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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Toolkit

Start your week off right, make Monday family night!

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Table of Contents Introduction

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Why are Family Dinners Important?

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Why Cook with Kids?

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Who Can Use this Kit?

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Teachers College Columbia University Pilot Study

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Best Practices from Our Experts

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Let’s Get Started!

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Lesson Plans

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Posters and Handouts

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© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Introduction In the past 30 years, there has been a dramatic shift not only in what we eat, but how we eat. We’ve seen childhood obesity rates skyrocket. Family dinner has all but disappeared as more of us rely on processed snack foods, microwavables and takeout meals. Our children are no longer engaged with how their food gets to their plate, or connected to culinary traditions. One of the most effective ways to increase kids’ consumption of healthy foods is to get them actively involved in cooking with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. That’s why we started The Kids Cook Monday: it’s a weekly opportunity for families to share the lessons of meal preparation and nutritious eating. Research has shown that Monday prompts can help start and sustain healthy behaviors. And when Monday is family dinner night, the meal becomes a fun event, ensuring that parents and kids start the week with quality time together. The Kids Cook Monday is a non-profit public health initiative of The Monday Campaigns, in association with Columbia, Johns Hopkins and Syracuse Universities. We offer a wide variety of tools to help families cook and eat together including a toolkit for parents, weekly family-friendly recipes on TheKidsCookMonday.org and active communities on Facebook and Twitter. In our Educators’ Kit, we’ve assembled the best practices, lesson plans and kid-friendly recipes that leading childhood nutrition and education experts use to encourage students to engage in weekly family dinners. Inside you’ll discover the benefits of letting kids help in the kitchen, learn about age-appropriate culinary tasks and get the step-by-step information you need to plan kids cooking lessons and help families start their own culinary traditions. Whether you are a teacher, chef, camp counselor or community leader, we hope that this information can help you start a Kids Cook Monday program that will keep going, both at home and in the classroom.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Why are Family Dinners Important? • Research published in The American Academy of Pediatrics found that kids who have regular family dinners experience a lower incidence of obesity.1 • Columbia University’s National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse found that kids who eat family dinners get better grades in school and are less likely to try drugs or alcohol.2 • A recent data review by Rutgers University suggests that family dinners can also boost produce consumption and reduce feelings of depression in teens.3

Why Cook With Kids? • Exposure to scratch cooking, particularly at a young age, helps kids develop a taste for fresh, wholesome ingredients. • Cooking together offers the perfect opportunity to talk about nutrition and help kids understand the personal and environmental impact of their diets. • Kids are much more likely to try new foods if they have had a hand in preparing them. • Kitchen time is quality time, when parents can share family stories or ask children about their day at school or activities over the weekend. • Cooking is an invaluable life skill - starting children early leads to great competency in the kitchen. Plus kids can learn other skills like science, reading comprehension, fractions, measuring, and fine motor skills. • Teaching culinary skills can also boost children’s confidence and allows them to take pride in the meal they created.

Adapted from Easy Meals to Cook with Kids by Julie Negrin © 2010 The book is available at www.JulieNegrin.com 1 Anderson, Sarah E., and Robert C. Whitaker. “Household Routines and Obesity in US Preschool Aged Children.” Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics 8 Feb. (2010). Web. 2010. 2 Califano, Joseph A., Lee C. Bollinger, Columba Bush, Kenneth I. Chenault, and Jamie L. Curtis. “The Importance of Family Dinners.” The National Center of Addition and Substance Abuse at Columbia University Sept. (2003): 1-14. Web. 2003. 3 Hsu, Christine. “Families Who Eat at the Table Are Healthiest.” Medical Daily. Rutgers University, 24 Apr. 2012. Web. 21 June 2012. © The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Who Can Use this Kit? Each learning environment offers unique opportunities and challenges. Whether you are working with a full kitchen or hosting sessions in your local community center, The Kids Cook Monday is a simple way to get children and their parents plugged into the art of cooking. Chefs Culinary professionals are leading the way in nutrition education through their participation in programs like the Let’s Move campaign’s Chefs Move to Schools. Monday is typically a slow night in the restaurant industry, making it the perfect time to invite the next generation of young chefs into your kitchen. Children will be delighted to experience a real restaurant kitchen and pick up tips from a professional chef. Plus, preparation and clean up will be a snap compared to a bustling Saturday night! Educators Classroom cooking can support many school subjects, like health, math, history and social studies. Even if schools do not offer student access to a fully functioning kitchen, raw dishes and tasting lessons can be helpful. Encourage family participation by creating part of the meal in school and sending home instructions for the main course. Places of Worship The Kids Cook Monday is an ideal activity to follow religious services when families are together. Parents and kids can learn the basics of cooking together and be encouraged to incorporate it into their weekly routine. Classes can pass on the congregation’s traditions to their youngest members and bring extra meaning to holidays.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Camp Counselors Camp offers a unique opportunity to engage students in longer activities where children can build skills over time. Let your campers show off their cooking prowess (and save some time for the staff!) by having them prepare a meal or snacks for their peers. If you are hosting a day or weekend camp, why not teach students a new culinary skill and send them home with a recipe that will help them showcase it? Parents and children alike will be proud of the new lessons they have learned! Community Organizers and Leaders Groups large and small can use The Kids Cook Monday to teach nutrition and culinary skills and it’s easy to incorporate weekly reminders or take home activities into existing programs. Use this kit to start classes in your local community center, school, or within the homes of participants. Try hosting a potluck each week with meals made at home so families can swap recipes, tell stories and share what they’ve learned together.

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Planting the Seeds: A Pilot at Teachers College, Columbia University In November and December of 2010, a total of 16 families gathered for a Kids Cook Monday pilot at The Center for Food and Environment at Teachers College, Columbia University. Two sets of Monday night classes were held over three consecutive weeks in Columbia’s test kitchen in New York City, with families recruited through the Harlem Health Promotion Center. The team at Teachers College, led by Executive Director Pam Koch, conducted the pilot to see if they could get families engaged in weekly cooking classes, which would in turn help parents and children partake in healthful, affordable meals at home. Each class was about two hours long and included both a nutrition education and culinary skills component, with students learning about the benefits of adding produce, whole grains and beans to their diet. After listening to guidelines on kitchen safety and hygiene, parent-child teams worked together on an appetizer, main course and healthy dessert recipe that correlated to the week’s lesson. Recipes included a Salsa Fresca, an Apple Pecan Medley, Vegetable Burritos, Black Bean Burgers, a Quinoabased Stir Fry and a Blueberry-Spinach Smoothie. The families then gathered for a shared meal with the other participants. Response to the Kids Cook Monday pilot program was overwhelmingly positive. Parents thought the group size (7-9 families per session) and Monday night 6pm scheduling made it easy to participate. They noted that the sessions taught them more about unfamiliar foods and empowered them to try more scratch cooking at home. Parents were also surprised to discover that kids can be quite skilled in the kitchen and that meal preparation time can be used to create positive family memories. Kids who participated also reported positive effects. 73% of the children said they wanted to be involved in their family’s future meal preparations and the majority demonstrated a new willingness to try unfamiliar foods. Almost all of the families said they would be happy to participate in future Kids Cook Monday events and would gladly recommend the sessions to a friend. Overall, the pilot demonstrated that weekly family meal classes can build confidence and competency in the kitchen, as well as an interest in healthier choices for both parents and children.

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Meet Our Experts: We invited some of our favorite kid’s cooking teachers to share their experiences, tips and lesson plans with us. We’re thrilled to have such prominent advocates in The Kids Cook Monday movement.

Pam Koch “I try to start the week by cooking with my sons on Monday evenings. They do everything from cutting, to stirring, to deciding what herbs to add to dishes. Now, cooking together is a ‘just normal’ part of our routine. Now that my older son is a teen, cooking is when he shares what is going on in his life.” Pam Koch, Nutrition Program, Teachers College Columbia University, is passionate about educating children about the food system from farm to fork. She is the primary author of the Linking Food and the Environment (LiFE) Curriculum Series and is the Executive Director for the Center for Food & Environment at Teachers College Columbia University. Julie Negrin “Kids are much more likely to eat what they make because cooking creates a sense of ownership. And meals prepared from scratch are usually much healthier than pre-packaged foods and restaurant meals. Kids who help out in the kitchen and share family meals are creating memories that will influence the way they eat for the rest of their lives.” Julie Negrin, M.S., is a certified nutritionist, cooking instructor and co-chair for Kids in the Kitchen at the International Association for Culinary Professionals (IACP). Her work has been featured in newspapers, magazines, and TV programs including, CBS Nightly News with Katie Couric, Today Show. and Sesame Street. She published her first cookbook, Easy Meals to Cook with Kids, for adults who want to cook with kids ages two years old and up. Her new e-book, How to Teach Cooking to Kids, will be released in 2012. Both books as well as recipes, tips and cooking class information can be found at www.JulieNegrin.com Melissa Halas-Liang “Get your kids involved in the kitchen whenever you can. Even having kids help with small tasks like washing or scrubbing veggies, or measuring and mixing can make a big difference in their willingness to accept new foods. Start with simple tasks and build from there!” Melissa Halas-Liang, RD, MA is a nationally recognized nutrition educator and certified diabetes instructor with over 15 years of experience in curriculum development, clinical care and counseling. Founded in 2006, her SuperKids Nutrition’s website, blog,

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Facebook and Twitter provide nutrition articles, resources, learning activities and newsletters to thousands of schools in over 35 states, motivating parents, teachers and kids to create a healthy life. Halas-Liang recently received the California’s Dietetic Association’s (CDA) Excellence in Community Dietetics Award. Stefania Patinella “At Children’s Aid, we know from years of experience that introducing children to delicious, healthy foods at an early age means they are more likely to embrace healthy eating over their lifetimes. Engaging toddlers in cooking in the classroom and at home breaks down their natural skepticism toward new foods, and opens their minds and senses to a wide, exciting world of fruits and veggies. It teaches them critical life skills, imparts a sense of responsibility and accomplishment, and makes healthy eating a cause for family and community celebration!” Stefania Patinella is Director of Food and Nutrition Programs for The Children’s Aid Society (CAS), where she created and leads the Go!Healthy initiative, a wellness program that promotes healthy eating for young children and their families through hands-on cooking, nutrition education, gardening programs, free meal services and advocacy. For more information on Go!Healthy and their curriculum, visit: www.childrensaidsociety.org/nutrition Stacey Ornstein “Many people lack basic cooking skills, find they don’t have time to cook, or have simply lost kitchen inspiration. Coupled with rising obesity, weight-related illnesses, and readily available cheap, unhealthy food substitutes-- we have a crisis. It’s more important than ever to embrace real, wholesome foods. Starting off young in the kitchen forms healthy eating habits and teaches kitchen skills that last a lifetime.” As the Program Director for Spoons Across America, Stacey Ornstein coordinates free food and nutrition curricula for over 30,000 New York City public elementary school students. She has extensive experience developing healthful recipes and corresponding lesson plans for a variety of after-school programs, summer camps and community classes. You can follow and support her work by visiting AllergictoSalad.com Stacey has a Masters in History of Education from New York University and is a contributing editor to the textbook Contemporary Issues in Curriculum (2006/2011). Gregory Silverman “Teaching kids to cook is a fun, affordable, and tasty investment in the health of the next generation!” says Greg Silverman, the Senior Manager of Educational Outreach for Share our Strength’s Cooking Matters™. Cooking Matters empowers families at risk of hunger with the skills, knowledge and confidence to make healthy and affordable meals. Before joining Share our Strength, Greg worked in London, UK as a food consultant for public sector organizations and the London Borough of Richmond Upon Thames, was a restaurant owner and chef in Ithaca, NY, and spent time as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Mali. Greg holds a degree in Anthropology from Ithaca College, a certificate in Culinary Arts from the French Culinary Institute and has completed course work for his MSC in Food and Nutritional Policy from the Centre for Food Policy at the City University of London. © The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Now Let’s Get Started! 1 How to Cook With Kids: The Basics

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2 What You’ll Need – Preparing a Kids Cooking Kit

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3 Age Appropriate Tasks

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4 Safety and Hygiene

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5 Class Outline and Tips

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6 Getting Parents Involved

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7 How to Keep on Cooking!

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Before You Get Started Things to consider when planning your Kids Cook Monday program 1. Finding space and supplies- Pitch your class to schools, community centers, local restaurants, supermarkets or culinary training programs. Remember, many cooking lessons don’t require a full kitchen! 2. Finding donations- Ask product manufacturers, local restaurants and grocery stores if they can donate ingredients and equipment. Seek additional support from government programs, corporations, after-school services or charitable organizations that focus on culinary education. 3. Advertising your class- Do you need to recruit students? Turn to local newspapers, community bulletins, parent blogs and other outlets to ensure plenty of participants. Use our free posters (included in this kit) to help get the word out! 4. Timing is everything- What time will you hold your class and how long will it last? Dinnertime sessions tend to work best for busy families.1 ½ to 2 hours is usually enough time to teach and cook together. Be sure to allot time for preparation and cleanup. 5. Number of classes- How many classes will you hold? The goal of the program is to create a weekly family routine, so ongoing classes are ideal. We recommend at least 4-6 classes to kick-start the habit, with refresher classes thereafter. 6. Get families involved- Ideally, classes should involve the whole family, but if you’re just working with kids, plan on take home recipes and exercises, or invite families to join for your final cooking class. 7. Know your numbers- How many students will you have? If working just with kids, aim to have one adult helper for every 5 students. If hosting parents and children together, around 4-6 families usually work best. 8. Always consider safety- Take student skill level, class size, required kitchen steps, and adult supervision into account when planning your lesson. Brush up on your knowledge of proper hygiene and food safety procedures and be sure to ask participants about food allergies. 9. Selecting a recipe- Think of your students, class size, kitchen access and available supplies when picking a culinary lesson. Your class could consist of anything from a simple tasting exercise to advanced cooking for a small group of older students. See the lesson plans in this kit for some suggestions.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

10. Create a learning experience- Supplement a great culinary lesson with fun facts about nutrition, portions, fresh foods and exotic dishes. Use the provided lesson plans, or create your own educational components and take-home materials! 11. Get others involved- You don’t have to go it alone! Improve the educational experience and get a helping hand by recruiting local chefs, farmer’s markets, supermarket dieticians, community health leaders, teachers, and college students. 12. Help The Kids Cook Monday grow- We want to hear about your program! Ask families to share their stories, take pictures (with permission from parents) and write to us at: info@TheKidsCookMonday.org

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Class Structure Before class, it’s important to evaluate your student demographic so you can determine an appropriate lesson plan. Use the left side of this form to consider your students, class space and equipment available. Depending on those specifics, use the right side of this chart to determine which type of cooking class is right for you.

Students and Site

Cooking Class Considerations * Check all that apply

Families or Kid Only? ___________________

Nutrition Activity_____________

Age Range of Kids_____________________

Cooking Demo______________

Equipment Available? _________________

Tasting____________________

Budget_______________________________

No Cooking__________________

Duration of Class________________________

“Cold” Cooking (no equip)_______ Minimal Equipment____________ Full Kitchen__________________

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Preparing a Kids Cooking Kit Sometimes the venue you secure for your Kids Cook Monday class does not provide all the niceties of a fully stocked kitchen. Kids cooking teacher Stacey Ornstein shares her must-have supplies for kids cooking classes. “Basics” listed are very basic—no cut, no cook, no blend recipes. Check dollar stores in your neighborhood first; many carry these supplies, often in “mini” form. In general, try to buy stainless steel over plastic as it will last longer. “A Little Bit More” lists tools that are recipe-specific. Think about the recipes you’ll be making before investing in these extras. Basics: (1) large bin for all supplies (1) spritz bottle with all-purpose disinfectant cleaner (1) sponge (2) kitchen towels (1) adult cutting board (1) adult knife (4) 4-quart mixing bowls (4) sets, measuring cups (4) Hand sanitizer spritz bottles (4) sets, measuring spoons (4) mixing spoons plates, napkins, cups, cutlery A Little Bit More: (20-30) reusable, light-weight cutting boards (15-30) knives (Try nylon chef knives for ages K thru 3.) (1) Hand-held immersion blender (1) portable electric burner (1) extension cord (1) large skillet (1) flipping spatula (1) 8-quart stock pot (1) ladle (1) small toaster oven w cook tray (4) bowls (4) box graters

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

(4) potato mashers (8-15) vegetable peelers (16) mini prep bowls (to place spices) (8) 2-3 cup capacity prep bowls (2) larger washing up bins, extra sponges (1) water pitcher (2) whisks (8-10) rolling pins (2-4) mesh strainers (2-4) pastry brushes This Kids Cooking Kit came to us from Stacey Ornstein of Allergic to Salad?

Š The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Age Appropriate Tasks Cooking Activities for Different Age Groups The following are suggested tasks for each age group. Of course, maturity and dexterity differ in each child. It’s up to you to determine what’s appropriate for your class. 2-3 year olds and up Most toddlers enjoy helping in the kitchen. They are very tactile and love the concept of eating their art project. This age group, however, needs very close adult supervision since their dexterity and motor skills are still developing. This age group can do the following tasks with minimal assistance: Squeezing lemons or limes, using a plastic juicer, washing produce in the sink, drying produce in a salad spinner; picking fresh herb leaves off stems, ripping them into small pieces; tearing up lettuce, sprinkling dried herbs and salt, using a pepper grinder, kneading dough, scooping potatoes or yams out of the skins, brushing (or “painting”) oil with a pastry brush, using the rolling pin for dough or puff pastry, whisking together vinaigrettes, squeezing water out of thawed spinach, stirring, and mashing. They will need close supervision to: Grate, peel, chop vegetables and herbs with a knife, and break eggs. 4-5 year olds and up In this age group, there is a lot of variability in motor skills, independence, and the ability to focus, which means that some kids will continue doing the 2-3 year-old tasks, and others will feel ready to move on to the 6-7 year-old tasks. 6-7 year olds and up This age group usually has developed fine motor skills so they can take on more detailed work, like using measuring spoons and

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

forming evenly sized patties. They may still need reminders to watch their fingers during grating and peeling. They also excel at: Dicing and mincing vegetables, grating cheese; peeling raw potatoes, ginger, mangoes and other fruits and vegetables; slicing and scooping out avocados, greasing pans, using a microplane zester, de-seeding tomatoes and roasted peppers, draining and slicing tofu, rinsing grains and beans, forming cookies and patties, pouring liquids into small containers, and garnishing (or “decorating”) dishes. 8-9 year olds and up There is a wide range of skills in this age group. Some 8 year olds are not mature enough to work at the stove. Others have the focus and diligence of an adult. You’ll have to decide if they should continue with the 6-7 year old tasks or if they are responsible enough to do more. This group can take on more sophisticated tasks such as: Using a pizza cutter and can opener, scooping batter into muffin cups, scraping down the (unplugged) electric mixer bowl and food processor bowl, putting away leftovers, pounding chicken, proofing yeast, skewering food, slicing bread, and chopping hot chili peppers (latex gloves are a good idea!). 10-12 year olds and up This age group can usually work independently in the kitchen. Before letting them do grown-up tasks on their own, they should have close adult supervision to assess whether they can follow basic rules such as tucking pan handles, unplugging electrical appliances, and safely using a chef’s knife. Once they pass a few of these “tests,” they can move onto basic tasks at the stove (stirring, making eggs) and oven, or using a chef’s knife, without close adult supervision.

Adapted from Easy Meals to Cook with Kids by Julie Negrin © 2010 The book is available at www.JulieNegrin.com © The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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Hygiene and Safety Guidelines Hand-washing. It’s important to be strict about handwashing. You need to show kids how to use warm water and soap, scrub well, and dry their hands in order to prevent spreading germs. The ideal amount of time for hand-washing is at least 20 seconds. While hand sanitizers are good for when you’re in a pinch in public, it’s best to teach children to wash their hands in the sink when they are cooking. Using knives. Small children, as young as two years old, can use plastic knives, metal butter knives, and lettuce cutters with close supervision. Keep a close watch on little fingers when they use these tools! In case of emergencies. It’s a good idea to store a fire extinguisher in a spot that older children can reach and teach them how to use it. Remind kids what to do if there is a fire: they should not throw water on it but, rather, they should find an adult who can cut off its oxygen supply (like putting a lid on a pot or keeping the oven shut). All children should be taught how to call 9-1-1 in case of an emergency. Cross-contamination. It’s important to note that any time you are working with meat, poultry or fish, you should use a clean plastic or glass cutting board (versus wood which is porous and can absorb bacteria). You must never cut animal products and then use the same knife or cutting board to cut fruits or vegetables. Instead, the knife and board should be thoroughly cleaned with hot soapy water (or in a dishwasher) and air dried. Kids should also be reminded to wash their hands thoroughly after working with meat, poultry, fish, or eggs.

Adapted from Easy Meals to Cook with Kids by Julie Negrin © 2010 The book is available at www.JulieNegrin.com © The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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Class Outline and Tips Before the Students Arrive (Varies depending on recipe) · List educational objectives relating to the lesson on a large wipe-off board or pad of paper. (See addendum for sample educational objectives.) · Do any prep not accounted for in the lesson plan. Introduction & Ice breaker (2 minutes) · Before you start the class, do a quick icebreaker. Go around the room and prompt students to say their names and a fun fact, like a fruit or vegetable that starts with the same letter as their name. · Review the educational objectives of today’s class. · Review last week’s recipe (if applicable). Food Safety/ Hygiene (10 minutes) · Food Safety and Hygiene should be reviewed, in depth, for 10 minutes during the first class. If you are teaching a series of classes, conduct a quick, 1 minute review in future classes. Explore the Recipe Title (5 minutes) · Display the recipes written on wipe off board or chart paper. · Ask student “What can you learn from the recipe title?” · Based on the name, what do you think is in the food? · The name of a recipe includes important information about the dish. After we eat we can think of other names that describe what we like about the dish. Explore Ingredients (5 minutes) · All ingredients are listed in the order in which they are used. · Review each ingredient. Hold up each ingredient as you review them to ensure students are familiar with them. Pass around a small sample to touch, smell etc. Explore Directions (10 minutes) · Clear instructions are used for every step for preparing, combining and cooking the ingredients. · Short sentences are used.

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· If this is a family class, divide the tasks between parent and child. Use the Cooking Tasks for Different Age Groups to ensure that only parents and older kids are using knives, handling the stove etc. Preparation (Varies - Anywhere from 15 minutes to one hour depending on the recipe) Transform the cooking area into an eating area (during the preparation) Enjoying the meal (10 minutes) · Facilitate a discussion about the food and elicit participants’ creative descriptions of the foods. · Reinforce positive messages about eating veggies! Compliment your creative chefs on a job well done! · Remind students to not “yuck someone’s yum” · Encourage students to ask each other about what they did to make the dish.

Clean-up (10 minutes) Wrap-up (5 minutes) · Prompt students to make up different names for the day’s dish. · Prompt students to share their favorite ingredient from the dish. Future Classes · If teaching a series of classes, entice the students by telling them what they will be cooking next week.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Getting Parents Involved · Open your class up to the entire family! You’ll find parents will be helpful during ingredient prep, while working alongside their chefs-in-training. · If you’re putting on a series of classes, hold a celebration at the end. Kids become empowered when they teach their parents what they learned! · Give the students leftovers to take home and share with their parents. Encourage them to share what culinary skills they learned, as well as how that food affects their bodies. · Give the students a handout to take home with them after class. Kids are more likely to remember their new skills when you keep them engaged.

Our Students Keep on Cooking! Here are ways to encourage your students to stay engaged with cooking, even after your class is over. • Start each week with a Kids Cook Monday family dinner night! Give students The Kids Cook Monday Toolkit for Families (pdf) and encourage them to explore it with their parents this week, and every week thereafter. • When talking to parents, frame The Kids Cook Monday family dinner night as a way for parents to check in with their kids about what they did over the weekend and plans for the week to come. • Sign up for free, weekly Kids Cook Monday recipes at TheKidsCookMonday.org. Each recipe comes to your inbox with “parent”, “kid” and “together” task suggestions. • Hold monthly potlucks for your students and their families. Incorporate fun food themes and invite students to update each other on the past month’s culinary adventures.

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Lesson Plans Now that we’ve gone over the basics, we’d love to share sample lesson plans and recipes from our favorite experts in The Kids Cook Monday movement. These culinary trailblazers have integrated the family dinner message through take-home activities that kids can do with their families after class. Each lesson plan was made for a different age group and in a different setting. Feel free to flip through and use the boxes to determine which lesson plan applies to you and your cooks-intraining. We encourage you to take inspiration from these lesson plans, customize them to fit your needs and tell us about it at info@TheKidsCookMonday.org.

Beans in My Belly!

For the Family: from Pam Koch, Director of the Center for Food and Environment at Teachers College, Columbia University.

The Mediterranean Diet with Greek Mezze

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Ages 5-8: from Greg Silverman, Senior Manager of Educational Outreach for Share Our Strength’s Cooking Matters

Eat Your Colors Lettuce Wraps

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Ages 5-8: from Stefania Patinella Director of Food and Nutrition Programs at The Children’s Aid Society.

Your Veggies, Your Way

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Ages 4-7: from Julie Negrin, Author of Easy Meals to Cook with Kids.

Go! Fruits- Apple Pancakes

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Ages 6-13: from Melissa Halas-Liang, founder of Superkids Nutrition Inc.

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Beans in My Belly! Source: Director of the Center for Food and Environment at Teachers College Columbia University Pam Koch, ED, RD. Excerpt from Creative Cooks. Age Group: Parents and kids of all ages. Equipment: Full Kitchen Timing: 90 minutes. Participants will be able to: • Understand basic principles of food and stovetop/flame safety. • Explain why eating beans is important for health. • Prepare bean dishes using stovetop burners. • Express positive attitude towards cooking.

Students and Site

Check all that apply

Age Group __all family members________

Nutrition Activity_x____________

Number of Kids _____________________

Cooking Demo_______________

Kitchen or Classroom _kitchen_________

Tasting_____________________

Budget____________________________

No Cooking_________________

One-time class or part of series _either__

“Cold” Cooking _(no equip)_____

Duration of class____________________

Minimal Equipment___________ Full Kitchen__x______________

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Materials Fresh food items: 1 green pepper 2 yellow onions 5 large cloves of garlic 1 bunch baby carrots 1 large bunch Swiss chard 1 cup of dried lentils Dried basil Chili powder Olive Oil Brown cane sugar Canned food Items: 2 (14.5 oz) can of whole tomatoes in juice 1 (15.5 oz) can of black-eyed peas 1 (15.5 oz) can of kidney beans 1 (15.5 oz) can of chickpeas 2 (8 oz) can of tomato sauce 1 (32 oz) containers of vegetable broth

Miscellaneous: 12 Heavy Duty Knives 24 small cups for serving 12 spoons 2 medium-sized cooking pots 2 Butane burners Poster board Marker Recipes on poster board Tape Paper towel Napkins Cutting boards 2 Heatproof mixing spoons 2 Ladles

Prior to the Lesson • Soak and cook lentils • Slightly boil carrots (to soften them so they can be cut with a plastic knife) • Smash Garlic • Rinse canned black-eyed peas, kidney beans, and chickpeas. Put each bean in a separate bowl • Gather materials • Write out recipes on chart paper

Procedure: 1. Introduction & Ice Breaker (2 min) • Welcome everyone! • Before we start, we will do a quick icebreaker. Let’s go around the room and everyone say his or her name and one fruit or vegetable that starts with the same letter as his or her first name.

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2. Explore the Importance of Eating Beans (5 min) • Beans are great vegetables because they provide many vitamins, minerals, protein, iron, and fiber to help your body to grow strong and stay healthy. • Beans help our bodies become stronger so that we can all play sports! • Can anyone name a bean? (Chickpeas, kidney beans, lima beans, pinto beans, black beans, blackeyed peas, lentils.) • Can anyone think of a way of adding beans to their foods? (With rice, in salad, in their pasta, mix them with their vegetables or eat them separately because they are so tasty!) 3. Exploring the Recipe (5 min) • We have read a lot of different recipes. Now we need to explore the recipe in a different way. By looking at the major ingredients and spices you can learn if the recipe appeals to you or not. That’s one way to decide on your own if you want to make the dish or not. • These recipes use a lot of different beans. What beans are in them? • What other beans do you like? What would you substitute? What would you keep the same? • The recipes also use spices. Spices add a lot of flavor to a recipe. Chefs usually have their favorite spices. If they like hot food they use different spices than if they enjoy sweet, sour, or savory flavors. • We are using three different spices, cumin, chili powder, and basil. Pass around small sample to smell. • What does the spice smell like? Have you smelled something like that before? • Spices are strong flavors. Let’s look at the recipe and compare the amount of spices to other ingredients. • Example: 11/2 cups carrots vs. 2 1/2 teaspoons cumin. • Now that you looked carefully at the recipe, we can make the dishes and then you decide what you like about them and what you would change or keep the same if you made it again. 4. Food Safety/ Hygiene (10 min) **Even when participants are familiar with this material, continue to do a quick review before cooking** Before we cook, it is important to review some basic things we must do so that we are safe in the kitchen, and our food is safe to eat. Any ideas about what we need to do before we start? Write these and other ideas from the students on poster board or chart paper and save for future sessions.

Safe Kitchens, Safe Food • Wash our hands for at least 20 seconds in hot water with soap • Make sure that all cooking surfaces and all equipment are clean • Thoroughly wash all fresh vegetables and fruits in cold water • Remember, if you have to scratch an itch or touch things that are not part of our clean cooking area, wash your hands again.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

• Be very careful with items such as knives and stoves. Explain that the stove is exciting, but also hot, so students should only go near it when adding ingredients and when an adult is right there. Show the students the stove and where the flame comes out. • When the instructor asks for quiet please stop what you are doing (including talking), look at the instructor and wait for further instructions. 5. Preparing the Dish (25-30 min) The first step is to wash our hands. Then we will divide into two groups and each make a recipe. When we are done, we will all sit down together to enjoy our meal! 6. Transform the cooking area into an eating area (during the preparation) Make the eating atmosphere as pleasant as possible. One way to do this is to clean up and put away the cooking materials, and set the table to make it into an eating area. 7. Enjoying the meal (15 min) Remind the students that their food just came off the stove and may be hot. Try a small sample first before taking a big bite and blow on their food to cool it.

Guide on eating together • Wait until everyone is served so we can all eat together. Don’t start eating until everyone is served. • Don’t “yuck” another person’s “yum.” • Use descriptive words when discussing the food, such as sweet, spicy, crunchy. • Compliment each other on your great cooking abilities.

8. Clean Up (10 min) Tasks include: washing bowls, utensils, throwing out trash, wiping down tables etc. 9. Wrap-Up (2 min) Let’s go around and have everyone say what they would keep the same if they made the recipe again or what they would change. Make Monday Family Night! The instructor describes what the class will be making the following Monday. Encourage families to keep exploring their favorite type of bean this week by creating a healthful recipe at home. Students can then share their dish ideas at the next class.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Three Bean Chili Makes 15 small or 8 large servings Ingredients: • 1 green pepper • 1 onion • 2 garlic cloves • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil • 1 (151/2 ounce) can kidney beans, rinsed and drained • 1 (15 1/2 ounce) can black eyed peas, rinsed and drained • 1 (15 1/2 ounce) can chickpeas, rinsed and drained • 1 (14 1/2 ounce) can diced tomatoes • 2 (8 ounce) cans tomato sauce • 1/2 tablespoon chili powder • 1 teaspoon brown sugar • 1 teaspoon dried basil • 1 cup water Directions: 1. Green pepper: Wash and chop. 2. Onion: Wash, peel, and chop. 3. Garlic: Peel and cut into very tiny pieces. 4. In a large, heavy pot, heat the olive oil. 5. Add the green pepper, onion and garlic to the pot. Cook, continuously stirring, until the pepper, onion, and garlic are soft. 6. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pot. 7. Cover and cook on medium-high until mixture just begins to bubble, about 10 minutes. Stir occasionally.

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

The Mediterranean Diet with Greek Mezze Lesson Plan Created by Julie Negrin © 2011 Overview: In this lesson, students learn about and cook with foods that are part of Greek cuisine, including fresh herbs, yogurt, olive oil and vegetables. Students also learn that Greek cuisine is a plant-based way of eating that keeps us healthy today and also prevent us from getting diseases in the future. To experience Greek cuisine, students learn to prepare and eat Tzatziki Yogurt Cucumber Dip and Crispy Pita Chips. Objectives: Students will be able to: • Identify key ingredients in Greek cuisine including fresh herbs, yogurt, olive oil and vegetables. • Demonstrate their ability to make yogurt dip and use a knife to cut vegetables. • List nutrients that are in yogurt and vegetables and describe the health benefits that go into these nutrients. • State their intentions to eat more yogurt and vegetables.

Students and Site

Check all that apply

Age Group __4-7 years old____________

Nutrition Activity______________

Number of Kids __10_________________

Cooking Demo______________

Kitchen or Classroom _either__________

Tasting____________________

Budget___$30-$38__________________

No Cooking____________

One-time class or part of series _either___

“Cold” Cooking (no equip)___x__

Duration of class__1-1.25 hours_________

Minimal Equipment___x_______ Full Kitchen___x______________

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Grocery List

Equipment List

1 small bag of baby carrots 4 whole-wheat or white pita pockets 2 ½ cups plain whole milk or Greek yogurt 1 ½ cucumber, grated 2 ½ tbsp apple cider vinegar 3 lemons, juiced 2 ½ tablespoon olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced 5 tsp fresh dill, chopped 1 ½ teaspoon kosher salt or sea salt freshly ground pepper, to taste 6 tablespoons olive oil 4-5 bell peppers Optional: 1 1/4 cup sour cream Optional: Dried oregano and/or basil

Small Oven or Toaster 10 cutting boards or plates 10 plastic knives or butter knives A few sets of measuring spoons 8-10 stainless bowls 1 colander pepper grinder At least 3 graters Chef’s knife & cutting board for instructor Several pastry brushes 2-3 baking sheets Parchment paper To-go containers and ziptop bags

Teacher Prep Before Class: • One hour before class starts, set out cutting boards/plates with knives. Place graters and “water” bowls (for students to squeeze excess liquid from cucumbers into). Set out the apple cider vinegar and olive oil with measuring spoons. Place out dried herbs, the pepper grinder and kosher salt for seasoning. • Rinse baby carrots and put them in a bowl. If the fresh dill needs rinsing, run it under water and dry well with paper towel or dishtowel. • Wash the cucumbers and lemons and cut into 10 portions so that each child gets to grate and squeeze their own. Lemon wedges should be big enough that, when squeezed, they will produce about 1 teaspoon of lemon juice. Wash the bell peppers and cut them into even portions for each child. Pull apart garlic cloves so that each student or pair gets 1-2 cloves. • Cut pita bread into triangles as directed in recipe and place on parchment paper lined baking sheet. Pour olive oil into small bowls and place pastry brushes on student table.

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What Teacher Will Do During Class: • Teacher oversees hand-washing. • Teacher oversees salting of pita chips and transfers to/from the oven. • Teacher helps students measure and add apple cider vinegar and olive oil. • Teacher can add scoop of sour cream to each bowl OR omit sour cream if you’re on a tight budget. • While kids are eating, the teacher reviews nutrition benefits of the meal (fiber, vitamin D), reviews new cooking terms (mincing, dicing) and reminds students that this meal is a good example of the Mediterranean diet, rich in plant based nutrients. What Students Will Do During Class: • Students wash hands and are reminded of class rules. • Students brush olive oil on pita chips and sprinkle salt and dried herbs on. • Students grate cucumbers, squeeze excess water out into a “water” bowl, and add to yogurt. • Older students can smash a clove of garlic and mince it. • Students tear dill into tiny pieces and add to yogurt mixture. • Students pour olive oil into each bowl with assistance from the teacher. • Students squeeze lemon slices into their mixture, add salt and pepper and stir. • Students do a taste test and adjust flavors (with their partner if they working in pairs). • Students eat the food while the teacher reviews nutrition and culinary concepts. Make Monday Family Night: Divide the leftover chips and tzatziki between the students to take home and show their parents. Encourage students to tell their families how the food affects their bodies, what they liked about the recipe and what they would change if they were to make the dish again.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Crispy Pita Chips Prep time: 10 minutes Total time: 25 minutes Yields: 32 chips Ingredients: • 2 whole-wheat or white pita pockets • 3 tablespoons olive oil • Kosher salt or sea salt to taste • minced garlic or dried herbs such as oregano, basil, parsley Directions: Preheat the oven to 350ºF degrees. On a cutting board, carefully slice each pita into eight triangle shapes with a pizza cutter or a knife. Pull each triangle in half so that one pita pocket will yield a total of 16 pieces. Lay the pita pieces close together on a greased baking sheet or one lined with parchment paper. Pour the olive oil into a small bowl. Brush each piece of pita generously with olive oil using a pastry brush. Sprinkle with salt and herbs and garlic. Bake the chips for 12-14 minutes, or until crispy and golden-brown around the edges. Store the pita chips in a sealed container or bag at room temperature for up to 4 days.

Tangy Tzatziki (Yogurt Cucumber Dip) Prep time: 20 minutes Total time: 20 minutes Yields: 2 cups Ingredients: • 1 cup plain whole milk yogurt or Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup sour cream • 1 cup grated cucumber • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced • 2 teaspoons fresh dill, chopped • ½ teaspoon kosher salt or sea salt • freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions: Drain the yogurt of excess liquid by carefully tipping the container over the sink. Scoop the yogurt into a medium-sized bowl, add the sour cream, and stir. Gather the grated cucumber into your fists and squeeze out as much liquid as you can until it’s drained of moisture. Add the cucumber to the yogurt and sour cream mixture. Stir in the vinegar, lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, dill, salt, and pepper and combine well. Serve immediately at room temperature with Crispy Pita Chips and veggies.

Adapted from Easy Meals to Cook with Kids by Julie Negrin © 2010 The book is available at www.JulieNegrin.com © The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Go! Fruits: Swedish Apple Pancake Source: Stefania Patinella, Director of Food & Nutrition Programs, The Children’s Aid Society. Lesson: Go! Fruits Overview: Go! Fruits is lesson 6 in The Children’s Aid Society’s 24-week Go!Kids Food and Fitness Curriculum. In this lesson, students learn that all fruits are “go! foods”—they give us the nutrients our bodies need to grow and go! The lesson focuses on apples. Students read the book Apple Farmer Annie; do an apple exploration activity that engages their five senses and begins to build their food vocabulary; and prepare and enjoy a Swedish Apple Pancake. Objectives: Students will be able to • explain that apples grow on trees. • describe how apples look, feel, sound, smell, and taste, thereby beginning to build a varied food vocabulary. • state their intention to eat more apples and other fruits.

Students and Site

Check all that apply

Age Group __3-6____________________

Nutrition Activity_x_____________

Number of Kids __16_________________

Cooking Demo__x_____________

Kitchen or Classroom _kitchen or classroom with access to electric or kitchen oven_________

Tasting_____x_________________ No Cooking___________________

Budget____________________________ “Cold” Cooking (no equip)________ One-time class or part of series _series__ Minimal Equipment______________ Duration of class_40 minutes, w/book reading_ Full Kitchen__electric or kitchen oven

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Materials Food items: 4 tablespoons butter 2 apples, for the class 1 cup 1% milk 4 large eggs 2 tablespoons brown sugar, divided 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 16 apples, for the take home activity

Equipment: Plastic Plates or Cutting Boards Vegetable Peeler Chef’s Knife (for the teacher) Measuring cups Plates, forks and napkins, for eating Plastic knives Rubber Spatula 9 Inch Round Baking Pan Measuring Spoons Mixing Bowls Metal Fork Oven Mitts Electric or Kitchen Oven

Optional Book: Apple Farmer Annie by Monica Wellington Prior to the Lesson Preparation: • Cut butter into small cubes. • Put unbleached flour, whole wheat flour and sugar (and other ingredients if you wish) into separate mixing bowls to make it easy for children to measure. • Keep one example of each color apple (red, yellow and green) whole for students to see. Peel, core, and cut the remaining apples into 8 equal pieces. Place apple slices in a bowl and squeeze a little lemon over them to keep them from turning brown. Lesson Plan: • Circle Time: Read Apple Farmer Annie, engaging the students in a conversation about apples. • Have students wash their hands, and reinforce the idea that they should always wash up before cooking and eating. • Show students all the ingredients they will use for the cooking activity. Help students name each one, and encourage them to explore each by touching and smelling. • Tell students they are going to do an “apple exploration” activity using all of their senses. Ask them to name the five senses (sight, touch, smell, taste and hearing). Explain that the goal of the activity is to use their senses to come up with as many different words as possible to describe apples. (This will encourage students to begin to build a vocabulary of new words to use when talking about food—beyond “I like/don’t like it.”) • Give one slice of apple to each child and ask:

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

• Use your eyes— what does the apple look like? (Ask them to comment on shape, color, and size.) • Use your fingers— how does the apple feel? (Firm, grainy, cold, etc.) • Use your nose— how does the apple smell? (Fresh, flowery, etc.) • Close your eyes and take a bite— how does the apple taste? (Crispy, juicy, sweet, etc.) • When you take a bite, what sound does the apple make? (Snap, crunch, etc.) • During cooking and eating, engage students in discussion, such as: • Before you put the pan with apples and butter in the oven, ask: “Can you guess what will happen to the apples and butter in the oven?” (Take guesses, and make sure to show the children what the partially cooked apples look like before you move on to step 3 of the recipe.) • When you pour the batter over the apples, ask: “Can you guess what will happen to the batter in the oven?” (Take guesses and when the pancake is done, explain that the batter turned from liquid to solid, and it puffed up because of the whisked eggs.) Make Monday Family Night: Give each student an apple to take home and use in a creative snack that they can make with their families. Students can share their snack idea with the class at the next session.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Baked Apple Pancake Food Items 4 tablespoons butter 2 apples, for the class 1 cup 1% milk 4 large eggs 2 tablespoons brown sugar, divided 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 16 apples 1) Preheat oven to 425 degrees. 2) Peel, core and cut apples into 8 pieces. Give students each a piece on their plates or cutting boards and instruct them to cut apples into thin slices with a plastic knife. Review knife safety rules with them. 3) Combine apples and butter into a 9-inch round baking pan. Place pan in oven and bake for 10 minutes, until apples begin to soften and butter is bubbling and beginning to brown around the edges. 4) While apples cook, help students crack eggs into a medium bowl and beat with a fork. 5) Help students measure and add the milk, 1 tablespoon brown sugar, vanilla, salt and cinnamon to the bowl with the eggs and mix with spatula until well blended. 6) Help students measure and add the flours to the same bowl and mix until batter is smooth. 7) Once apples have cooked for 10 minutes, pour batter over apples in baking pan and sprinkle the top with the remaining 1 tablespoon brown sugar. 8) Bake the pancake for an additional 15-20 minutes, until it is puffed and golden brown. Let rest for 20 minutes and serve warm.

Š The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Your Veggies, Your Way Source: Greg Silverman and Jill Panichelli from Share Our Strength’s Cooking Matters. Age Group: Kindergarten-3rd grade Equipment: Pots, a hot plate, knives, bowls, index cards and stickers. Educational Objectives: 30 minutes Participants will be able to: • Understand the distinctive flavors of different fresh herbs. • Understand how different fresh herbs affect the flavors of vegetables. • Express positive attitude towards cooking.

Students and Site

Check all that apply

Age Group _K-3rd grade____________

Nutrition Activity_____________

Number of Kids _____________________

Cooking Demo______________

Kitchen or Classroom _either__________

Tasting___x_________________

Budget____________________________

No Cooking_________________

One-time class or part of series _either__

“Cold” Cooking (no equip)______

Duration of class____30 minutes_______

Minimal Equipment___x________ Full Kitchen_________________

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Ingredients: • At least 2 medium carrots per child. • 1-2 tablespoons canola oil. • 5 bunches of different fresh herbs. — Basil, dill, sage, cilantro, mint, oregano, rosemary and parsley all work well here. Before Class: • Bring a pot of water to boil. Rinse and slice the carrots. • On each of the five index cards, write the name of one of the five herbs you have chosen for the activity. • When the water is boiling, add carrot slices to the pot. Cook to desired tenderness. • Drain and add a small amount of canola oil and a dash of salt to the pots. Stir well to coat all the carrots. During Class: • Ask kids to wash hands in preparation (see Hygiene and Safety Guidelines on page 18). • Pass out sprigs of fresh herbs and have kids pluck and chop the leaves, assisting as needed. Instruct them to place each chopped herb in a separate bowl. • In front of each bowl, place the index card with the name of the herb in that bowl. • Distribute the carrots among the herb bowls, reserving just enough carrots for kids to have another taste of their favorites at the end. Stir the carrots so that they are coated evenly with the herbs, There should be approximately 1 tablespoon of herbs for every 2 cups carrots. • Invite kids to taste each variation of the seasoned carrots and indicate their preferred flavor by placing a sticker on the index card in front of the herb they liked best. • Provide everyone with another taste of one or two of the “most popular” flavors. Congratulate kids on experimenting with many new flavors.

Make Monday Family Night! Suggest other vegetables that students could help their parents flavor at home in the same way, such as zucchini, squash, corn or sweet potatoes. Hand out the Black Bean and Vegetable Quesadilla recipe and encourage students to make the quesadillas that night with their families. Explain to students that they can apply their new knowledge of fresh herbs while seasoning the zucchini for the quesadillas.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Black Bean and Vegetable Quesadillas Recipe created by Chef Deborah Kelly of Share Our Strength’s Cooking Matters. Prep time: 25 minutes Total time: 20 minutes Yields: 6 quesadillas Materials: • Box grater • Can opener • Colander • Cutting board • Fork • Large skillet with a fitted lid • Measuring spoons • Medium bowl • Rubber spatula • Sharp knife

Ingredients • Half of 1 (15.5 ounce) can “no salt added” black beans • 2 medium zucchini • 4 cups fresh spinach • 1 ear fresh corn or 1 cup canned corn • 4 ounces lowfat cheddar cheese • 1 tablespoon canola oil • pinch of cayenne pepper • 1-2 teaspoons water • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper • 6 (8 inch) whole wheat flour tortillas • non-stick cooking spray • 3 tablespoons fresh parsley, cilantro or your favorite fresh herb.

Directions: Together: In a colander, drain and rinse black beans. Rinse zucchini. Cut into thin slices or shred with a grater. Rinse and chop fresh spinach. Rinse and chop the fresh herbs. Adult: If using an ear of fresh corn, peel it and use a knife to cut the kernels off the cob. If using canned corn, drain. Together: Grate cheese. Adult: In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil. Add zucchini and cayenne pepper. Cook until zucchini is semi soft, about 5 minutes. Add corn and spinach. Cover and cook until tender, stirring a few times, about 5 minutes more. Remove from heat. Adult: Add black beans to the veggie mixture. Stir to combine. Smash beans lightly with a fork. Add 1-2 teaspoons water to make a bean-and-veggie paste. Season mixture with black pepper and the fresh herbs. Transfer mixture to medium bowl. Reserve skillet. Together: Spread vegetable mixture evenly on half of each tortilla. Sprinkle cheese on top. Fold tortillas over. Press lightly with spatula to flatten. Adult: Spray skillet lightly with non-stick cooking spray. Heat over medium heat. Add one folded tortilla. Cook about 4 minutes per side, or until both sides of the tortilla are golden brown. Repeat until all quesadillas are cooked. Cut each quesadilla into 2 wedges. Serve while hot. © The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Eat Your Colors Lettuce Wraps Grades: K-6 Source: Superkids Nutrition Inc. Time Allotted for the Lesson: Approximately 45 Minutes Overview: The lesson will focus on the benefits of eating a variety of colors. Students will discuss different kinds of healthy foods and learn how to use MyPlate to eat a varied diet. Afterwards, students will have the opportunity to prepare lettuce wraps from different colors of vegetables. Optional slides for this lesson plan can be found at: http://www.superkidsnutrition.com/SuperCrewTastingParty.pdf Educational Objectives: Nutrition Information • Students will state the importance of eating a variety of colorful health foods in their diets. • Students will identify the Super Crew® kids’ favorite foods and the benefits of each color of food. Self-assessment • Students will identify their favorite fruits and vegetables based on color and self-assess their current intakes of all different colors of these foods. Health Behavior Change: • Students will be able to name at least one benefit of eating a variety of different colors of fruits and vegetables, and understand what it means for their overall health. • Students will be able to taste a variety of vegetables in order to increase the likelihood of them tasting new foods at home. Culinary Skills • Students will identify the different colors of fruits and vegetables in a recipe and develop a taste for them. • Students will learn how to prepare Eat Your Colors Lettuce Wraps. Self-efficacy/ Action Plan • Students will receive supplemental material on tracking their progress of eating fruits and vegetables of all different colors throughout the week.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Students and Site

Check all that apply

Age Group ____K-6_________________

Nutrition Activity______x_______

Number of Kids __15_________________

Cooking Demo____x_________

Kitchen or Classroom _either__________

Tasting_______x____________

Budget___$30-$38__________________

No Cooking____________

One-time class or part of series __x_____

“Cold” Cooking (no equip)______

Duration of class__45 minutes_________

Minimal Equipment___x_______ Full Kitchen__________________

Grocery List Lettuce Wraps • 1 bag of shredded carrots • 2 heads of romaine lettuce • 2 roasted red peppers from a glass jar • 1 can (15 oz) of corn • 1 can (15 oz) of black beans • Buy or make balsamic vinaigrette dressing or ranch dressing Balsamic Vinaigrette Dressing (optional): • 3/4 cup olive oil • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar • 1 tbsp honey • 1 clove garlic, minced • salt, to taste • 1/2 tsp dry mustard • 1/4 tsp ground pepper

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

Equipment List • Knives for cutting peppers • Plastic knives for children • Can opener • Measuring spoons • Measuring cups • Bowls • Spoons • Small serving bowls Materials/ Resources Needed • Slide projector and presentation or printed copies of PowerPoint slides • Eat the Alphabet Handout • Follow your Food Handout • The Super Crew Colorful Food Tracker • MyPlate Activity • Dry erase board, chalk board or white poster board • Laminated pictures of healthy foods (optional) • Large image of MyPlate (optional)

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Preparation: • Review equipment inventory, make sure burners are working • Purchase all ingredients about one day in advance • Make copies of the handouts and recipes for the students • Obtain a projector for PowerPoint slides, or print out a copy for each student Instructional Procedures: 1. Begin the lesson by saying that we are going to make Colorful Lettuce Wraps, and discussing the importance of eating a variety of colors with the Super Crew Kids. (Slides 1 to 3): • The Super Crew gets their super powers from their favorite color of healthy food. • Eating lots of different colors can make you healthy and give you a lot of energy like the Super Crew. 2. Briefly discuss the seven colors represented by the Super Crew characters that reflect the ingredients featured in the recipe. Introduce the Super Crew character that likes each color, his or her power and favorite foods of that color. See slides for details on how to present. a. Green Foods with Jessie (slide 4): b. White/Beige Foods with Carlos (Slide 5): c. Red Foods (Slide 6) d. Yellow Foods (slide 7) e. Orange Foods (slide 8) f. Black and Purple Foods (slide 9) g. Brown Foods (slide 10) Answer to Question: A kind of nut that looks like a heart and a brain is a walnut. h. All the colors! (slide 11) 3. Aim for all the colors (slide 12) • Instructor will describe the importance of eating a variety of colors • Different colors of fruits and vegetables have their own special vitamins and minerals that make you feel good, look good, and give you a lot of energy. They make you healthy, protect your heart, and keep you smart! Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables so you can get all of these vitamins and minerals. 4. What healthy foods do you eat that start with the letters of the alphabet? (slide 13, Handout: Eat the Alphabet) a. Engage the students in a discussion regarding their intake of different colors of fruits and vegetables • Students will raise their hands or call out names of foods starting with each letter. They may need the instructor to provide some examples. • Write the children’s responses on a dry erase board or a white poster board. • Optional: Show laminated pictures of foods to help children come up with ideas.

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b. Conclude: “Wow, so many of you guys are eating all the colors of foods already!” 5. Super Crew Tracker (Handout: The Super Crew Colorful Food Tracker) • Use the Super Crew Color tracker activity to have students color in which colors of foods they ate today. Then encourage them to continue the tracker for the rest of the week! 6. Let’s Practice MyPlate with Colors (Slide 14) a. Instructor will illustrate how different colors of foods fit into MyPlate guidelines b. Optional Activity: Using a poster board of MyPlate, invite kids to come up and put laminated images of different colors of foods on the correct food group. c. Discuss the five food groups on MyPlate based on the image on the slide. • What are some examples of different colors of food in the vegetable group? (answers include: green broccoli, red pepper, purple eggplant, etc.) • What are some examples of different colors of foods in the fruit group? (answers include: red apple, orange mango, purple plum, yellow lemon) • What are some examples of grains? Which Super Crew Kid likes whole grains? (answer: Kira) • What are some examples of different colors of food in the protein group? (answers include: white and black beans) 7. Name 2 Healthy foods that you like for each Super Crew Character! (Slide 15) a. Review different colors of foods based on the color each Super Crew Kid enjoys. Children will name 2 healthy foods that they like for each character. b. Conclude: “Look how many different colored foods we all like!” 8. Instructor will introduce recipe and help children prepare a healthy snack (Slides 16-18). a. Before Cooking: • Explain: “Today we are going to make a recipe that has lots of colors in it!” • Introduce Colorful Lettuce Wraps • Review the different colors of each ingredient in lettuce wraps: 1. Orange carrots 2. Green romaine lettuce 3. Red peppers 4. Black beans 5. Yellow corn 6. Brown Pepper 7. White garlic • Review hand washing and food safety tips.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Eat Your Colors Lettuce Wraps (serves approximately 15 children) Wrap Ingredients: 1 bag of shredded carrots 2 heads of romaine lettuce 2 whole red peppers 1 can (15 oz) of black beans 1 can (15 oz) of corn Make or buy balsamic dressing: Other optional ingredients: quinoa, brown rice, or barley.

Equipment: • Knives for cutting peppers • Plastic knives for children • Can opener • Measuring spoons • Measuring cups • Plates • Spoons • Small serving bowls

For Dressing: Balsamic Vinaigrette Dressing (optional): • 3/4 cup olive oil • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar • 1 tbsp honey • 1 clove garlic, minced • salt, to taste • 1/2 tsp dry mustard • 1/4 tsp ground pepper 1. Set up the equipment at the front of the classroom, including a serving bowl, measuring cups and spoons, mixing spoon, and a garlic mincer. 2. Invite children to help out with the following tasks: • Measure and pour ¾ cup of oil into a serving bowl. • Older children: Ask children how we can measure ¾ cup from available measuring cups. Explain that you can use one ½ cup and one ¼ cup since they add to ¾. • Measure and pour ¼ cup balsamic vinegar into serving bowl with the oil. • Measure 1 tbsp of honey, and add to serving bowl. • Measure ½ tsp of dry mustard, and add to serving bowl. • Measure ¼ tsp of dry pepper, and add to serving bowl. 3. The teacher can use a garlic mincer or grater to crush the garlic clove and add to mixture. Season with salt to taste. 4. Invite several children to come to the front of the classroom, one at a time, and take turns mixing the ingredients. 5. Put aside for later.

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Lettuce Wraps: 1. Hand out cutting boards and plastic knives to every student. 2. Set up the equipment at the front of the classroom, including a serving bowl, measuring cups and spoons, can opener, and a mixing spoon. 3. Open the cans of corn and black beans. 4. Invite children to help out with the following tasks: • Open the bag of shredded carrots and pour into the serving bowl. • Pour can of black beans into the serving bowl. • Pour can of yellow corn into the serving bowl. • Separate romaine lettuce into leaflets and set aside. • Add optional ingredients, if using. 5. Cut red peppers • Invite two children to cut each of the two peppers into 8 pieces. • Hand out a piece of the pepper to every child. Instruct each child to cut the pepper into smaller pieces. • Collect pieces of red pepper and add to other ingredients in large serving bowl. 6. Invite children to pour in dressing, and stir ingredients together. 7. Demonstrate how to assemble lettuce wraps. Make a pile of romaine lettuce to assemble like a wrap. 8. Hand each child a piece of romaine lettuce on a plate, and let children serve themselves the vegetables. 9. Enjoy!

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The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Make Monday Family Night: (Slide 19 and MyPlate Activity, Tasting Party with All the Colors) • After completion of the lesson, children will make a healthy body pledge by checking the “goal” boxes on the handout. • They will then choose a behavior they would like to start, a behavior they would like to stop, and a behavior they would like to keep. For example, a child can decide to start eating more broccoli, stop eating candy, and continue to eat yellow corn. • Give students the MyPlate Activity, Tasting Party with All the Colors. • Students and their families solve the Tasting Party with All the Colors activity. • Students draw Monday Night’s dinner, according to which food groups are fulfilled, in the MyPlate Activity Sheet. Students share their family dinner drawings in the next class.

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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A Tasting Party for all of the Colors with the Super Crew® Colorful Lettuce Wraps Ingredients

Tools

1 bag  of  shredded  carrots   2  heads  of  romaine  leAuce   2  whole  red  peppers  (roasted  glass  jar   pepper  op6onal)   1  can  (15  oz)  of  corn   1  can  (15  oz)  of  black  beans   Make  or  buy  balsamic  vinaigreAe   dressing  or  ranch  dressing   Op6onal  :  quinoa  or  brown  rice  

•  •  •  •  •  •  • 

• 

•  •  •  • 

Knives for  cu-ng  vegetables  -­‐                                             include  plas6c  knives  for  younger       children   Can  opener   Plates   Spoons     Small  serving  bowls    

Directions 1. 

Wash and  separate  leaves  of  romaine  leAuce    

2. 

Wash and  cut  red  peppers  into  small  pieces  

3. 

Combine pieces  of  pepper,  black  beans,  corn,  shredded  carrots,  salad  dressing  and  op6onal   ingredients  in  a  serving  bowl.  

4. 

Mix vegetables  together.      

5. 

Wrap vegetables  in  a  salad  leaflet,  and  enjoy!  

Did you  know  you  know  ea6ng  a  variety  of   colors  makes  you  have  super  powers?  Eat  at   least  4  different  colors  everyday  and  you   can  be  a  Super  kid,  just  like  us!    -­‐Andy  

“saving the world one healthy food at a time” TM

© www.superkidsnutrition.com


A Tasting Party Logic Puzzle At the  tas6ng  party,  Baby  Abigail  told  the  Super  Crew  kids  that  they  should  eat  all  of  the   colors  of  fruits  and  vegetables.    So,  all  of  the  Super  Crew  kids  decided  to  taste  a  new  color  of   food.      Baby  Abigail  made  black  beans,  yellow  corn,  orange  carrots,  red  pepper,  and  green   leAuce.  Baby  Tom  Tom,  Jessie,  Penny,  Marcus,  and  Andy  aAended  the  party.  Using  the  clues   below,  find  out  which  new  food  each  Super  Kid  tried!   1. None  of  the  children  ate  the  same  thing   2. None  of  the  Super  Crew  kids  ate  their  favorite  color  of  food  at  the  tas6ng  party.       3. Andy  ate  a  yellow  vegetable   4. Baby  Tom  Tom  did  not  eat  an  orange  vegetable   5. Jessie  ate  Penny’s  favorite  color  food   6. Penny  wants  X-­‐ray  vision,  and  ate  a  vegetable  that  helps  her  see  beAer!   Baby  Tom-­‐Tom    

Jessie

Penny

Marcus

-­‐Abigail Andy  

1. Black  Beans   2.  Romaine   LeAuce   3.  Carrots  

5.  Corn   Baby  Tom  Tom    

Penny

Jessie

Andy

Kira

Practice MyPlate and your Colors! •  Make  ½  your  plate  fruits  and  vegetables   •   Make  at  least  ½  your  grains  whole  grains   •   Go  lean  with  protein   •   Choose  low-­‐fat  or  fat  free  dairy   •   Always  remember  to  eat  a  variety  of  colors!   “saving the world one healthy food at a time” TM

© www.superkidsnutrition.com

Answers: 1. Jessie 2. Baby Tom Tom 3. Penny 4. Marcus 5. Andy

4.  Red  Pepper  


A Tasting Party Logic Puzzle Answer Key

Baby Tom  Tom    

Jessie

Penny

Marcus

Andy

1. Black  Beans  

X

yes

X

X

X

2. Romaine  LeAuce  

yes

X

X

X

X

3. Carrots  

X

X

yes

X

X

4.  Red  Pepper  

X

X

X

yes

X

5.  Corn  

X

X

X

X

yes

Answers: 1. Jessie 2. Baby Tom Tom 3. Penny 4. Marcus 5. Andy

“saving the world one healthy food at a time” TM

© www.superkidsnutrition.com


The Kids Cook Monday Educators’ Kit

Recommended Books: • Everybody Eats Lunch, by Cricket Azima • Mama Panya’s Pancakes, by Mary and Rich Chamberlin and Julia Cairns • Everybody Bakes Bread, Everybody Cooks Rice, and Everybody Serves Soup, by Norah Dooley and Peter J. Thornton • Eating the Alphabet, by Lois Ehlert • Market Day, by Lois Ehlert • Come and Eat with Us!, by Annie Kubler and Caroline Formby • How My Parents Learned to Eat, by Ina R. Friedman and Allen Say • Bread, Bread, Bread, by Ann Morris and Ken Heyman • Easy Meals to Cook with Kids, by Julie Negrin • How to Teach Cooking to Kids, by Julie Negrin • The Tortilla Factory, by Gary Paulsen and Ruth Paulsen • La Tortilleria, by Gary Paulsen, Ruth Wright Paulsen and Gloria De Aragon Andujar • How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World, by Marjorie Priceman • A Kwanzaa Celebration Pop-Up Book: Celebrating The Holiday With New Traditions And Feasts, by Nancy Williams and Robert Sabuda • A Comer/Let’s Eat, by Ana Zamorano, Susana Pasternac and Julie Vivas

© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

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This Certifies that has successfully completed The Kids Cook Monday Course

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Families who cook together eat healthier and live better.

Start your week off right: Make Monday family night!

SM


When kids help prepare dinner, they help prepare themselves for life.

Start your week off right: Make Monday family night!

SM


When kids cook, they get a taste for teamwork. Start your week off right: Make Monday family night!

SM


Kids who cut carrots are less likely to cut class. Start your week off right: Make Monday family night!

SM

The Kids Cook Monday: Educators' Toolkit  

In our Educators’ Kit, we’ve assembled the best practices, lesson plans and kid-friendly recipes that leading child- hood nutrition and educ...

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