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WASTEWATER WHY WE DO IT To protect public health by providing all urban properties in Tauranga with a reliable wastewater system.

WHAT WE DO Wastewater is the dirty water discharged from toilets, kitchens, bathrooms and laundries in dwellings and commercial premises. It consists of over 99% water and less than 1% solids. Wastewater also includes trade waste collected from industrial premises. • The wastewater activity consists of the following key components: --

collection of wastewater on a continuous basis and transporting by means of gravity drains and pumped pipelines to treatment facilities

--

t reatment of all of the wastewater collected to suitable standards

--

isposal of the treated wastewater to the d environment.

• T here are 1,109 km of pipelines and 174 pumping stations, 31 of which are private stations but maintained by Council • W astewater is delivered to two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) at Chapel Street and Te Maunga • T he reticulation (pipework) network and pump stations are maintained under a five-year performance based maintenance contract by City Care. This contract expires on 30 June 2013 • T he treatment plants are operated and maintained by Council staff based at the Chapel Street WWTP

WWTP which tests a wide range of samples to check the operation of the plants and compliance with the discharge consent conditions • T he Council owns and operates wastewater assets with a replacement cost in excess of $358 million • L egislation which sets the minimum service levels that must be provided and which affect asset operation, maintenance and development of the wastewater activity includes the following: --

Local Government Act 2002

--

Health Act 1956

--

Resource Management Act 1991

--

Local Government (Rating) Act 2002

--

Building Act 2004

The Council has approved and is constructing a new wastewater pipeline called the Southern Pipeline valued at over $100 million. The project has sub-projects: Maleme Street and Memorial Park pump stations and storage tanks; Maleme Street to Memorial Park pipeline; Memorial Park to the Strand pipeline; a harbour crossing; and Matapihi to Te Maunga Pipeline.

STRATEGIC DIRECTION Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following: City Vision

Built to Fit our Hills, Harbour & Coast

A Clean, Green, Valued Environment

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

Living Well, Wasting Less

Council Outcomes This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes. Key Strategies and Plans • SmartGrowth 2007 • Wastewater Asset Management Plan The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies and Plans.

• An International Accreditation New Zealand (IANZ) accredited laboratory is also based at the Chapel Street

145


WASTEWATER CURRENT DELIVERY • Tauranga’s wastewater network is generally in very good condition. The pipe materials have a life expectancy of around 80 to 100 years and most of the pipes were laid in the last 35/40 years. However some of the concrete and asbestos cement trunk sewers laid in the 1970s have corroded due to the action of hydrogen sulphide and are requiring replacement or rehabilitation. Some reticulation lines have deteriorated in recent years due to poor ground conditions and construction methods. An emerging issue is the premature failing of mPVC rising mains. In some extreme cases the life expectancy is now down to two to three years rather than 80 to 100 • A s the population increases with infill and greenfield development the wastewater flows increase through the existing reticulation and pumping stations. Approximately 10 pumping stations no longer comply with the Council’s Infrastructure Development Code in terms of pumping capacity and emergency storage • C hapel Street WWTP treats wastewater from approximately 65,000 people in Tauranga and Te Maunga WWTP treats wastewater from approximately 35,000 people in the coastal strip (Mount Maunganui and Papamoa) • T he effluent from Chapel Street WWTP is disinfected with ultraviolet light to produce a very low bacteria count. The treated wastewater from this plant is pumped to Te Maunga where it is discharged into two wetlands before being pumped out to sea via the ocean outfall pipeline • T he ocean outfall discharges 950m off the coast adjacent to Te Maunga. A resource consent for this discharge has been granted for 35 years (has 30 years remaining), along with the reclaimed water and related

146 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

consents • T he sludge produced at the Chapel Street WWTP is treated in two digesters then dewatered by centrifuge before being trucked for disposal at a consented site • T he sludge from the Te Maunga WWTP is temporarily stored in a sludge pond which was once part of the Mount Maunganui oxidation ponds • The Chapel Street WWTP is a mature asset in the sense that it is older than the 20-year expected life of the mechanical and electrical plant in it. Thus the plant requires renewal of components year by year as they wear out • T he Waterline customer education programme is a key service that promotes efficient and sustainable use of Tauranga City’s water, wastewater and stormwater services by the community. This programme has been active since 1999 and continues to develop and extend valuable education services within our community

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS • D evelop and implement a Biosolids Management Strategy that manages the biosolids produced at both Chapel Street and Te Maunga WWTP • I ncreasing odour complaints throughout the network are being investigated. New ways to treat these that offer a higher level of control at a lower cost are part of the initiative • An extended education programme that focuses on the wider community is being developed. This programme incorporates and encompasses the views and concerns of local Tangata Whenua

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN No significant differences to the above


WASTEWATER SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECTS Wellbeing Significant negative effects or risks

S*

C*

EC*

EN*

Changing weather patterns (weather bombs) may result in extreme events causing damage to valuable assets.

Ongoing improvements made to assets are based on the recently revised TCC Infrastructure Development Code and/or specialist studies (e.g. Lifelines).

Overflows of untreated wastewater from the wastewater network due to:

Council’s telemetry and customer contact systems are linked with the maintenance contractor’s workflow and dispatch system to ensure prompt response. Response times and job priorities defined in maintenance contract to ensure urgent tasks are given immediate attention.

Discharge of insufficiently treated (i.e. untreated or only partly treated) wastewater through the ocean outfall.

Ongoing monitoring of treatment processes and discharge quality.

Disposal of wastewater treatment byproducts, such as biosolids (stabilised solids extracted from the wastewater during the treatment process).

Disposal to properly managed and consented disposal sites to minimise the cultural, social and environmental impact.

• Blockages • Pump station or other plant malfunction • Excessive inflow/infiltration of stormwater into the wastewater system • Insufficient capacity.

How Council will mitigate the effect or risk

Investment in new treatment processes to reduce the amount of solids requiring disposal.

* S = Social, C = Cultural, EC = Economic, EN = Environmental

147


WASTEWATER STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) WASTEWATER Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 1,167 9,006 3,639 6,398 0 19,043 17,876 17,233 8,087

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 1,154 9,201 3,019 6,848 (300) 18,768 17,614 18,195 24,821

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 1,208 9,653 3,424 7,193 (413) 19,857 18,649 19,900 24,917

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 1,266 13,134 3,818 7,957 (531) 24,378 23,112 21,367 24,784

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 1,334 10,485 4,382 8,027 (548) 22,346 21,012 22,950 30,156

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 1,405 10,832 4,842 9,877 (566) 24,985 23,580 24,647 21,576

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 1,474 11,496 5,103 10,483 (582) 26,500 25,026 26,340 15,938

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 1,546 15,234 5,142 11,044 (599) 30,821 29,275 27,750 11,814

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 1,611 12,209 5,196 11,543 (618) 28,330 26,719 29,320 10,937

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 1,682 12,586 5,279 12,053 (638) 29,280 27,598 31,025 30,035

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 1,755 13,264 5,556 12,770 (660) 30,930 29,175 32,810 36,306

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

148 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

952 0 215 1,167

1,028 0 126 1,154

1,045 0 126 1,171

1,064 0 126 1,190

1,090 0 126 1,216

1,115 0 126 1,241

1,139 0 126 1,265

1,164 0 126 1,290

1,177 0 126 1,303

1,190 0 126 1,316

1,204 0 126 1,330

9,006 3,639 6,398 0 19,043 17,876

9,201 3,019 6,848 (300) 18,768 17,614

9,360 3,320 6,974 (400) 19,254 18,083

12,360 3,592 7,488 (500) 22,940 21,750

9,564 3,997 7,322 (500) 20,383 19,167

9,569 4,278 8,725 (500) 22,072 20,831

9,876 4,384 9,006 (500) 22,766 21,501

12,724 4,295 9,224 (500) 25,743 24,453

9,883 4,206 9,344 (500) 22,933 21,630

9,858 4,134 9,440 (500) 22,932 21,616

10,056 4,212 9,682 (500) 23,450 22,120

17,233 643 0 0 0 17,876

18,195 (581) 0 0 0 17,614

19,296 (1,213) 0 0 0 18,083

20,107 1,643 3,000 0 0 24,750

20,933 (1,766) 0 0 0 19,167

21,774 (943) 0 0 0 20,831

22,629 (1,128) 0 0 0 21,501

23,177 1,276 3,000 0 0 27,453

23,734 (2,104) 0 0 0 21,630

24,300 (2,684) 0 0 0 21,616

24,875 (2,755) 0 0 0 22,120

8,087

24,821

23,987

23,087

27,165

18,755

13,347

9,510

8,441

22,172

25,621

3,409 1,508 0 1,275 542 1,353 0 0 8,087

4,880 6,755 0 7,889 4,229 1,068 0 0 24,821

4,644 6,500 0 7,880 3,895 1,068 0 0 23,987

4,429 6,214 0 8,223 3,153 1,068 0 0 23,087

4,633 6,352 0 10,471 3,986 1,723 0 0 27,165

4,059 6,975 0 5,258 0 2,463 0 0 18,755

4,166 1,406 0 5,409 0 2,366 0 0 13,347

3,545 1,190 0 2,967 0 1,808 0 0 9,510

3,607 1,338 0 1,831 0 1,665 0 0 8,441

4,591 1,576 0 13,870 0 2,135 0 0 22,172

4,466 5,768 0 13,884 0 1,503 0 0 25,621


WASTEWATER TEN YEAR PLAN MEASURES AND LEVELS OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE MEASURES - ACTIVITY OUTCOME MEASURES

What this measure tells us

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

TCC

Increase no greater than 1%

20%

18%

Increase no greater than 1%

Increase no greater than 1%

Increase no greater than 1%

Increase no greater than 1%

Increase no greater than 1%

TCC

10.2 blockages per 100km

143 blockages 13.5 blockages per 100km

151 blockages in total 8.90 blockages per 100km

161 blockages 15 blockages per 100km

No more than 15 blockages per 100km of pipe

No more than 15 blockages per 100km of pipe

No more than 15 blockages per 100km of pipe

No more than 15 blockages per 100km of pipe

Measure

Data Source

Protection of public health (factual)

Number of ‘no bathing’ notices and shellfish collection bans each year that are due to wastewater system seepages or overflows.

Reliability of the wastewater collection system and effectiveness of education programmes (factual)

Number of blockages each year per 100km of sewer, with a breakdown of the main causes and including total number of blockages and length of the sewer network. * National average is 34 per 100km of sewer. Over the past 10 years the range for Tauranga has generally been 10-15 per 100km. * Blockages are caused primarily by tree roots or fat build up, but also by mechanical damage or construction debris. * Note that work is required to maintain the network, if nothing was done blockage numbers would increase year to year.

149


WASTEWATER PERFORMANCE MEASURES - SERVICE OUTCOME

What this measure tells us Reliability of the wastewater collection system, particularly when flooding occurs, and effectiveness of education programmes (factual)

Measure

Data Source

Number of overflows each year, in a normal* year, per 100km of sewer, with a breakdown of the main causes and including total number of overflows and length of the sewer network. * A normal year is when there are no major flood events. ** Some overflows may be caused by blockages, these are included in both measures. *** Note that work is required to maintain the network, if nothing was done overflow numbers would increase year to year.

TCC

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

2.7 overflows per 100km

19 overflows 1.8 per 100km

18 overflows 1.8 per 100km

25 overflows 2.3 per 100km

No more than 2.3 overflows per 100km of pipe

No more than 2.3 overflows per 100km of pipe

No more than 2.3 overflows per 100km of pipe

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

No more than 2.3 overflows per 100km of pipe

LEVELS OF SERVICE

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Provision of wastewater treatment services (factual)

All wastewater is treated prior to being discharged into the ocean, and meets ongoing resource consent conditions, including those regarding quality of discharged or reclaimed water (measured twice weekly).

TCC

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieve

Achieve

Achieve

Achieve

Responsiveness (factual)

95% of the time, contractors are on site within one hour of notification of a blockage or overflow.

TCC

95%

99%

100%

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

Responsiveness (factual)

95% of the time wastewater services will be restored within eight hours.

TCC

Not measured

99

Achieved

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

What this measure tells us

150 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


WASTEWATER LEVELS OF SERVICE

What this measure tells us Provision of education programmes (factual)

Measure Provision of education programmes: (a) Number of primary schools (3 Waters programme) (b) Number of classes (Wastewater programme) (c) Community contact / presentations (3 Waters) (d) Domestic visits - efficiency and repairs (3 Waters) (e) Development of education and communication programmes - new initiatives or redevelopment of existing (3 Waters)

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

TCC

Not measured

Of the 27 schools in the area, 20 schools elected to take up the programme. 89 lessons were provided to primary and intermediate classes, reaching 2,670 pupils this year about sustainable use of the City’s Drainage systems.

The Waterline Schools Programme (including water, stormwater, wastewater & Hydroponics) reached 27 schools and early childhood, and included 102 classes and about 3,060 students. Also 5 Kindergartens consisting of about 150 students were reached with the Great Drain Game. In addition 26 Public presentations to community and business groups; 1,263 visits to domestic customers; 2 visits to business customers; 18 school audits and 5 Community / public events were undertaken.

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

27 programmes

(a) >17 schools (b) > 35 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 35 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 35 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 35 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

OTHER INTERESTING STATISTICS

What this measure tells us Throughput volume of treated wastewater discharged (factual)

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

Average volume of treated wastewater discharged per day (and per person per day)*. * Most of this is discharged into the ocean, but a very small percentage is instead used for irrigation at Omanu golf course, Tauranga Domain and Sulphur Point.

TCC

26,244m3

26,403m3

26,642m3

151


WASTEWATER ASSET MANAGEMENT Key Assets as at 30 June 2011

• One ocean outfall

Capital Expenditure – Growth Related Projects

• 15,627 wastewater manholes

Allocations of capital expenditure for growth related projects are indicative only and final allocations are reviewed and confirmed on an annual basis by applying the policy process outlined in the Development Contributions Policy.

This Activity has a comprehensive Asset Management Plan. This is the key tool which ensures that capital funds, along with existing assets, are used efficiently and effectively. The performance and condition of all Wastewater assets is constantly monitored. This, along with annual updates of the Asset Management Plan, ensures that demand will continue to be met despite the pressure that growth places upon the management of Wastewater and its related assets.

• Two wastewater treatment plants • Three wetlands, one oxidation pond • 1,109 kms wastewater pipe • 143 wastewater pump stations • One sludge conditioning pond

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE WASTEWATER NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - GROWTH Southern Pipeline - pipeline and pumping stations to transport wastewater to Te Maunga treatment plant Upgrade of Te Maunga treatment plant Conversion of oxidation ponds to wetlands at Te Maunga Major pumping stations to service Wairakei development Sundry growth-related projects - Papamoa Pump Stations Pyes Pa West Provision of infrastructure in the Tauriko Business Estate Duplication of sewers in Avenues area Duplication of Ohauiti trunk sewer Sundry growth-related projects - Bethlehem Total new or upgraded assets - Growth IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Growth

152 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$58,384,069 $15,617,144 $15,096,433 $12,219,447 $15,451,045

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$1,584,000 $10,423,000 $0 $0

$9,726,000 $0

Total

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

$33,862,000 $5,867,440

$1,896,000 $0

$2,480,000 $0

$5,000,000 $0

$2,118,000 $0

$635,000 $400,000

$0 $2,500,000

$0 $2,967,440

$13,247,777

$0

$0

$0

$867,784

$1,700,000

$2,700,000

$0

$200,000

$4,378,908

$3,401,085

$400,692 $1,242,702 $2,169,690

$0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0

$215,259 $840,696 $332,442

$185,433 $0 $1,136,755

$0 $402,006 $644,107

$0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $56,386

$0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0

$200,000 $200,000 $0 $0 $0 $315,862 $0 $0 $0 $0 $481,736 $0 $0 $0 $481,736 $116,171,968 $17,713,144 $17,576,433 $17,219,447 $20,306,962

$0 $0 $0 $4,057,188

$0 $0 $0 $6,246,113

$0 $0 $0 $2,967,440

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $315,862 $0 $0 $0 $1,840,386 $14,801,908 $13,442,947

$134,296,841 $17,713,144 $18,258,399 $18,485,076 $22,542,759

$4,667,389

$7,458,484

$3,686,154

$2,384,772 $20,050,665 $19,050,000


WASTEWATER CAPITAL EXPENDITURE WASTEWATER Total NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - VESTED Assets vested to Council by developers Pyes Pa West $2,088,911 Assets vested to Council by Developers - Wairakei $2,443,187 Other Assets vested to Council by developers $12,334,333 Total new or upgraded assets - Vested $16,866,431 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Vested $20,320,026 NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - LEVEL OF SERVICE Increasing the capacity of the ocean outfall pipe $15,132,630 Upgrade of Chapel Street treatment plant $1,345,842 Sundry capital projects $2,595,727 Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service $19,074,199 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service $23,490,175 ASSET RENEWALS Reticulation renewals Treatment plant renewals Pump station renewals Reduce unintended stormwater inflow into wastewater system Chadwick Rd sewer reticulation repairs Laboratory equipment renewals Total Asset Renewals IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Asset Renewals

$19,000,000 $4,385,000 $18,161,078 $3,139,043

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$0 $0 $1,067,990 $1,067,990

$0 $0 $1,067,990 $1,067,990

$0 $0 $1,067,990 $1,067,990

$0 $601,755 $1,121,390 $1,723,145

$1,285,256 $0 $1,177,459 $2,462,715

$803,655 $325,549 $1,236,332 $2,365,536

$0 $509,573 $1,298,149 $1,807,722

$0 $302,246 $1,363,056 $1,665,302

$0 $704,064 $1,431,209 $2,135,273

$0 $0 $1,502,768 $1,502,768

$1,067,990

$1,109,428

$1,146,487

$1,912,863

$2,833,107

$2,824,687

$2,245,552

$2,157,898

$2,892,441

$2,129,573

$800,000 $340,000 $270,700 $1,410,700

$0 $592,170 $250,000 $842,170

$0 $50,000 $250,000 $300,000

$400,000 $50,000 $250,000 $700,000

$7,500,000 $50,000 $250,000 $7,800,000

$0 $50,000 $270,700 $320,700

$0 $50,000 $250,000 $300,000

$200,000 $50,000 $250,000 $500,000

$500,000 $50,000 $250,000 $800,000

$5,732,630 $63,672 $304,327 $6,100,629

$1,410,700

$874,846

$322,050

$777,070

$8,973,120

$382,948

$372,660

$647,900

$1,083,680

$8,645,201

$1,900,000 $600,000 $1,700,000 $300,000

$1,900,000 $510,000 $1,790,000 $300,000

$1,900,000 $475,000 $1,825,000 $300,000

$1,900,000 $400,000 $1,835,154 $300,000

$1,900,000 $400,000 $1,835,154 $300,000

$1,900,000 $400,000 $1,835,154 $300,000

$1,900,000 $400,000 $1,835,154 $300,000

$1,900,000 $400,000 $1,835,154 $300,000

$1,900,000 $400,000 $1,835,154 $300,000

$1,900,000 $400,000 $1,835,154 $439,043

$150,000 $150,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $109,230 $14,730 $14,500 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $44,944,351 $4,664,730 $4,514,500 $4,510,000 $4,445,154 $4,445,154 $4,445,154 $4,445,154 $4,445,154 $4,445,154 $4,584,197 $53,351,579

$4,664,730

$4,689,663

$4,841,485

$4,934,565

$5,113,705

$5,307,958

$5,521,770

$5,760,031

$6,021,406

$6,496,266

Total Wastewater $197,056,949 $24,856,564 $24,001,093 $23,097,437 $27,175,261 $18,765,057 $13,377,503 $9,520,316 $8,450,842 $22,182,335 $25,630,541 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Wastewater $231,458,621 $24,856,564 $24,932,335 $24,795,099 $30,167,257 $21,587,322 $15,974,076 $11,826,137 $10,950,601 $30,048,191 $36,321,040

153


WASTEWATER For ease of understanding for the reader, some capital projects have been disclosed under a different activity area than is recorded in Council's financial systems. There follows a reconciliation between the ‘Capital Expenditure’ figures shown in the summarised financial information for this activity, and the detailed list of projects above.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Ten Year WASTEWATER Project Cost Per detailed list above Total Wastewater excl inflation $197,056,949 Total Wastewater incl inflation $231,458,621 subtract items included in ‘City Waters Support’ activity Laboratory renewals and minor expenditure $150,630 Per summarised financial information Total Wastewater excl inflation $196,906,319 Total Wastewater incl inflation $231,285,033

154 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$24,856,564 $24,001,093 $23,097,437 $27,175,261 $18,765,057 $13,377,503 $9,520,316 $8,450,842 $22,182,335 $25,630,541 $24,856,564 $24,932,335 $24,795,099 $30,167,257 $21,587,322 $15,974,076 $11,826,137 $10,950,601 $30,048,191 $36,321,040 $35,430

$14,500

$10,000

$10,000

$10,000

$30,700

$10,000

$10,000

$10,000

$10,000

$24,821,134 $23,986,593 $23,087,437 $27,165,261 $18,755,057 $13,346,803 $9,510,316 $8,440,842 $22,172,335 $25,620,541 $24,821,134 $24,917,273 $24,784,364 $30,156,156 $21,575,818 $15,937,417 $11,813,715 $10,937,643 $30,034,645 $36,306,869


WATER SUPPLY WHY WE DO IT To provide all urban and rural-residential properties in Tauranga with a constant, adequate, sustainable and high quality water supply.

WHAT WE DO • T he Water Supply activity consists of the following key components: --

protection of source water through Water Supply Catchment management

• T he network of pipes is maintained under a five-year performance-based maintenance contract by Council’s contractor, City Care. This contract expires on 30th June 2013 • C ity Waters will balance efficiency, environmental impacts and future needs to deliver quality services to its customers.

STRATEGIC DIRECTION Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following:

abstraction of raw water from source streams.

--

roduction or processing of suitable quality and p quantities of potable water

City Vision

--

istribution or transportation of the product to the d point of supply to the customer where it meets specific flow, pressure and quality standards on a sustained basis.

Built to Fit our Hills, Harbour & Coast

• T o undertake this activity, the Council owns and operates water assets with a replacement cost in excess of $288 million

A Clean, Green, Valued Environment

• C urrent legislation and regulations which essentially set the minimum service levels that must be provided, and which affect asset operation, maintenance and development in the Water Activity include:

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

Living Well, Wasting Less

Local Government Act 2002

--

Health Act 1956

--

Health (Drinking Water) Amendment Act 2007

--

Resource Management Act 1991

--

Local Government (Rating) Act 2002

--

Building Act 2004.

This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes. Key Strategies and Plans • SmartGrowth 2007 • Water Supply Asset Management Plan • Public Health Risk Management Plans

--

--

Council Outcomes

The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies and Plans.

155


WATER SUPPLY CURRENT DELIVERY • T auranga residents receive and pay for Aa Grade water quality as defined by the Ministry of Health (MoH) Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand (2008) and the Public Health Grading of Community Drinking Water Supplies (2003) guideline • A Customer Services Charter is in place and is aimed to build awareness with customers as to their expectations and responsibilities relating to the water supply • W ater supplies in Tauranga have undergone major redevelopment since 1995. The City is currently supplied by the Joyce and Oropi Road Processing Plants using micro-filtration as leading international technology to produce high quality water • Other initiatives include: --

--

t he adoption of universal metering (100% consumer user fees). This has markedly improved the sustainability of water usage in the city and has resulted in deferring the upgrading of treatment infrastructure by at least 12 years a leak detection programme, which has resulted in maintaining leakage to low system losses as benchmarked against international standards

--

a backflow protection programme to prevent cross contamination of the supply system

--

computerisation of water supply asset information

--

the partnering arrangements for on-going maintenance of distribution assets and support agreements for core equipment at the microfiltration facilities.

• T auranga’s water is sourced from the Tautau and Waiorohi streams in the foothills of the Kaimai ranges.

156 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

Council owns about 2,500 ha of the approximately 4,500 ha of drinking water catchment land. The Council has a water right of approximately 37,000m3 per day for the Tautau Stream and 54,000m3 per day from the Waiorohi stream. The water abstracted from these streams is processed at the Joyce Road and Oropi Road Processing Plants with a total processing capacity of approximately 67,000m3 per day • A n Integrated Catchment Management Plan has been drafted to improve catchment management practices aimed at protecting the water supply catchments and to ensure that existing stream water quality and quantity is sustained and to ensure the interests of all stakeholders are maintained. Specific provisions relating to Council’s drinking water supply catchments have been made within the relevant Western Bay of Plenty District and Bay of Plenty Regional plans and close working relationships with their staff have been established • T he bulk consumptions for the 2010/11 (vs.2009/10) financial year were an average of 35,000 (35,681)m3 per day with a maximum of 47,533 (50,246)m3 per day. This represents 52% (53%) and 71% (75%) of the processing capacity respectively • C ouncil has implemented Public Health Risk Management Plans (PHRMP) which ensure risks of contamination to the water supply (from source to customer) are kept to a minimum and in so doing, meet requirements of the Ministry of Health (MoH) and the Health (Drinking Water) Amendment Act 2007 • A review of the Assessment of Water and Sanitary Services has been undertaken and has been incorporated in the latest Asset Management Plan • R esidential, rural-residential, commercial and industrial properties receive a water supply that complies with

Council’s Infrastructure Development Code and the NZ Fire Service Code of Practice (where specific criteria can be met, some rural properties have also been serviced) • A sset renewal programmes are in place to ensure that the system infrastructure continues to meet existing levels of service in perpetuity • M aintenance of the water supply network is contracted out under a performance-based contract with specified response times and customer satisfaction indices • W ater metering occurs on a quarterly basis for domestic and smaller commercial/industrial users and monthly for larger commercial/industrial users • T he development of bulk infrastructure to meet city-wide growth is co-ordinated in-house whereas infrastructure associated with subdivision development is developer driven and then vested in the Council as assets • W ater demand management and conservation is actively practised by Council in support of the goal of efficient water use. Initiatives include active leakage control, pressure management, the renewal of pipes in poor condition as well as continuous monitoring of the distribution system • T he Waterline customer education programme promotes efficient and sustainable use of Tauranga City’s water, wastewater and stormwater services by the community.

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS • T o construct further reservoir storage in the City’s Eastern Zone • In addition to the water demand management initiatives above, emphasis will be placed on methods to further


WATER SUPPLY extend the life of water resources and infrastructure. Specifically peak water demands in the City are to be monitored to evaluate the timing of the delivery of the future Waiari scheme near Te Puke. Water tariff options to minimise peak demands will be investigated with the intention of deferring capital spend as long as practicable • T he Integrated Catchment Management Plan to be approved. In conjunction with this plan an integrated pest animal management plan has been prepared and direction on the implementation of both these plans would be sought • C ouncil to work cooperatively with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council and Western Bay of Plenty District Council towards improving catchment management practices and protecting and sustaining the water sources in the water supply catchments. This will include participating with policy and planning teams relating to water abstraction and land use practise and also with issues of land slips, run off from unsealed roads, fly dumping and the protection of riparian margins • T o review and evaluate Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) or associated Smart Metering technology and to establish if a business case exists in either the domestic and / or commercial / industrial metering fields to justify the implementation of this technology. AMR or Smart Metering technology would allow more flexibility in developing tariff options, improve information flow to customers, improve public health risk management, and strengthen the metering / revenue collection / water loss management linkages in the three waters’ business.

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN Implementation of remote operation of critical reservoir shut off valves in an attempt to reduce water loss arising from significant mains breaks and seismic activity thereby mitigating the risk of running out of water and of associated water flood damage to neighbouring properties.

SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECTS Wellbeing Significant negative effects or risks

S*

C*

EC*

EN*

Insufficient water supplies during times of drought or emergency. In particular when high rainfall events result in processing plants shutting down.

How Council will mitigate the effect or risk Demand management through volumetric charging and education. 48hrs AADD storage capacity. Pre-treatment at Oropi Plant to be commissioned in 2012. Provision of additional storage and processing capacity to meet growth (Reservoirs & Waiari). Implement restriction procedure.

Insufficient Eastern Reservoir Storage serving the coastal strip.

Land acquired and the reservoir to be constructed.

Health and safety risks associated with the operation, maintenance, or construction of Water Supply infrastructure.

Public Health Risk Management Plans.

Drinking water not meeting the Drinking Water Standard 2008.

Regular Safety Audits conducted on contractor work sites. Maintenance contractor’s Hygiene Code of Practice. •

Ownership of catchment land to minimise risk of contamination. State of the art processing. Internal & external lab testing. Public Health Risk Management Plans. Incident and Emergency Management Plans.

Inadequate pressure and flow to fight fires.

Ongoing routine testing of hydrants. Modelling to identify network weaknesses.

* S = Social, C = Cultural, EC = Economic, EN = Environmental

157


WATER SUPPLY STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) WATER SUPPLY Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 14,585 9,121 3,148 6,124 0 18,393 3,808 1,325 14,398

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 15,786 9,547 1,827 5,915 0 17,289 1,503 2,364 5,566

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 16,961 9,905 1,876 6,089 0 17,870 909 2,481 4,665

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 17,647 10,315 1,919 6,400 0 18,634 987 2,601 6,356

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 18,166 10,745 2,012 6,644 0 19,401 1,235 2,731 10,778

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 19,056 11,160 2,131 7,187 0 20,478 1,422 2,862 17,741

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 19,788 11,555 2,298 7,807 0 21,660 1,872 2,979 26,160

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 20,076 11,969 2,374 8,266 0 22,609 2,533 3,099 43,179

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 21,109 12,462 2,442 8,550 0 23,454 2,345 3,235 46,932

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 21,842 12,979 2,529 8,696 0 24,204 2,362 3,343 22,659

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 23,321 14,104 2,617 9,824 0 26,545 3,224 3,454 30,884

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

158 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

14,880 0 (295) 14,585

16,097 0 (311) 15,786

16,757 0 (311) 16,446

16,918 0 (311) 16,607

16,881 0 (311) 16,570

17,145 0 (311) 16,834

17,311 0 (311) 17,000

17,079 0 (311) 16,768

17,398 0 (311) 17,087

17,419 0 (311) 17,108

17,991 0 (311) 17,680

9,121 3,148 6,124 0 18,393 3,808

9,547 1,827 5,915 0 17,289 1,503

9,604 1,819 5,904 0 17,327 881

9,707 1,806 6,023 0 17,536 929

9,801 1,835 6,061 0 17,697 1,127

9,859 1,882 6,349 0 18,090 1,256

9,927 1,974 6,707 0 18,608 1,608

9,997 1,983 6,903 0 18,883 2,115

10,088 1,977 6,921 0 18,986 1,899

10,166 1,980 6,811 0 18,957 1,849

10,693 1,984 7,448 0 20,125 2,445

1,325 2,483 0 0 0 3,808

2,364 (861) 0 0 0 1,503

2,405 (1,523) 0 0 0 882

2,448 (1,520) 0 0 0 928

2,491 (1,364) 0 0 0 1,127

2,528 (1,272) 0 0 0 1,256

2,559 (951) 0 0 0 1,608

2,588 (473) 0 0 0 2,115

2,619 (720) 0 0 0 1,899

2,619 (770) 0 0 0 1,849

2,619 (174) 0 0 0 2,445

14,398

5,566

4,491

5,921

9,709

15,422

21,907

34,759

36,219

16,727

21,794

4,657 2,669 0 5,819 0 803 450 0 14,398

3,333 531 0 899 0 803 0 0 5,566

3,138 350 0 200 0 803 0 0 4,491

3,148 370 0 1,600 0 803 0 0 5,921

2,983 (450) 0 6,177 0 999 0 0 9,709

4,997 2,952 0 6,561 0 912 0 0 15,422

3,794 925 0 16,241 0 947 0 0 21,907

4,587 510 0 28,686 0 976 0 0 34,759

3,802 510 0 30,883 0 1,024 0 0 36,219

4,011 777 0 10,863 0 1,076 0 0 16,727

3,903 510 0 16,252 0 1,129 0 0 21,794


WATER SUPPLY TEN YEAR PLAN MEASURES AND LEVELS OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE MEASURES - ACTIVITY OUTCOME What this measure tells us

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

TCC - annual residents' survey

77%

77%

76%

70%

70%

70%

70%

70%

Average water consumption per person in cubic meters per household connection per year: (a) Total (b) Domestic use, and (c) Commercial / industrial use

TCC

Not measured

(a) 234.4 (b) 176.8 (c) 943.8

(a) 236.8 (b) 179.9 (c) 899.9

Decreasing

Decreasing or maintaining

Decreasing or maintaining

Decreasing or maintaining

Decreasing or maintaining

Annual peak demand in litres per capita per day.

TCC

New measure

New measure

New measure

475 litres / capita / day

450 litres / capita / day

450 litres / capita / day

450 litres / capita / day

450 litres / capita / day

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Measure

Data Source

High quality water supply (perception)

Percentage of residents that are satisfied with the water quality in Tauranga (i.e. with its taste, odour, colour).

Degree of effectiveness of water conservation education programmes (factual) Degree of effectiveness of peak water demand management programmes (factual)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES - SERVICE MEASURE 2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

TCC

0.4 hours (24 mins)

0.6 hours (36 mins)

0.55 Hours (33 mins)

No more than two hours

No more than two hours

No more than two hours

No more than two hours

No more than two hours

TCC - annual residents' survey

Not measured

82% of respondents aware of ways to conserve and 84% had taken steps to conserve water

81% of respondents aware of ways to conserve and 82% had taken steps to conserve water

Increasing

Maintaining or increasing

Maintaining or increasing

Maintaining or increasing

Maintaining or increasing

What this measure tells us

Measure

Data Source

The continuity (reliability) of the city’s water supply (factual)

Average time without water per customer is no more than two hours each year (this includes planned and unplanned outages).

Effectiveness of water conservation education programmes (perception)

Of residents who are aware of ways they can conserve water, the percentage that have taken any steps to conserve water.

159


WATER SUPPLY

LEVELS OF SERVICE Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Responsiveness (actual)

Where customers are out of water, 95% of the time contractors are on site within one hour of notification.

TCC

99.8%

100%

99%

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

Responsiveness (actual)

Where customers are out of water, 95% of the time water will be restored within eight hours of notification.

TCC

Not measured

98.9%

98.4%

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

Provision of high quality driniking water (factual)

Council supplies drinking water that meets the Ministry of Health’s Aa water quality standards to all customers. Water quality is audited by Toi te Ora Public Health. *Fluoride is not added to Tauranga’s water supply, this has no impact on the Aa water quality rating.

TCC via Toi Te Ora Public Health

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Provision of reliable water supply (factual)

Peak production capacity of 67 million litres per day through the two water processing plants. This is tested once a year.

TCC

Achieved

Achieved where tested

Partially achieved

Achieved

Achieved if within 10% of the total design capacity of 67 million litres per day

Achieved if within 10% of the total design capacity of 67 million litres per day

Achieved if within 10% of the total design capacity of 67 million litres per day

Achieved if within 10% of the total design capacity

Adequate provision of water supply for fire fighting (factual)

Conduct hydrant testing to meet the Fire-fighting Water Supply Code of Practice SNZ PAS 4509 requirements. * Testing is carried out on a five-year cysle across the city. Measure hydrant flow litres per second (l/s).

TCC via Fire Department

Not specifically measured

90% of the tested hydrants met 25 l/s with 100% of tested hydrants meeting the code of practise of 12.5 l/s

91% of the tested hydrants met 25 l/s with 99% of tested hydrants meeting the code of practise of 12.5 l/s

At least 80%

At least 80% meet 25 l/s and 100% meet 12.5l/s

At least 80% meet 25 l/s and 100% meet 12.5l/s

At least 80% meet 25 l/s and 100% meet 12.5l/s

At least 80% meet 25 l/s and 100% meet 12.5l/s

What this measure tells us

160 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


WATER SUPPLY LEVELS OF SERVICE What this measure tells us

Measure

Provision of a Water loss from the reticulation sustainably-managed system as a result of leakage water supply (factual) overflows, etc does not exceed either 15% of total production or 100 litres per connection (household or business) per day (l/c/d). Provision of a Provision of education programmes: sustainably-managed (a) Number of primary schools (3 water supply (factual) Waters programme) (b) Number of classes (Stormwater programme) (c) Community contact / presentations (3 Waters) (d) Domestic visits - efficiency and repairs (3 Waters) (e)Development of education and communication programmes - new initiatives or redevelopment of existing (3 Waters)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Data Source

2008/09 Results

TCC

17% and 102 l/c/d (2007/08 results)

12.1% and 77 l/c/d

14.9% and 85 l/c/d

No more than 15% and no more than 100l/c/d

No more than 15% and no more than 100l/c/d

No more than 15% and no more than 100l/c/d

No more than 15% and no more than 100l/c/d

No more than 15% and no more than 100l/c/d

TCC

Not measured

Of the 27 schools in the area, 20 schools elected to take up the programme. 89 lessons were provided to primary and intermediate classes reaching 2,670 pupils this year about sustainable use of the City’s Water Supply system. 1306 domestic customers were visited. 6 external public talks (and 4 public events) have occurred since April (not measured prior to this).

The Waterline Schools Programme (including water, stormwater, wastewater & Hydroponics) reached 27 schools and early childhood, and included 102 classes and about 3060 students. Also 5 Kindergartens consisting of about 150 students were reached with the Great Drain Game. In addition 26 Public presentations to community and business groups; 1263 visits to domestic customers; 2 visits to business customers; 18 school audits and 5 Community / public events were undertaken.

School programme - 27 per year. Public talks and visits to domestic customers increasing

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

OTHER INTERESTING STATISTICS What this measure tells us Throughput - peak day use (factual)

Measure

Data Source

Peak day use this year (which will always be less than the peak production capacity)

TCC

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

48.2 million litres per day

50.25 million litres per day

47.53 million litres per day

No targets required

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

161


WATER SUPPLY This Activity has a comprehensive Asset Management Plan. This is the key tool which ensures that capital funds, along with existing assets, are used efficiently and effectively. The performance and condition of all Water Supply assets is constantly monitored. This, along with annual updates of the Asset Management Plan, ensures that demand will continue to be met despite the pressure that growth places upon the management of Water Supply and its related assets.

ASSET MANAGEMENT Key Assets as at 30 June 2011 • 17 reservoirs • Two microfiltration water processing plants • 1,263 kms of water pipes • 52,701 backflow prevention devices

Capital Expenditure – Growth Related Projects Allocations of capital expenditure for growth related projects are indicative only and final allocations are reviewed and confirmed on an annual basis by applying the policy process outlined in the Development Contributions Policy.

• 51,732 metered water service connections

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE WATER SUPPLY NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - GROWTH Waiari project - Development of Tauranga's third water scheme New reticulation for Papamoa East (Wairakei) New watermains - Papamoa New watermains - Tauranga Central New watermains - Welcome Bay / Ohauiti / Pyes Pa New reticulation for Pyes Pa West New reticulation for the Tauriko Business Estate Reservoir construction Contribution to Western BoP DC under the SubRegional Water Resource Agreement Total new or upgraded assets - Growth IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Growth

Total

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

$64,219,244

$200,000

$200,000

$0

$0

$7,629,447 $15,607,443 $875,130 $14,092,196 $970,301 $2,480,685 $11,996,565 $600,000

$0 $100,000 $0 $100,000 $0 $0 $600,000 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,600,000 $0

$118,471,011

$1,000,000

$200,000

$150,110,986

$1,000,000

NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - VESTED Assets vested to Council by developers $9,470,536 Total new or upgraded assets - Vested $9,470,536 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Vested $11,383,327 NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - LEVEL OF SERVICE Reservoir Remote Isolation Valves Oropi WPP Intake - Silt Management System Upgrade water assets central Tauranga

162 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

$800,000 $600,000 $760,000

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$1,000,000

$5,986,455 $17,900,000 $29,100,000

$9,832,789

$0

$100,000 $2,857,447 $0 $113,448 $0 $575,642 $1,700,000 $0

$100,000 $260,000 $0 $2,227,816 $54,497 $770,160 $4,100,000 $100,000

$100,000 $100,000 $600,000 $10,558,006 $0 $0 $3,050,932 $0 $59,040 $28,290 $1,134,883 $0 $3,996,565 $0 $100,000 $100,000

$530,000 $0 $0 $350,000 $50,000 $0 $0 $100,000

$6,419,447 $0 $875,130 $8,100,000 $757,884 $0 $0 $100,000

$1,600,000

$5,346,537

$8,612,473 $15,027,875 $28,686,296 $30,882,580 $10,862,789 $16,252,461

$207,760

$1,717,600

$5,935,191

$9,907,789 $17,944,786 $35,634,117 $40,017,647 $14,714,734 $23,031,362

$802,575 $802,575

$802,575 $802,575

$802,575 $802,575

$999,224 $999,224

$911,839 $911,839

$947,071 $947,071

$975,535 $975,535

$1,024,312 $1,024,312

$1,075,527 $1,075,527

$1,129,303 $1,129,303

$802,575

$833,715

$861,564

$1,109,239

$1,048,980

$1,130,897

$1,211,810

$1,327,303

$1,456,909

$1,600,335

$0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0

$0 $20,000 $0

$0 $30,000 $0

$0 $550,000 $0

$160,000 $0 $760,000

$160,000 $0 $0

$160,000 $0 $0

$160,000 $0 $0

$160,000 $0 $0

$280,000 $1,231,990 $0 $150,000 $20,590 $0 $0 $100,000


WATER SUPPLY CAPITAL EXPENDITURE WATER SUPPLY Total NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - LEVEL OF SERVICE (continued) New Watermains - Bethlehem $130,000 Sundry other capital works $3,302,000 Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service $5,592,000 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service $6,732,069 ASSET RENEWALS Pipe asset renewals $20,400,000 Meter asset renewals $6,950,000 Replacement of CMF Membrane Modules at water $4,156,656 treatment plants Reservoir asset renewals $3,350,000 Mechanical and electrical asset renewals $1,800,000 Replacement and upgrade of equipment used for the $1,000,000 management and control of water Sundry other renewals $110,753 Total Asset Renewals $37,767,409 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Asset Renewals $45,243,090 Total Water $171,300,956 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Water $213,469,472

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$130,000 $300,000 $430,000

$0 $300,000 $300,000

$0 $300,000 $320,000

$0 $300,000 $330,000

$0 $300,000 $850,000

$0 $335,000 $1,255,000

$0 $300,000 $460,000

$0 $300,000 $460,000

$0 $567,000 $727,000

$0 $300,000 $460,000

$430,000

$311,640

$343,520

$366,333

$977,840

$1,498,596

$571,412

$596,068

$984,794

$651,866

$2,400,000 $350,000 $0

$2,000,000 $350,000 $215,042

$2,000,000 $400,000 $215,042

$2,000,000 $400,000 $0

$2,000,000 $550,000 $1,863,531

$2,000,000 $650,000 $179,120

$2,000,000 $750,000 $1,253,837

$2,000,000 $1,000,000 $215,042

$2,000,000 $1,200,000 $215,042

$2,000,000 $1,300,000 $0

$300,000 $180,000 $100,000

$300,000 $180,000 $100,000

$300,000 $180,000 $100,000

$350,000 $180,000 $100,000

$350,000 $180,000 $100,000

$350,000 $180,000 $100,000

$350,000 $180,000 $100,000

$350,000 $180,000 $100,000

$350,000 $180,000 $100,000

$350,000 $180,000 $100,000

$3,075 $3,333,075

$43,514 $3,188,556

$2,900 $3,197,942

$3,000 $3,033,000

$3,880 $5,047,411

$4,600 $3,463,720

$3,208 $4,637,045

$7,089 $3,852,131

$16,849 $4,061,891

$22,638 $3,952,638

$3,333,075

$3,312,272

$3,432,991

$3,366,933

$5,806,542

$4,136,028

$5,760,137

$4,991,591

$5,502,238

$5,601,283

$5,565,650

$4,491,131

$5,920,517

$9,708,761 $15,421,723 $20,693,666 $34,758,876 $36,219,023 $16,727,207 $21,794,402

$5,565,650

$4,665,387

$6,355,675 $10,777,696 $17,741,150 $24,710,307 $43,177,476 $46,932,610 $22,658,675 $30,884,847

For ease of understanding for the reader, some capital projects have been disclosed under a different activity area than is recorded in Council's financial systems. There follows a reconciliation between the "Capital Expenditure" figures shown in the summarised financial information for this activity, and the detailed list of projects above.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE WATER SUPPLY Per detailed list above Total Water Supply excl inflation Total Water Supply incl inflation subtract item included in ‘Support Services’ activity Property Transactions Per summarised financial information Total Water Supply excl inflation Total Water Supply incl inflation

Ten Year Project Cost

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

$171,300,956 $213,469,472

$5,565,650 $5,565,650

$4,491,131 $4,665,387

($1,213,545) $172,514,501 $214,918,566

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$5,920,517 $9,708,761 $15,421,723 $20,693,666 $34,758,876 $36,219,023 $16,727,207 $21,794,402 $6,355,675 $10,777,696 $17,741,150 $24,710,307 $43,177,476 $46,932,610 $22,658,675 $30,884,847 ($1,213,545)

$5,565,650 $5,565,650

$4,491,131 $4,665,387

$5,920,517 $9,708,761 $15,421,723 $21,907,211 $34,758,876 $36,219,023 $16,727,207 $21,794,402 $6,355,675 $10,777,696 $17,741,150 $26,159,401 $43,177,476 $46,932,610 $22,658,675 $30,884,847

163


STORMWATER WHY WE DO IT

Quality

STRATEGIC DIRECTION

To manage stormwater so that property and people are protected from flood damage, and to minimise adverse effects on the harbour and waterways from stormwater run-off.

• S tormwater quality is addressed by the Resource Management Act (RMA) and managed by Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BoPRC) through the resource consent process

Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following:

WHAT WE DO

• C ouncil undertakes public education to raise the profile of water quality and stormwater issues

Stormwater systems are those that receive all surface water run-off and then treat/dispose of the same. The System • T he Council manages approximately 724 km of underground pipe, 84 km of open drains, 122 treatment and attenuation ponds, 210 hectares of drainage reserve and over 1,727 outlets to the harbour, ocean or rivers. (Drainage reserves frequently provide recreational opportunities in addition to their stormwater function i.e. walkways, cycleways, plantings etc.) • T he Council stormwater system involves collection, treatment and disposal. A primary system of pipes and open drains with ponds is intended to cope with at least a 10-year storm event. A system of secondary flow paths through reserves, private properties and along road corridors is utilised for more significant storm events • M ost residential properties in Tauranga City rely on ground soakage for disposal of roof water • T he stormwater system is maintained under a 5-year performance-based maintenance contract by City Care. This contract expires on 30 June 2013.

• A new Pollution Prevention bylaw has been approved which provides Council greater control over stormwater discharges into its network. This bylaw came into effect on 1st November 2010.

City Vision

Built to Fit our Hills, Harbour & Coast

A Clean, Green, Valued Environment

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

Living Well, Wasting Less

Flooding • T he Council’s Infrastructure Development Code requires the overall stormwater system to be designed for a 50-year storm event with building floor levels having 200mm to 500mm of freeboard depending on the type of building • P roviding acceptable levels of flood protection in new areas is relatively straightforward, but retrofitting established areas and dealing with urban intensification are significantly more complex and expensive matters • T he highest priority for flood mitigation is to protect residential buildings followed by commercial and industrial buildings.

Council Outcomes This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes. Key Strategies and Plans • Open Space Strategy 2006 • Tauranga Transport Strategy 2012-2042 • Urban Design Strategy 2005 • Vegetation Strategy 2006 • Smart Economy 2004 • SmartGrowth 2007

164 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


STORMWATER • Reserve Management Plans

--

• Stormwater Asset Management Plan The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies and Plans.

CURRENT DELIVERY Flood Risk • W hile most residential buildings are not at risk from inundation in a 10-year flood event the number at risk from a 50-year flood event is uncertain • T he primary system of pipes and sumps in the newer areas is typically designed to cope with a 5- or 10-year rainfall event without causing undue nuisance. In the older areas many of the primary systems can only cope with a 2-year rainfall event • O verland (secondary) flow-paths are intended to convey floodwaters that exceed the capacity of the primary systems. Streets and reserve areas can double as overland flow-paths. In new areas overland flowpaths across private property are usually identified and protected by an easement in favour of Council. In the older areas there are very few identified or protected overland flow-paths. Overland flow-paths which discharge over vulnerable slopes where no defined or effective flow-paths exist can result in slips and damage to buildings • C atchment studies and flood occurrences provide the basis of the capital works upgrade programme. $54 million has been budgeted ($5 million per year) in the Ten Year Plan to continue with the capital works programme

--

t he rainfall design criteria in the Council’s Infrastructure Development Code have been reviewed subsequent to the May 2005 floods and also to take account of the recommendations on climate change from the Ministry for the Environment. The combined effect of updated rainfall data and climate change is a prediction of a greater number of high intensity rainfall events in the future. Systems will need to be designed for 1030% more capacity to cope with predicted rainfall events in 2055 comprehensive stormwater consents are being prepared in accordance with the Regional Water and Land Plan and the RMA. The four remaining Comprehensive Consent applications have been lodged and are being processed. This will complete the consenting of all of Tauranga City. Management plans will be prepared as a condition of these consents setting out work required to address identified issues.

and quality monitoring. The cost and resourcing for compliance monitoring is becoming a significant issue • T he Pollution Prevention Programme, established in 2001, continues to focus on audits of commercial and industrial properties • T he Waterline customer education programme promotes efficient and sustainable use of Tauranga City’s water, wastewater and stormwater services by the community. Cultural Issues • Tangata Whenua are consulted on Stormwater projects, including planning, physical works and quality issues during consent consultation, through established committees and on a project-by-project basis

Quality Issues • T he quality of water discharged to the harbour, particularly from industrial areas and major roads, can be poor. At present, much of the stormwater discharging is largely untreated, is of variable quality and can pollute the receiving water • T reatment methods such as ponds, filter devices and pollutant traps are being required to improve the quality of the stormwater discharging from urban catchments and road run-off to receiving waters. These can be difficult and expensive to retrofit in existing urbanised catchments. All new stormwater discharge consents issued by BoPRC include conditions requiring treatment

165


STORMWATER ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS • C omprehensive Stormwater Consents (CSC): A Citywide consent application has been lodged with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council. Once this consent is granted Catchment Management Plans (CMP) for each individual catchment will be applied for. The aim is to have all these completed and granted in the next three to four years • F lood Hazard Maps: Roll out of the first completed catchment commenced in late 2011. The remainder of the City’s catchments to be completed over the next three years • S tormwater Guidelines: Implement controls on managing stormwater impacts on both “greenfield” and “brownfield” areas by offering alternative solutions focusing on low impact designs.

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN • No significant differences to the above.

166 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECTS Wellbeing Significant negative effects or risks

S*

C*

EC*

EN*

How Council will mitigate the effect or risk

Changing weather patterns (weather bombs) may result in extreme events causing damage to valuable assets.

Ongoing improvements made to assets are based on the recently revised TCC Infrastructure Development Code and/or specialist studies (e.g. Lifelines).

Discharge of polluted stormwater impacting on public health, environmental, cultural and aesthetic values.

ity Waters Pollution Prevention Team proactively works with C industry to minimise the risk of stormwater contamination through education, cooperation and enforcement. Swift response from Council staff and contractors in case of spills or contamination to minimise the impact. Installation of stormwater protection devices in high risk areas.

Lack or inadequacy of existing assets to cope with large rainfall events causing flooding, which could have significant negative social and economic impacts.

Ongoing stormwater catchment modelling programme to identify areas at risk, overland flow paths and additional infrastructure requirements. Storm recovery programme: upgrade of under-capacity infrastructure following the 2005 flood events Tauranga experienced. ong term planning of required infrastructure to ensure right L timing and capacity.

* S = Social, C = Cultural, EC = Economic, EN = Environmental


STORMWATER STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) STORMWATER Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 18 3,660 5,390 4,200 (1,295) 11,955 11,937 11,937 8,689

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 18 4,092 5,980 2,881 0 12,953 12,935 12,935 15,387

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 18 4,203 6,602 3,015 0 13,820 13,802 13,803 10,638

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 19 4,364 7,246 3,188 0 14,798 14,779 14,779 13,068

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 20 4,528 8,164 3,444 0 16,136 16,116 16,115 21,919

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 20 4,701 8,775 3,696 0 17,172 17,152 17,151 17,268

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 21 4,849 9,421 3,943 0 18,213 18,192 18,192 23,582

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 21 5,037 10,105 4,282 0 19,424 19,403 19,403 17,899

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 22 5,002 10,782 4,532 0 20,316 20,294 20,294 24,652

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 23 5,180 11,476 4,834 0 21,490 21,467 21,467 20,452

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 23 5,382 12,190 5,127 0 22,699 22,676 22,676 28,623

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

18 0 0 18

3,660 5,390 4,200 (1,295) 11,955 11,937

4,092 5,980 2,881 0 12,953 12,935

4,076 6,401 2,923 0 13,400 13,382

4,107 6,818 3,000 0 13,925 13,907

4,130 7,446 3,141 0 14,717 14,699

4,153 7,752 3,265 0 15,170 15,152

4,166 8,094 3,387 0 15,647 15,629

4,207 8,440 3,576 0 16,223 16,205

4,049 8,728 3,669 0 16,446 16,428

4,058 8,989 3,787 0 16,834 16,816

4,080 9,242 3,887 0 17,209 17,191

11,937 0 0 0 0 11,937

12,935 0 0 0 0 12,935

13,383 0 0 0 0 13,383

13,907 0 0 0 0 13,907

14,699 0 0 0 0 14,699

15,153 0 0 0 0 15,153

15,629 0 0 0 0 15,629

16,205 0 0 0 0 16,205

16,428 0 0 0 0 16,428

16,816 0 0 0 0 16,816

17,191 0 0 0 0 17,191

8,689

15,387

10,240

12,173

19,745

15,011

19,748

14,409

19,025

15,098

20,199

1 6,085 0 1,016 0 1,587 0 0 8,689

5 8,325 0 200 0 6,857 0 0 15,387

15 8,438 0 200 0 1,587 0 0 10,240

4 8,462 0 2,120 0 1,587 0 0 12,173

4 6,806 0 4,119 0 8,729 0 87 19,745

14 6,748 0 4,580 0 3,669 0 0 15,011

15 8,084 0 4,114 0 7,535 0 0 19,748

19 7,068 0 956 0 6,366 0 0 14,409

6 6,555 0 3,198 0 9,266 0 0 19,025

1 6,419 0 2,247 0 6,431 0 0 15,098

26 6,418 0 11,522 0 2,233 0 0 20,199

167


STORMWATER TEN YEAR PLAN MEASURES AND LEVELS OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE MEASURES - ACTIVITY OUTCOME What this measure tells us Level of protection for people and property from flood damage (factual)

Effectiveness of pollution prevention education programmes (factual)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Number of residential buildings* that were flooded, and the number and degree of flood events that happened during the year. * Refers to habitable parts of residential buildings only. ** Target is to have no residential buildings flooding in a ‘normal’ year. Number of recorded incidents of pollutants being put into the stormwater system.

TCC

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

77

194

Less than 80

Less than 80

Less than 80

Less than 80

Less than 80

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

TCC Not measured Customer Contact Module system

PERFORMANCE MEASURES - SERVICE MEASURE What this measure tells us Level of protection for people and property from flood damage (perception) Effectiveness of pollution prevention education programmes (perception) Level of security from flooding (factual)

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

TCC - annual residents' survey

Not measured

80%

72%

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

TCC - annual residents' survey

44%

33%

34%

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Not measured

23 additional hectares have been protected from this year's flood protection programme.

The focus for the year was the lower Pillans catchment (Maxwell's Road), lower Bureta catchment (Vale St) and several smaller catchments. This makes it difficult to estimate an actual accurate area

59 additional Increasing hectares that have been protected from this year's flood protection. Focus for this year is the Fifteenth Avenue catchment

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Measure

Data Source

Percentage of residents who feel that their homes and business buildings are adequately protected from flooding. Percentage of residents that correctly know that stormwater is not treated before it is released into the harbour or ocean.

Overview of how much more security TCC from flooding has been provided for people in Tauranga as a result of this year’s flood protection work programme, including key areas that have been protected.

168 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


STORMWATER LEVELS OF SERVICE What this measure tells us Provision of environmentally sustainable services stormwater discharge (factual) Provision of education programmes (factual)

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

All stormwater discharged into the harbour, ocean and streams meets ongoing resource consent conditions for water quality (these consent conditions, and any exceptions to them, will be explained further when reporting). Provision of education programmes: (a) Number of primary schools (3 Waters programme) (b) Number of classes (Stormwater programme) (c) Community contact / presentations (3 Waters) (d) Domestic visits - efficiency and repairs (3 Waters) (e)Development of education and communication programmes - new initiatives or redevelopment of existing (3 Waters)

TCC

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

TCC

Not measured

86 lessons were provided to primary and intermediate classes this year about sustainable use of the City’s Stormwater system. 20 wastewater and water supply school visits

250 lessons 27 school visits were provided to primary and intermediate classes this year about sustainable use of the City’s Stormwater system. Approx 1500 students heard our message. 1263 Domestic visits were made and 5 community/ public events such as the Home Show were attended

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

(a) >17 schools (b) > 40 classes (c) > 30 (d) >1,200 (e) Achieved

169 169


STORMWATER LEVELS OF SERVICE What this measure tells us Provision of accurate information about areas that are flood prone (factual)

Measure

Data Source

Records of known flood prone areas are up to date and are publicly available. Accurate assessments for specific properties are available for use in LIM and PIM processes on request.

TCC catchment modelling

170 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

Commenced - producing flood hazard maps from catchments already done.

Partially Achieved - A City wide record of flood prone zones is now available on request. More detailed flood hazard maps are still in progress. Established areas are restricted to on site attenuation in order to limit outflow to equal pre development flows or provide a safe flow path off site to an established system in order to mitigate the effect of the development.

Partially Achieved. As with last year a City wide record of flood prone zones continues to be available on request. Development of more detailed flood hazard maps are still in progress. Established areas are restricted to on site attenuation in order to limit outflow to equal pre development flows or provide a safe flow path off site to an established system in order to mitigate the effect of the development.

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved


STORMWATER •

ASSET MANAGEMENT Key Assets as at 30 June 2011 •

724 kms stormwater pipes

84 kms open drains

210 ha drainage reserve

1,727 stormwater outlets into the natural environment (harbour, dunes, ocean or streams) and into man made watercourses

11,358 stormwater manholes

Capital Expenditure – Growth Related Projects

This Activity has a comprehensive Asset Management Plan. This is the key tool which ensures that capital funds, along with existing assets, are used efficiently and effectively. The performance and condition of all stormwater assets is constantly monitored. This, along with annual updates of the Asset Management Plan, ensures that demand will continue to be met despite the pressure that growth places upon the management of Stormwater and its related assets.

Allocations of capital expenditure for growth related projects are indicative only and final allocations are reviewed and confirmed on an annual basis by applying the policy process outlined in the Development Contributions Policy.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

$200,000

$200,000

$870,000

$0

$0

($892,987)

$0

$0

$1,000,000 $10,467,297

$0

$0

$1,250,000

$2,003,986

$948,720

$1,459,063

$0

$0

$1,150,912

$1,055,040

$0

$0

$0

$1,136,706

$0

$216,800

$1,255,542

$1,116,369

$0

$0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $200,000

$0 $0 $0 $0 $200,000

$0 $0 $0 $0 $2,120,000

$1,169,875 $0 $0 $0 $4,310,567

$2,009,262 $0 $473,681 $1,447,920 $4,879,583

$1,677,649 $0 $339,669 $639,934 $3,440,128

$0 $0 $0 $0 $1,255,542

$1,629,691 $219,960 $0 $0 $2,966,020

$0 $0 $0 $0 $96,250 $0 $0 $0 $2,247,162 $11,522,337

$200,000

$207,760

$2,275,820

$4,785,160

$5,613,472

$4,107,857

$1,559,634

$3,843,369

$3,044,006 $16,328,304

$18,274,903

$0

$0

$0

$4,755,749

$1,764,479

$1,174,194

$4,399,309

$6,181,172

$0

$0

$10,218,348

$0

$0

$0

$2,307,398

$155,660

$1,983,616

$37,820

$1,429,294

$4,304,560

$0

$7,811,705

$5,270,879

$0

$0

$0

$0

$2,540,826

$0

$0

$0

$0

$18,324,012 $54,628,968

$1,586,617 $6,857,496

$1,586,617 $1,586,617

$1,586,617 $1,586,617

$1,665,948 $8,729,095

$1,749,245 $3,669,384

$1,836,708 $7,535,344

$1,928,543 $6,365,672

$2,024,970 $9,635,436

$2,126,219 $6,430,779

$2,232,528 $2,232,528

$65,386,173

$6,857,496

$1,648,178

$1,703,233

$9,690,168

$4,221,259

$8,997,954

$7,907,438 $12,485,598

$8,711,133

$3,163,715

STORMWATER Total NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - GROWTH Land purchase and infrastructure for Papamoa East $11,844,310 (Wairakei) urban growth area Land purchase and infrastructure for Papamoa urban $7,867,721 growth area Land purchase and infrastructure for Pyes Pa West $3,725,417 urban growth area Infrastructure for Tauriko Business Estate $6,486,477 Infrastructure for Welcome Bay urban growth area $219,960 Infrastructure for Bethlehem urban growth area $909,600 Infrastructure for Bethlehem West urban growth area $2,087,854 Total new or upgraded assets - Growth $33,141,339 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Growth $41,965,382 NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - VESTED Land and infrastructure for Papamoa East (Wairakei) urban growth area Land and infrastructure for Pyes Pa West urban growth area Assets vested to Council by developers of Tauriko Business Estate Other assets vested to Council by developers Total new or upgraded assets - Vested IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Vested

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

171


STORMWATER CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$4,420,000

$5,530,000

$5,528,000

$5,528,000

$5,528,000

$5,528,000

$5,528,000

$5,528,000

$5,528,000

$5,528,000

$400,000 $0 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$2,000,000 $17,550 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$2,000,000 $43,758 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$0 $282,555 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$0 $13,455 $15,000 $473,000 $418,000

$0 $1,289,574 $156,600 $473,000 $418,000

$0 $349,830 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$0 $0 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$0 $0 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$0 $0 $0 $473,000 $418,000

$5,711,000

$8,438,550

$8,462,758

$6,701,555

$6,447,455

$7,865,174

$6,768,830

$6,419,000

$6,419,000

$6,419,000

$5,711,000

$8,765,966

$9,084,771

$7,439,396

$7,417,152

$9,391,804

$8,408,241

$8,317,740

$8,695,177

$9,096,365

$107,141 $107,141

$4,914 $4,914

$15,155 $15,155

$3,947 $3,947

$3,851 $3,851

$14,247 $14,247

$14,809 $14,809

$18,918 $18,918

$4,731 $4,731

$1,275 $1,275

$25,294 $25,294

$130,444

$4,914

$15,743

$4,237

$4,275

$16,390

$17,683

$23,500

$6,130

$1,727

$35,844

STORMWATER Total NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - LEVEL OF SERVICE Stormwater recovery programme $54,174,000 Council has allocated $54m over ten years to address stormwater issues identified following the floods of May 2005 and subsequent flooding events. Priority in the first five years will be the Mount industrial area. Other projects currently planned to be addressed in the TY planning period include: 14th and 16th Avenue Central Bureta Catchment Minor upgrades Greerton Catchment 3rd to 14th Avenue Eversham Road Campbell Rd soakage disposal Lee Street soakage disposal TEL related stormwater upgrades $4,400,000 Upgrade Wairakei Stream culverts $1,996,722 Upgrade systems in the Hairini area $171,600 Minor projects $4,730,000 Consultants' fees and staff salaries related to capital $4,180,000 projects Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service $69,652,322 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service $82,327,612 ASSET RENEWALS Sundry minor renewals Total Asset Renewals IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Asset Renewals

Total Stormwater $157,529,770 $12,773,410 $10,240,322 $12,173,322 $19,745,068 $15,010,669 $18,855,455 $14,408,962 $19,025,187 $15,098,216 $20,199,159 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Stormwater $189,809,612 $12,773,410 $10,637,646 $13,068,061 $21,919,000 $17,268,274 $22,515,299 $17,898,813 $24,652,837 $20,452,043 $28,624,228

172 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


STORMWATER For ease of understanding for the reader, some capital projects have been disclosed under a different activity area than is recorded in Council's financial systems. There follows a reconciliation between the "Capital Expenditure" figures shown in the summarised financial information for this activity, and the detailed list of projects above.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE STORMWATER Per detailed list above Total Stormwater excl inflation Total Stormater incl inflation subtract item included in ‘Support Services’ activity Property Transactions Per summarised financial information Total Stormwater excl inflation Total Stormwater incl inflation

Ten Year Project Cost

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$157,529,770 $12,773,410 $10,240,322 $12,173,322 $19,745,068 $15,010,669 $18,855,455 $14,408,962 $19,025,187 $15,098,216 $20,199,159 $189,809,612 $12,773,410 $10,637,646 $13,068,061 $21,919,000 $17,268,274 $22,515,299 $17,898,813 $24,652,837 $20,452,043 $28,624,228 ($3,506,185)

($2,613,198)

($892,987)

$161,035,955 $15,386,608 $10,240,322 $12,173,322 $19,745,068 $15,010,669 $19,748,442 $14,408,962 $19,025,187 $15,098,216 $20,199,159 $193,489,125 $15,386,608 $10,637,646 $13,068,061 $21,919,000 $17,268,274 $23,581,615 $17,898,813 $24,652,837 $20,452,043 $28,624,228

173


SOLID WASTE WHY WE DO IT

• Relevant Strategic Plans:

To ensure sustainable waste management that protects public health and the environment.

--

National Waste Strategy (Adopted MfE/LGN 2002)

--

Regional Waste Strategy (June 2004)

WHAT WE DO

--

oint TCC/WBoPDC Waste Management and J Minimisation Plan (adopted 2010).

• T he activity has three main services which are highly interdependent: --

collection

--

disposal

--

waste reduction and environmental

• T hese activities range from waste collection and disposal through to litter collection, closed landfills and waste minimisation. Activities like rubbish collection, composting and the transfer stations have the ability to generate income through user charges or rental of the facilities • O thers like recycling, education, waste minimisation initiatives, closed landfills, household hazardous waste, street cleaning and litter collection must rely on rate revenue or external funding • T he challenge over the next decade is to reduce the waste that has no potential to be used as a resource (residual waste) to an absolute minimum • T here are conflicting objectives which the Solid Waste activity has to manage. On one hand the Council policy is driven by the need to pursue waste minimisation. On the other hand they must operate transfer stations and potentially a landfill site that require certain minimum volumes of solid waste to meet the cost of ownership and operation

CURRENT DELIVERY Collection

STRATEGIC DIRECTION Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following: City Vision

A Clean, Green, Valued Environment

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

• W e provide a pay-as-you go user pays bagged rubbish collection service throughout the city. This service encourages waste reduction because a bag is only put out as required, not because an advance payment has been made to fill a bin. There is a competitor to Council’s bag collection service • C ouncil’s service comprises about 15% of the domestic collection market by weight or about 5,000 bags per week. If Council’s service was withdrawn, the private service may be phased out to compel customers to enter into bin service contracts. Disposal

Living Well, Wasting Less

Council Outcomes This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes. Key Strategies and Plans • SmartGrowth 2007 • Smart Economy 2004 • Joint Waste Management & Minimisation Plan for Tauranga and Western Bay of Plenty 2010

174 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies and Plans.

• C ouncil owns two transfer stations which are operated under a Lease Agreement entered into on 1 June 2004 and which expires in 2017. This change from conventional waste services contracting models was necessary to maximise the use of the facilities and to improve Council’s financial position with these services. The Agreement has unbundled the services so that the transfer stations operate more as a processing factory for waste companies that want to arrange and pay for their own transport and final disposal of waste. The Agreement calls for the management of both transfer stations, the transport of the waste and its disposal at a consented landfill of the contractor’s choice • The lessee provides recycling services at the two


SOLID WASTE transfer stations free to customers

• Community education programmes

General

• A performance measure in the Agreement is an increasing diversion of resources away from landfill disposal

• Events recycling and waste minimisation planning.

• T he rates contribution to this function is around $250,000 pa which represents the net costs of ownership offset by rental of the facilities

• R esource recovery facilities at the two transfer stations accept a range of materials for reuse as second-hand goods and processing for recycling free of charge to customers. They do not operate second hand goods outlets to the public; however they supply goods to such businesses and not-for-profit organisations

• C ouncil has facilitated a number of projects with the private sector in a partnering relationship to ensure an activity is provided in a cost effective and efficient manner

• W estern Bay of Plenty District Council (WBoPDC) residents from Katikati to Te Puke use our facilities for both disposal and recycling. WBoPDC has recently opened recycling centres in these towns • H azardous wastes are accepted at the two transfer stations using purpose made stores. Household Hazardous Waste is accepted free of charge. Waste Reduction and Environmental The Council has a joint adopted Waste Management and Minimisation Plan with WBoPDC which has some common actions and some specific to each Council. The Waste Management and Minimisation Plan has set targets for the reduction of waste to landfill including actions and projects that will support this. Some community programmes that Council run include: • H ome vermi-composting workshops targeting a reduction in kitchen waste to landfill • Tauranga City Council in-house recycling system • A programme to assist businesses to minimise waste is supported by Bay of Plenty Regional Council through a subsidy • Education in primary and intermediate schools • Support Funky Junk re-use depot

Recycling

• T he lessee of the transfer stations also performs secondary recycling from the waste pit after customers have chosen to pay for its disposal as waste • A Resource Recovery Park is under development around the Te Maunga Transfer Station. Currently it includes concrete crushing to aggregates, solvent distillation, construction and demolition sorting for re-use and a materials’ processing facility for kerbside recycling materials. Litter Collection, Abandoned Cars and Street Sweeping • L itter collection from street berms and reserves and the emptying of about 700 litter bins is carried out under contract. The specifications are performance-based for bins and a mix of scheduled and on-demand clearing of ground litter • A bandoned cars are removed from streets and reserves when they create a nuisance • A ll streets are swept and street sumps are cleaned on a programmed schedule.

• T hese have included the composting activity where a private company operates the business on the Councilowned facility by processing and marketing the green waste delivered from the transfer stations. Such initiatives and partnering arrangements are likely to be more common in the future where the Council has the ability to facilitate the activity and control the level of service, but leave the business aspect to the private sector.

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS The vision is to reduce residual waste being sent to the landfill. This refers to the whole waste stream, not just the portion controlled by the Council through the transfer stations and to do this we have to gain community support. The Waste Minimisation Programme Leader will champion the Waste Minimisation actions of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan adopted in 2010. The Plan promotes a programme for the progressive reduction of waste to landfill. • R esults to date indicate that projects such as home composting and cleaner production work yield good environmental benefits for the economic resources applied • F unding of about $300,000 pa from the waste levy, will be available to progress actions under the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

175


SOLID WASTE ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN No significant differences to the above.

There are no significant variances between this Ten Year Plan and the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECTS Wellbeing Significant negative effects or risks

S*

User pays policy for collection and disposal of waste reduces Council’s control of the waste stream and consequently the ability to structure services to minimise waste. Kerbside Recycling by private contractors reduces Council’s control of this service.

C*

EC*

EN*

Implementation of the Solid Waste Bylaw (as reviewed by June 2012) and the Waste Management & Minimisation Plan 2010.

Implementation of the Solid Waste Bylaw (as reviewed by June 2012) and the Waste Management & Minimisation Plan 2010.

* S = Social, C = Cultural, EC = Economic, EN = Environmental

176 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

How Council will mitigate the effect or risk


SOLID WASTE STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) SOLID WASTE Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 881 2,232 521 173 0 2,926 2,045 2,045 50

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 906 2,165 483 237 0 2,885 1,979 1,979 50

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 934 2,241 498 239 0 2,978 2,044 2,044 21

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 963 2,333 514 169 0 3,016 2,053 2,053 54

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 993 2,490 550 165 0 3,205 2,212 2,212 56

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 1,026 2,593 568 160 0 3,321 2,295 2,295 23

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 1,055 2,688 584 169 0 3,441 2,386 2,386 60

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 1,085 2,792 601 188 0 3,581 2,496 2,496 25

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 1,119 2,909 620 190 0 3,719 2,600 2,600 26

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 1,157 3,031 641 192 0 3,864 2,707 2,707 27

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 1,195 3,164 662 191 0 4,017 2,822 2,822 28

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

583 298 0 881

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

594 312 0 906

2,232 521 173 0 2,926 2,045

2,165 483 237 0 2,885 1,979

2,173 483 232 0 2,888 1,982

2,196 483 159 0 2,838 1,932

2,271 502 150 0 2,923 2,017

2,291 502 141 0 2,934 2,028

2,309 502 145 0 2,956 2,050

2,332 502 157 0 2,991 2,085

2,355 502 154 0 3,011 2,105

2,374 502 151 0 3,027 2,121

2,399 502 145 0 3,046 2,140

2,045 0 0 0 0 2,045

1,979 0 0 0 0 1,979

1,982 0 0 0 0 1,982

1,931 0 0 0 0 1,931

2,018 0 0 0 0 2,018

2,028 0 0 0 0 2,028

2,050 0 0 0 0 2,050

2,085 0 0 0 0 2,085

2,105 0 0 0 0 2,105

2,121 0 0 0 0 2,121

2,140 0 0 0 0 2,140

50

50

20

50

50

20

50

20

20

20

20

50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50

50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50

20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20

50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50

50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50

20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20

50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50

20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20

20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20

20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20

20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20

177


SOLID WASTE PERFORMANCE MEASURES - ACTIVITY OUTCOMES What this measure tells us

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

TCC

450 kg/capita/ annum

465 kg/capita/ annum

479 kg/capita/ annum

477 kg/capita/ annum

467 kg/ capita/ annum

457 kg/ capita/ annum

457 kg/ capita/annum

457 kg/ capita/ annum

TCC

25%

20%

21%

27%

30%

33%

37%

40%

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Measure

Data Source

Indication of the level of sustainable waste management (factual)

Reduction of 20 kg in per capita/annum of waste to landfill by 2015 from the 2010 baseline of 477 kg/capita/annum (Target 1 of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2010).

Indication of the level of sustainable waste management (factual)

40% of resources processed through council-owned or associated facilities is diverted as resources by 2015 (Target 2 of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2010).

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES - SERVICE MEAURES What this measure tells us

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

TCC - annual residents' survey

73%

79%

86%

75%

80%

80%

80%

80%

Percentage of residents that are satisfied with the management of loose litter and litter bins in our parks and streets.

TCC - annual residents' survey

66%

62%

65%

70%

65%

65%

65%

65%

Percentage of residents that are satisfied with the cleanliness of the footpaths in (a) the Tauranga CBD and Mount Maunganui and Greerton neighbourhood centres; and (b) their local neighbourhood centre.

TCC - annual residents' survey

(a) 86% (b) 82%

(a) 82% (b) 81%

(a) 84% (b) 83%

65% for both (a) and (b)

80%

80%

80%

80%

Measure

Data Source

Quality of all residential rubbish collection services, Council and nonCouncil (perception)

Percentage of residents that are satisfied with what happens on rubbish collection day including all collections on that day, and the state of the street afterwards.* * Note that this is not within Council’s direct control, as most rubbish collection services are provided by independent companies.

Quality of litter collection services in public areas (perception) Quality of footpath cleaning services (perception)

178 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


SOLID WASTE LEVELS OF SERVICE What this measure tells us Provision of waste minimisation education (factual)

Provision of transfer stations - opening hours, accessibility (factual) Provision of residential refuse collection services (factual) Provision of litter bin services - emptying (factual)

Provision of footpath scrubbing services (factual)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Education initiatives provided regarding TCC waste minimisation in schools, businesses and homes plus the level of attendance at them (participant hours = no. hours of education sessions x no. attendees). The two transfer stations, Maleme Street TCC and Te Maunga, are open seven days per week (except Good Friday, Christmas Day and New Years Day).* *Weekdays 7:30am – 5pm and Sat, Sun and Public Holidays 9am – 5pm. A rubbish bag collection service is TCC provided to all residential properties in urban and rural-residential areas.

25,480 hours provided

31,813 hours provided

29,786 hours provided

15,000 hours provided

25,000 hours provided

25,000 hours provided

25,000 hours provided

25,000 hours provided

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Litter bins are not allowed to get to TCC overfilled stage. Frequency of emptying litter bins is driven by demand rather than a set schedule, except that the plastic liners in all litter bins are replaced at least twice a week. Footpaths are scrubbed once a month TCC in the Tauranga CBD and Mount Maunganui and Greerton Neighbourhood Centres (plus high pressure cleaning of all sections over a three year period). The footpaths on the west side of The Strand are cleaned daily (either wet or dry scrubbing). There is no footpath cleaning carried out in other areas, other than on notification of a problem.

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Measure

Data Source

179


SOLID WASTE LEVELS OF SERVICE What this measure tells us Provision of loose litter collection services (factual)

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Loose litter is collected from: - Tauranga CBD and the Mount Maunganui centre - at least once a day, seven days a week. - 24 other suburban shopping centres once a day, Monday to Saturday. - 62 parks and reserves - between once a day and once a week, depending on the park. - Remaining parks and reserves - on notification of a problem. - Road to beach access ways from Mount Main Beach to Papamoa Domain - once a week (2 metres either side of each access way). - 47 km of road berms on mainly arterial roads - each week. - Remaining road berms - on notification of a problem.

TCC

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

180 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved


SOLID WASTE The demand for assets that process waste for disposal to landfill will be minimal. Facilities that process resources as an alternative to disposal will become preferable.

ASSET MANAGEMENT Key Assets as at 30 June 2011 • T wo transfer stations including recycling centres (Maleme Street and Te Maunga) • One site for a landfill at Mathers Road • One composting facility • Resource recovery site • 760 litter bins

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE SOLID WASTE ASSET RENEWALS Renewal of litter bins Te Maunga Transfer Station pit floor renewal Maleme St Transfer Station pit floor renewal Total Asset Renewals IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Asset Renewals Total Solid Waste IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Solid Waste

Total

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$200,000 $60,000 $60,000 $320,000

$20,000 $30,000 $0 $50,000

$20,000 $0 $0 $20,000

$20,000 $0 $30,000 $50,000

$20,000 $30,000 $0 $50,000

$20,000 $0 $0 $20,000

$20,000 $0 $30,000 $50,000

$20,000 $0 $0 $20,000

$20,000 $0 $0 $20,000

$20,000 $0 $0 $20,000

$20,000 $0 $0 $20,000

$368,863

$50,000

$20,776

$53,675

$55,505

$23,008

$59,705

$24,844

$25,916

$27,092

$28,342

$320,000

$50,000

$20,000

$50,000

$50,000

$20,000

$50,000

$20,000

$20,000

$20,000

$20,000

$368,863

$50,000

$20,776

$53,675

$55,505

$23,008

$59,705

$24,844

$25,916

$27,092

$28,342

181


LIBRARIES WHY WE DO IT

STRATEGIC DIRECTION

To ensure our citizens have easy access to a wide range of resources for information, education, leisure and cultural enrichment.

Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following:

• T he library buildings provide approximately 40m2 of space per thousand population, and are in good condition • S tock is at 2.48 items per head, below the target level of service of 2.6 per head due to reduction in budget in 2011/12. Stock is in good condition

City Vision

WHAT WE DO Libraries are provided in the Tauranga city centre, Papamoa, Mount Maunganui, and Greerton. A mobile library serves other areas.

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

• T he library management software system was replaced in 2009/10 and continues to be enhanced with lowcost new features to improve customer experience and increase efficiency

Main services provided by our libraries:

Actively Involved People

• S elected fees and charges were increased in the 2010/11 year

• P roviding and lending collections - print, online, DVDs, CDs, large print • C onnecting customers with information and resources they have requested • P roviding access to the internet and assisting customers to make best use of online information and information-related software

A Great Place to Grow Up

Council Outcomes

• A cost review process has been undertaken and efficiency and cost saving initiatives have been implemented.

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS • Expand the Greerton Library

• C ollecting, preserving, and making accessible heritage information resources relating to the Bay of Plenty

This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes.

• P roviding activities which support literacy, independent learning, information skills, and cultural enrichment for both adults and children

Key Strategies and Plans

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN

• Our Community Places Strategy 2008

No significant differences to the above.

• P roviding informal community space where people meet, browse, share and learn in a comfortable, clean, safe environment.

• Greerton Neighbourhood Plan 2006 The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies and Plans.

CURRENT DELIVERY • T he library remains very popular with the community, with over 1,654,000 issues, 912,000 visits to the libraries, and 160,000 visits to the website in 2010/11

182 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


LIBRARIES STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) LIBRARIES Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 934 5,357 681 1,674 0 7,712 6,778 6,778 1,314

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 811 5,572 640 1,627 0 7,839 7,028 7,028 2,567

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 857 5,799 684 1,900 0 8,383 7,526 7,526 2,082

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 891 5,882 729 2,148 0 8,759 7,868 7,868 2,152

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 953 6,139 807 2,407 0 9,353 8,400 8,400 2,226

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 1,023 6,334 859 2,695 0 9,888 8,865 8,866 2,324

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 1,065 6,460 909 2,431 0 9,800 8,735 8,735 2,441

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 1,109 6,667 961 2,422 0 10,050 8,941 8,941 2,558

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 1,159 6,875 1,018 2,611 0 10,504 9,345 9,345 2,688

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 1,213 6,945 1,079 2,813 0 10,837 9,624 9,624 2,833

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 1,347 7,232 1,143 2,923 0 11,298 9,951 9,951 2,989

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

920 0 14 934

791 20 0 811

811 20 0 831

819 20 0 839

849 20 0 869

884 20 0 904

895 20 0 915

907 20 0 927

918 20 0 938

930 20 0 950

1,001 20 0 1,021

5,357 681 1,674 0 7,712 6,778

5,572 640 1,627 0 7,839 7,028

5,623 663 1,843 0 8,129 7,298

5,536 686 2,022 0 8,244 7,405

5,600 736 2,195 0 8,531 7,662

5,596 759 2,381 0 8,736 7,832

5,550 781 2,088 0 8,419 7,504

5,568 803 2,023 0 8,394 7,467

5,565 824 2,114 0 8,503 7,565

5,439 845 2,203 0 8,487 7,537

5,483 866 2,216 0 8,565 7,544

6,778 0 0 0 0 6,778

7,028 0 0 0 0 7,028

7,298 0 0 0 0 7,298

7,405 0 0 0 0 7,405

7,661 0 0 0 0 7,661

7,832 0 0 0 0 7,832

7,504 0 0 0 0 7,504

7,467 0 0 0 0 7,467

7,565 0 0 0 0 7,565

7,537 0 0 0 0 7,537

7,544 0 0 0 0 7,544

1,314

2,567

2,005

2,005

2,006

2,020

2,044

2,059

2,074

2,092

2,109

1,006 308 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,314

1,211 760 0 596 0 0 0 0 2,567

1,238 767 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,005

1,235 770 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,005

1,229 777 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,006

1,236 784 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,020

1,253 791 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,044

1,261 798 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,059

1,270 804 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,074

1,281 811 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,092

1,291 818 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,109

183


LIBRARIES PERFORMANCE MEASURES - ACTIVITY OUTCOME Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

TCC - annual residents' survey

87%

84%

87%

90%

85%

85%

85%

85%

Percentage of customers that are satisfied with the range of titles and of formats available.

TCC - annual residents' survey

Titles: 83% Formats: 70%

Titles: 82% Formats: 75%

Titles: 84% Formats: 77%

90% for both

Titles: 85% Formats: 80%

Titles: 85% Formats: 80%

Titles: 85% Formats: 85%

Titles: 85% Formats: 85%

The value of literacy / education / cultural programmes provided (perception)

Percentage of attendees that found the literacy / education / cultural programme they attended valuable.

TCC evaluation form for programmes

97%

96%

97%

90%

95%

95%

95%

95%

Uptake of on-line access (factual)

Number of sessions on Libraries website each year.

TCC

129,442

144,006

160,307

130,000

165,000

170,000

175,000

180,000

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

What this measure tells us

Measure

Data Source

Accessibility of libraries (perception)

Percentage of customers that are satisfied with library opening hours.

Whether there is enough choice in titles and formats (perception)

LEVELS OF SERVICE

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Service provision stock items (factual)

Number of stock items held per resident (including 25% of the Western Bay of Plenty District’s residents). * Results will change as the Library developments are completed.

TCC

2.6

2.6

2.56

2.60

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

Service provision - library space (factual)

Area of library space per 1,000 population (including 25% of the Western Bay of Plenty District’s residents). * Results will change as the Library developments are completed.

TCC

39.61m2

40.7m2

40.2m2

39.86m2

40.0

41.2

40.6

39.9 39.2 38.6 38.0 37.4 36.8 36.2

What this measure tells us

184 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


LIBRARIES LEVELS OF SERVICE

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

Service provision - opening hourse, accessibility (factual)

Hours per week that libraries are open: (a) Tauranga = 52.5 (b) Mount Maunganui = 42.5 (c) Greerton = 41.5 (d) Papamoa = 48

TCC

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Unchanged

Unchanged

Unchanged

From 2018 Greerton library 48 hours

Service provision - programmes run (factual)

Key literacy / education / cultural programmes run each year.

TCC

706 events in total

317

Children 359 Adults 168

300 programmes in total

500

500

500

500

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

What this measure tells us

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

OTHER INTERESTING STATISTICS What this measure tells us

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

Throughput Learning Centre

Number of customers using the Learning Centre each year.

TCC

10,284

12,687

13,331

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

Local history items collected and made available online

Number of items added to Tauranga Memories database.

TCC

Not measured

Not measured

700

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

185


LIBRARIES This Activity has asset management plans which are the key tool to ensuring that capital funding and existing assets are used as efficiently and effectively as possible.

ASSET MANAGEMENT Key Assets as at 30 June 2011

Growth continues to place pressure on this Activity and its assets. Annual comprehensive reviews of the assets and asset management plan are undertaken to determine and assess these impacts and to plan for demand.

• Four libraries • One mobile library • 320,872 items in the library collection

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE LIBRARIES NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - LEVEL OF SERVICE Greerton library extension Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service

Total

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$600,000 $600,000

$600,000 $600,000

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$600,000

$600,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$1,838,240 $128,604 $1,966,844

$1,854,844 $149,742 $2,004,586

$1,871,560 $133,138 $2,004,698

$1,888,389 $117,119 $2,005,508

$1,905,329 $114,627 $2,019,956

$1,922,380 $121,510 $2,043,890

$1,939,542 $119,717 $2,059,259

$1,956,813 $117,500 $2,074,313

$1,974,194 $117,500 $2,091,694

$1,991,682 $117,500 $2,109,182

$1,966,844

$2,082,364

$2,152,043

$2,226,314

$2,323,757

$2,440,609

$2,558,012

$2,687,895

$2,833,409

$2,988,922

$2,566,844

$2,004,586

$2,004,698

$2,005,508

$2,019,956

$2,043,890

$2,059,259

$2,074,313

$2,091,694

$2,109,182

$2,566,844

$2,082,364

$2,152,043

$2,226,314

$2,323,757

$2,440,609

$2,558,012

$2,687,895

$2,833,409

$2,988,922

ASSET RENEWALS Library stock purchases $19,142,973 Sundry renewals $1,236,957 Total Asset Renewals $20,379,930 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Asset Renewals $24,260,169 Total Library $20,979,930 IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Library $24,860,169

186 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


VENUES & EVENTS WHY WE DO IT

STRATEGIC DIRECTION

and Plans.

To facilitate a vibrant community that comes together often to enjoy our arts, culture and leisure activities.

Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following:

CURRENT DELIVERY

WHAT WE DO

City Vision

This activity broadly includes the following: • P roactively manages and operates the Baycourt Community and Arts Centre

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

• M anages bookings for Council’s active and passive reserves • M anages bookings for some other Council venues and facilities

Strong Sustainable Economy

• Provides physical and technical events support • Provides an event facilitation service

Living Well, Wasting Less

A Great Place to Grow Up

• C ontributes money to support events in the Tauranga community • A ssists with event delivery of Council events, New Year’s Eve (including Tauranga central city), and Flagship events.

Council Outcomes This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes. Key Strategies and Plans • Sport and Active Living Strategy 2005 • Smart Economy 2004 • SmartGrowth 2007 • Smart Tourism 2007 • Western Bay of Plenty Sub-Regional Events Strategy The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies

• T he 2009-2014 Events Strategy provides direction for events in the Western Bay of Plenty and Tauranga City. This strategy clearly articulates that Council’s role is as an enabler and advocate for events in the region. It also identifies the need to work collaboratively with other parties to deliver on the actions of the strategy • T he Baycourt brand is strong, however it relates only to the Baycourt building. The Venues and Events brand will be developed to umbrella the suite of event services that are provided by Council • T he operational systems utilised by Venues and Events have recently been replaced by the Ungerboeck System (Event Business Management Software). The Events Strategy identified having one central system for event information storage as a critical item within Council, and the wider Western Bay of Plenty community. The Ungerboeck system provides the platform for this to occur, and has replaced all of the business systems that were previously unsupported • B aycourt is recognised as Tauranga’s premier performing arts facility, having a 4-star Qualmark rating, and is receiving high levels of customer satisfaction. A subsidy system is in place to encourage client types, as identified in the Venues and Events Subsidy Procedure, to hold their theatrical and exhibition events in Baycourt • A range of equipment and services are available for events, with subsidised rates for client types identified in the Venues and Events Subsidy Procedure. A critical part of this service is the relationships that exist with non-Council owned or managed venues and service providers to maintain a collaborative whole-of-the-

187


VENUES & EVENTS community approach. • A ccess to event information is via a web portal and in person. This information is currently provided by the Council website and an Events One Stop Shop which provides a face-to-face option for event organisers. Event information includes bookings of Council facilities, guidance on Council processes and systems, management of the funding related to the Community Investment Policy, as well as mentoring of new event managers. These services are well publicised and valued by event organisers and the community • V enues and Events is the event delivery arm for Council where this is appropriate (e.g. New Year’s Eve, Anzac Day etc). An event delivery option exists for Flagship Events, other Council Partners e.g. Tauranga City Venues Limited (“TCVL”), and other community events • T here is a Flagship Events administration office located on the Baycourt mezzanine floor • V enues and Events acknowledges the need for an event volunteer workforce, and facilitates this through promoting the nationally co-ordinated Volunteer Now website (http://www.volunteernet.org.nz/). This database is not well populated, or well known. Council will capitalise on the legacy initiatives from the Rugby World Cup 2011 volunteer programme to build community use, knowledge and linkages throughout the Bay of Plenty region. This is an issue identified in the Events Strategy • A review of Event Support Funding, has been completed.

quality/quantity/participation of Tauranga events

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS

• Review the Events Strategy (2014)

• P romote Venues and Events as the premiere event support solution organisation for the Western Bay

• D evelop systems to enable better utilisation of volunteers to support events.

• E nhance the event support services provided to TCVL and their customers to ensure success of events at the TECT Arena

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN

A review of Council-controlled organisations is underway. It is expected that that review will be completed by 30 June 2012. The outcomes of that review may affect this activity area.

• Implement Ungerboeck Event Booking System in all TCC venues (sports fields, TCVL venues, sports facilities) and any other Tauranga venues that wish to pay for this service. This will facilitate better marketing of events in Tauranga • I mprove community understanding of “What’s On” by improving the marketing of Tauranga events • Review funding of events to increase/improve the

SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECTS Wellbeing Significant negative effects or risks

S*

Events managed, facilitated or assisted by Council may have significant negative effects on the environmental wellbeing of non-participants. Such negative effects include increased noise, increased traffic congestion, and restricted access to public facilities.

C*

EC*

* S = Social, C = Cultural, EC = Economic, EN = Environmental

188 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

No significant differences to the above.

• U ndertake a review of how event and venue management services are delivered in/for Tauranga City Council venues (i.e. TCVL, Tauranga Leisure Limited, and Venues & Events)

EN* •

How Council will mitigate the effect or risk Council works with event managers and affected parties to minimise these negative effects wherever possible. Council has an “Event Planning Team” that meets regularly to consider event compliance with the City Plan provisions.


VENUES & EVENTS STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) VENUES & EVENTS Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 1,465 2,581 70 582 0 3,233 1,768 1,768 211

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 1,646 2,972 70 441 0 3,483 1,837 1,837 305

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 1,697 3,056 76 443 0 3,575 1,878 1,877 384

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 1,749 3,140 80 472 0 3,692 1,943 1,943 192

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 1,804 3,249 87 481 0 3,817 2,013 2,012 240

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 1,863 3,345 92 492 0 3,929 2,066 2,066 401

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 1,916 3,426 98 478 0 4,002 2,086 2,086 327

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 1,970 3,531 102 490 0 4,123 2,153 2,153 235

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 2,033 3,637 106 467 0 4,210 2,177 2,177 246

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 2,101 3,768 111 463 0 4,342 2,241 2,241 339

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 2,171 3,909 117 533 0 4,559 2,388 2,388 310

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

1,435 0 30 1,465

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

1,616 0 30 1,646

2,581 70 582 0 3,233 1,768

2,972 70 441 0 3,483 1,837

2,963 74 429 0 3,466 1,820

2,955 76 444 0 3,475 1,829

2,963 80 438 0 3,481 1,835

2,955 82 435 0 3,472 1,826

2,943 84 411 0 3,438 1,792

2,950 85 409 0 3,444 1,798

2,944 86 378 0 3,408 1,762

2,951 87 363 0 3,401 1,755

2,964 88 404 0 3,456 1,810

1,768 0 0 0 0 1,768

1,837 0 0 0 0 1,837

1,820 0 0 0 0 1,820

1,829 0 0 0 0 1,829

1,835 0 0 0 0 1,835

1,827 0 0 0 0 1,827

1,792 0 0 0 0 1,792

1,798 0 0 0 0 1,798

1,762 0 0 0 0 1,762

1,755 0 0 0 0 1,755

1,810 0 0 0 0 1,810

211

305

370

179

216

349

274

189

190

250

219

150 61 0 0 0 0 0 0 211

213 92 0 0 0 0 0 0 305

275 95 0 0 0 0 0 0 370

122 57 0 0 0 0 0 0 179

152 64 0 0 0 0 0 0 216

258 91 0 0 0 0 0 0 349

198 76 0 0 0 0 0 0 274

130 59 0 0 0 0 0 0 189

131 59 0 0 0 0 0 0 190

179 71 0 0 0 0 0 0 250

154 65 0 0 0 0 0 0 219

189


VENUES & EVENTS PERFORMANCE MEASURES - ACTIVITY OUTCOME What this measure tells us Vibrant community that comes together often to enjoy arts, culture and leisure activities (factual) Diversity of events right type, mix and number (perception)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Number of events held in the sub-region, as identified in the events calendar.

TCC

427

516

494

480

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Percentage of residents that are satisfied with the number and variety of events in Tauranga.

TCC - annual residents' survey

70% satisfied with the number of events. 69% satisfied with the variety of events

71% satisfied with the number of events. 76% satisfied with the variety of events

64% satisfied with the number of events. 61% satisfied with the variety of events

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

PERFORMANCE MEASURES - SERVICE MEASURE What this measure tells us Indication of participation in arts, culture and leisure events provided (factual)

Indication of the diversity of events provided (factual) Satisfaction with Baycourt as a venue to hire (perception)

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Baycourt occupancy rates* * Historically the EVANZ Occupancy system has been used, however the new Ungerboeck System is becoming the industry standard, and this measures occupancy in a different manner. This is why the occupancy target seems to have been reduced, where in fact the actual occupancy will be similar, but measured differently. Event mix at Baycourt, split into percentages of: (a) Youth focussed events (b) Local (not-for-profit) events (c) Commercial / professional events Percentage of Baycourt venue hirers that are satisfied with the venue.

TCC

42.6%

48.1%

46.6%

50%

30

30

31

32%

TCC

(a) 39.5% (b) 29.7% (c) 30.8%

(a) 27.2% (b) 53.4% (c) 19.3%

(a) 38.2% (b) 26.8% (c) 35.0%

(a) 33.3% (b) 33.3% (c) 33.4%

(a) 33.3% (b) 33.3% (c) 33.4%

(a) 33.3% (b) 33.3% (c) 33.4%

(a) 33.3% (b) 33.3% (c) 33.4%

(a) 33.3% (b) 33.3% (c) 33.4%

TCC - hirers' survey

Not measured

5.06 average 5.1 score (Measured on a scale of 2 = 'Did not meet expectations', 4 = 'Met Expectations', and 6 = 'Exceeded Expectations' )

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

Increasing

190 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


VENUES & EVENTS LEVELS OF SERVICE What this measure tells us

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Qualmark Venues Assessment

Not measured

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Number of events assisted during the year via the events planning one-stopshop.

TCC

566

479

589

400

400

410

420

increasing

Number of events that received technical support during the year (lighting, sound etc), either at Baycourt or at other locations / private events.

TCC

Not measured

581

567

770

570

580

590

Increasing

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Targets not required

Targets not required

Targets not required

Targets not required

Targets not required

Measure

Data Source

Provision of Baycourt services - quality of venue (factual)

Baycourt achieves a 4-star rating in the national Qualmark Venues Assessment and Grading. * 4-star rating is ‘excellent, constantly achieves high quality levels with a wide range of facilities and services’.

Provision of event assistance services (factual) Provision of technical support services (factual)

OTHER INTERESTING STATISTICS What this measure tells us Throughput atendance at Baycourt events (factual)

Measure

Data Source

Average attendance at Baycourt events, split into: (a) Youth focused events. (b) Local (not-for-profit) events. (c) Commercial / professional events.

TCC

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

(a) 333 (b) 269 (c) 420

(a) 259 (b) 287 (c) 452

(a) 470 (b) 235 (c) 370

191


VENUES & EVENTS The development of the Sport and Exhibition Centre and the new Bethlehem Arts Centre is likely to cause a change in demand for technical and event equipment which may be provided by this Activity or by the private sector.

ASSET MANAGEMENT Key Assets as at 30 June 2011 •

Baycourt

Wurlitzer Organ

A wide range of technical and event equipment, including lighting and sound equipment, outdoor seating and barriers.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE VENUES & EVENTS NEW OR UPGRADED ASSETS - LEVEL OF SERVICE General event infrastructure purchases Replacement of non-technical equipment at Baycourt Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total new or upgraded assets - Level of Service ASSET RENEWALS Renewal of crowd control barriers Renewal of Portable Seating Replacement of electrical and technical equipment at Baycourt Maintenance of the Baycourt building Total Asset Renewals IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Asset Renewals Total Venues and Events IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Venues and Events

192 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

Total

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$208,186 $150,577 $358,763

$28,186 $24,577 $52,763

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$20,000 $14,000 $34,000

$422,567

$52,763

$35,319

$36,499

$37,743

$39,114

$40,599

$42,235

$44,057

$46,056

$48,181

$10,000 $50,000 $1,572,000

$10,000 $5,000 $217,000

$0 $5,000 $146,000

$0 $5,000 $140,000

$0 $5,000 $177,000

$0 $5,000 $250,000

$0 $5,000 $170,000

$0 $5,000 $150,000

$0 $5,000 $71,000

$0 $5,000 $111,000

$0 $5,000 $140,000

$550,000 $2,182,000

$20,000 $252,000

$185,000 $336,000

$0 $145,000

$0 $182,000

$60,000 $315,000

$65,000 $240,000

$0 $155,000

$80,000 $156,000

$100,000 $216,000

$40,000 $185,000

$2,557,135

$252,000

$349,037

$155,658

$202,038

$362,376

$286,584

$192,541

$202,145

$292,594

$262,164

$2,540,763

$304,763

$370,000

$179,000

$216,000

$349,000

$274,000

$189,000

$190,000

$250,000

$219,000

$2,979,703

$304,763

$384,356

$192,157

$239,782

$401,490

$327,183

$234,776

$246,202

$338,650

$310,345


BAYPARK WHY WE DO IT

COUNCIL OUTCOMES

To provide and manage the facilitation of recreation at the Baypark site for people to participate, interact and enjoy a diversity of sport, recreation and leisure opportunities.

This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes.

WHAT WE DO Through Tauranga City Venues Limited (“TCVL”), Council currently provides the Baypark Stadium and the TECT Arena on the Baypark site.

STRATEGIC DIRECTION Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following: City Vision

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN No significant differences to the above.

The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies and Plans.

A review of Council-controlled organisations is underway. It is expected that that review will be completed by 30 June 2012. The outcomes of that review may affect this activity area.

CURRENT DELIVERY The stadium and associated facilities are managed by TCVL and contracts for the operation of speedway, catering and rugby matches are in place. The TECT Arena has officially opened for business and has been operating successfully for nearly one year. There is an approved Statement of Intent and Business Plan.

For performance measures and service levels please see Tauranga City Venues Limited’s statement of intent for the relevant year. For actual performance against target performance measures and levels of service please see Tauranga City Venues Limited’s annual report for the relevant year.

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

Strong Sustainable Economy

A Great Place to Grow Up

To solidly grow the business to provide a wide range of services to the community. To make the most of the whole site by professionally coordinating the sports, speedway and events functions.

SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECTS Wellbeing Significant negative effects or risks

S*

C*

EC*

Speedway and event noise negatively impacting on the local community

EN* •

How Council will mitigate the effect or risk By ensuring that TCVL maintain noise within the limits imposed by the Resource Consent for the Baypark site. TCVL will carry out regular testing by an independent assessor to monitor noise levels.

* S = Social, C = Cultural, EC = Economic, EN = Environmental

193


BAYPARK STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) BAYPARK Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 210 0 210 0 0 210 0 0 0

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 934 1,285 195 0 0 1,480 546 546 0

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 1,148 1,308 335 0 0 1,643 495 495 0

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 1,307 1,391 414 0 0 1,805 498 498 0

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 1,425 1,481 444 0 0 1,925 500 500 155

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 1,537 1,578 458 20 0 2,056 519 519 161

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 1,653 1,675 471 41 0 2,187 534 534 167

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 1,778 1,778 485 63 0 2,326 548 548 174

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 1,862 1,834 500 86 0 2,420 558 558 501

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 1,924 1,896 517 151 0 2,564 640 640 467

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 1,988 1,958 534 213 0 2,705 717 717 198

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing* Depreciation* Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

194 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

0 0 210 210

739 0 195 934

788 0 325 1,113

840 0 390 1,230

895 0 405 1,300

953 0 405 1,358

1,015 0 405 1,420

1,080 0 405 1,485

1,102 0 405 1,507

1,102 0 405 1,507

1,102 0 405 1,507

0 210 0 0 210 0

1,285 195 0 0 1,480 546

1,268 325 0 0 1,593 480

1,309 390 0 0 1,699 469

1,351 405 0 0 1,756 456

1,394 405 18 0 1,817 459

1,439 405 35 0 1,879 459

1,485 405 53 0 1,943 458

1,485 405 70 0 1,960 453

1,485 405 118 0 2,008 501

1,485 405 162 0 2,052 545

0 0 0 0 0 0

546 0 0 0 0 546

480 0 0 0 0 480

469 0 0 0 0 469

456 0 0 0 0 456

459 0 0 0 0 459

459 0 0 0 0 459

458 0 0 0 0 458

453 0 0 0 0 453

501 0 0 0 0 501

545 0 0 0 0 545

0

0

0

0

140

140

140

140

387

345

140

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

140 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 140

140 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 140

140 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 140

140 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 140

387 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 387

345 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 345

140 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 140


BAYPARK CAPITAL EXPENDITURE BAYPARK ASSET RENEWALS Renewals Baypark and TECT Arena Total Asset Renewals IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Asset Renewals Total Baypark IMPACT OF INFLATION ON CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Total Baypark

Total

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22

$1,432,000 $1,432,000

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$140,000 $140,000

$140,000 $140,000

$140,000 $140,000

$140,000 $140,000

$387,000 $387,000

$345,000 $345,000

$140,000 $140,000

$1,824,758

$0

$0

$0

$155,414

$161,056

$167,174

$173,908

$501,475

$467,337

$198,394

$1,432,000

$0

$0

$0

$140,000

$140,000

$140,000

$140,000

$387,000

$345,000

$140,000

$1,824,758

$0

$0

$0

$155,414

$161,056

$167,174

$173,908

$501,475

$467,337

$198,394

* Depreciation and debt servicing relating to the TECT Arena at Baypark are shown in the Indoor Space & Active Living Activity Area and will be transferred to the Baypark Activity Area once the Arena is transferrred to Tauranga City Venues Ltd.

195


ARTS & HERITAGE WHY WE DO IT

STRATEGIC DIRECTION

CURRENT DELIVERY

To provide dynamic facilities and services that help create a strong sense of community mana, pride and identity, reflecting the heritage and culture of our region.

Strategic direction for this Activity is primarily provided from the following:

• T auranga is not perceived as having a culturally rich and diverse arts scene. Of eight cities surveyed in 2010 (as part of the Quality of Life survey) Tauranga residents had the lowest perception that the area they live in has a “culturally rich and diverse arts scene” (50% agreed or strongly agreed). Other cities ranged from 53% to 93%

City Vision

WHAT WE DO • A rts and cultural institutions make a significant contribution to the social and economic development of an area • I t has been recognised in a number of strategic documents (including Tauranga Tomorrow, SmartGrowth and SmartEconomy) that public arts and cultural facilities are an important part of the community infrastructure and that they have a key role in terms of both identity and economic development. The need for arts and culture facilities and support services is clearly defined in the Sub-Regional Arts and Culture Strategy adopted in 2006 • T his activity area plan covers three distinct areas which have their own individual goals:

Vibrant, Healthy & Diverse Communities

Strong Sustainable Economy

• S martGrowth and Tauranga Tomorrow have identified the need to build a strong cultural and artistic infrastructure as an integral part of creating a high income economy in Tauranga. Tauranga Heritage Collection

A Great Place to Grow Up

Council Outcomes

• T he Tauranga Heritage Collection, the successor of the Tauranga Historic Village, although not open to the public, holds the only comprehensive collection (approx 30,000 items) reflecting Tauranga’s history

This activity contibutes to all of the Council Outcomes

• T auranga is the only city in the country without a functioning public museum.

--

Tauranga Heritage Collection

Key Strategies and Plans

Heritage Collection Services

--

Art Gallery

--

Arts and Heritage Facilitation.

• W estern Bay of Plenty Sub-Regional Arts and Culture Strategy

• T he Council has determined that only very limited heritage collection services will be provided:

• SmartGrowth 2007

--

no public exhibitions

• Smart Economy 2004

--

v ery restricted public access to the collection (e.g. Tangata Whenua access to Taonga, limited research access)

--

very limited schools’ education programme.

--

o further cataloguing of the collection (unless n required for schools’ education programme)

--

storage, conservation and protection of collection

• Smart Tourism 2007 • Smart Arts Strategy 2006 The following pages outline how this activity contributes to delivering the City Vision, Council Outcomes and Strategies and Plans.

196 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


ARTS & HERITAGE --

accession of items consistent with Council’s Collections Policy

--

r epository for items under the New Zealand Protected Objects Act 2006

--

ontinued repatriation discussions (relationships c maintained).

• T he “Hands On Tauranga” education programme gives primary and secondary schools in the Tauranga area the opportunity to access real heritage collection objects which can be used for educational purposes. As practicable, and given the resources available, further items are added to the Hands On Tauranga collection • T he Tauranga Heritage Collection is currently unable to meet the community’s expectation that a public museum will provide access to its collections. There is on-line access to a limited number of items in the collection through the Tauranga Heritage Collection Image Gallery (accessible via the “Hands On Tauranga” website) • W ork on cataloguing the collection, using volunteer support, occurs as practicable • W here practicable, staff contribute to one external exhibition per annum. Museum Project Planning • T he project to construct a public museum facility was removed from the 2006-2016 Ten Year Plan. There is now no capital expenditure, capital funding or operational expenditure in the Council budgets for a museum facility • I n May 2010 Council approved the establishment of a stand-alone community trust to progress the museum development project

• A n independent trust, the Tauranga Moana Museum Trust, has subsequently been established to foster community support for a museum, to plan for, fund and build a museum facility, and to then operate that museum facility on an ongoing basis. Art Gallery

These services include: • Provision of an information hub on arts and culture • Supporting arts and cultural development support services within the Tauranga community • I nput to Council on strategies, policies, plans and projects impacting on the arts and culture sector

• T he Tauranga Art Gallery Trust was initially an independent organisation and had successfully raised the majority of funds required for the capital construction of the art gallery. In order to protect the ratepayer interest in the operational contribution, Council required the Tauranga Art Gallery Trust to become a Council Controlled Organisation

• M anagement and monitoring of the implementation of the Smart Arts Strategy.

• T he Gallery was opened in October 2007. Through the Statement of intent, Council has agreed to fund the net operational costs to $847,400 for the 2012/13 year and has indicated that this figure will remain unchanged in 2013/14. This is the same as for 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12 i.e. no increases have been made to reflect annual inflation

ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN THE NEXT THREE YEARS

• T he Gallery adopted a new strategic plan in 2010 with a focus on four areas: exhibitions, visitor experiences, relationships and collections • T he Tauranga Art Gallery Trust is required to secure at least 20% of revenue from non-ratepayer sources and is doing this through a variety of sources including sponsorship, applications to charitable trusts, other central and local government funding, and user charges. Arts & Heritage Facilitation

Council staff also undertake strategic planning and evaluation work for various arts and culture initiatives, where appropriate, including contributing to the future planning of The Elms.

• Tauranga Heritage Collection Heritage Collection Services --

no change.

• Museum Project Planning --

work with the independent Tauranga Moana Museum Trust as and when they develop ideas and plans for a new museum facility for the city.

• Art Gallery --

no change.

• Arts & Heritage Facilitation --

work with the Artsville Trust on long-term plans for the Artsville site on Elizabeth Street.

Council has entered into an agreement with Creative Tauranga for the delivery of services to support and build community capacity in the area of arts and culture.

197


ARTS & HERITAGE ADDITIONAL DELIVERY IN YEARS FOUR TO TEN No different to the above (unless the Tauranga Moana Museum Trust becomes further advanced with proposals for a museum facility).

A review of Council-controlled organisations is underway. It is expected that that review will be completed by 30 June 2012. The outcomes of that review may affect this activity area.

SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECTS Wellbeing Significant negative effects or risks

S*

C*

The community are unable to learn about and experience the stories of the western Bay of Plenty due to the lack of museum services and facilities.

Ratepayer contribution to Art Gallery continues to increase in real terms.

EC*

How Council will mitigate the effect or risk New project established that will facilitate a community led Museum proposal. Very limited schools education programme provided. Clearly communicate through Council planning documents the fact that public access to the collection is very limited and restricted.

* S = Social, C = Cultural, EC = Economic, EN = Environmental

198 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

EN*

Council has capped the contribution at a constant amount for the next three years. Clear direction provided to the Gallery Trust that at least 20% of revenue must come from sources other that ratepayers.


ARTS & HERITAGE STATEMENT OF PROSPECTIVE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING INFLATION) ARTS & HERITAGE Total Operating Revenue Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/ (Surplus) to Fund Total Rates required (excluding other fund sources) Capital Expenditure

2011/12 Budget ($000’s) 60 1,612 33 36 0 1,681 1,621 1,621 0

2012/13 Forecast ($000’s) 70 1,696 29 24 0 1,749 1,679 1,679 0

2013/14 Forecast ($000’s) 72 1,748 29 7 0 1,784 1,712 1,712 0

2014/15 Forecast ($000’s) 74 1,800 29 3 0 1,832 1,758 1,758 0

2015/16 Forecast ($000’s) 77 1,967 30 0 0 1,997 1,920 1,921 0

2016/17 Forecast ($000’s) 79 1,918 29 1 0 1,948 1,869 1,869 0

2017/18 Forecast ($000’s) 81 1,970 29 1 0 2,000 1,919 1,920 0

2018/19 Forecast ($000’s) 84 2,028 29 1 0 2,058 1,974 1,974 0

2019/20 Forecast ($000’s) 86 2,091 28 1 0 2,120 2,034 2,034 0

2020/21 Forecast ($000’s) 89 2,162 28 1 0 2,191 2,102 2,102 0

2021/22 Forecast ($000’s) 92 2,236 28 1 0 2,265 2,173 2,173 0

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING STATEMENT IN 2012/13 DOLLARS (EXCLUDING INFLATION) OPERATIONAL Operating Revenue User Fees and Charges Subsidies and Grants Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue Operating Expenditure Other Operating Expenditure Debt servicing Depreciation Less Non Funded Depreciation Operating Expenditure to be Funded Deficit/(Surplus) to Fund FUNDING Rates (Increase)/Decrease in Cash Reserves Reserve Funding Other Funding Loan Funding Total Funding CAPITAL Capital Expenditure FUNDING Renewal Funding Loan Funding Reserve Funding Development Impact Fees Infill Fees Vested Assets Other Revenue Funding Subsidies and Grants TOTAL FUNDING

0 60 0 60

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

0 70 0 70

1,612 33 36 0 1,681 1,621

1,696 29 24 0 1,749 1,679

1,695 28 7 0 1,730 1,660

1,694 27 2 0 1,723 1,653

1,794 27 0 0 1,821 1,751

1,694 26 0 0 1,720 1,650

1,693 25 0 0 1,718 1,648

1,694 24 0 0 1,718 1,648

1,693 23 0 0 1,716 1,646

1,694 22 0 0 1,716 1,646

1,695 21 0 0 1,716 1,646

1,621 0 0 0 0 1,621

1,679 0 0 0 0 1,679

1,660 0 0 0 0 1,660

1,653 0 0 0 0 1,653

1,751 0 0 0 0 1,751

1,650 0 0 0 0 1,650

1,648 0 0 0 0 1,648

1,648 0 0 0 0 1,648

1,646 0 0 0 0 1,646

1,646 0 0 0 0 1,646

1,646 0 0 0 0 1,646

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

199


ARTS & HERITAGE PERFORMANCE MEASURES - ACTIVITY OUTCOME What this measure tells us Level of cultural richness and diversity (perception)

Measure

Data Source

Percentage of residents that agreed that there is a culturally rich and diverse arts scene in Tauranga city.

TCC - annual residents' survey

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

51%

Not measured this year

50%

45%

Retain at 50%. (Increase not expected due to Council policy direction and investment decisions.)

Retain at 50%

Retain at 50%

Retain at 50%

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

PERFORMANCE MEASURES - SERVICE PERFORMANCE What this measure tells us

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

Creative Tauranga - annual customers' survey

99%

99%

Service 99% rated very good or excellent. Availability 99 % rated mostly or always

99% each for service and availability

99% each for service and availability

99% each for service and availability

99% each for service and availability

99% each for service and availability

TCC

Not measured

3,288 visitors. A total of 4,690 users (recorded webhits)

3,676 visits, 2,435 unique visitors. Total number of hits recorded since site created: 13,234

Increasing over time

Increasing over time

Increasing over time

Increasing over time

Increasing over time

Measure

Data Source

Level of satisfaction with service provided (perception)

Percentage of users that are satisfied with the operation of, and information available at, the information hub (Creative Tauranga office and web links).

Accessibility of Museum Collection (factual)

Number of sessions on the Museum website each year.

200 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022


ARTS & HERITAGE LEVELS OF SERVICE What this measure tells us Accessibility of museum collection (factual) Accessibility of museum collection (factual) Provision of exhibitions (factual) Funding sources (factual) Accessibility of information hub (factual)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

Measure

Data Source

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Percentage of the Museum collection available to view on the website.

TCC

Not measured

2.90%

4.00%

Increasing

Increasing over time

Increasing over Increasing time over time

Increasing over time

Number of schools visited to provide education programmes each year, and the number of items loaned to those schools. Range of special exhibitions held at the Art Gallery each year. Level of operational funding generated from sources other than rates. Opening hours of information hub (Creative Tauranga office aspect).

TCC

Not measured

12 schools are registered

16 schools 368 items loaned

12

Art Gallery Trust Art Gallery Trust Creative Tauranga

19

24

28

16

24%

19.75%

27%

20%

16 schools Steadily increasing loans Narrative report At least 20%

16 schools Steadily increasing loans Narrative report At least 20%

16 schools Steadily increasing loans Narrative report At least 20%

16 schools Steadily increasing loans Narrative report At least 20%

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

Open 6 days per week (excluding public holidays) when the Creative Tauranga office is open

OTHER INTERESTING STATISTICS What this measure tells us

Measure

Data Source

Throughput - visitors (factual)

Number of visitors to the Art Gallery each year.

Art Gallery Trust

2008/09 Results

2009/10 Results

2010/11 Results

49,032

47,537

55,383

2011/12 Target (per Annual Plan)

Year 1 2012/13 target

Year 2 2013/14 target

Year 3 2014/15 target

Years 4-10 - 2015/16 to 2021/22 target

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

No targets required

201


ARTS & HERITAGE ASSET MANAGEMENT Key Assets as at 30 June 2011 • No assets other than staff computers and furniture. The growth in the city will cause minimal change in demand for assets in this Activity.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE ARTS & HERITAGE There are no capital projects in this group of activities

202 Tauranga City Council Draft Ten Year Plan 2012-2022

Total

Budget 2012/13

Budget 2013/14

Budget 2014/15

Budget 2015/16

Budget 2016/17

Budget 2017/18

Budget 2018/19

Budget 2019/20

Budget 2020/21

Budget 2021/22


8.2. Groups of Activites 7-14 DRAFT