-part transformation plan was announced at our conference in November 2012, setting the stage for a concerted series of activities designed to: 1.

Support CMHO’s member agencies through a 3 year period of change and disruption so they will be well-positioned to assume new roles in the transformed system, and 2. Ensure that our members’ frontline knowledge and expertise informs the government’s decision-making about the shape and implementation of system transformation. In order to meet the new challenges of system transformation, we re-aligned responsibilities in our own staff leadership team, creating the positions of Director of Member Relations and Director of Government and Community Relations. This re-alignment enabled us to significantly increase our consultations with members about the Ministry’s proposals for change, and to produce a strong initial position statement about the conditions needed to ensure that the transformed system is sustainable. We were also able to expand our series of Management Webinars that was launched in 2012 to help prepare member agencies for some of the coming change management and collaborative leadership challenges they will face – these webinars build on the outstanding success we have had for more than four years with our series of Clinical Webcasts. During the year we also completed the transition of the management of CMHO’s accreditation program to the Canadian Centre for Accreditation (CCA), which officially launched on April 1st. While CMHO continues to own and update the accreditation standards for child and youth mental health programs, CCA now delivers a more independent, third-party review process that has high credibility with government funders as well as service users. Our advocacy and public awareness work also accelerated during 2012-13, with a month-long effort in April to reach parents who see early signs of difficulty in their children, our successful and growing “Change the View” video contest which culminated with an awards presentation during Children’s Mental Health Week in May, and pre-budget submissions that stressed the need for new funding to address agencies’ operational and infrastructure costs, such as clinical supervision and information technology. There’s so much else to tell – about our hugely-popular website, our leading-edge youth engagement work, our strong suite of shared services for members, and more – that we encourage you to read through the rest of this Annual Report for more details about how we are pursuing our commitment to champion the right of every child and youth in Ontario who needs mental health services to receive them quickly and effectively.

Patricia Day Chair, Board of Directors

Gordon Floyd President & CEO


Our Values Dignity - We believe that children and youth with mental health challenges have the right to be loved, respected, supported, and included in their families, communities and schools. Family - We believe that functional families, in all their diversity, are the most important resource

available to children and youth. Availability - We believe that children and youth have the right to mental health treatment and support services that are timely, safe and effective, and delivered in the context of their family, culture, community and school. Investment - We believe that meeting the mental health needs of children and youth requires significant and sustained investment in human, technological, and physical resources. Engagement - We believe that children and youth have the right to be engaged in decisions regarding their own treatment and the design and delivery of child and youth mental health services. Collaboration - We believe that children and youth benefit from close collaboration and shared responsibility among families, caregivers, service providers, communities, educators and other professionals, and governments. Integration - We believe that community services, including agencies, schools and hospitals, must work as integrated networks to meet the mental health needs of children and youth. Accountability - We believe that mental health services for children and youth must be evaluated based on outcomes, accreditation standards, and ethical stewardship.

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Our Mission, Vision and Goals Our mission is to champion the right of every child and youth in Ontario to mental health and well-being. Our vision is an Ontario where every child and youth grows up mentally healthy. Our vision for Children’s Mental Health Ontario is to be the primary catalyst in strengthening and enhancing mental health services for children, youth and their families in Ontario. We have three strategic goals: ● Support and strengthen our members, and advocate for child & youth mental health services ● Provide leadership and engage our members, families, youth and other allies to reform Ontario’s child and youth mental health system ● Develop the financial and organizational capacity necessary to ensure the achievement of Children’s Mental Health Ontario’s strategic plan

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A Year in Review

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Together with bright red communications, CMHO developed the Parent and Family Education and Awareness Campaign to educate parents on the signs of mental health issues. With RBC as the lead partner in the campaign, CMHO successfully connected directly with parents and families to help start a dialogue on the early signs associated with mental health issues in children and youth. We distributed 7150 green ribbons and 2500 lapel pins to our members and allies for Children’s Mental Health Week. CMHO aired its 4th season of webinars. Over 715 staff from CMHO member centres participated in a total of 13 webinars. Responsibility for operating the accreditation program for CMHO member centres transferred from CMHO to the Canadian Centre for Accreditation. This change, the result of over three years of planning and preparation, means that accreditation is now an independent, third-party process. The New Mentality grew to ten groups in its 6th year. CMHO’s Public Policy Committee established two Task Forces to oversee the development of two CMHO position statements, engaging 17 executive directors from accredited members plus several allies.

The New Mentality hosted the largest ever Disable the Label leadership training conference. The annual four-day conference welcomed 65 participants, including 36 youth and 29 adult allies representing 10 CMHO agencies. Staff from the Ministry of Children and Youth Services also participated. CMHO’s two-day annual conference in November 2012, with more than 30 workshops, attracted 600 attendees. CMHO released two position papers: Easing Transitions for Children, Youth and Emerging Adults and Towards a Sustainable Future: Working Together to Transform Ontario’s Child and Youth Mental Health System. Both of the statements have been used as valuable advocacy tools. CMHO developed a sophisticated Find a Centre mapping tool, allowing the public to search for services online by typing in their postal code. During Children’s Mental Health Week, CMHO met and surpassed our goal of reaching 1000 Facebook followers. CMHO’s Facebook graphic promoting Children’s Mental Health Week was shared by 751 Facebook users and seen by over 56,000 people. Change the View posters and brochures were mailed to all CMHO member agencies, 838 Ontario secondary schools, 975 libraries, 29 public health units, and all members of provincial parliament.

www.kidsmentalhealth.ca was consistently among the top four mental health-focused websites in Ontario. Accreditation was awarded to 15 member centres. CMHO received over 100 video entries during our 4th annual Change the View contest. Thirty-seven member agencies completed our Member Services Satisfaction Survey, providing feedback about CMHO’s services and benefits. The highest satisfaction ratings went to our group liability insurance (offered through Moore-McLean), our Fast Reports e-newsletter, our biennial salary/ compensation survey, and the training module we provide regarding the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. Over the course of CMHO’s Parent and Family Education and Awareness Campaign, the number of visits to our homepage increased 32% from last year at the same time. Traffic to CMHO’s website continues to grow, with an average of 12,000 unique visitors each month in 2012– 2013. Traffic increased by more than 23% from 2011–2012 levels. The most frequently-viewed pages are those that list career opportunities, news and events, and information for parents. Our YouTube page for Change the View 2013 has been viewed 10,500 times.

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Policy Development CMHO produced two position papers this year. The first, Easing Transitions for Children, Youth and Emerging Adults, was released in January 2013 and distributed to members, MPPs, government, and other stakeholders, as well as posted in the policy section of our website. The statement discusses the difficult transitions that children and youth face when navigating through and between mental health services and education, health, youth justice, and child welfare services. It also reflects on the challenges associated with transitioning from early childhood to school-age services and from the child and youth mental health system to adult mental health and addictions. After completing Easing Transitions for Children, Youth and Emerging Adults, CMHO’s Public Policy Committee began work on a series of position statements directly pertaining to the Ministry’s plans for change within the system. The first position statement of the series, released in May 2013, was Towards a Sustainable Future:

Working Together to Transform Ontario’s Child and Youth Mental Health System. The statement outlines the historic issues that have led to the current shape of the child and youth mental health system and highlights methods to improve its sustainability. At the root of the statement lies the importance of improving positive outcomes and the quality of care for children and youth with mental health and addiction issues.

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Both of the statements released this year have been used as valuable advocacy tools to guide discussions with MPPs and senior officials at in-person meetings, and to provide an overview of particular challenges facing the sector. Our goal is to release the subsequent position statements in the new series in a timely manner to inform the Ministry’s decision-making process regarding system transformation. CMHO’s Public Policy Committee carefully selected the topics after consultation with our board of directors and the executive directors of our member agencies. The position statements are intended to reflect the major elements of system transformation in order to have the greatest impact on the proposed changes. The selected paper topics that will be released in early 2014 are

Lead Agency Capacity, an Outcomes Framework for Accountability, a Multi-Sector Collaboration Model, and the development of a Funding Model. Additionally, CMHO’s Youth Action Committee (YAC) will be releasing a policy paper this fall. The YAC posed the question, “What can schools do to create a more supportive environment for children and youth with mental health and addiction issues?” After gathering a substantial amount of data from online surveys, focus groups, and through our Change the View video contest, YAC members analyzed the results to create a statement that outlines the issues at hand and provides recommendations for the future, most importantly, from a youth perspective. With support from CMHO, the paper (titled Building Better School Environments

for Youth with Mental Health and Addictions Issues) will be distributed to educators, government, and mental health agencies across the province.


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Engagement with Allies During the past year, CMHO worked closely with several allies to develop a better-coordinated system of mental health services, with accredited community-based services at the centre. Together with a large number of mental health and education organizations, CMHO continues to play an active role in the Coalition for Children and Youth Mental Health. The Coalition is led by the Ontario Public Schools Boards’ Association. Its purpose is to advocate for integrated public policy and collaboration across all sectors that serve the mental health needs of students. This past year, the Coalition focused primarily on student success, mental health literacy and awareness in schools, inter-ministerial/multi-sector collaboration, integrated public policy, and ensuring the student and parent voice. CMHO continues to play a leadership role in the creation of 18 service collaboratives, with Gordon Floyd cochairing the Provincial Collaboratives Advisory Group. A service collaborative is a network of individuals, agencies, and organizations that provide mental health and addiction services in a particular Ontario community. Their role is to address gaps across sectors by improving services and coordination at three key transition points: the transition from children and youth services to adult services; the transition between hospital-based services to community agencies; and the transition between justice and health systems. The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is leading the development of service collaboratives under the auspices of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. CMHO continues to provide core funding to and work closely with Parents for Children’s Mental Health, a

provincial, non-profit, parent-led organization that provides a voice for families who face the challenges of child and youth mental health issues. CMHO staff members serve on the Advisory Committee of the Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health. The Centre works with child and youth mental health agencies to strengthen services and build an effective and accessible system of care. The Centre offers tools, services, products, and training to help professionals find, use, and share evidence that will improve outcomes on the front line of care. Gordon Floyd is Vice-Chair of the National Alliance for Children and Youth (NACY), a non-profit umbrella organization that brings national organizations together in a collaborative network dedicated to enhancing the well-being of children and youth in Canada. Gordon also co-chairs a NACY working group to develop a Canadawide agenda for children, youth, and their families, including sections on mental health and well-being, violence, bullying, and peer victimization. CMHO is part of the Mental Health Nurses Reference Group facilitating the introduction of mental health nurses in schools. The Reference Group was struck by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The Ontario Mental Health and Addictions Alliance continued to meet this past year with efforts focused on developing a strategy and implementation plan in anticipation of a possible election in 2013. CMHO and nine other mental health and addiction organizations with province-wide mandates came together to update the Alliance’s “asks” and supporting documentation.

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Accreditation Accreditation is truly a seal of approval. Consumers can be assured that accredited organizations have undergone an extensive internal and external review process that measures their practices against the sector or industry standard. These organizations are encouraged to use best practice approaches in all areas of service delivery, governance, and administration. On April 1, 2013, responsibility for operating the accreditation program for CMHO member centres transferred from CMHO to the Canadian Centre for Accreditation (CCA). This change, the result of over three years of planning and preparation, means that accreditation is now an independent, third-party process. CMHO continues to have close links with the accreditation process provided by CCA. As a founding member, CMHO has two representatives on the CCA board of directors. Additionally, CMHO has retained ownership of the Child and Youth Mental Health Standards Module. CMHO continues to be responsible for ensuring that the accreditation standards applied to child and youth mental health programs and services are relevant and up-to-date and reflect good practice in the field. Children’s Mental Health Ontario, formerly the Ontario Association of Children’s Mental Health Centres (OACMHC), developed and operated its own accreditation program for over 20 years. During that time, 229 accreditation site reviews took place and 125 staff from member centres volunteered as site reviewers. Accreditation committee and working group members contributed countless volunteer hours over the years. We are very pleased that our members continue to have access to an excellent, high quality accreditation program through CCA.

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Youth Engagement Youth engagement is a core value of CMHO; it is an effective practice that mobilizes youth to influence and contribute to the system that serves them. Through The New Mentality, CMHO engages and empowers youth to be leaders in creating more accessible mental health services. The programming decisions for CMHO’s New Mentality program rest with a core team of youth and adults from across Ontario. The New Mentality received a large Laidlaw Foundation grant in November 2012 to build social infrastructure. This funding allowed for the hiring of a full-time network coordinator and a summer policy intern to help write a youth-led policy paper. It also paid for a full-scale evaluation of The New Mentality program and for a provincial core team to convene regularly around program design and governance. The Ministry of Children and Youth Services also provided a grant to directly support New Mentality groups and a summer training event. Funds from CMHO support staffing for The New Mentality.

The New Mentality Groups CMHO contracts annually with local host agencies and provides seed funding to each New Mentality group. The New Mentality continued to grow throughout its 6th year in 2012–2013, and now consists of ten groups. Agencies hosting a New Mentality group identify one staff to act as an adult ally and two young people to act as facilitators for the group. Each group has 5 to 20 people. The youth decide on the activities to be undertaken and how the funding will be used to support their goals. As such, each New Mentality group is autonomous and self-directed. The following agencies partnered with CMHO to deliver New Mentality groups: ● ● ● ● ● ●

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Algoma Family Services Delisle Youth Services Dufferin Family and Child Services East Metro Youth Services New Path Youth and Family Services Pathways for Children and Youth


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The Phoenix Centre for Children and Youth Reach Out Centre for Kids (ROCK) Sarnia-Lambton Rebound Windsor Regional Children’s Centre

Anti-stigma Projects The groups worked in partnership with adult allies and mobilized youth to decrease the stigma surrounding mental illness, increase youth leadership capacity, and raise mental health awareness. By amplifying the youth voice, The New Mentality is working toward effective systemic change and setting the standard for youth engagement. Groups delivered a range of unique projects, including a YouTube video series, a public art project, speaking engagements in local communities, and a regional mental health awareness conference.

Leadership Training Once again, the New Mentality hosted Disable the Label, an annual four-day leadership training conference held at YMCA Geneva Park in Orillia, Ontario. The event was the largest ever, with 65 participants, including 36 youth and 29 adult allies representing 11 CMHO agencies. Staff from the Ministry of Children and Youth Services also joined, providing them with an opportunity to hear the views of young people who have accessed the system first hand.

Program Evaluation A program evaluation, including nine in-person focus groups and two phone-in focus groups with all New Mentality groups, confirmed that The New Mentality model is working. Youth have a true sense of belonging and acceptance in a supportive, non-judgmental, and safe context. They have a stronger voice in the system and develop new life skills. Recommendations arising from the evaluation include providing more support, such as funding, branding, communications, and linkages between the groups; and expanding The New Mentality network to include more diverse representation of ages, gender, and geographic representation.

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Advocacy Pre-Budget Submission 2013 CMHO’s pre-budget submission focused on the economic benefits of investing in child and youth mental health. It detailed current pressures within the sector and proposed greater flexibility for child and youth mental health organizations to apply funds where the needs are greatest. The submission called for greater resourcing related to the costs that plans to transform the system are likely to present. Finally, CMHO recommended that the government continue to provide funding for child and youth mental health as announced in 2011. The submission was informed by broad consultation with member agencies through the Advocacy and Satellite Working Group, and reflected feedback received from members via a survey on wage restraint. The pre-budget submission was put forward to the Ministry of Finance in March 2013. When the 2013 Ontario Budget was announced on May 2, it protected the $93 million that was committed for 2013–14 and reiterated the government’s commitment to the Comprehensive Mental Health and Addictions Strategy (focused on children and youth during its first three years).

Moving on Mental Health—MCYS plan for System Transformation The Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) first announced Moving on Mental Health at CMHO’s annual conference in November 2012. CMHO has actively supported the successful implementation of Moving on Mental Health by engaging members and seeking their feedback on the plan via meetings, surveys and teleconference. All of the data received have been compiled, analyzed, and submitted to the System Transition Team at MCYS and circulated to members. CMHO has developed good working relationships with staff and leaders of the System Transition Team and conversations are ongoing. CMHO has also been meeting with senior political staff at MCYS and has met with various MPPs and the new Minister of Children and Youth Services to discuss the impact that proposed changes are likely to have on the child and youth mental health sector.

CMHO has been involved in MCYS’s consultation process since the fall. CMHO staff, member agency executive directors, and board members/former board members are active on advisory groups established by MCYS, including the Expert Panel on System Transformation, the Service Framework Advisory Committee, and the Parent Youth Advisory Committee.

The Minister and Minister’s Office CMHO has developed a good working relationship with the new Minister of Children and Youth Services, Ms. Teresa Piruzza, since her appointment in the spring of 2013. During Children’s Mental Health Week, Minister Piruzza stood in the house to deliver a statement on child and youth mental health and called on all MPPs to wear green ribbons. CMHO staff members facilitated this statement and the distribution of green ribbons, and were on-hand at Queen’s Park as the Minister’s invited guests to hear the address. The minister and her staff also attended a public event in Peel at which CMHO announced the winner of our Change the View contest.

CMHO Position Papers This year, CMHO produced two position papers. Easing Transitions for Children, Youth and Emerging Adults was released in January 2013, while Towards a Sustainable Future: Working Together to Strengthen Ontario’s Child and Youth Mental Health System was distributed in May 2013. These valuable advocacy tools are being used to guide discussions with MPPs and senior officials and to provide an overview of particular challenges facing the sector.

Supplementary Advocacy Initiatives CMHO also supported a number of other advocacy initiatives taking place this year within the broader non-profit sector. CMHO actively worked with the Ontario Non-Profit Network to inform their efforts to oppose wage restraint in the broader public sector. CMHO also supported the Housing Opens Doors campaign developed by the Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association to raise awareness about the importance of affordable housing.

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Knowledge Exchange CMHO aired its 4th season of webinars this year. Over 715 staff from CMHO member centres participated in a total of 13 webinars. Over the years, CMHO has made remarkable progress on the delivery and uptake of these webinars. The webinars are increasingly used as centre-wide professional learning and development opportunities for staff. In addition to our clinical series, this year we launched a management webinar stream. The management series features guest speakers presenting on a variety of topics, including organizational management, human resources, and administration. These webinars are peer-led and showcase innovative, timely, and leading-edge evidence-informed practices occurring in the field. CMHO’s webinar series provides attendees with an opportunity to share knowledge, network, and debate current issues. The 2012–2013 webinars included: ● Adapting Therapy for Children and Youth with Learning Disabilities (LD): Practical Ideas for Therapists ● RAP, TAP – Open the Door!: Identifying and treating high-risk children and their families using a collaborative community approach by children’s mental health with schools, fire, and police services ● Youth Mental Health Court Program ● What’s Up Walk-In: Developing a five day per week citywide walk-in clinic through inter-agency collaboration ● Clear Directions Substance Use Day Treatment Program ● Effects of Family Violence on Children: Understanding Impact to Inform Intervention ● One Day a Week Walk-in Model ● Lutherwood – Building for Success ● Did you know that up to 50% of you could experience a claim in the next 12 months? ● Amalgamation Experiences ● Tips on Cross-Cultural Communication ● Understanding the New Ontario Non-Profit Corporation Act

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Shared Services for Members CMHO offers a suite of shared services to member centres. In 2012–13, these services included: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Commercial Group Liability Insurance (Moore-McLean Corporate Insurance Ltd.) Group Home and Automobile Insurance for employees of accredited members (MooreMcLean Corporate Insurance Ltd./Waterloo Insurance) Group Health Benefits (HealthSource Plus) Staff Training (Safeguards) Legal Services (Rosen Sunshine LLP) ONE Mail Secure Patient Information Exchange (eHealth Ontario) The Inclusion Quarterly! (Diversity At Work) Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabiliteis Act (AODA) Training Group Acquisition Initiative Network (GAIN) Shared Purchasing Services

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Children’s Mental Health Week Across the province, CMHO community-based member centres organized numerous events to celebrate Children’s Mental Health Week. Thanks to their leadership, close to 40 communities from across Ontario took part in events that brought attention to our cause and emphasized the importance of eliminating stigma. On Monday May 6th, CMHO kicked-off Children’s Mental Health Week with an hour-long guest Twitter session with the Ministry of Children and Youth Services. This gave us the opportunity to share information about children’s mental health and promote the work of our member centres. Municipalities held flag-raising ceremonies and made proclamations officially declaring the first full week of May Children’s Mental Health Week. Libraries set up displays on children’s mental health, including posters and agency brochures. Children’s mental health agencies hosted contests, information sessions by staff experts, display booths, human chains, and much more. School boards worked with local child and youth mental health service providers to host events such as walks for children’s mental health. In addition, media outlets across Ontario reported on the many great events that took place during Children’s Mental Health Week, as well as the importance of raising awareness. There was a flurry of activity at Queen’s Park during Children’s Mental Health Week. Given the Member Statements, Ministerial Statements, Oral Questions, and a Motion for the Wearing of Green Ribbons in the Legislature, it was evident that child and youth mental health is a priority for our provincial legislators. CMHO’s Facebook graphic promoting Children’s Mental Health Week was shared by 751 Facebook users and seen by over 56,000 people — a CMHO record!

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Parent and family Education and Awareness Campaign Together with bright red communications, CMHO developed the Parent and Family Education and Awareness Campaign to educate parents on the signs of mental health issues and direct them to CMHO’s website to learn more. The campaign was designed to highlight how difficult it can be to see the early warning signs of mental health issues and to prompt parents and families to be more vigilant and more in-tune with their children’s moods and behaviours. The campaign featured two distinct yet complimentary poster images, termed “Knowing” and “Because.” The month-long campaign took place in the lead-up to Children’s Mental Health Week. With the creative ads at the heart of the campaign, CMHO engaged parents and families using the following: ● Media outreach (print ads, online content, community-based poster displays/mall signage) ● CMHO website as an online information portal ● Social media outreach ● Member agency engagement Over the course of the campaign, the number of visits to Children’s Mental Health Ontario’s homepage increased 32% from last year at the same time.

happy, fun loving, obsessive, carefree, funny, excited, rebellious, shy, energetic, worried, studious, active, social, outgoing, agreeable, withdrawn, depressed, even-tempered, anxious, agitated, logical, angry, easy-going, smiling, expressive, open, frustrated, playful, destructive, short-tempered, motivated, erratic, reliable, responsible. Knowing what to look for is the first step. Learn more. Find help. kidsmentalhealth.ca

With RBC as the lead partner in the campaign, the Parent and Family Awareness and Education Campaign achieved, and in some cases, surpassed, expected goals and outcomes. It allowed CMHO to connect directly with parents and families to help start a dialogue on the early signs associated with mental health issues in children and youth. CMHO would like to thank our members, RBC Children’s Mental Health Project, bright red communications inc., Parent’s for Children’s Mental Health, and all of our supporters across Ontario for making the Parent and Family Education and Awareness Campaign a success.

are hard to read.

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CHANGE THE VIEW

For the 4th year in a row, CMHO celebrated Children’s Mental Health Week with a YouTube video contest called Change the View. The contest is a joint effort by CMHO and the Youth Action Committee (YAC). The YAC is an advisory committee to CMHO, made up of youth from across the province who work to reduce stigma and improve mental health services for children and youth. This year’s contest engaged young people in promoting healthy school environments for students with mental health and/or addictions problems. From February to April 2013, Ontario youth ages 13–25 were invited to create videos showing what schools can do to encourage support for all students. In several schools, teachers incorporated Change the View into the curriculum. bright red communications once again provided pro bono support, coordinating the design and development of Change the View posters and brochures and securing free advertising. Promotional materials were sent to all Ontario secondary schools, libraries, public health units, members of provincial parliament, and CMHO member agencies. Youth representatives from Dufferin Child & Family Services and Kinark promoted the contest on the Rogers Cable program Local Notes. The Ministry of Children and Youth Services, the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies, and the Ontario Association of Residences Treating Youth lent their support to the cause by promoting the contest online. CMHO received over 100 video entries. The winning videos can be viewed on www.kidsmentalhealth.ca.

Hon. Teresa Piruzza, Minister of Children and Youth Services, presents Lankesh Patel with a prize for winning Change The View 2013.

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“It’s almost taboo to talk about, and I think that most people don’t know how to talk about it…The more people step up and share their story, the more awareness will be generated – which brings us that much closer to getting rid of the taboo” – Danielle Poirier, 17, Change the View Runner-up “We see people and are quick to judge them based on what we expect them to be like, but it isn’t until you really get to know someone that you understand their true story.” - Lankesh Patel, 17, Change the View 2013 Winner

“When an entire student-body can unite together in support of a cause, it’s a powerful thing.” - Hailey Shultz, 16, Change the View Runner-up

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Communications and Media Traffic to CMHO’s website continues to grow, with an average of 12,000 unique visitors each month. Traffic in 2012–2013 increased by more than 23% from 2011–2012 levels, and www.kidsmentalhealth.ca was consistently among the top four mental health-focused websites in Ontario. The most frequently-viewed pages are those that list career opportunities, news and events, and information for parents. Several recent improvements have been made to CMHO’s website, including a much-improved map-based Find a Centre feature, updates to parent information about signs and disorders, and the addition of policy and clinical resources to assist professionals, including teachers. Every day, parents and professionals call CMHO looking for help or information. As the volume of calls increases, the need for a consistent approach to handling them has also grown. During the summer, an internal task force prepared a handbook of standard, or template, responses to some of the most common calls we receive. CMHO staff field inquiries from journalists almost every week. Often we connect reporters with someone at a member agency who has expertise in the topic they are covering, or with a youth or parent who is willing to be interviewed. CMHO’s CEO Gordon Floyd also often participates in media interviews. CMHO is increasingly active on social media, and our reach is growing. Our followers on Facebook have grown from 731 to 1,100 so far in 2013, and our Twitter followers have more than doubled from 640 at the beginning of the year to 1,442. CMHO’s Twitter followers include the Ministry of Child and Youth Services, the Mental Health Commission of Canada, and the Centre of Excellence on Child and Youth Mental Health.

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CMHO member agencies Adventure Place Aisling Discoveries Child & Family Centre Algoma Family Services Anago (Non) Residential Resources Inc. Associated Youth Services of Peel Blue Hills Child and Family Centre Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington Dufferin Carizon Family and Community Services Catholic Family Services - St. Martin’s Manor Central Toronto Youth Services Centre for Addiction & Mental Health (Child Youth & Family Program) Centre for Children & Families in the Justice System Centre Psychosocial Chatham-Kent Children’s Services Child & Adolescent Clinic, Brampton Civic Hospital Campus Child and Adolescent Services, Public Health Services, City of Hamilton Child and Family Centre/Centre de l’enfant et de la famille/ Ngodweaangizwin Aaskaagewin Child and Parent Resource Institute (CPRI) Child Development Institute Children First Children’s Centre Thunder Bay Children’s Mental Health of Leeds & Grenville Children’s Mental Health Services, Hastings and Prince Edward Counties Chimo Youth and Family Services Craigwood Youth Services Crossroads Children’s Centre Delisle Youth Services Dilico Anishinabek Family Care Dufferin Child & Family Services East Metro Youth Services The Etobicoke Children’s Centre Family, Youth and Child Services of Muskoka FIREFLY Frontenac Youth Services The George Hull Centre for Children and Families Griffin Centre Haldimand-Norfolk R.E.A.C.H. Hands TheFamilyHelpNetwork.ca / Mains LeReseaudaideauxfamilles.ca The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre Humewood House

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Huron House Boys Home Huron-Perth Centre for Children and Youth Integra J.D. Diamond Adolescent Centre, Jewish Family and Child Kenora-Rainy River Districts Child & Family Services Kinark Child and Family Services Lutherwood Lynwood Charlton Centre Maryvale Adolescent & Family Services The Massey Centre for Women Merrymount Children’s Centre Mothercraft Nelson Youth Centres New Path Youth and Family Services Nexus Youth Services North Eastern Ontario Family and Children’s Services North of Superior Counselling Programs Oolagen Youth Mental Health Open Doors for Lanark Children and Youth Oxford-Elgin Child and Youth Centre Parent-Child & Youth Clinic, Quinte Healthcare Corporation Pathstone Mental Health Pathways for Children and Youth Peel Children’s Centre The Phoenix Centre for Children and Families Point in Time Centre for Children, Youth and Parents Rapport Youth & Family Services Reach Out Centre for Kids (ROCK) Regional Children’s Psychiatric Centre Roberts/Smart Centre Rosalie Hall St. Clair Child & Youth Services St. Leonard’s Community Services St. Mary’s Home Thistletown Regional Centre Turning Point Youth Services Vanier Children’s Services Western Area Youth Services Windsor Regional Children’s Centre Woodview Mental Health & Autism Services The York Centre for Children, Youth and Families Yorktown Child & Family Centre Youth Services Bureau of Ottawa/ Bureau des services à la jeunesse d’Ottawa YouthLink Youville Centre


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CMHO board of directors Adam Borgida Joanne Curran Patricia Day Tony Diniz Natricia Drummond Gordon Dunning Gaston Franklyn Kelly Henderson Jacques Kenny Peter Kinch Richard Lambert-Belanger Joanne Lowe Jackie Mitchell Marie Parsons Sylvia Pivko Diane Sacks Bill Saul Terri Sparling

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Children’s Mental Health Ontario


CMHO STAFF Gordon Floyd President & CEO Joanne Johnston Director of Member Relations Sibel Cicek Director of Government & Community Relations Alejo Freire Data Analyst Brian O’Hara Manager, BCFPI Implementation & Information Systems Cathy Dyer Program Coordinator, The New Mentality (TNM) Caralyn Quan New Mentality Network Coordinator Christine Pelletier Manager of Communications Frances Ruffolo Manager of Knowledge Exchange Jeffrel Sto. Domingo Web Applications Developer Margo Warren Manager of Public Policy Marta Condolo Administrative Assistant Novlette Samuels Finance Officer Verna McPhee Executive Assistant

Annual Report 2012-2013

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REvenue for 2012-13 Member Fees BCFPI Annual Conference Donations New Mentality Other

53% 24% 12% 5% 5% 1%

1,067,000 479,188 249,678 94,561 99,403 25,982

100%

$2,015,812

53%

24% 12% 5% 5%

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Children’s Mental Health Ontario

Other

New Mentality

Donations

Annual Conference

BCFPI

Member Fees

1%


expenditure by activity 2012-13 Accreditation Administration Advocacy & Communication BCFPI Children's Mental Health Week Governance Member Services & Knowledge Exchange The New Mentality

10% 11% 17% 23% 7% 7% 17% 8%

194,822 226,520 335,245 443,028 131,039 143,480 325,837 160,473

100%

$1,960,444

17% Accreditation

7%

BCFPI Children's Mental Health Week

10% 11%

Administration Advocacy & Communication

8%

7% 23%

17%

Governance Member Services & Knowledge Exchange The New Mentality

Annual Report 2012-2013

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Children’s Mental Health Ontario SantÊ mentale pour enfants Ontario 40 St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 309 Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4T 1M9 Phone: (416) 921-2109 Toll Free: 1-888-234-7054 Fax: (416) 921-7600 Email: info@cmho.org www.kidsmentalhealth.ca facebook.com/kidsmentalhealth

twitter.com/kidsmentalhlth

youtube.com/2013changetheview


Children's Mental Health Ontario Annual Report 2013