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Kirloskar Institute of Advanced Management Studies

Enriching Lives

The

Chanakya VOLUME 14

ISSUE 2

IN THIS ISSUE E- waste- Another nail in the coffin Kavita Bhajantri & Navneet Kaur Corporate Social Responsibility At JSW Steel Ltd. Vijaynagar Dr. Vishwaanath Palled Impact Interview Aadhar Pratishthan Trust Environmental Issues Development and Deprivation Praveen G. Saptarshi Human Capital Or Human Burden Rajnish Kumar

SEPT. 2013

Focus Environment Management


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From the Director I have always had a fascination for trilogies, and I have now seen an opportunity to at least venture into the bi-logy (sic!). Three points from my piece in the Chanakya of September 2013 has launched me on my way. I quote the same: Ÿ The artificial anxiety of ‘placement before convocation’ destabilizes the academic process. Ÿ We always had our perspective of Academic and Placement processes right Ÿ The Institute seamlessly moves from the leading partner in academics, to a supporting partner in placements.

industry. Each student is encouraged to keep an Industry-Readiness scorecard and chart their progress in the above four domains to be ready for industry. The Institute facilitates the same by organizing projects from industry for hands-on problem solving skills, running competitions for providing solutions to real time industry problems, encouraging working with faculty for writing papers and cases, inviting the alumni to share their experiences as well as mentoring the students, and many more. In order to carry out ‘in process’ control, the Institute organizes mock interviews with senior alumni, industry executives and other experts. The students undergo a full-fledged interview in the job they are aspiring for, defined by the function, sector and domain in therein. Interview places the student on three scales – exceeds expectations (A), meets expectations (B) and below expectations (C). A detailed feedback is given to each student. This allows the student reflect and take corrective steps. Another innovation is to have a % of the internal assessment marks assigned through subject based GD/ PI. A pilot has shown that, with some adjustments, this would help in displaying subject knowledge, GD skills and PI performance. Thus the two process integration gets reinforced.

My experience has been that a paradox rules the AcademicPlacements relationship: while academics is the passport to placements (else corporate would pick up anyone from the streets!), there is a tension between the two processes which enervates both. Instead of wringing our hands in despair, KIAMS has moved to integrate the two with a focus on conceptual mastery with a practical orientation. We have appropriately labelled it as the Industry-Readiness Program, subsuming both processes in the same. The integration is jointly driven by the Institute and the Students. It is classified under four heads 1) The Fundamental Professional Requirements, which include concept knowledge, functional aptitude, communication and presentation skills, harnessing information and communication technology, group discussions and decision making, professional grooming and attitude. 2) Experience and skill through application. This includes short term industry projects, research projects, case writing, paper writing and conferences. 3) Awareness of the context through country report (Business and Economic), industry sector report, book review, participating in functional area club activities. 4) Building and nurturing competencies and traits for entry to

While the Institute facilitates as above, the student is also encouraged to seek their own avenues through our considerable good will in industry, the alumni and the faculty. While we have developed these initiatives with hope, the results will only be evident at the end of the cycle. But the PDCA process will be used to institutionalize this process. The first of my trilogy dealt with the environmental reality of a BSchool. This installment dealt with how we are addressing it with our processes. The next will deal with our attempts to strengthen Industry-Institute Interaction. Watch this space!

Editorial Nature writer and environmentalist Sigurd Olson said it best: Wilderness preservation "...is directly concerned with the physical and spiritual welfare of our people." With these opening lines team chanakya brings you the September issue of the year 2013and another stimulating topics with its main focus on “environment management”. Environmental management practices have evolved over time as we have learned to make peace with the land. Today, we value the environment that is the basis for our economy, our technology and our recreation. Unfortunately, the road to our current state was not without cost. While the environment has always been in flux, the state of harmony has been drastically disrupted throughout history. While nature has played a role, human activities have had the greatest impact on the environment. One of the greatest hurdles in environmental management has been the public's failure to recognize the need.

beginning in the 1970s, the emergence of voluntary codes of corporate conduct and environmental management practices over the past 30 years, Widespread concern for environmental protection emerged dramatically with the advent of the Industrial Revolution Today, education has benefited the environment. With the passage of time as a nation we have evolved from viewing the environment as a barrier to advancement to seeking harmony with the land. We cannot undo the mistakes of the past; we can only move forward on a mission to create balance. This issue of chanakya comprises on the several topics that touches upon the various ways of managing our environment so as to live peacefully and also leave behind a better future for the next generation. "Conservation is a state of harmony between men and land."

The story of environmental management can be traced to the Industrial Revolutions of 18th and 19th centuries, the lack of standards for industrial products and processes in the early 20th century, the creation of environmental laws and regulations

Happy Reading! The Editorial Team 1

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Life after graduation - Ms. Abhinaya Chandrasekhar

Graduation is a confusing time. You are all prepped up with a job and marketable skills to join the big bad corporate world. But what you do not dwell on much at this stage are the softer aspects of life in the corporate world and how to deal with them. Here are few of my learnings that can probably help you too -

months of my work life observing people. You will be surprised what you gather when you watch people from a distance and understand them. And once you have a clearer picture, you will know whom to talk to about your initiative, which projects to pick and who to stay away from. And remember, that people are observing you. Don't give them the chance to size you up too quickly.

You may earn more than me, but I don't want to scratch my eyes out every morning

30 is not the new 20 I was the first to be placed in my year. But, the pay that I was offered was dangerously close to the bottom on the average scale. Since the offer was a PPO, I could either reject it and look for a better paying job, and trust me any job would have been a better paying one, or I could take up my dream ticket to enter the world of advertising and branding with an almost negligible salary. I went for it. The effect of taking up a low pay lasted two years. But hey, I still wake up every morning feeling happy. Of course there are days when all I want is to set my client on fire, but there is no other field I would rather work in. So get real, and understand the job and the company before you make your move. Would you wake up every morning wanting to go to work or would you rather scratch your eyes out. Money is fluid. It will come to you anyway, maybe not immediately but give it time. If you love what you do, you will do your best. And that's what the corporate world is looking for.

Contrary to popular belief, 30 is not the new 20. This is the defining decade of your life. Use it to experience life. Read. Travel. Converse. Build new relationships. These aspects help build your personality and differentiate you from others. Most people while away this decade putting off getting serious till 30. Before you know it, you will be 30 without a career path, partner, money and experiences. The interview with my current boss was an hour long conversation about my last trip to Africa. And he won a really big client over a conversation about his trip to Portugal. Do not underestimate the power of travel experiences. If money is your concern, you will be surprised at how cheap it is to backpack. Call me and we will talk. If the end-result of all this is supposed to be happiness, I would have just adopted a dog.

You may be a post graduate, but so are people around you That was what I told my boss once. And it is true. The end result is happiness. You will be faced with many difficult decisions to take and the trick is to always do what makes you happy. I read about this great technique once, and it really helped me. Take a piece of paper and write down what all you would do on a daily basis if money was not an object. Design your everyday life on that paper. Try and match that to your life now. There may be many things that you have been putting away for no reason. Maybe you want to learn a new language or an instrument or volunteer in Vietnam for a month. You can make all this happen. Happiness is intrusive and only you can bring it alive. So here’s a lot of luck to the graduating batch. Make us proud. God Bless.

Or in my case - you may be a post graduate, but who gives a damn. Two weeks after I joined my first job, I was taken for a pitch. We were pitching for one of the best education institutes in the country. I hadn't slept a wink and worked round the clock for this. As a group of 8, we entered their conference room and I was all geared up for my first pitch presentation. And then the head of the company I worked for, turned to me and said, "Be a dear and get me a cup of coffee." I looked around the conference room and realized that I am the only one with a masters degree and my job was to get her coffee?! In a state of shock, I quietly did. Nobody cares about your masters degree, they care about what you bring to the table. Set your ego aside, because like me you will either work in an industry where everybody else also has a masters degree or in a place where nobody gives a shit. Very soon you will all lead a team, and remember then to get your coffee yourself.

-Ms. Abhinaya Chandrasekhar Alumni, B10 About the authorAbhinaya works as a brand consultant by day in Mumbai and also has a start up called ‘Brand touchpoints’ that deals with testing marketing campaigns, delivering accurate and relevant insights, conduct brand management workshops and takes up bootstrap consulting projects

The power of observation is underrated I was a wide eyed newbie taking up every initiative and accepting every little project that came my way. In my naivety, I forgot to observe. If I could, I would go back in time and relive the first 3

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Pollution has been one of the major problems the world is encountering and it continues to grow every day. Now we have another big, global problem, another threat that is enfolding our environment - E-waste, which has adverse impacts on environment, the health of human and other living beings, if not handled properly.

Ÿ Technology is advancing at lightning fast speed. New products are

coming to the market at a much faster pace making the older ones outdated and inefficient. An outdated and inefficient product is also an e-waste. Ÿ Increasing disposable income along with price decline is another factor for growth of e-waste Ÿ With increasing population the number of electronic products bought by people is also increasing. So increase in population would increase the amount of e-waste as the old products would be thrown away as new technology comes in.

Electronic waste or ‘e-waste’ includes all types of electrical and electronic equipment that has or could enter the waste stream. E-waste covers any household or business item with circuitry or electrical components with power or battery supply. These items may consist of electrical and electronic equipment and accessories that are non operational or whose life cycles are extinguished. Obsolete electrical and electronic equipment include computers, televisions, audio-visual recorders, mobile phones, printers and other electronic goods such as air conditioners, electronic toys, washing machines, sewing machines, lawn mowers, elevators, kitchen equipment, therapeutic equipment, surveillance equipment, mobile radio transmitters, refrigerators, and their accessories.

Impact of hazardous substances on health and environment: The substances present in the waste from electronic products are toxic and carcinogenic. Even in developed countries these material are difficult to recycle in an environmentally sustainable manner. The table below lists some harmful elements present in electronics products and the danger they pose to health and environment.

The term electronic waste or e-waste is only a recent entity, as instruments of sophisticated technology only began to be produced towards the latter half of the 20th century. Before the 1970s, there was little production of these technologically complicated items, consisting of over thousand different substances, several of which are toxic and create serious pollution problems upon disposal. Every year, more new devices are created, and more new devices are thrown out. This began in the most developed nations such as the United States and Japan, leading the technological revolution but also leading the electronic pollution revolution as well. And with an immense population, America remains one of the biggest locations where electronic waste originates from.

Metal

Danger

Lead

Is a neurotoxin that affects the kidneys, the reproductive system and mental development in children? High quantities of lead can be fatal. Mechanical breaking of CRTs (cathode ray tubes) and removing solder from microchips release lead as powder and fumes. Plastics Contain carcinogens. Plastics contain brominated flame retardants which give out carcinogenic brominated dioxins and furans. These toxins can harm reproductive and immune systems. Chromium Is used as a coating on metal housings and plates in a computer to protect from corrosion. Inhaling chromium can damage liver and kidneys and cause bronchial maladies including asthmatic bronchitis and lung cancer. Mercury It is the most dangerous toxin which is released when circuit’s boards and switches are broken and burnt. It affects the central nervous system, the immune system and kidneys. It impairs fetus growth and also harms infants through mother’s milk. Mercury in water bodies’ forms methylated mercury through microbial activity

It is an unquestionable fact that improper recycling operations pose a major threat to both human health and environment. E-waste broadly consists of ferrous and nonferrous (copper, aluminum and precious metals like silver, gold, platinum, palladium etc.) metals, glass, plastics, wood, plywood, printed circuit boards, rubber, concrete, ceramics, and other items. Certain elements like mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, flame retardants etc. beyond a certain threshold quantity makes e-waste hazardous to health. This composition of ewaste makes it very complex to handle. Problems arise when e-waste is not recycled or disposed properly. The pollutants in e-waste are mainly concentrated in batteries, circuit boards, plastics and LCDs. The reason why the amount of e-waste is increasing rapidly is:

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Acid

ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT residents in areas with significantly high e-waste recycling operations, found higher levels of cadmium copper and lead confirming the previous findings.

and can enter the human food chain through aquatic. Is found in switchboards and printed circuit boards. It is carcinogenic and can cause lung diseases. Is carcinogenic. Long-term exposure causes a disease named Itai-itai disease, which causes severe pain in the joints and spine. It affects the kidneys and softens bones. Cadmium is released into the environment as powder when plastics, CRTs and circuit boards are crushed. This powder may also enter the water body posing threat to aquatic creatures. Acids (Sulphuric and hydrochloric) are used to separate metals from Circuit boards. Acid Fumes contain chlorine and sulphur dioxide, which cause respiratory

One thing is certain; electronic waste is with us to stay. And it’s likely to continue increasing in volume. The serious challenge we are facing is that refurbishing and reuse of computers and televisions, while desirable and encouraged, just delays the ultimate disposal problem. These items will eventually be unusable, and it will be important to have programs in place that divert this waste from landfills.

The United Nations latest reports predicts that by 2020 e-waste from old computers in countries like South Africa and China will increase by 200–400 % and by 500 % in India compared to 2007 levels. The report

The solution to the e-waste problem is not simply the banning of movements of e-waste, as domestic generation accounts for a significant proportion of e-waste in all countries. Fundamental to a sustainable solution will be tackling the fact that current practices and the illegal trade provide economic stimulus. It is important to recognize local and regional contexts and the social implications of the issue; implementing a high-tech, capital-intensive recycling process will not be appropriate in every country or region. Effective regulation must be combined with incentives for recyclers in the informal sector not to engage in destructive processes. Cheap, safe and simple processing methods for introduction into the informal sector are currently lacking; hence, it is necessary to create a financial incentive for recyclers operating in the informal sector to deliver recovered parts to central collection sites rather than process them themselves.

mentions that by 2020 e-waste from old and unused mobiles phones will be about seven times higher than 2007 in growing countries like India and China. In developed counties like US more than 150 million mobiles and pagers were sold in the year 2008, up from 90 million five years before, and globally more than 1 billion mobile phones were sold in 2007, up from 896 million in 2006.The UN report also estimates that countries like Senegal and Uganda can expect e-waste flows from personal computers alone to increase 4 to 8-fold by 2020.

More generally, solutions to the global e-waste problem involve awareness rising among both consumers and e-waste recyclers in the informal economy, integration of the informal sector with the formal, creating green jobs, enforcing legislation and labor standards, and eliminating practices which are harmful to human health and the environment. It is also imperative to target electrical and electronics manufacturers by introducing Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation and encouraging initial designs to be green, long lived, upgradeable and built for recycling. In considering solutions to the e-waste problem, this paper focuses on worker protection through appropriate legislation, formalization of the informal recycling sector and the opportunities represented by cooperative organization of ewaste workers. -By Kavita Bhajantri Navneet Kaur IIM Indore

Globally, e-waste is growing by about 40 million tonnes a year. The manufacture of mobile phones and personal computers consumes 3 per cent of the gold and silver mined worldwide each year; 13 per cent of the palladium and 15 per cent of cobalt. Modern electronics contain up to 60 different elements -- many valuable, some hazardous, and some both. Carbon dioxide emissions from the mining and production of copper and precious and rare metals used in electrical and electronic equipment are estimated at over 23 million tonnes – 0.1 percent of global emissions (not including emissions linked to steel, nickel or aluminum, nor those linked to manufacturing the devices). There are growing concerns that most of the e-waste generated in developed countries is transmitted in developing countries that are economically not viable and lack the infrastructure for environmentally sound and robust management of e-waste. This results in adverse socioeconomic, public health and environmental impact of toxins in e-waste. A study conducted in soil, air dust and human hair collected from an ewaste recycling site in Bangalore, India, resonated increased concentrations of trace elements such as lead, zinc, silver, cadmium and copper compared to reference sites. A further study in China on human scalp hair, assessing the extent of heavy metal exposure to workers and

References: http://www.ewaste.ch/facts_and_figures/statistical/quantities/ http://www.consultancyafrica.com/index.php?option=com_content& view=article&id=829:e-waste-a-growing-environmental-problem-forafrica-&catid=92:enviro-africa&Itemid=297

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Earth is the only place to live! - Mr. Saurabh Kumar

A

have nothing to compare it to. We have never known a place with no natural disasters so we have no idea what it would be like to live somewhere where they are non-existent. Earth at times can be unsustainable for us humans to live on. But on earth, they're places where people are safe from any natural danger. Of course other planets that are like us in a way, can be lived on and we could have a better life there, but nothing can compare to what's on earth and its natural wonders. So, earth can be a stable place to live on, if people like us can take the time to take care of it and protect it as it does for us.

s of 2013, mankind has not created any living spaces off planet, so you are stuck here. There are areas which are safer than others, and there are some areas that are dangerous. One should learn about any area before they travel through or try to live in it. In geographical terms and in reference to all the earthquakes, volcanoes and natural hazards we have. This is not an opinion question, but reasons whether other planets are better to live on and why earth is or isn't a good and stable place to live.

Responsibility for preserving the environment ultimately belongs to each individual person and not the government. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the opinion above. Support your point of view with reasons and/or examples from your own experiences, observations and readings. Individual action seems to be becoming quite potent when you understand the effect that globalized communication has had on the way the world works, but is repressed, as governments around the world vie for power in a new battle against activists. The environment is something that is most definitely the responsibility, of individuals and the government together, but it is the methods that are being used that end up causing a rift between even well-meaning entities.

This is a difficult questions because we don't know how it is on other planets. We know some little things, like how Pluto is very cold because it's the farthest away from the sun. But that's just few of the things we know. Earth is all human beings know so we

Preservation and Conservation of Environment

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eople those who are mainly concerned with protecting the environment will often use the terms preservation and conservation. Let’s know in details what preservation and conservation of environment exactly means. These two terms are often confused and are generally used to mean the same thing, although differences exist. In this article we will briefly discuss about environmental preservation and conservation and their major differences.

not yet touched by humans. This is because of the fact that mankind is encroaching into the environment at such a rate that various wild landscapes are being given over to farming, industry, housing, tourism and other human developments. And we lose much of the natural areas. Preservationists also strongly support the protection of nature for purely human-centred reasons. However, some adopts less human-centred approach to environmental protection, placing a value on nature that does not relate to the needs and interests of human beings. But is a fact that by preserving and conserving environment we can make a healthy atmosphere to live in.

Conservation of environment simply implies the sustainable use as well as management of natural resources which include wildlife, water, air, and earth deposits. There are renewable and nonrenewable natural resources. Conservation of natural resources generally focuses on the needs & interests of human beings, for instance the biological, economic, cultural and recreational values. Conservationists have the view that development is necessary for a better future, but only when the changes occur in ways that are not wasteful. Read on to know more about preservation and conservation of environment.

Considering preservation and conservation of environment, the United States Environmental preservation is viewed or seen as the setting aside of earthly resources for preventing damage normally caused by contact with humans or by certain human activities, such as logging, mining, hunting, and fishing, only to replace them with new human activities such as tourism and recreation. Furthermore regulations and laws may be enacted for the preservation of natural resources. Being earth friendly is very essential as this will save our planet at the time making a better place to live in for us, for future generations.

As far as preservation of environment is concerned, it tries to maintain the present condition areas of the nature or Earth which are

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ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT produced materials, which ideally are made close to home without transporting any component parts over vast distances. Also purchase used products whenever possible, and use them for as long as you can, even if you must pay to have them repaired. Recycle your waste whenever possible, and choose products with minimal and biodegradable packaging.

How to Play a Role in Preserving the Environment

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uman industrial activities have added record levels of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, creating a host of problems such as declining air quality, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. These issues may seem difficult to address because of their magnitude. However, focusing on personal lifestyle changes and close-tohome issues makes helping the environment easy. Thinking close to home will also give you a better grasp of the issues you care most about, making you more effective in enacting change.

5. Get involved with local environmental efforts such as starting a community garden, advocating for bike paths, planting trees at a nature preserve or weatherizing people's houses. Find something you're passionate about and jump in. Joining an advocacy organization that works toward a cause such as clean air, clean water or protection of natural places is another option. If an organization doesn't already exist for a cause you want to support, start one. Announce a meeting in local papers and community centres, then join with interested people to form your group. 6. Get involved with local politics if you feel environmental issues are taking a backseat to other concerns. Run for office, and make greening the city part of your platform. Even if you don't win, you'll have the chance to educate others by speaking publicly about issues such as air quality, natural resource management and recycling programs. Campaign for candidates whose policies you believe in as well. Attend city council meetings and come prepared to present your rationale for initiatives you believe your city should take. Attend school board meetings and advocate for hands-on environmental education programs.

Proactive measures required 1. Green your home by weather-proofing your house to reduce your energy usage. Use eco-friendly cleaning products and energy-saving appliances as well. Consider installing solar panels to generate energy at home, too. Set your thermostat to a slightly lower temperature, use compact fluorescent light bulbs when your old bulbs stop working, unplug appliances you’re not using and take shorter showers. Also wash clothes in cold water and then hang up your clothes to let them air dry.

7. Write letters to the editor to local newspapers expressing your stance on local and regional environmental issues. Talk with people to share your thoughts, striving to speak calmly and candidly. If someone’s opinion differs, speak respectfully but point toward resources that back up your point. Remember that she may not change her mind during the conversation, but she might reflect on your talk later on, and you have a far better chance of winning her over if you remain friendly. Above all, keep a positive attitude so you'll stay motivated to continue working toward a healthier environment.

2. Adopt more earth-friendly eating habits so you'll have a positive effect on the environment with every meal. Buying local, organic food reduces chemicals in the environment from agricultural runoff. Plus, eating organic keeps you from eating these chemicals, and eating local food reduces the emissions used to ship food over vast distances. Although organic food has gained a reputation as being expensive, food at local farmers markets may cost less than at large chain stores. Growing your own food will save you money as well. Consider eating mainly vegetarian meals, too. Meat comes with high environmental costs, because it requires more resources for production than vegetables and grains do. 3. Reduce your emissions from travel. Stay closer to home when possible, and use a bicycle or public transportation instead of a car. If you're looking for a new car, consider a hybrid. If you must drive, try to carpool. When you go on vacation, find a close-to-home spot such as a lakeside cabin where you can get away without driving far.

Reference: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/play-role-preserving-environment78681.html http://list25.com/the-25-most-dangerous-cities-on-earth/ http://www.studymode.com/subjects/preserving-the-environmentpage1.html h t t p : / / f e e l f r i e n d l y. c o m / i n f o r m a t i o n - p r e s e r v a t i o n -

4. Reduce your consumption by purchasing only the products you really need. Choose products made from natural, sustainably

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Corporate Social Responsibility At JSW Steel Ltd. Vijaynagar - Dr. Vishwanath Palled

areas are done through individually and partnership models. It has structured process for identification and prioritization of all its’ stakeholders needs, concerns and their expectations.

INTRODUCTION

J

SW Steel, the flagship company of the JSW Group, is today an integrated steel manufacturer. JSW Steel is the largest private sector steel manufacturer in terms of installed capacity located at Toranagallu in Bellary district of Karnataka, the heart of rich-iron ore belt. JSW Steel has been ranked 6th amongst the best operating steel plant in the world by World Steel Dynamics in June 2012. The Company’s key products include Hot Rolled coils, Cold Rolled coils, and Long Products such as Wire Rod coils and Bar Rods. At JSW Steel, we believe that business conduct with social, environmental and economic considerations is the key towards achieving responsible citizenship. The company fully complies with the revised clause-49 of corporate governance requirement of SEBI.

CSR IS AN INTEGRAL PART OF OUR BUSINESS POLICY The vision of JSW is ‘Global recognition for quality and efficiency while nurturing nature and society’ which clearly illustrates that CSR is an integral part of business. At JSW, we believe that a company’s prosperity is linked with the overall development of its neighboring communities. Empowering communities and enabling them to grow hand in hand with us is deeply ingrained in our business approach. Its activities stem from the leadership’s firm belief that business is dependent on society for its growth and prosperity and those islands of prosperity will not survive for long in the vast sea of poverty and unfulfilled basic needs.

JSW believes that a company’s prosperity is linked with the overall development of its neighboring communities. Empowering communities and enabling them to grow hand in hand with us is deeply ingrained in our business approach. At JSW, CSR is defined as ‘beyond law’ commitments and activities pertaining to social, environmental and economic concerns of all its stake holders. JSW strives to achieve sustainable development in all spheres of life including education, health, livelihood and sports, promotion of arts and culture and environmental protection. JSW is committed to allocate a minimum of 1.5% of net profit in the annual business plan for Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives.

The CSR activities of the company are being carried out since inception through a structured body named JSW Foundation. It is an independent institution under Indian Charitable Trusts laws and governed by a Board of Trustees, members of which are nominated from the senior management of the JSW group of companies. To meet the needs of growing population during the expansion of projects, the infrastructure developments like roads, drinking water, community toilets, bus shelters etc. in the surrounding villages have been taken up simultaneously.

JSW has a separate environment department which deals with the issues of clean technologies, Water conservation, clean Development Mechanism, Solid waste management, Tree plantation etc. JSW & Times of India have jointly instituted the Earth Care awards and has started sensitizing the senior executives of JSW Steel on the issues related to climate change in collaboration with Earth Watch Institute which is a reflection of their commitment to recognize, strengthen and foster initiatives on mitigation & adaptation measures to combat Climate change, at organizational and individual level. Over the years, nearly 15 lakh trees have been planted and the trend is continuing. Tree plantation is also being encouraged in the surrounding villages and schools to inculcate awareness among the public.

JSW has established an exclusive Vocational Training Center for improving not only the technical skills of the local community but also in ensuring the job opportunity for all successful candidates. This is also a strategic vision to ensure the continuous availability of skilled human resources for the future. Computer Aided Learning Centers (CALCs) have been set-up in all government schools surrounding the plant and all along the water pipe line villages to increase the knowledge of the next generation. This has enabled in completing the project well in time with negligible trouble from the locals. A rural BPO center has been set up to generate not only local employment but also enhance the employability of rural women. Under the PPP model, two higher secondary schools with best infrastructure facilities are being constructed. In order to ensure holistic and sustainable growth, village development activities like garbage management, health camps, mid day meal scheme for school children etc. have been initiated in participation with local panchayaths and other institutions. As high movement of truckers was anticipated during the expansion, a ‘Drop–in-center’ was established to create awareness on HIV/AIDS amongst the drivers. All these CSR activities made the expansion plans of company not only smoother but also succeeded in convincing the masses living in the peripheral areas that JSW has been playing the role of a catalyst in bringing prosperity in their lives.

The CSR activities of the company are being carried out through an exclusive structured body named JSW foundation. JSW Foundation cherishes people and believes in inclusive growth to facilitate creation of a value based and empowered society through continuous and purposeful engagement of all partners in the development process. JSW Foundation focuses its’ works in a total of 29 villages. The developmental activities in the surrounding

The CSR annual action plan is prepared and budgeted like the plan of any other production unit in the company and included in the annual business plan. Also the CSR performance is included on the Board/committee agenda. The HR policy of the company provides time off for minimum of 5 working days (40 hours) in a year to participate in the CSR programme and apprised accordingly during their performance appraisal. For AGMs and above, CSR is a KRA

CSR training as part of their education to understand the concept and the interventions made in the area. Employee families are also involved in social activities and do participate in the foundation activities from time to time. Employees are encouraged to improve the organization and society by participating in a voluntary programme called LEAP (Learn Experience Act Persuade). The employees support the contribution to JSW Volunteerism by way of time and expertise, pay slip deductions towards contribution to social projects, material collections for a social cause etc.

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in itself with a score of 10%. Employees are encouraged to improve the organization and society by participating in a voluntary programme called LEAP, championed by JSW Foundation, a CSR arm of the JSW Group. All the new entrants in the organization undergo CSR training as part of their induction to understand the concept and the interventions made in the area.

emerging opportunities, children of surrounding villages should be equipped with necessary knowledge and skills and prepare them to meet the future challenges with confidence. In spite of laudable efforts by Government, like mid day meal schemes, free and compulsory education, scholarship support, opening up of new schools in each and every village, etc. to bring each and every rural child in to schools, retaining them and improve the quality of education remains far from reality. The rapid industrialization of the taluka forces parents to withdraw their children from schools and get them employed to supplement family income. Keeping this in view, JSW Foundation has taken up following educational initiatives in about 25 villages of Sandur taluk, in co-ordination with Government, NGOs and other developmental agencies.

An external evaluation by is being done on a regular basis. Society satisfaction Survey by independent external agency is one of the methodologies adopted by the organization to measure the organization’s social performance. The survey aims at defining and measuring the ‘’Quality of Life, which generates indices to quantify the effectiveness of social corporate spending. Identifying the societal requirements and community needs:

ACTIVITIES Ÿ The requests made by the community thru the Panchayats are

given priority to address the immediate needs.

Mid- day Meal for School Children To attract the school dropouts and retain them in the schools JSW Foundation has associated with the Akshaya Patra Trust and provides hygienic and nutritious mid-day meal for nearly 1,33,000 children from 479 Govt. Higher primary schools in and around Bellary District. Five acres of land has been allocated to the trust to set up their state-of- the art kitchen. JSW is also providing Rs 1 Crore every year towards the feeding cost of children in Bellary district. JSW employees are contributing to this noble cause by sponsoring the children. The Foundation proposes to reach out to at least 2 lakh students.

Ÿ The local institutions in the villages like SDMC, Youth Clubs

and the notable individuals are being consulted and discussed at various stages before a final proposal is made. Ÿ The special needs of the women are being discussed in the Mahila Dairy Development Group meetings, which takes place once in a fortnight. The Executive Directors of MDDG forward their requests to JSW Foundation for any assistance only after ratification. Ÿ JSW Foundation plans pro-actively by observing and assessing the local situation, as the CSR team has qualified and experienced development workers visiting the villages on regular basis. Ÿ A base line survey is also conducted through Educational volunteers to identify specific issues like out of school children, slow learners, child labour, disabled children etc.

Computer Assisted Learning Centers (CALC): This is a collaborative project between the JSW Foundation, the Azim Premji Foundation and the Village School Management Committees. Nearly 12,500 children are being benefited through setting up of such centers in 37 schools with 155 computers. Apart from improving the learning levels, the programme has helped in attracting out of school children and preventing the potential dropouts.

The Foundation works on the premise that every school going aged boy and girl who is not attending school is either into child labour or social exploitation. JSW lays strong emphasis on Primary, Secondary and Vocational Education for all. Its aim is to support the Right to Education and other Government Sponsored projects to ensure all children in age group 6 to 14 years are in school and get decent education. Various educational initiatives like Computer Aided Learning centers, nutritious and hygienic mid day meals, village learning centers for slow learners & out of school children , school infrastructure development, scholarship support, summer camps has brought many of the children back to school and prevent potential drop outs. JSW foundation implements these programmes in collaboration with Dept. of public instruction and the School Development committee. The identified potential local educated girls are the key persons for the success of the programme.

Village Child Learning Centers ( Balwadis, Children Mobile Libraries, Tution classes) JSW Foundation provides training and teaching materials for the identified potential local girls. In the balwadi’s, the children in the age group of 2 ½ to 5 years receive pre- primary education. Children mobile libraries have encouraged and sustained a reading habit among 3240 and more children. The books are rotated among the centres so that children get variety of books. In these centres, run by selected educated local women, conduct ‘bridge course’ for the school dropouts who are in the age group of 6-14 years. Different motivational activities for the school dropouts are being conducted in the evening hours. These centres play the ‘parent role’ in their schooling process. Special residential camps are being organized to motivate these children to go back to school. During 2010-11 period, 526 children in 16 balwadis, 530 children in 20 mobile library centres & 492 slow learners in 20 villages have been benefited with respective activities. The Educational volunteers from the respective villages have identified around 54 out of school children in the age group of 6 to 14 years and parents are counselled to send their children to schools. During the reporting period, they have re-admitted 12 children in the school and others are being given literacy skills and knowledge in these centres only.

The O. P. Jindal Centre partnered with the Nettur Technical Training Foundation (NTTF), Bangalore to establish itself as a major training provider in vocational training center. The OPJC vocational training center provides technical skill training for hundreds of surrounding matriculation studied boys and girls in mechanical, electrical, tailoring trades. The school for the specially abled children-TAMANNA, is providing services to the needs of most disadvantaged section of the society. The growing of several industries in and around Bellary District has opened up several employment avenues and enterprise opportunities for the local population. To make best use of these

NTTF Vocational Training Centre

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NTTF-an Educational Foundation Established in the year1963 is the living symbol of Indo-Swiss co-operation aimed at promoting a Purposeful technical education for the youth in India. The foundation implements its programme of technical training through its 20 training Centers located all over India. JSW Steel in association with NTTF has started a NTTF-OPJC Vocational Training Centre which was inaugurated on May 19, 2008. Presently two programmes namely Certificate Programme in Mechanical Maintenance and Certificate Programme in Electrical Maintenance are going on. Each programme consists of modules of Modular Employable Skills as per scheme of Ministry of Labour & Employment, Govt. of India. Beside these MES modules, trainees is imparted training in English, Soft skills and additional technical skills to make young boys suitable for the industrial jobs like Welder, Crane Operator and Mechanical Maintenance Mechanic (Mechanical Discipline) & Electrical Maintenance Mechanic and Electric AC Motor Winding Mechanic.

The rural women BPO has been set up not only to provide gain full employment but also make them IT savvy. The setting up of napkin production center by the SHG groups is viewed as a health awareness campaign more than a mere income generation activity. The rapid industrialization of the area has created huge employment and enterprise opportunities for many of the surrounding people. In spite of this, some of the surrounding women have remained underemployed due to lack of skill sets and desire to live in the village and earn a livelihood. The problems of women in our surrounding villages are no way different from any other Indian rural areas. JSW strongly believes in the philosophy that women's empowerment is central to societal development. Gender discrimination, unequal access and control over resources and opportunities, domestic violence, lack of importance given to basic needs of women, etc. are major areas of concern for us. Hence, women still need a very much focused attention as far as their socio-economic empowerment is concerned. Keeping this in view, JSW Foundation is strongly committed to the empowerment of women and for this it has formulated a number of inspiring initiatives.

TAMANNA School for Specially-Abled Children Tamanna as the name implies “Desire”. This institute is managed by OPJ Centre. It is dedicated to the welfare of ‘Mentally Challenged’ people. The OPJC operates day care centre for the mentally challenged children of the neighboring villages of JSW Steel Plant. Tamanna’s vision is that all the special children will have the opportunity to fulfill their potential and lead independent life with the self respect and dignity. Tamanna School for Specially –Abled Children inaugurated on Feb 9, 2009 and was another feather to the OPJC cap. The school started with 4 children, now the strength of the school is 38 out of which 2 are physically challenged with learning disability.

JSW Foundation facilitates SHG’s with the sole objective of reaching out to the poor women in villages around plants through collateral free credit programmes aimed at income generation and thereby promoting sustainable livelihood opportunities to them. This objective is being achieved by organizing these women into Self Help Groups (SHGs), which assist them to build their capacities by enabling them to identify and prioritize their needs and resources. Mahila Dairy Development Group (MDDG)/Self Help Groups (SHGs): MDDG is a society registered for socio-economic development of women in our surrounding villages. MDDG, though meant to support dairy initiatives started supporting other entrepreneurs as well. Regular meetings and giving thoughts on how to improve the income levels made the group to decide that money should also be made available to some members who are interested in other than dairy activity. In due course of time, these members were formed into groups & started their own small saving Rs 100/- per person) by meeting twice in a month. The saving of the group is in turn lent out as a credit to members in the form of micro finance. The success of these groups created demand for the same in other villages also. Hence JSWF went beyond the initial eight groups in five villages and set up another 81 groups making a total of 89 groups (covering about 1000 women) from 13 villages which are functioning in a structured way as SHGs. All the groups have their own bank account in the concerned banks. The turnover of these SHGs has been around Rs 79 lakhs so far.

Health The foundation provides door-to-door medical care by conducting regular general health check-ups. It also conducts specialized healthcare for the elderly by conducting cataract screening and performing free surgeries. This apart, it holds routine STI/RTI check-up camps to identify potential HIV cases to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS cases at the same time enhancing rural awareness of the dreaded scourge. As part of out reach programme of the Jindal Sanjeevani Hospital, the specialist doctors provide all the medical services at the villages through fortnight camps. It also conducts special health camps during out break of diseases like Malaria and Dengue. Health issues confronted by the rural people are diverse and many. The failure to detect diseases at early stage is leading to a state of point of no return in most of the cases. The poor can not afford costly medicine and consultancy. The women are hesitating to express their sex related problems. The public health care system is not delivering the desired services due to poor infrastructure facility, distance, and availability of doctors during emergency etc.

Rural BPO JSW Steel Ltd. has also set up a non-voice BPO (Business Process Outsourcing) unit for uplifting rural women. JSWs’ contribution includes technical support to download and upload, provide hardware and network support and training on key boards, infrastructure, electricity, furnishing and provision of computers. The key board training period varies from 2 to 4 months. At the end of the training, certification of the trainees takes place and based on the skill, they will be trained on specific projects. The project include health, survey, banks account opening applications, IPO, XML, scanning and digitizing, loan processing forms related and so forth. The scanned hand written documents will be digitized and sent back with 100% accuracy. The unit has benefited around 1000

Women Empowerment The JSW Foundation has always championed the causes of women, especially in the rural areas. JSW Foundation forms SHG’s with the sole objective of reaching out to the poor women in villages around plants through collateral free credit programmes there by promoting sustainable livelihood opportunities. T break the gender barriers, the foundation has been keen to engage women in its workforce in those areas which are traditionally reserved for men. It encourages rural girls with higher secondary education to take on the unorthodox skill of operating heavy earth-moving machines.

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women. This unit is providing a dignified employment opportunity to even a just school pass out girl and earning around Rs 3500 to Rs 7000 per month. The women are also provided with the facilities like transportation at their doorstep, stipend/salary, PF, medical insurance/accident benefit, incentive, personality development and uniform, etc. Women on heavy jobs The Foundation encouraged rural girls with higher secondary education to take on the unorthodox skill of operating heavy earthmoving machines. After training, they were employed as pay loaders. These women are being imparted 3 to 6 months of training and during the period, they are given a stipend every month, Group Personal Accident benefit/Workmen’s Compensation benefit and are extended with the benefit of all safety equipments. Some of the needy trainees’ are being provided with transport facility also. After the successful completion of the training, these women are placed with the associate companies, which can fetch them a salary in between Rs 2500-6000/- p.m. depending upon their qualification and the type of work they carry out. So far about 80 women from the surrounding villages have been facilitated for placement with the Associate Companies of the company.

printing, printing block and other day today expenses by availing loan from Mahila Dairy Development Group (MDDG), a registered society floated by JSW Foundation for the benefit of surrounding rural women. As their contribution, they have also contributed Rs 2000 each for starting the unit. So the unit has been started with an initial investment of around Rs 4 lakhs. Garbage Management This is a project to determine community involvement in collection, disposal and management of village waste. This has been established following a prolonged dialogue with the community. Village shops have been persuaded to purchase two used drums and every household is given two waste bins for segregating their waste. The community has nominated village men and women for daily collection of waste. From the collection point is transported to a nearby dump where it is composed using biological methods. The respective Panchayaths are not able to implement the proper garbage management systems. There are garbage dumps all around the roads and common places which are the breeding ground for infectious diseases like cholera, malaria, jaundice and numerous skin ailments, and breeding ground for mosquitoes. The major responsibility lies in managing the solid wastes, including sweeping the colonies, garbage collection and its transportation to dumping yard for the scientific recycling and disposal. Keeping this in view, as part of social responsibility, JSWSL has taken a proactive step to combat the menace of garbage.

Placement with Associate Companies Rural women in addition to all these are also facilitated for placement as even electricians, welders, fitters, security guards, call coordinators, accountants, admin assistants, attenders, computer operators and coordinators under Associate Companies in the plant. Till now 80 women (46 male oriented and 34 regular) have placed with associate companies.

Village Infrastructure Development The need and scope of basic amenities improvements are accumulating as the village population is growing in manifold because of the industrialization. The local panchayath (Gram Panchayath and taluk Panchayath) is unable to provide these facilities to match its speed. There were no proper roads, drainages, water supply and other basic facilities. Population density has increased and the wastewater quantity has also increased. The stagnated water leads to easy spread of diseases and the health of the people gets affected and hence there is an urgent need for proper drainage system. Lack of proper toilet facilities made the life of women miserable.

Training Centre for Textile & Apparel Rural women are also encouraged to master vocational skill of tailoring. OPJ Centre for Vocational Training imparts tailoring training to the surrounding rural women. After training, the trained women either start tailoring business in their village itself or join the production unit of OPJC where the uniform stitching of school & balwadi children, hospital staff, NTTF trainees, BPO trainees and our Associate Companies’ employees are undertaken. These women apart from getting the stitching charges are also given an incentive.

Recognition & Appreciation So far, JSW has spent nearly Rs 100.98 crores for its Vijayanagar CSR Activities. In recognition of its’ CSR activities JSW Steel has received CSR Award from Federation of Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) in 2012, Certificate of Appreciation from TERI Corporate Social Responsibility Award 2007 & Bagged the prestigious Golden Peacock Award for Corporate Social Responsibility – 2008, instituted by Institute of Directors, India.

Sanitary Napkin Training cum Production Unit: As part of women empowerment, Foundation has trained rural women from surrounding village on EDP to motivate them to involve themselves in individual as well as group entrepreneurial activities for earning better livelihood, to ensure sustainability of the entrepreneurial activities being carried out by these women and thereby make our programme more visible. 40 women from CSR villages were imparted intensive training on Entrepreneurship Development (EDP) to motivate them for setting up of micro enterprises. After the training, 15 women got motivated to start Sanitary Napkin production activity as an enterprise. The main objective to facilitate these women to start this entrepreneurial activity was not only to provide them with some livelihood opportunity, but primarily to bring menstrual health and hygienic awareness among rural women. The selected women who had shown their interest for activity were taken to an exposure visit to the sanitary napkin unit in one of the village where the NGO in collaboration with NABARD had initiated the production. JSW Foundation has facilitated this unit by supporting them financial assistance of Rs 3 lakhs towards machinery and raw materials. In addition, the women also invested Rs 1 lakh towards the cover

- Dr. Vishwanath Palled (Chief-CSR)

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Impact Interview Aadhar Pratishthan Trust is a dignified NGO based in the city of Pune (State of Maharashtra, India) with over 4,000 active members all over the State of Maharashtra. At Aadhar, they strive to spread social awareness among rural as well as urban communities for the welfare of human society and bring about constructive sociocultural change. Their social service programmes focus on today’s rampant yet vastly neglected issues. In this light, they conduct Educational Projects, Health Awareness Programs, Self Employment Programs, Women Empowerment Programs, Medical Camps, Rehabilitation Projects (for the Disabled), Child Labor Projects, and Environmental Awareness Programs rural as well urban areas. Mr. Vaibhav When was PRASTHITHAN founded?

How do you raise funds ?

Basically we founded it a long time back. But it was at that point of official one. I and my friends used to take slum children or orphans to various places. There they would interact with locals and would show their skills. I received tremendous support from my friends. We were happy with the way we were going until we found that it is compulsory to register as a NGO. So we first registered our NGO in 2005. We have a head office in PUNE which is a one point to contact for interested persons .

Raising funds s a big task for any NGO. We also face difficulty in raising funds. Since I am working in Software sector, we have lots of stationary lying idle with us at the office. I request them to share these with me. You may not believe it but after getting stationary from office we generally do not need any other stationary items. My colleagues also contributes with their own items. Actually this contribution is a cyclic contribution. When one of our staff member contributes, others also join. This is yielding good results for us. We may not get monetary funding that much but we get a lot of material funding. This is more for us as we are not after exclusive monetary funding. Can you share any one model of social work which your NGO employs ? We are woking for underprivileged children. They are deprived from education specially the children of wage labourers. What we do is that we pick up any construction site. We go there and try to convinve the builder to allow us to teach the children of labourers. Mostly we get negative response. But we do not give up. We bring legal pressure on them as there are regulations that binds builders to do something for labourers. Our aim is to teach the children at least that much that they can read or write. They should be atleast good enough to read and write. That is enough at this stage. We conduct classes on the construction site. At the same time we should appreciate that some builders gave positive response. We conduct classes as far as their parents work over there. Generally construction work goes on for 1 year . This is enough time for us to teach them to read and write.

How Pratisthan is different from other NGO? We are different in many ways. As I stated earlier, I was fed with other NGO'S .As they are giving membership but not active participation. We do just the opposite. We do not take any cash as a donation.We encourage our volunteer not to donate but to participate. Participation is much more powerful than donation . Donation can be arranged from any source but whole hearted participation cannot be substituted by money. We want to arouse passion for social service. While the other NGOs preach, we believe in doing. We make sure that none of our volunteer remains idle. That is what separates us from others.

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Environmental Issues: Development and Deprivation By Praveen G. Saptarshi Praveen.saptarshi@gmail.com Professor of Sustainability Management, IndSearch, Pune

comes to 3 metric tons (MT) per year. Assuming the emission factor to be 0.12 per MT of firewood the emission of CO2 per family per year can be quantified to be 0.36 MT. If this figure is compared with carbon emission occurred due to travel by air in economy class from Pune to Delhi and back it is about 0.41 MT. If radiative emission factor (1.9 times ) is taken into account the total emission is about 0.78 MT. This means that a person travelling from Pune to Delhi and back in economy class is responsible for carbon emission equivalent to fire wood used by two families for whole year.

Natural Resources in India: ‘Resources are not --- they are made’, is the principle that geographers are well aware. If we trace the history of rural development in the country it is quite visible that there has been a great competition amongst the claimants and hence rural sector is lagging behind the urban one. It may be stated that the rich countries in the world and rich societies in the developing countries have constantly strengthened the system of exploitation of natural resources for the benefits of rich class in the world. It is difficult to challenge the system because of poor economic and political power of the people who are mainly affected by environmental degradation especially degradation of natural resources like oil, minerals, soil, water and air. They are deprived of the development mainly because of the system, which diverts the resources to handful people. Thus, it is necessary to identify the issues between privileged and deprived people to develop policy instruments to tackle problems associated with resource development.

This logic may be extended and each flights and by taking into account number of flights for various destination from Pune, it may be stated that the air traffic from Pune airport for a week is equivalent to the fire wood requirement of entire tribal population of the district for a period of one year. The air traffic at Pune for the period two months may be causing emission of green house gases equivalent to the same due to use of fire wood by entire tribal population of Maharashtra.

Global Issues of Environment and its Impact on Resource Base:

In another study it is observed that firewood consumption in Gujarat state is about 11.2 crore MT. If we consider carbon emission due to burning of fire wood in Gujarat state it is estimated to be 1,34,40,000 MT (11,20,00,000 X 0.12). If this figure is divided by 0.78, the factor of carbon emission per person travelling in economy class from Pune to Delhi and back, it comes to 1,72,30,769 persons travelling for a similar distance. If we see air traffic data for the recent period such kind of air travel can be covered with period of one year at the domestic air ports in Gujarat. Thus far, it is an attempt to bring to the notice the fact that carbon emission caused by rich people is about 1000 times more than poor section of society. Ethically, we should ethically try to reduce emission by changing our life style instead advising poor people to reduce the consumption of firewood. The present way of awareness campaign for climate change may not fulfil the goals that we would like to set. This is the reason why we should develop our own ways and means to tackle the issues of climate change with the emphasis on strengthening life support system of vulnerable population.

Much discussed global issues of environment is ‘climate change’ has social, economic and political dimensions. The planners and academicians should attend this problem taking into account these dimensions. The interdisciplinary approach is certainly beneficial to understand intricacies of the problem. Therefore it is necessary to design the variety of methodologies and action plans to mitigate effects of climate change and test it at local, regional and global level. This kind of teamwork efforts may develop a good model of capacity building of the affected societies to combat effects of climate change, which has direct bearing on agricultural resources in India. With this view in mind I would like to put forth the facts obtained from the primary survey and interpretation of the same in the context of well discussed issues like climate change. Comparison of air travel and use of Firewood The emission of green house gases is always minimum by the poor people. It may be interesting to compare energy requirement of tribal people with the middle class. In a survey conducted 2 yrs back in tribal zone of Pune district it was observed that the requirement of fire wood per family per day is about 9.864 kg say 10 kg. It is also observed in survey that the majority of tribal people can have luxury of cooking food at home only for 289 days in year. This means that they are not in position to meet the ends throughout the year. If we assume that they use 10kg of firewood for about 300 days in a year it

Impact on Agriculture: Climatologists are of the opinion that climate change would affect the distribution of rainfall. The first stage of this kind of disaster would be marked by high frequency of extreme climatic events like high intensity cyclones, cloud bursting, severe droughts, floods, etc. Such events have direct bearing on agriculture. Agricultural systems in India can broadly be divided into two, 1) Irrigation and 2)

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Dry farming. It is worth to understand the impact of climate change on these two systems of agriculture. Irrigated Agriculture:

develop proper understanding of soil-water-climate complex and human activities as well. Following studies may give guidelines for capacity building of agriculture in India.

Agriculture with canal irrigation may be affected by changing rainfall patterns. The water resources are brought from high rainfall zone to low rain fall areas for irrigation. We have experienced it in the past that in extreme conditions irrigated areas have suffered their productivity because of low storage of water in the dams. More importantly, we are losing our traditional wisdom of diversified cropping especially in irrigated areas as market forces have dominated the agriculture. In such situation it would be difficult to cope with even minor changes in climatic patterns.

Optimisation of Water Resources: It is observed in a study that better agricultural production can be possible by reducing water requirement by adopting proper cropping pattern. This further ensures improvement in employment. The microlevel studies handling village level data have concluded that such strategy can improve the sustainability of agriculture and in turn achieve rural development. Watershed Management:

Rainfed Agriculture: Geographers have improved their knowledge about water resource management. The well accepted principle is followed here. Any regional development can be sustainable if it is based on local natural and manpower resources. Watershed management programmes are based on this principle. Such programmes can be quite apt for capacity building. Agriculture as a Close System:

As irrigated tracts show progress of agriculture dry farming sector has shown inclination towards market guided cropping pattern especially in last 3 to 4 decades. We are losing our wisdom for selection of crops for early or late arrival of monsoon. It was well known practice to take the crops like pulses based on early monsoon. If it fails the quantity of loss would be bearable. However, monoculture in the dry farming sector has become the practice in recent past. For example, rice cultivation in high rainfall zone and hybrid jowar in semiarid zone have become dominant crops reducing the area under variety of crops which provide proteins and require less water. This has made the dry farming sector quite vulnerable for predicted climate change. More importantly the agriculture has become more dependent on externalities created due to other factors like high range of market fluctuations. Thus, the sector which has been already weakened may face more severe impacts.

There are several research papers in to prove that root cause of agricultural problems is outgoing cash flow. The studies carrying out cost-benefit analysis have revealed that a small part of income due to agriculture based on local soil, water and human resources remain in the rural areas. More than 65% of the profit goes to urban sector. This means that agriculture should be developed as the close system in which a little or no scope is provided to transgress the earnings in agriculture to other sectors. Organic farming can be promoted in this context.

Thus, both the agriculture may be considered as less capable to absorb the shocks of extreme climatic conditions. Here the role of environmental management experts is important because they can

Thus, it may be concluded that the students of Environmental Management should develop the skill to identify who are the culprits of environmental degradation and who are the sufferers.

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B-16 Experiences

I

, Anuja Mathur, was born and brought up in lucknow. I am an B.tech biotechnology graduate from Amity university lucknow uttar Pradesh. As far as my journey is concerned initially I never gave a thought of joining any management course. But after completion of my 3rd year in b.tech I came across some really new subjects , which were marketing and business management. As these subjects were totally new to me , it developed a kind of eagerness and curiosity to know more about it. That was the time when it ticked my mind that I can make my career out of it. Then I started acquiring more knowledge about the courses available and various streams. In my last semester of b.tech I joint MBA entrance exam coaching for a few months for polishing my skills and knowledge.

we get to manage and organise the vents for ourselves along with our seniors. When we get our days off its always great fun to get out of the college atmosphere and enjoy our day off with all of our friends. Movies, shopping, and eating out are the usuals on our to do list. So by the time we get back we are exhausted and had enough fun to last us for another week. Till now its been an enjoyable experience and i am confident that its going to continue into the future. Thank you Swati Khanwalkar PGDM I, KIAMS

After the CAT results came I was in a utter confusion state because of various college options available. I consulted everywhere , talked to every source possible. Some of my teachers and friends told me that , KIAMS is one of the bright and shining B-schools of India. The I started searching about various aspects of the quality of KIAMS. Websites , news channels , sources etc and ended up joining KIRLOSKAR INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED MANAGEMENT STUDIES (PUNE). After coming to this college I realized that its much more than what I thought. Its really “enriching my life” , the way my life and personality has changed from my undergrad’s stupidity to a budding manger’s professionalism , its amazing me as well. I am expecting much more out of me and keeping my fingers crossed for that.

I

wanted to pursue a pgdm course because firstly it is highly demanded in the job market today and also because i wanted to become a good administrator and create a niche for myself in the HR field. So after my graduation i started preparing for the various entrance exams and eventually got selected for KIAMS.. when i first arrived here i really liked the location and the weather of the place. Food facility is very good here compared to other hostels(past experience). Coming to the faculty and seniors, i found them both to be extremely helpful. Whenever im in need they always help me. I found some wonderful friends here. After leaving home i was a little apprehensive about getting along with people but now i can say that i have a small family with my awesome friends. Here in college the schedule is hectic. We get loads of assignments but th good thing about that is that its in groups so we learn how to work in a group situation and get alsong with people with differeing temperaments.

I

decided to do a PGDM from a reputed college in my graduation itself. It was a dream come true to me when i got selected for KIAMS. It is a new and my first experience to be away from home. I did not find it tough to adjust at all with the new environment and new people as the people here are very helpful and cooperative and treats us as if we are their own. I made some really good friends and have wonderful coupmates. KIAMS has provided us with experienced and knowledgeable faculties. Also they conduct guest lectures almost every week which gives us exposure and knowledge of many fields. Lots of events are organised here which gives students opportunity to participate and showcase their talents. There is also a system of selecting representatives for the events like Operacy, Nostalgia and other cultural events so as a result of which

Every Thursday we get to go to the main city. We all look forward to it eagerly as its our only day off in the entire week. It feels great to get away from the daily grind of classes,assignments and presentations. Hanging out with friends, relaxing and chitchatting over coffee or something is the order of the day. So overall i am having a great experience here. Thats all about the KIAMS journey till now from my point of view. Thank you Soad Fatma PGDM I, KIAMS

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I

I

, Pranasha Sahu,(B.E. Electronics & Telecommunications) had made up mind to pursue a career in MBA. I started my preparations in 3rd year of my bachelor’s degree and had decided to pursue MBA from a renowned institution. After the declaration of results of qualifying exams many of my friends, colleagues, teachers suggested me about this college. With a very positive attitude I was done with my interviews and got admission in KIAMS. Since I was leaving my home for the first time to stay in a residential b-school I was but worried about managing things. The journey to pursue PGDM in KIAMS began on 22nd June 2013. There was a very enthusiastic induction program given by the faculty and staff members of the institution of what I am supposed to be in two years , and that I have become a part of the Kirloskar family which has a tag line “ enriching lives” i.e . valuing the morals of oneself and prosper to achieve great heights. Since then till now we the first year students are in a continuous process of being moulded into a professional and would sustain a corporate life further in all aspects despite of whichever stream he/she chooses.

Pooja agarwal (BCA) from Bhopal Madhya Pradesh, have done my graduation in computer science. I started planning about my career in management from my 2nd year of graduation. After clearing my exams i started preparing for the entrance exam (CAT) and succeeded in clearing it with 81 percentile. Then my teachers and some of my friends suggested me about this college. When i enquired about it i found this college worth giving my level best efforts and 2 years time for pursuing mba. When i came to this college i got a very warm welcome from my seniors and college staff. I found my classmates also very supportive and everyone is trying to give their best efforts in adopting a professional life style or a schedule which is full of efforts. The way we are getting trained here i see myself at higher heights in the corporate world after 2 years. After experiencing the college atmosphere i found that it is one of the best decisions of my life made by me of joinig kirloskar institute... - Pooja Agrawal PGDM I, KIAMS

- Pranasha Sahu PGDM 1, KIAMS

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Environment Management – The way forward - Miss Ishani Ray

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nvironmental Management has been defined as management of the interaction and impact of societies on the environment. The main objective of Environmental management is to ensure that the resources of the ecosystem are protected and maintained for future generations. Additionally it also attempts to identify factors that create a conflict between meeting needs and protecting resources. This topic is highly relevant in today’s world as we face acute shortage of natural resources and drastic changes in the global climate. If we trace back the story of environmental management, it started way back during the industrial revolution of the 19th century when there were no standards for the industrial goods and products being made. Widespread pollution was gradually becoming the norm of the day. This allowed the environmental movement to get an early foothold into the system. Linfen, in China, is today the world’s most polluted city. Hundreds of factories and refineries spew out poisonous gases into the atmosphere and water bodies. A few other examples are the Chernobyl disaster of 1986 and Bhopal Gas tragedy in 1984, of whose consequences we are all aware of. All this is having a massive impact on all parts of the environment. Thus it is evident that steps need to be taken to stop this kind of irresponsible behaviour. In March 2009, a meeting was held of the Copenhagen Climate Council where climate experts from all over the world issued a keynote statement that there was now "no excuse" for failing to act on global warming and that without strong carbon reduction targets "abrupt or irreversible" shifts in climate may occur. India faces a lot of environmental issues. The worst phase of India’ s environmental condition was between 1947 till 1995 but according to World Bank data, India has made the fastest progress between 1995 till 2010. There is a conflict in placing economic development factor in either the causes for environmental degradation or in the resolution of the problem. Some feel that India s growing population is the main reason for the degradation of the environment but research challenges this theory. Others believe that economic development is the only answer to India s growing problems. India has to face some tough challenges if they want to confront the environmental issue. Despite having some highly advanced environmental laws and regulations sustainable environment practices like controlling air pollution and water pollution is still at a very rudimentary level when compared with the practices that are being followed in developed western countries. The government has taken some steps to resolve the problem of pollution like waste water management and roping in celebrities and associating them with government plans like “Ganga Action Plan” and “Yamuna Action Plan” but these have largely been failures. Increased

environmental regulations will have to become a key area of concern in the near future as the increasingly wealthy citizens are demanding more advanced environmental controls and a reduction in exposure to pollution. Rapid progress in urbanization is further putting pressure on the country’s urban infrastructure. As per the McKinsey Global Institute it was found that the infrastructure which will be equivalent of a “new Chicago” or two “new Mumbais” will have to be built every year in India for the next 20 years to meet the country’s growing demands. Another way of looking at the need for expanded infrastructure is that India will need to add 20-times the capacity of paved roads, metros and subways that were added in the past decade to meet the anticipated urban population rise by 2030. Thus the environmental sector is expected to be at the forefront of India’s evolving story in the coming years. Though sustainability of environmental resource management has improved, corporate sustainability has to improve a lot more. Businesses should now be environmentally oriented, ie: they need to consider the location, scale of the enterprise and range of products. They should focus on how to reduce the impact of businesses on the environment. They can do this by reorienting themselves with regard to their products, organizational processes, structure and shareholders attitudes so that they lean more towards environmentally benign processes and stay away from those that are environmentally damaging. It is not only the duty of the top level management to keep this point in mind but also mid level managers so that they can also help by contributing their inputs and viewpoints on the issue. In that way more solutions can come up through brainstorming. Thus it is a multifunctional activity. We, as a society, also need to be more responsible and act maturely. Small changes in our day to day activities like reducing wastage of natural resources, reducing pollution, dumping and littering can make a great impact if done collectively on the environment. Formation of associations with a common purpose and public pressure can also have an impact on the government and lead them to take a more proactive role in environmental management. - Miss Ishaani Ray, PGDM 1, KIAMS

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Reflections project, but as everybody starting working on the project, things began to clear up and became more interesting to work on. After a week of brain storming with Ms. Abhinaya (who has the patience of a saint!), every group tried to come up with their best solution. It took around two week for all the four teams to come up with their solutions. All the team presented their solutions in front of alumni who came down to Harihar from Mumbai. Each team discussed the case deeply and had a healthy interaction with her. Live projects are the apt platform for students to develop their employment abilities and gain some industrial experience. We are extremely thankful to Ms. Abhinaya Chandrashekar for giving us an opportunity to apply our knowledge in real time environment. -Mr. Apoorv Srivastava PGDM II, KIAMS

Industry Insights KIAMS has always believed in integrating pragmatism in their pedagogy through various industrial readiness programs. This year KIAMS has taken it to a new level by starting a drive to give industrial exposure to the students along with their curriculum. It is a pilot attempt to make students understand the real applications of imparted knowledge in their curriculum with the help of KIAMS Alumni who have an experience in various field of Industry. The above attempt was manifested by Mr. Ramaprabhu RP & Mr. Adhitya Bhalajee, two enthusiastic executives of HUL who have passed through the portals of KIAMS. Their domain of expertise was Supply chain management. Their served two main purposes; mainly they shared the HUL supply chain practices through a marathon of informative session which lasted for around 6 hours. In this session, they explained the real industry practises keeping our curriculum in backdrop. The few fortunate curious minds who benefited from this drive were TIM (Total Inventory Management) students of B15 Operations stream. The session was interactive and many concepts came alive through their experience and immaculate articulation of the same. Nevertheless, no knowledge impartation process is complete without a proper evaluation of the assimilation of knowledge by the students. In addition, when it comes to evaluation nothing beats one to one interactive viva sessions. The viva session was a pre-insight to the technical round of interviews held during the placement season. They gave a feedback tailored to the personal level. The feedback given through a post viva session told us what is expected from students who wish to pursue a career in operations. This exposure would certainly enable the students to plan the students to channelize their efforts in right direction to build a strong foundation for a successful career ahead. -Mr. Alok Kavthankar, Ms. Apurva Chaudhari PGDM II, KIAMS

ezNetScan+ - A‘LIVE’ Project We have been witnessing technological advancements in the modern era and we are supposedly leading a smart life by virtue of smart phones (or should I say other way?!). Mobile Applications covers emerging e-business theories, architectures, and technologies that are emphasized to stimulate cutting-edge information into research and business communities. A bunch of teams worked on a LIVE project assigned to us by Ms. Nidhi Bansal, from B13 who is the HR of VR Software Systems Pvt. Ltd., Vadodara. The project was related to promoting a mobile app developed by the company ahead of its launch such that it creates visibility and hype enhancing the downloads and hence generating revenue. To capitalize on the success of its first app ‘ezNetScan’, VRSS decided to launch a paid app and named it ‘ezNetScan+’ (the first version was free of cost). ezNetScan+ is an advanced version app with additional features targeted at existing users of free version and new customers. The basic function of this utility based app is to list down the connected devices in your wifi network. Supported by our esteemed faculty Prof. Krishnamoorthy, our main objective was to create visibility and hype using online media to increase the number of downloads of the app.

The Art of Branding MBA is all about learning and self development. Lectures and books help us to develop a conceptual base but there is always a need for a platform where students can apply their conceptual knowledge and learn practically. A recruiting company looks for conceptual and analytical skills, leadership qualities, communication skills, willingness to learn, and interpersonal skills with real time environment. This can be very well served by a live project. Recently, the students of KIAMS got one such opportunity to work on a live project. It was one of the interesting projects on brand management, which was facilitated by one of our Alumni of B-10, Ms. Abhinaya Chandrashekar who works as a brand consultant in Alok Nanda & company and the founder of Brand Touchpoint website. Precisely speaking, the project was about building brand architecture and the positioning and also to understand how brand architecture works in non FMCG industries, how to arrive at the right brand positioning, what are the relationships between brand positioning and the corporate vision and what role does the customer play in this. The students of B-15 welcomed this opportunity and 23 students came up and enrolled themselves. The students were divided into four groups. Initially there were lot of questions raised regarding the

Following was the overall structure of the project: A total of seven teams geared up for the task and started sending their strategy map to Ms. Nidhi. Upon approval of those strategies the teams worked on implementing them. Exploring new horizons to promote the app was the need of the hour. The social media i.e., Facebook, Twitter, Google+ were used to a great extent. Social networking websites allow individuals to interact with one another. When apps like ezNetScan+ join those sites, people get to interact with ezNetScan+ and there you create a relationship. Right from creating nuggets for the above mediums to creating user manual guides for the app, we gave a shot at every possible way. Few teams even wrote articles explaining the app and email content to woo its target. A team even created a video to promote the app. We had to apply the various online marketing concepts from Kotler in reality. The short duration (2 weeks) of the project kept us on our toes and it was a tremendous learning to all of us. I sincerely thank Ms. Nidhi of VR Software Systems for providing this opportunity and Prof. Krishnamoorthy for guiding us throughout the project. -Mr. Priyojeet Kumar PGDM II, KIAMS 18

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India: Land Of Human Capital Or Human Burden - Mr. Rajnish kumar

Economist Theodore Schultz invented the term in the 1960s to reflect the value of our human capacities. He believed human capital was like any other type of capital; it could be invested in through education, training and enhanced benefits that will lead to an improvement in the quality and level of production.” – Investopedia.com India is the 2nd most populated country of the world after China. It also has the largest pool of youth in the world. Such a large population of young has never been seen in history of world. When the whole world is facing the problem of ageing population, India has got such a large resource which has the capacity to bring and accomplish any kind revolution on this planet. There is an utmost need to extract the potential of this resource otherwise it may turn into“Bhasmasur” (Hindu mythological character who had the power to burn anything by putting his hand on it, at last he put it on his own head) for the nation itself. In this era of globalisation everybody is exposed to all types of market offerings which are creating a high level of desire in the young generation. They want to achieve anything and everything. But, the paradox is that we don’t have capacity to employ such a large population. And the current education system is just rubbing the salt in the wound.

Another major aspect is the increasing gap between the poor and rich. India is a nation where more than 32% of the population is below poverty line (sustaining on less than $1.25 per day as per WHO standard). And the top 100 people together have got a net worth of $250 billion (source: Forbes list) which is almost 13.5% of India’s GDP of $1841.70 billion. And, here we have not even considered the huge chunk of black money deposited in foreign banks by politicians, industrialists, large investors, etc. These data are portraying a vivid picture of the gap between bottom and top of the pyramid. And this gap is increasing at an increasing rate. All these factors together are giving the sharp signal of the need to draft a futuristic labour policy and develop an adequate labour market which can serve not only the nation but can meet the demand of foreign countries also(25 million people of Indian origin are already in various countries of world). We just need to extract this potential instead of considering population as a reason for all problems, otherwise this huge mass of unemployed youth full of uncontrolled desires can bring even civil war for the nation if they are not adequately engaged and employed in some constructive activity.

This current education system is producing only “white collar” workforce having big desires and theoretical knowledge. This type of workforce can serve basically the service sector. And for that also higher education has become the minimum qualification. For a country like India where more than 40% of the population is below poverty line, it is very difficult for most of people to achieve a higher degree. And the situation gets worse if this highly educated individual is not able to get employment. And at this point of time there is a very high probability of such highly educated minds turning towards anti-social and anti-nation activities.

India has always been a country with abundance of resources. The only problem is that we do not identify and explore our resources at the right time. With 65% of people below the age of 35 years, India is going to become the youngest nation of world (with average age of 29 years). We are going to feed the growing population of the world with our hard work, intelligence and management capabilities. The policy makers will have to take immediate steps toward extracting this huge potential. We definitely have the opportunity to become the power-house of workforce in the 21st century which can provide a new boost to the declining economy of India as well as world. But, if we will fail to do so then instead of boon this opportunity may turn into a doom.

The other side of the coin is that we have a huge mass of unskilled workforce who is willing to work but are not getting adequate employment opportunity. One reason behind this is lack of adequate skills among workers as per industry requirements. The employment of capital intensive technology is also affecting the unskilled labour market. Although skilled labourers are also affected during the period of recession, they have various other opportunities. They can even turn into small entrepreneurs and give employment to other unskilled workers. But a normal unskilled and illiterate labour from any backward area doesn’t have such leverage. He is being exploited in many ways in the existing unorganised labour market of India.

- Mr. Rajnish kumar PGDM II, KIAMS

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Change Is Permanent.. - Mr. Sourav Soni

There’s nothing that’ll last forever, There’s only one permanence called change; You can put all your efforts whatsoever, But time changes and things go out of range.

No matter how you prepare or what you do, Life finds its way, to live and to move; They know there’s lot more to say and lots more to woo, Who cares!!!! How you suffer or what you prove.

I tried hard to get the best out of it, Succeeded in nothing but yes something; I mustered up my lost pals from a fallen pit, To regain my grit and be at the side of receiving.

If you can’t change your fate, change your attitude, Work hard to increase your lane of latitude; In this game of eternal-ephemeral series called life, Remember your genesis and always have gratitude……

- Mr. Sourav Soni PGDM I, KIAMS

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BIZ QUEST

Q1. Of which international confectionery major is IIM-B alum Sameer Suneja took over as the CEO?

Q15. With 2200 clubs in 50 states of US and 14 countries, this Minneapolis HQ co has the world’s fastest growing fitness club chain. Name it.

Q2. Who was the star speaker in the MOOC giving with purpose’ a free online course on philanthropy by Learning by Giving started on 15th July?

Q16. Saregama has decided to stop manufacturing CD/DVDs etc and go digital. They decided to outsource their manufacturing from?

Q3. From whom did Jeff Bezos acquire Washington Post for $250 Million?

Q17. Which international watch brand has a luxury range called Ananta?

Q4. Wonga, Xoom, Azimo are hot startups getting eye popping valuations. In what business are they in?

Q18. What will the TV programme/ website “Power of shunya” showcase?

Q5. Which company is the biggest buyer of used jets in 2013? Q19.Which Indian CEO figures at No 3 on the “Top 30 CEOs to follow on social media worldwide” compiled by worldofceos com?

Q6. What is common to Birell and Moussy brands owned by Heineken and Carlsberg respectively? Q7. Who was the Quiz Master in the Bournvita Quiz Contest show when it first appeared on radio nearly 40 years ago?

Q20. Under what brandname has Sadanand Maiya the man who built MTR launched processed foods once again after selling MTR earlier to Orkla Foods of Norway?

Q8. Rumi Virjee is the recent PIO who has got membership in the UK’s House of Lords. Which chain did he bring to UK?

Q21. Name the Economist who coined the acronym BIMARU for backward states in a paper submitted to Rajiv Gandhi in the 80’s.

Q9. As per the recent TRAI report, as of March 2013, the no of Indians who access Internet on mobile is about ______ million.

Q22. Which retail chain owns the multi-brand multi-product multilocation service chain ResQ?

Q10. In the context of enivironment/development what is the full form of NIMBY?

Q23. A case study has been written by Harvard Business School on Kerala based Synthite Industries. In which business is the company in?

Q11. Which group now owns the luxury car maker Bentley? Q24. Which two major holding companies in advertising will merge to create the largest advertising co worldwide and what would it be called as?

Q12. Frederick W Taylor is known as the Father of Scientific Management. He was also an inventor. What process did he develop with White?

Q25. Which is the first place outside UK where Unilever has created Four Acres, a leadership development institute, recently?

Q13. Why is the creation of Telangana causing misery to map makers? Q14. Which Birla co produces Birla Tyres, Birla Shakti Cement and Vasavadatta cement?

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Brand Updates - Mr. Kesav Satish

The programs aren't meant for document, spreadsheet, and presentation creation, rather, they're aimed at helping Office users make quick fixes to existing work, and share those files.

Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd , India's largest sports utility vehicle (SUV) maker, for the first time since their inception, entered the country's small car market by launching the Verito Vibe, a compact version of its sedan, at a starting price of 563,000 rupees ($10,000) among the cheapest of its passenger vehicles, believing that this car can give them an opportunity to play in the large and highly competitive compact car segment.

The app includes several features that let Office 365 subscribers pick up files on their phones where they left off on their PCs. The files, like all Office 365 documents, will sync with Microsoft's SkyDrive Web storage service. The app is free to download but will only work for subscribers to Microsoft's Office 365 Home Premium and ProPlus service, thus showing the company’s commitment in providing additional value for their Office 365 subscribers.

Having a presence in the small car market might be a positive factor if demand returns in the next fiscal year, but it is an open fact that Mahindra will have to compete with established brands such as Maruti Suzuki India Ltd, Renault SA's Duster and South Korea's Hyundai Motor Co, who have already made their mark in the small car market. In an attempt to inject some open competition into the mobile space, Mozilla has come up with Firefox OS, an OS meant for smartphones. This operating system is entirely based on open web standards that Mozilla is positioning as a more open alternative for powering low-cost and mid-range devices in high-growth emerging markets.

Microsoft on July 31 came up with amazing news for the subscribers of Microsoft's Office 365 Home Premium. The tech company announced that it's now bringing the Office Mobile app to Android, which includes access to Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

Firefox is also unique in focusing a big chunk of the OS functionality around search, and eschewing the need for a lot of dedicated apps. The whole point is to show off what a phone can do with web standards. The OS has now become a matter of inspection for experts in observing how the company would face the software tycoons like Apple and Google.

- Mr. Kesav Satish PGDM I, KIAMS

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BIZ NEWS 1) The National Aluminium Company Limited (NALCO), a Navratna PSU, has been foraying into other metals and energy sectors. The company has set up its 2nd Wind Power Plant at Ludarva in Jaisalmer district of Rajasthan with a capacity of 47.6 MW. A part of the project has been commissioned successfully and power production has commenced from 18 Wind Energy Generators. The Rs. 283 crore Wind Power Project is being executed through M/s Gamesa Wind Turbines Private Ltd., which involves erection of 56 Wind Turbines, each of 850 KW rating. This is the second green initiative of NALCO towards promoting sustainable development by harnessing the unconventional and renewable energy sources, which would credit the company with incentives from the Government. The project is scheduled to be completed by August 2013.

the MNC's plan to increase its presence in emerging markets such as India, where HUL brands are market leaders in most of the categories they operate in. 4) The Supreme Court cleared the hurdles for the implementation of FDI in multi-brand retail sector saying that the "consumer is king and if that is the philosophy working behind the policy then what is wrong". The apex court said the policy aimed at "throwing out" the middleman, who are "curse to Indian economy" and "sucking" it, has to be "welcomed". A bench headed by Justice R.M. Lodha said the policy does not suffer from any unconstitutionality or illegality requiring it to be quashed. "This court does not interfere in the policy matter unless the policy is unconstituional, contrary to statutory provisions or arbitrary or irrational or there is total abuse of power. Before pronouncing the order, the bench said the policy was for the benefit of the consumer, farmers and the retailers with the objective to eliminate middlemen. The bench noted that the policy was prepared after detail study of the economy of developing countries like China, Brazil, Argentina, Singapore, Indonesia and Thailand where FDI is permitted upto 100 per cent, local retailers co-exist along with organised retail and are integral in the organised retail chain.

2) Finance Minister P. Chidambaram sought to woo foreign investors by clarifying that a tax residency certificate (TRC) will be sufficient to claim tax concessions on investments routed through countries such as Mauritius while cutting the rate of withholding tax on interest payments on government and corporate bonds to 5% from 20%. Lok Sabha passed the finance bill without a debate after most of the Opposition decided to walk out over the Supreme Court's observations on alleged government interference in the functioning of the CBI. The minister, who has travelled to various global financial centres to woo foreign investors, unveiled several measures to attract foreign capital and removed provisions relating to TRC that had made way into the budget documents and spooked foreign investors The apprehensions over TRC go back to a provision in the previous budget, for fiscal 2012-13, which made it mandatory for all foreigners to furnish a TRC from their home country to claim benefits under the double taxation avoidance agreement. But the language used in Budget 2013-14 spooked foreign investors, who saw it as a fresh provision that could empower tax officials to deny tax benefits to investments routed through Mauritius.

5) OxiCash Wallet, a money transfer facility, became the country's first independent/ non-bank mobile wallet facility Launched by Oxigen Services on the IMPS (immediate payment service) platform of the National Payment Corporation, OxiCash is a real-time, round-the-clock facility that can be used even by a person without a bank account. Launching the service, Reserve Bank chief general manager at the payments and settlement division, Vinay Chug said, for the first time, the country has seen electronic payments overtaking cheque payments in the just concluded fiscal, but did not offer details. On the importance of popularising the electronic payments systems, Chug said, on an average 5 billion mobile money transactions take place in a month in the country and said on a value point of view it would be many billions. This service is available with 55 major banks and the remaining six will join soon. Additionally, a customer can also transfer funds from an OxiCash Wallet to another OxiCash Wallet, he added.

3) Anglo-Dutch company Unilever has offered to pay $5.4 billion (over Rs 29,000 crore) to increase its stake in Hindustan Unilever to 75%, the largest acquisition deal in India's consumer goods sector that comes at a time India's lustre has dimmed for many foreign investors. The maker of Rin detergent, Lux soap and Knorr soups said the deal was driven by its desire for a bigger pie of HUL's dividend outflow, and it had no intention of delisting its Indian unit. The parent company plans to buy over 487 million HUL shares at Rs 600 each in a public offer, to raise its holding to 75% from 52.48% at present. The offer represents a 20.6% premium over Monday's closing share price and a 26% premium to the one-month average price. The acquisition is Unilever's biggest since its 2000 purchase of Best Foods for $23 billion and is the largest offer announced in the history of Indian capital markets. It becomes the second multinational to spend big money to hike its stake in its Indian unit after GlaxoSmithKline spent over $1 billion ( Rs 5,222 crore) in February this year to raise its stake to over 70% from 43%, marking a break in a narrative of doom and gloom about the Indian economy. The Unilever move, which sent HUL shares surging 17%, is part of

6) The Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) has accorded 'green signal' to Oil India (OIL's) proposed exploration activities in KG-ONN-2004/1 block in the Krishna-Godavari basin According to an order issued on Monday, theAndhra Pradesh government, which forwarded OIL's application to the Ministry for environmental clearance, said the sample collected during the exploration activity should not be used for commercial purpose. References:http://economictimes.indiatimes.com http://indiabiz.com http://google.com http://yahoo.com

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CROSSWORD

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Across 2. 5. 6. 7.

.................. is owned by Volkswagen group HAMID SAYANI was the first quiz master of .................. show .................. VIBE was launched by Mahindra & Mahindra. Reliance owns a multi-brand, multi-product, multi-location service chain named ..................

Down 1. 3. 4. 5.

.................. is a dangerous toxin released when circuit board is burnt. .................. has the largest pool of youth in the world CRT stands for .................. RAY TUBES. Ashish Bose, the economist is famous for coining this ..................

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The Chanakya Inter B-School Contest Winner : Kavita Bhajantri and Navneet Kaur – IIM, Indore Other Contributors : Arjun A and Renjith Prahaladan – FMS, Delhi. Kshama Adka – Goa Institute of Management. Rohit Sonawane and Deepak Sharma – IIM, Lucknow Supratim Paul – IIM, Trichy. Aishwarya Gautam and Kunal Anand – IIT, Kharagpur. Bhanu Gandotra – IMT, Ghaziabad. Saurabh Kumar – Institute Of Management, NIRMA University. Debanjan Nag – NITIE, Mumbai. Akhil Suresh and Anjali Agrawal– NMIMS, Mumbai Priyo Ranjan – XISS, Ranchi Vivek Damodar – Chetanas R K institute of Management & Research.

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CAMPUS NEWS r

KIAMS celebrated 15th August with full vigour .

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The students of B-15 experienced a mock interview taken by Mr.N.Luthra,President, Governing Council of KIAMS.

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Dr. V.S. Pai has kept the KIAMS flag bearing high. His case on, “Godrej Consumer Products, LTD” has been accepted for publication in the Summer Edition of the Business Case Journal (U.S.A) in September 2013. Also his case written on Kanthappa Agencies Ltd (a business enterprise based out of Harihar) along with two B14 students (Ravi Santosh and Devanshu Bajaj) has been accepted for publication by IVEY Publishing, Canada (a Richard-Ivey B-school initiative)

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Batch 16 had an interactive session on 2nd July, with Mr. Sanjay Sahay (IG- Eastern Range, Karnataka Police) who shared his experiences on “Fulfillment in life and Career”

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I-Club – promoting Idea, Innovation & Industry Readiness, was initiated on 11th July. An integration of all clubs namely, finance, HR, marketing and operation management, it is devoted to imbue the requirements of Industry.

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Batch 15 had their SIP presentations from 19th-21st July. Industry experts and alumni were invited to evaluate the process.

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Mr. Ramaprabhu RP & Mr. Adhitya Bhalajee from HUL, Supply chain visited the Harihar campus and enlightened the students by conducting workshops on supply chain on 2nd & 3rd August.

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The long awaited Fresher’s Party was organized on 7th August 2013 at Harihar Campus.

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Ms. Abhinaya Chandrasekhar, Founder of brand touchpoints, conducted a marketing workshop for batch 15 on 9th & 10th August.

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On 9th August, ‘Eid-ul-Fitr’, was celebrated marking the end of the Islamic month of ‘Ramzan’ with much fervor across KIAMS.

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For the very first time in the history of KIAMS, a cricket match was held between B15 girls and B16 girls on 19th August. B16 girls won by 10 wickets.

ANSWERS OF BIZ QUEST 1. 2. 3. 4.

Perfetti Van DeMelle Warren Buffett Grahams family Financial technologies firms who are disrupting many services like money transfers, micro lending etc 5. Boeing to create a market for new 747s 6. Non-alcoholic beers 7. Hamid Sayani, elder brother of Amin Sayani

9. 150 m 10. Not in My BackYard 11. Volkswagen group 12. Taylor-White process for high speed steel used in tool making 13. Unsold stock of printed maps with the old AP state boundaries 14. Kesoram Industries 15. Anytime Fitness 16. Sony

18. Innovations from India that will have minimum negative effects 19. Anand Mahindra 20. Maiya’s 21. Ashish Bose 22. Reliance 23. Natural oleoresins 24. Publicis and Omnicom 25. Singapore

Team Chanakya gives special thanks to Mr.Rahul Raju of PGDM-1,KIAMS for his valuable contribution in designing the cover page of September,2013 issue of The Chanakya.

Faculty Advisor Prof : Sunaina Kuknor Student Editorial Team Ms.Bhaswati Chakraborty Ms.Pulkit Tiwari Mr.Saurabh Jadhav Mr.Bharathwaj S.

We invite you to send in your feedback to help us Bring out the best in ‘The Chanakya’. chanakya@kiams.ac.in thechanakya.kiams@gmail.com

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KIRLOSKAR INSTITUTES OF ADVANCED MANAGEMENTS STUDIES

Gut No-356, 357, Near Tata Foundry Village-Dhamane, Taluka-Maval Pune-410506 Maharashtra (India)

One Institute, Two Locations Website : www.kiams.ac.in Email : kiams@bgl.vsnl.net.in

HARIHAR CAMPUS P.O. Yantrapur Harihar-577 602 Karnataka (India) designpoint.pune@gmail.com : 99707 81058

PUNE CAMPUS

Chanakya september 2013  

The Chanakya Volume 14 Issue 2, Sept 3013. Main Focus on Environment Management. Release by Kirloskar Institute of Advanced Management Studi...

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