Page 1

STI Fall & Winter Program A LEARNING COMMUNITY TECHNOLOGY

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE

TEACHING STRATEGIES

EQUITY & ACCESS

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT

INTERDEPENDENCE

1


STI Table of Contents

Principles Responding to Individual Student Needs Collaborations with Other Organizations Mini Grant Program National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Professional Performance Review Program Teacher as Reader Technical Skills

Page 8 8 9 10 10 10 10 10

Overview EHS - Edgemont Junior/Senior High School EWS - Edgewood School FMS - Fox Meadow School GRA - Greenacres School GRV - Greenville School

HCS - Heathcote School QRS - Quaker Ridge School SHS - Scarsdale High School SMS - Scarsdale Middle School SPS - Seely Place School

*Course has prerequisites for participation; see description for details. #

Title

Beginning

Open To

Credit

Coordinator

Page

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE The Mentor Support Seminar: Edgemont The Mentor Support Seminar: Scarsdale

8/28

Edgemont

2

R. Farrell

11

8/27

Scarsdale

3

M. Absgarten

11

3730

Mentoring Workshop for Senior Options Steering Committee

9/22

SHS

3

A. Liptak

11

3731

The Child and the Curriculum

9/18

Edgewood

2

C. Five

12

3732

Reflective Practice Seminar

10/16

All

2

P. Dempsey H. Rodstein

12

3733 A&B

Reflections on the Teaching of Reading: K-5

TBA

Edgewood, Heathcote

1

S. DeLorenzo J. Sullivan K. Theall

13

3734

Let’s Talk Math

10/7

SMS/SHS Math

1

C. Desoe

13

3735

Exploring Balanced Literacy at Quaker Ridge III

TBA

Quaker Ridge

1

P. Hamlet R. Lane

14

3736

Book by Book: Balanced Literacy at Heathcote Teachers Reading Together: Edgewood Keeping Current in Literature at Fox Meadow Keeping Current in Literature at Greenacres Teacher as Reader: Heathcote

10/2

Heathcote

2

14

9/23

Edgewood

2

9/23

Fox Meadow

1

T. DeBerry L. Hicks N. O’Rourke C. Schaeffer J. Schorr

9/24

Greenacres

1

15

9/23

Heathcote

2

C. Phillips C. Sansone A. Frantz

Quality Readers of Quaker Ridge

9/23

Quaker Ridge

2

S. Hendler M. Tallevi

15

3729E 3729S

3737 3737A 3737B 3737C 3737D

2

14 15

15


3737E

Literature Across Boundaries Women’s Studies: Women in American History

9/23

All

2

D. Golden J. Sullivan E. Draper

15

9/23

All

2

Teacher as Reader: Edgemont Teacher as Reader: Science Topics in Education

9/24

Edgemont

2

H. Brandon J. Stockton N. Pisano

16

11/25

SHS

1

10/22

Edgemont Jr/Sr HS

2

A. Nelson D. Schuchat

16

3739

Sustainability and Social Justice

11/4

All

1

C. Gilliland

16

3740

Classic Books into Film

10/21

All

2

D. Golden J. Sullivan

17

3741

Action Research

TBA

All

3

V. Sonnenborn D. Wrobleski

17

HHREC Distinguished Lecture and Seminar Series An Author’s Walk Through Brooklyn: The River’s Edge

9/22

All

1

N. Ginsberg

18

9/26-27

All

1

L. Onofri

18

3744

Bringing the Freedom Trail to Students

11/14-15

SMS Social Studies

1

L. Tallevi

19

3745

Duets: The Iconography of the American Half-Century A Look into NYC: Greenwich Village

10/02

All

1

S. Mounkhall P. Sheehey

19

10/3-4

All

1

P. Tomizawa

20

3747

Greek Art: Our Heritage

10/7

All

1

H. Pasternack

20

3748

New Developments in Biology

12/4

6-12 Science

1

A. Bloom

21

3749

Grand Central

12/12-13

All

1

M. Motl

21

3750

A Look into NYC: The Bronx

12/12-13

All

1

P. Tomizawa

21

3751

J.R.R. Tolkein: An Exploration of the Lord of the Rings

1/30-31

All

1

J. Toscano

22

3737F

3737G 3737H 3738

16

16

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE 3742 3743

3746

INTERDEPENDENCE 3752

Global Encounters/ Cultural Exchange

9/23

SMS/SHS

3

3753

Spanish I: Conversation and Culture for Beginners Encore du Français? V

10/7

All

1

10/16

All*

3755

Introduction to Beadwork and Decoupage

10/17-18

All

3756

Cuba: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

12/5-6

6-12

3754

R. DiYanni S. Mounkhall J. Weber J. Toscano

22

1

A. Tripodi

24

1

C. Desoe E. Ungar

24

1

D. Schuchat

25

23

3


3757

Dots and Points on the Map: Japan

11/7-8

All

1

L. Kuklis J. Stockton

25

3758

The Study of Cultural Generational Conflict Through Film

1/30-31

All

1

P. DiBianco

26

3759

Connecting Cultures Through Dance Earth Links: Toward Awareness and Understanding of Current Events

TBA

K-6

1

P. Hamlet

26

TBA

All

1

P. DiBianco J. Weber

26

Diversity Through Literature Challenge 20/20

9/16

MS/HS

1

P. DiBianco

27

TBA

All

3

P. Dempsey R. DiYanni J. Weber

27

Using Literature to Build Community at Greenacres Celebrating Children’s Literature

9/10

Greenacres

1

C. Phillips

28

10/2

Quaker Ridge

1

S. Hendler

28

3764B

Greenville Book Club IX

9/17

Greenville

1

B. Horowitz

29

3765

Developing Reading Comprehension in an Online Age

9/18

Scarsdale Elementary Collaborative Teams*

2

J. Crisci S. Luft C. Phillips W. Yang

29

3766

Reading Comprehension Study Group: Grades 2-6

9/16

2-6 Edgemont

1

P. McCallion D. Schroer

29

3767

LCI at STI

9/25

LCI participants

3

D. Celentano R. DiYanni J. Weber

30

3768

The Art of Quilt Making

9/26-27

All

1

31

3769

The Reggio Emilia Approach to Teaching

10/7

All

2

M. Ball D. Rivellini L. Hicks L. Lamonaca

3770

Movies in the Social Studies Curriculum

10/14

All

1

S. Goodman S. Scharf

32

3771

Creating, Managing, and Sustaining the Reader’s Workshop III

10/14

K-3 Edgemont

1

M. Ferrara

32

3772

Non-Fiction Matters

10/30

5-9

1

32

3773

Exploring New Literature for ELA Instruction Grades 3-6

10/16

3-6

1

M. Fox S. Waskow B. Horowitz V. Sonnenborn

3774

Field Trips as a Teaching Tool in Social Studies

10/16

All

1

M. Lahey M. Rothman

33

3775

Lesson Study in Elementary Mathematics

10/17

K-6 Scarsdale

3

K. de la Garza B. Jackson N. Pavia

34

3776

Keeping Current in Young Adult Literature Expression Art

10/23

5-9

1

34

10/24-25

All

1

L. Waltzman S. Waskow L. Hicks

3760

3761 3762

TEACHING STRATEGIES 3763 3764A

3777

4

31

33

34


Art Museums as Resources for Teachers Thinking Like a Genius

10/31-11/1

All

1

B. Colleary

35

10/31-11/1

All

1

I. Smith

35

Let’s Make Books: Classical Bookbinding Singapore Math with Ban Har Yeap

11/7-8

All

1

N. Closter

36

11/7-8

K-6 Scarsdale

1

K. de la Garza N. Pavia

36

Art Through Children’s Picture Books POGIL: A StudentCentered Teaching Technique

11/14-15

K-6

1

36

12/5-6

K-12 Science

1

S. Faranda J. Schorr E. Levine J. Williams

If I Had a Hammer: Empowering Children Through Folk Music — Pete Seeger Food, Family, Fables: Writing Your History Making Meaningful Murals

12/5-6

All

1

L. Forte L. Hicks

37

1/8

All

1

J. Dean

38

1/9-10

All

1

D. Cassano

38

3787

The 2008 Caldecott Possibilities at Seely Place

1/9-10

K-6 Edgemont

1

P. Bronzell

39

3788

Sound, Science, and Music

1/8

K-6

1

L. Forte

39

3789

Tessellations Across the Curriculum

1/23-24

All

1

S. Capuano J. Stockton

40

3790

Tools of the Trade

1/23-24

K-6

1

K. de la Garza A. Kenney

40

3791

Integrating Music in the Academic Classroom

1/23-24

All

1

S. Goodman C. Reali

40

3792

Picture Books in a Weekend

1/30-31

K-5 Scarsdale

1

41

3793

Engaging Students in Building Classroom Community

1/30-31

All

1

Scarsdale Elementary Librarians S. Scharf

3794

Let’s Make Books: Photo Albums Learning Styles in the Classroom

2/6-7

All

1

N. Closter

42

2/6-7

All

1

L. Tallevi M. Tallevi

42

River, Earth, and Sky at the Hudson River Museum Did You Hear That? How to Listen to Music

2/27-28

All

1

C. Gilliland

42

2/27-28

All

1

C. Reali

43

Drawing on Your Imagination

2/27-28

All*

1

D. Cassano

43

Current Practices in PE and Health EQUITY AND ACCESS

10/7

PE, Heath

1,2

G. Blessing

44

3800

The ESL Students in the Mainstream Classroom

10/2

All

1

J. O’Shea S. Silkowitz

44

3801

Language Processing in the Classroom

10/24-25

All

1

B. Lorie A. Tripodi

45

3802

Mean Girls

11/14-15

All

1

J. Turetzky

45

3778 3779 3780 3781 3782 3783

3784

3785 3786

3795 3796 3797 3798 3799

37

41

5


3803

Empathy Through the Ages

1/9-10

All

1

M. Beni E. Bitterman

46

3804

All Kinds of Minds: A Neurodevelopmental Approach to Learning

2/6-7

All

1

J. Turetzky

46

3805

Sign Language: Alternative Form of Communication

10/3-4

All

1

P. Raines

47

3806

Teaching Games to Differentiate Instruction

2/27-28

All

1

B. Pagel

47

3807

10/21

5-9 math and support staff

1

S. Walsh

48

3808

Differentiated Math Instruction: Teaching to the Middle School Student Race Matters

TBA

SHS

1

48

3809

Withdrawn

N. Ginsberg F. Goldberg

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT 3810

The School of Belonging: A Different Standard

10/17-18

All

1

M. Grey

49

3811

Stress Management for Teachers

10/3-4

All

1

I. Smith

49

3812

Saving the Coral Reef! A Hands on Approach to Eco-Activism

11/7-8

SMS

1

M. Ball M. Motl S. Waskow

49

3813

Urban Agriculture and Community Gardening

10/17-18

All

1

C. Forray D. Wilson

50

3814

Rockefeller State Park as a Resource

10/3-4

All

1

C. Browne-Sibrizzi 50 R. Colantuono

3815

The Heat Is On! Climate Change Through the Lens of Sustainability

11/21-22

All

1

C. Browne-Sibrizzi 51 R. Colantuono

3816

Reading Connections: V

10/23

Edgemont

1

P. McCallion D. Schroer

52

3817

Introduction to Challenge Course/Low Ropes

11/14-15

Edgewood

1

B. Pagel J. Weigel

52

3818

Parents and Teachers Working Together

11/21-22

All

1

M. Beni

52

TECHNOLOGY 3819

Back to Technology Basics

10/2

K-6

1

J. Giroux K. Leary

53

3820

Web 2.0: An Online Experience

10/14

All

1

J. Crisci K. Holvig

53

3821

Using SMART Board in Your Classroom

12/12-13

All

1

D. Vermes

53

3822

Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Photostory

10/24-25

All

1

M. Curtin

54

3823

Enlivening Science Through Projection Technologies

10/24-25

SMS Science

1

J. Gilbert C. Gilliland

54

3824

New Technologies Seminar

10/29

Edgemont

1

M. Curtin

55

6


3825

Adobe Illustrator and CAM

10/31-11/1

All

1

S. Rambone

55

3826

Using the Vernier LabQuest in the Science Classroom Making Your Field Trip a Digital Day

10/17-18

SHS Science and Math

1

I. Szkolar J. Williams

55

11/14-15

All

1

L. Fisher K. Holvig

56

3828

Keynote: Developing Dynamic Presentations

10/31-11/1

All

1

S. Scharf S. Walsh

56

3829

Using Technology to Support the Writing Process Photoshop Jumpstart

11/21-22

6-12

1

M. Curtin D. Rose

56

11/21-22

All

1

57

3831

Comics in the Curriculum with Comic Life

12/5-6

All

1

L. Fisher P. Tomizawa L. Fisher S. Goodman

3832

iLife in a Weekend

12/12-13

See desc.

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

58

3833

Five Trends for the Future

1/6

All

1

J. Crisci

58

3834

Working with Data 101

1/8

All

1

D. Rose

58

3835

Video on Demand: EdVideo in the Classroom

1/9-10

All

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

59

3836

Inspiration in a Weekend

1/23-24

All

1

D. Rose

59

3837

Making the Cut: Final Cut Express Made Simple

2/6-7

All*

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

60

3827

3830

57

SPECIAL PROGRAMS – NON CREDIT 3838A 3838B

Conversational English for Adult Learners

10/28 10/30

All

NC

M. Nowak

60

3839

CPR with AED

11/1

All

Stipend

J. Hoffman

60

3840

Ceramics

10/7

All

NC

M. DeAngelis

61

StayFit Method

Ongoing

All

N. Gavrin S. Sekulow

61

Course Coordinators and Speakers Registration and Credit Information Emergency Closing Information Registration Form/Fee Schedule Organization

62 65 65 66 67

7


Principles The purpose of the Scarsdale Teachers Institute is to offer planned and continuous education to the professional staff of the Scarsdale and Edgemont Schools, teachers in other school districts, and community residents. Scarsdale teachers began this program because they believe that the best teachers are alert, openminded people who continue to learn and to translate their insights into appropriate experiences for their students. Offering a variety of professional experiences in response to the needs of those working with children, the Institute contributes to an atmosphere of intellectual inquiry that stimulates the staff to continue learning. This professional interaction on educational issues benefits the students and the staff of the Scarsdale and Edgemont School Districts. Scarsdale and Edgemont teachers also endorse the principle that cooperation among autonomous groups is fundamental to growth and is essential to progress in education. They view the Institute as a laboratory for this principle. Here various groups of teachers, administrators, and community leaders may work together for a valued purpose. Supported and sponsored by the Scarsdale Teachers Association, the Edgemont Teachers Association, and the Scarsdale and Edgemont Boards of Education, the Institute reaffirms the principles of professional autonomy and professional collaboration inherent in the highest quality of professional development. Thus, through STI organization, administration, and planning, teachers assume a large degree of responsibility for their professional growth. The Scarsdale Teachers Institute also serves as one of the established Teacher Resource and Computer Training Centers of New York State, funded, in part, by a competitive grant from the New York State Department of Education and governed by a Policy Board of teachers, administrators, community residents, and parents. As one of the founding members of the Lower Hudson Teacher Center Network, the Scarsdale Teachers Institute collaborates and cooperates with other teacher centers to provide professional growth opportunities for the entire educational community.

Responding to Individual Student Needs Curriculum and pedagogy must respond to individual learning differences among students. This fundamental principle of teaching and learning, stated in the Scarsdale district goals, also informs teacher practice in the classroom and in STI programs. Courses that specifically address differentiated techniques and strategies of instruction can be found in the Equity and Access section of the catalogue. Courses in all areas are designed to address the varied ways children learn.

8


Collaborations with Other Organizations The Scarsdale Teachers Institute enhances its program through selected collaborations with other educational institutions. These relationships provide Scarsdale and Edgemont faculty with resources that enrich opportunities for professional growth. Lower Hudson Teacher Center Network The 21 teacher centers in the Lower Hudson region meet regularly to share resources and develop programs for local educators. Call the STI office for further information. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts The STI, the Edith Winthrop Teacher Center, and the Teacher Center at Purchase College have collaborated with the Performing Arts Center at Purchase College to offer teachers the opportunity to work with guest artists from the Kennedy Center’s Education Program. Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center The STI continues the affiliation with the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center that brings distinguished scholars to the community. Facing History and Ourselves The programs of Facing History have a continuing impact on the Scarsdale schools. Teachers participate in summer institutes as well as yearlong programs. New York Technology Education Network The New York Technology Education Network (NYTEN) provides a forum for technology coordinators to share information and concerns related to the implementation of technology in schools. It is a vehicle for suggestions, support, and strength in the pursuit of excellence in K-12 technology. This network is co-sponsored by the Edith Winthrop Teacher Center of Westchester and the Scarsdale Teachers Institute. New York Institute of Technology Educational Enterprise Zone The Educational Enterprise Zone (EEZ) is a K-12 videoconferencing consortium of providers and receivers that meets regularly at various sites throughout New York City. EEZ offers support to members in designing and implementing videoconferencing units of study. NYSERVS NYSERVS (New York Sharing Educational Resources Through Videoconferencing) is a consortium of seventeen Westchester and Rockland school districts that meets regularly to share videoconferencing resources, equipment, expertise, and instructional practice among school districts, colleges, and other educational support systems. WINDWARD SCHOOL Windward School provides an instructional program for childen with language-based learning disabilities. Windward Teacher Training Institute (WTTI) offers professional development based on scientifically validated research in child development, learning theory, and pedagogy. Courses, workshops, and lectures address a broad range of developmental and curricular topics appropriate for both mainstream and remedial settings. WTTI serves as a resource for educators and professionals in allied disciplines such as speech and language therapists and psychologists, as well as for parents. WTTI workshops that meet after school and on weekends may be considered for STI credit. One credit is offered for every 12 hours of workshops, which may equate to two or more WTTI classes. WTTI’s schedule of fall/winter course offerings is listed on the Windward Teacher Training Institute link on Windward School’s website: www.windwardny.org. Partial tuition reduction for Edgemont and Scarsdale staff is available. Call the STI for additional information.

9


Mini Grant Program The Scarsdale Teachers Institute Mini Grant Program enables teachers and other educators to design, implement, and assess innovative projects aimed at improving learning and teaching. Teachers may collaborate with colleagues, implement a Professional Performance Review Project, design assessment, technology, cooperative learning, or other innovative projects. Teachers have the opportunity to develop new teaching strategies, to engage in particular research related to teaching, or to work with other teachers on topics of specific educational interest. Requests for proposals are sent to the Scarsdale and Edgemont faculties once each year.

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Teachers who are interested in applying for NBPTS certification may receive scholarships to fund the cost of the application and mentoring to support the process. The STI offers a support seminar for teachers engaged in seeking National Board certification. Additional resources from the National Board will be available. For further information about this seminar call the STI office.

Professional Performance Review Program The expanded Professional Performance Review Program offers opportunities for teachers to design programs for professional growth that reflect their particular interests and goals. STI courses are designed to support the Professional Performance Review Program by furthering inquiry based learning, alternative assessment, standards for evaluation, and student centered classrooms. Almost any STI course may be used as part of the Professional Performance Review.

Teacher as Reader “We need to make reading, which is in its essence a solitary endeavor, a social one as well, to encourage that great thrill of finding kinship in shared experiences of books. We must weave reading back into the very fabric of the culture, and make it a mainstay of community.” Andrew Solomon, “The Closing of the American Book,” NYT, July 10, 2004. The importance of reading literature for adults has gained nationwide attention with the publication of recent studies indicating that pleasure reading among Americans in every group is down. The STI Teacher as Reader courses counter this trend. Participants meet throughout the year to read classic and new literature. In addition to genre, participants examine themes, character development, and all other aspects of literary form. Adults who love reading communicate this enthusiasm to the children in their care. Because of the popularity of this course, the STI offers a number of sections determined by enrollment or interest at individual schools.

Technical Skills The Scarsdale Teachers Institute offers a full range of beginning to advanced courses for staff and community members. Courses are designed collaboratively by teachers and administrators to meet the district goal of integrating technology into the school curriculum.

10


REFLECTIVE PRACTICE The Mentor Support Seminar: Edgemont......................... #3729E Over the past seven years the Mentor Program has become an integral part of the Edgemont District program. This year the Mentors and new teachers will continue to refine and develop the program.This seminar provides a systematic program of support for teachers new to Edgemont and recognizes and rewards the experience and skill that Mentor teachers bring to new teachers. The program is a rich opportunity for the professional development of expert teachers who are now trained to work with colleagues. This seminar assists the Mentor teacher in defining his/her role and its relationship to the new teacher. Mentor teachers will meet together to identify needs, discuss problems, and seek solutions. Course topics include roles and responsibilities of mentoring, teacher collaboration, and effective communication. Mentor teachers participate in creating this unique program designed specifically to meet the needs of the Edgemont staff.

has become an integral part of the Scarsdale District program. This year the Mentors and new teachers will continue to refine and develop the program. This seminar provides systematic support for teachers new to Scarsdale and recognizes and rewards the experience and skill that Mentor teachers bring to new teachers. The program is a rich opportunity for the professional development of expert teachers who are now trained to work with colleagues. This seminar assists the Mentor teacher in defining his/her role and its relationship to the new teacher. Mentor teachers will meet together to identify needs, discuss problems, and seek solutions. Course topics include roles and responsibilities of mentoring, teacher collaboration, and effective communication. Mentor teachers participate in creating this unique program designed specifically to meet the needs of the Scarsdale staff. Course Coordinator: Marian Absgarten Course Speaker: Diane Wrobleski Open to: Instructional staff designated as Mentor teachers

Course Coordinator: Rose Farrell

Time: W, 9/24, 10/15, 11/12, 12/10, 1/28, 3/25, 4/29, 3:30-5:30

Open to: Instructional staff designated as Mentor teachers

Location: SHS, rm 170

Time: 8 sessions beginning Th, 8/28 Location: EHS Credit: 2 points salary credit for those teachers eligible for salary credit, $750 stipend for first-year Mentors not eligible for salary credit, $1,000 stipend for secondyear Mentors

The Mentor Support Seminar: Scarsdale......................... #3729S Over the past 24 years the Mentor Program EHS - Edgemont Junior/Senior High School EWS - Edgewood School FMS - Fox Meadow School GRA - Greenacres School GRV - Greenville School

Credit: 3 points salary credit for those teachers eligible for salary credit, $1,000 stipend for first-year Mentors not eligible for salary credit, $1,250 for second-year Mentors plus 2 salary credits or $600 stipend

Mentoring Workshop for Senior Options Steering Committee ...........................................#3730 Every year Scarsdale High School’s Senior Options Steering Committee supervises, organizes, reviews, and revises the Senior HCS - Heathcote School QRS - Quaker Ridge School SHS - Scarsdale High School SMS - Scarsdale Middle School SPS - Seely Place School

11


Options Program. Teaching staff on the Senior Options Steering Committee must reevaluate program policies, forms, and logistics. The case load of mentors and students changes annually; therefore, the Steering Committee must develop new strategies, train new mentors, and supervise new students. From September to February, participants meet monthly to review the previous year’s program evaluations, to assess the outcomes, to make revisions, and to recommend policy changes, where called for, as directed by committee reflection. From March through June, participants will meet at least twice monthly to introduce the revised program to mentors and students. Steering Committee members also work independently with individual mentors and students on project choices and proposal writing. Spring meetings involve individual caseloads and subcommittee work. Committee members must also read and approve caseload proposals by the end of the third quarter. During the Senior Options experience, meetings focus on problems specific mentors and students may have in preparation for presentations, on critiquing the ongoing work of the program, and on presenting ideas for reevaluation.

level. This year, elementary teachers will once again be immersed in the pedagogy of a new curriculum: Singapore math. Both of these training experiences guide teachers in developing the skills and concepts unique to each course of study. To supplement these experiences, teachers need to observe, confer with, and listen to the children who are learning curriculum. This course will help teachers examine student work outcomes from curricular programs.

Course Coordinator: Ann Liptak

Open to: Edgewood Time: Th 9/18, noon-1, with remaining dates to be set by group

Open to: SHS Senior Options Steering Committee

Guided by professional literature and discussion with colleagues, participants in this course will explore the process of conducting class-based research. Each teacher will select several students to observe and will follow their progress throughout the year by collecting samples of their work, taking notes during conferences, and listening to their comments. Observing, listening, and questioning students about their learning experiences keep teachers alert to student needs and indicate ways to improve instruction within the structure of the new approaches to teaching. Participants in the course will examine protocols for looking at and learning from student work. Course Coordinator: Cora Five

Time: M, 9/22, 10/27, 11/24, 12/15, 1/26, 2/23, 3/23, 4/27, 5/18, 3:30-6, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: SHS, rm 1N7

Location: EWS

Credit: Three credits: one credit or stipend awarded at the end of the first term; two points salary credit or stipend awarded at the end of the second term

The intent of this program is to promote positive change in classroom practice by helping teams of practitioners reflect together on the core issues of teaching and learning as well as school culture. The goal is to build a community of learners among colleagues. In this yearlong course participants will:

The Child and the Curriclum ...........................................#3731 In the past year, teachers at Edgewood School have engaged in professional development focused on LitLife, learning strategies to enhance the teaching of reading and writing and reviewing the state standards and expectations for each grade

12

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Reflective Practice Seminar.. #3732

• Look collaboratively at concrete examples of teacher and student work. • Examine and apply various protocols for looking at student and teacher work.


• Observe in classrooms. • Participate in activities designed to understand the culture of a school. Two trained coaches lead the Reflective Practice Group, composed of 8-12 professional staff members. The group meets once a month; members will develop a set of reflections on their work with students and colleagues. Members also will complete a set of peer observations as the year progresses. Course Coordinators: Patty Dempsey, Howard Rodstein Open to: All Time: Th, 10/16, 11/20, 12/11, 1/22, 2/26, 3/26, 4/23, 3:30-6, and 5/21, 3:30-8 with two hours of observation time Location: varies Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Reflections on the Teaching of Reading: Grades K-2.. #3733 A/B The Reader’s Workshop was established by the National Council of Teachers of English to encourage reading and to support teachers in the teaching of reading. Important questions to consider as children learn to read are: How can teachers best assess the quality of their students’ reading? How can they manage guided reading groups in the classroom? Student-teacher conferences provide a structure for teachers to reflect, assess, and share information with students on their progress in reading. A framework of essential questions for teachers to use in student conferences can lead to a better understanding on the part of the reader. This course will operate as a collegial study group in which participants will reflect upon the teaching and assessing of reading, review current theory and research in the field of reading, and learn strategies to provide students with useful information to comprehend text effectively. Assessment of individual student reading progress is an important part of reading instruction. Participants will view actual DRA (Developmental Reading Assessments)

appraisals in action with children, plan for the school year, and examine new ideas on reading skills and strategies. Course Coordinators: Sharon DeLorenzo, Jim Sullivan, Kim Theall Open to: K-2 Heathcote, Edgewood Time: noon-1 Location: HCS & EWS Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Let’s Talk Math................. #3734 The New York State Department of Education is in the process of rolling out a new sequence of Regents courses and exams in mathematics, and the Scarsdale schools begin a new elementary math program this year. These changes have implications for math instruction across the curriculum, and secondary teachers need the time and opportunity to discuss the impact of math curriculum modifications as well as current trends in math education with colleagues. The importance of longitudinal conversation is vital to preserving the high standards of excellence and achievement in the District. Participants will focus attention on the transition from 8th to 9th grade, the evolving ninth grade program and implications for future math courses, the impact of the elementary’s Singapore math program on secondary math instruction, the use of appropriate materials and technology, and the transition from AP to AT. This course will meet for four two-hour sessions. The other four hours of the course will be spent observing math classes in other schools. Course Coordinator: Carol Desoe Open to: SMS-SHS Math Time: Tu, 10/7, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: SHS, rm 222 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

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Exploring Balanced Literacy at Quaker Ridge III................. #3735 The Scarsdale School District has identified Balanced Literacy as an approach to reading and writing instruction that supports the value of classroom best practices developed by teachers. Scarsdale teachers and administrators have completed a guide to Balanced Literacy, a curriculum philosophy and framework that promotes the instruction of students in individual and small group ability levels and allows for differentiation within the classroom in an authentic and purposeful manner. Research supports this methodology as effective in the assessment, instruction, and advancement of skills and comprehension for students within the elementary years of reading acquisition. This yearlong course will support teachers as they deepen their knowledge of Balanced Literacy, implement methods, and reflect upon the components outlined in the guide. Participants will continue the introductory work relating to Balanced Literacy that transpired during the past school year. They will examine methods of assessment through the Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA), and additional informal tools, and will develop strategies to use data in the planning of instruction. Techniques gained from Reader’s Workshop will be reviewed: read alouds, shared reading, guided reading, conferencing, and independent reading. The course features modeling and practice of successful classroom activities followed by reflection and sharing with colleagues. Course Coordinators: Penny Hamlet, Robyn Lane Open to: Quaker Ridge Time: TBA Location: QRS Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Book by Book: Balanced Literacy at Heathcote...................... #3736 The Scarsdale School District has identified Balanced Literacy as an approach to reading and writing instruction that supports the

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value of classroom best practices developed by teachers. Teachers and administrators have completed a guide to Balanced Literacy, a curriculum philosophy and framework that promotes the instruction of students in individual and small groups and allows for differentiation within the classroom in an authentic and purposeful manner. Research supports this methodology as effective in the assessment, instruction, and advancement of reading skills and comprehension for elementary students. This yearlong course will support teachers as they deepen their knowledge of Balanced Literacy, implement methods, and reflect upon the components outlined in the guide. Participants will continue the work relating to Balanced Literacy that transpired during the year. They will examine methods of assessment through the Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA), and additional informal tools, and will develop strategies to use data in the planning of instruction. Participants will engage in book study and conversations related to best practices in a balanced literacy classroom. Course Coordinators: Trent DeBerry, Lindsey Hicks Open to: Heathcote Time: Th 10/2, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: HCS library Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Teachers Reading Together: Edgewood.......................... #3737 The journey of a lifelong reader is a search to gain insight and understanding by reading, talking, and reflecting. By transforming reading into a community event through discussion groups, teachers learn differing perspectives on the same work and gain knowledge of literature, genre, and technique. The commitment to read widely and deeply is an important endeavor for teachers as they model the love of reading and the skills of reading and understanding for their students.  Participants will read assigned books and come prepared to discuss aspects of literary


form such as character development, theme, plot, and more. They will gain insight into point of view by listening to their colleagues’ responses to each book. Participants will enhance their own reading skills and learn techniques for leading discussion groups with students. The first book participants read is Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. Course Coordinators: Nancy O’Rourke, Carol Schaeffer

Teacher as Reader: Heathcote .........................................#3737C For the first session, participants should bring a book read over the summer to share with the group. Course Coordinator: Amber Frantz Open to: Heathcote

Open to: Edgewood

Time: Tu, 9/23, 10/28, 11/25, 12/16, 1/27, 2/24, 3/31, 4/28, 5/26, 6/16, 3:30-6

Time: Tu, 9/23, 10/28, 11/25, 12/16, 1/27, 2/24, 3/31, 4/28, 5/26, 6/16, 3:30-6

Location: HCS library

Location: EWS LRC Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Keeping Current in Literature for Fox Meadow Teachers..... #3737A The first book to be read by the group is The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. Course Coordinator: Jan Schorr Open to: Fox Meadow Time: Tu 9/23, 10/28, 11/25, 12/16, 1/27, 2/24, 3/31, 4/28, 5/26, 6/16, noon-1, with two dates to be set by group.

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Quality Readers of Quaker Ridge .........................................#3737D Possible texts will be: Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See, and Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India, and Indonesia by Elizabeth Gilbert. Course Coordinators: Susan Hendler, Marie Tallevi Open to: Quaker Ridge

Location: FMS library

Time: Tu, 9/23, lunchtime, with remaining dates to be set by group

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: QRS faculty lounge

Course limited to 15 participants.

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Keeping Current in Literature for Greenacres Teachers......... #3737B

An Examination of Literature Across Boundaries............ #3737E

The first two books to be discussed are Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali and I, Mona Lisa by Jeanne Kalogridis.

The first book participants will read is Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

Course Coordinators: Carole Phillips, Cindy Sansone Open to: Greenacres Dates: W, 9/24, 10/22, 11/19, 12/17, 1/14 & 28, 2/25, 3/11 & 25, 4/22, 5/20, 6/17, noon-1 Location: GRA library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend.

Course Coordinators: Dorothy Golden, James Sullivan Open to: All Time: Tu 9/23, 10/28, 11/25, 12/16, 1/27, 2/24, 3/31, 4/28, 5/26, 6/16, 3:30-6 Location: SMS, rm P190 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

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Women’s Studies: American Women in History............. #3737F Course Coordinator: Elisa Draper

their professional lives when they meet in collaborative settings to read and discuss research and literature related to classroom practice.

A short story will be read and discussed at the fist session.

This class provides a forum for teachers to read, reflect, and discuss with colleagues current education issues and their impact on teaching. A selection by the course leaders will be distributed before the first meeting; participants should read the article and be prepared with questions and reflections for discussion. At that session, participants will be able to suggest reading selections of interest to the group for future meetings. Participants will also keep a journal based on selections read by the group and write about each topic in their journal or blog which will serve as a basis of discussion.

Course Coordinators: Heather Brandon, Jeannette Stockton

Course Coordinators: Art Nelson, Dan Schuchat

Open to: Edgemont Time: W 9/24, 10/15, 11/19, 1/14, 2/25, 3/25, 4/22, 5/27, 3:30-6:30 Location: EHS faculty lounge

Open to: Edgemont Jr/Sr HS Time: W, 10/22, 11/5, 12/17, 1/21, 2/25, 3/18, 4/15, 5/13, 6/10, 3:30-6, with one remaining date to be set by group

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Location: EHS library

Course limited to 25 participants.

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Teacher as Reader: Science .........................................#3737H

Sustainability and Social Justice .......................................... #3739

Course Coordinator: Nicole Pisano

The study of sustainability probes environmental policies and practices that can satisfy the needs and aspirations of a community in the present without diminishing the resources of future generations. Sustainability education must include an examination of the environment as well as the culture where that environment occurs and the economy that fuels the culture. Issues of social justice are inextricably linked to the study of sustainability and to empowerment concerns of nations and their governments. In an interdependent world the role of education is critical to providing students a social justice perspective on environmental issues.

Open to: All Time: Tu 9/23, 10/28, 11/25, 1/27, 2/24, 3/31, 4/28, 5/26, 3:30-6:30 Location: QRS, rm 207 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Teacher As Reader: Edgemont .........................................#3737G

Open to: SHS Time: Tu 11/25, 3:30-6:30, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: SHS science conference rm Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Topics in Education.............#3738 Teachers need opportunities to stay current with contemporary educational literature in a collaborative environment. Research and report topics in professional journals and books have the potential to impact classroom instruction and student-teacher relationships: child and adolescent brain functioning; social and emotional health; nutrition; and parenting. Teachers enhance

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Participants will read four books, each on the subject of the many faceted topic of sustainability: Ishmael: An Adventure of the Mind and Spirit, a novel by Daniel Quinn;


The Sustainable Revolution - Portrait of a Paradigm Shift, a nonfiction work by Andrew R. Edwards; the third and fourth books will be decided by the group at the first session. Participants will meet four times during the school year to discuss the books and their application to the classroom and curriculum. Course content focus will be an exploration of sustainability through the lenses of culture, economics, social justice, and the environment. Participants will be encouraged to research suggested solutions to identified environmental problems. Course Coordinator: Cristine Gilliland Open to: All Time: Tu 11/4, 1/13, 3/24, 5/19, 3:30-6:30 Location: SMS, rm F75 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Classic Books into Film....... #3740 What elements are common to classic books and motion pictures? The transformation of great literature into film creates images of characters, settings, and dialogue. By including the film version of a work of literature under study in curriculum, teachers encourage critical thinking and analysis as well as attention to creative modes of interpreting an author’s intent and meaning. A comparison of both genres offers a window on the creative process of writers and, similarly, the creative team behind the lens. Teachers, and their students, will learn to study both novels and film with critical skill as they compare and contrast written and visual formats. Participants will analyze the great works of literature through both original texts and cinema as they explore the elements that make a classic book or film. Biographic monograms and critical essays about authors, books, and movies will add depth of interpretation to both genres. Instruction and discussion will model the use of literature and film interpretations into curriculum. The first and second books and films of the course will be The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck and The Razor’s Edge by Somerset Maugham.

Course Coordinators: Dorothy Golden, Jim Sullivan Open to: All Time: Tu 10/21, 11/18, 1/20, 2/10, 3/17, 4/21, 5/19, 6/9, 3:30-6:30 Location: SMS, P190 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Action Research in the Classroom ...........................................#3741 Action Research is a collaborative activity conducted by teachers, with the guidance of an advisor, in the design and implementation of inquiry into practice conducted over the school year. Teachers elect topics from practical situations encountered in their professional lives, rather than theoretical constructs of academic interest. Action Research is developed, conducted, and implemented by teachers with the goal of enhancing professional knowledge, engaging in problem solving, or improving practice. In an Action Research project, school based teachers or teams select a topic for inquiry, develop questions, and follow a research protocol that culminates in evaluation and recommendations for change. Dr. Joann Jacullo-Noto, well-known expert in the field of Action Research, will guide teachers in an inquiry process focused on real and relevant classroom concerns. Participants may select topics of interest related to teaching and schooling such as planning and implementing interdisciplinary units of study, developing differentiated units of instruction, managing the classroom, enhancing literacy instruction, encouraging mathematical thinking, engaging the reluctant reader, and many more. Participants will follow an Action Research protocol from formulating research questions, to gathering evidence and analyzing data, to reporting conclusions and implications for change in the classroom, the school, or the district.

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Course Coordinators: Vivian Sonnenborn, Diane Wrobleski Course Speaker: Dr. Joann Jacullo-Noto, Action Research consultant, former Director, Office of Teacher Education, Metropolitan Study Council, Teachers College, Columbia University Open to: All Time: TBA Location: TBA Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center Distinguished Lecture and Seminar Series ........................................... #3742 The continuing affiliation between the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center and the Scarsdale Teachers Institute offers the faculty and the community an exceptional opportunity to examine the contemporary relevance of the Holocaust as it illuminates such issues as bigotry, racism, and human rights violations. The lecture and seminar series presents leading scholars and experienced educators who deal with a variety of Holocaust-related topics that are directly applicable to the Social Studies and English curricula and that are mandated by New York State. Participants in these programs are also invited to make use of the many other services for teachers offered by the Westchester Holocaust Education Center. The 2008-2009 program consists of two components: 1. A Distinguished Lecture Series 2. Focus Seminars M, 9/22, 7:30 Lecture: Blowing the Whistle on Genocide Presenter: Dr. Rafael Medoff, Director, David Wyman Institute Th, 11/20, 4-6:30 Seminar: Collective Memory and the Holocaust Presenter: Professor Suzanne Vromen, Bard

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College, author, Hidden Children of the Holocaust: Belgian Nuns and Their Daring Rescue of Young Jews from the Nazis Th, 2/5, 4-6:30 Seminar: On Learning Intolerance: Education for Understanding Presenter: Mark Weitzman, Director, Task Force Against Hate and Terrorism, Associate DIrector of Education, Simon Weisenthal Center, NYC Th, 2/26, 7:30 Lecture: The Right to Protect the Way Forward Presenter: Sheri Rosenberg, Director, Holocaust and Human Rights Clinic, Cardoza Law School Th, 3/26, 7:30 Lecture: Genocide in the 20th Century: Can It Be Stopped? Find Out How Presenter: Mark Hanis, Founder and Executive Director of Genocide Intervention Network Th, 4/23, 7:30 Lecture: Voices of the Holocaust: When They Came to Take My Father Presenter: Mark Seilger, Photographer with several projects and exhibitions on the Holocaust Course Coordinator: Neil Ginsberg Open to: All Time: Lectures, 7:30; seminars, 4-6:30 Location: Reid Castle, Manhattanville College Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Fee: None

An Author’s Walk Through Brooklyn: The River’s Edge.. #3743 From its 17th century settlement by Dutch farmers to its 21st century renaissance, Brooklyn provides a fascinating and diverse narrative with numerous curricular applications. Much of its history is tied to the East River: early ferry service that began commuter travel to Manhattan; the history-making construction of the Brooklyn


Bridge; its reign as one of America’s busiest commercial ports for a time. Visiting neighborhoods and sites near the East River illuminates the history, artistic and architectural heritage, industry, ethnic diversity, and natural features not only of Brooklyn but also of New York City and, in some cases, the United States. Adrienne Onofri, travel and entertainment writer and author of Walking Brooklyn (Wilderness Press, 2007), will lead the course. A classroom session on Friday provides background information on Brooklyn with a focus on areas along the river, examining their significance to the history of Brooklyn and the daily lives of its people. Many of these historic sites have been rediscovered and redeveloped in recent years. The second part of the course features a narrated walking tour that proceeds “in one bridge and out the other.” Of special interest are the Manhattan Bridge and the neighborhoods of Dumbo, Vinegar Hill, the old Navy Yard, Downtown, the Ferry District, and Brooklyn Heights. The tour concludes with a walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. Course Coordinator: Lisa Onofri Course Speaker: Adrienne Onofri, Author of Walking Brooklyn, Educator and Tour Guide Open to: All Time: F 9/26, 3:30-7:30; Sa 9/27, 8:30-4:30 Location: HCS library and Brooklyn Fee: $2-4 for bus fare, plus lunch Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Bringing the Freedom Trail to Students............................. #3744 When a teacher walks in the footsteps of history, a connection with the past is made that can enrich the subject matter for students. The walk alone is powerful, but the experience can be greatly enhanced when shared with colleagues. Bringing the Freedom Trail to Students provides a departmental collaboration by the Middle School social studies teachers and their related team members around the ideas and ideals of the American Revolution and how best to teach them to students. The course

will deepen teacher understanding of key events and personalities of the time period through researching in advance, walking the Historic Freedom Trail in Boston, and incorporating technology in a way that will allow teachers to illustrate the experience to students. In preparation for the Boston excursion, participants will gather for a session to research specific components of several Freedom Trail highlights assigned to them from related topics that include the Boston Massacre, Dr. Warren’s Tavern, and fourteen other historic sites. Participants will present a podcast of their research to fellow participants at their assigned location along the Freedom Trail. During the actual 2.5 miles of the trail, teachers will create a photo journal documenting their experiences in a manner to be shared with students. The second session of the class will take place after the trip for the purpose of editing podcasts and journals and for preparing classroom presentations. Course Coordinator: Len Tallevi Open to: SMS Social Studies Time: F 11/14, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/15, 8:304:30 Location: SMS library and Boston Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Duets: The Iconography of the American Half-Century....... #3745 Interdisciplinary teaching reaches students with a range of learning styles and interests. Visual and aural documents engage student senses and open up new possibilities for analysis because the questions being asked go beyond the usual ones bound by a particular discipline’s concern. This course will pair figures who are significant in the fields of art, music, television, and film; these paired icons share some overlapping sensibility but nonetheless differ enough to reveal some salient aspect of the historical moment in which each flourished. By studying the most recent 50 years of American history through these pairs, teachers will experience interdisciplinary learning and develop their own materials.

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This course will examine a series of concepts through the following pairs: the changing nature of the public performance of masculinity as traced through Frank Sinatra’s swinging innuendo and Bob Dylan’s raspy aggression; the creation of a feminine mystique in a society where the values and morals are in flux as voiced by Loretta Lynn and Joni Mitchell; the ambiguities of flat surfaces in Norman Rockwell’s apparently comforting Americana and Andy Warhol’s hipster quoting of the familiar; the representation of race as screened by Sidney Poitier and then Denzel Washington; and the mockery of the American living room as portrayed by Norman Lear’s All in the Family and Matt Groening’s The Simpsons. The sessions will explore one pair per week for five weeks and will include short lectures, short readings, and much discussion, leaving the sixth class for course members to present their own pairs to the class. Course Coordinators: Steven Mounkhall, Paul Sheehey Open to: All Time: Th 10/2, 10/16-30, 11/6-13, 3:30-5:30 Location: SHS, rm 203 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

A Look into New York City: Greenwich Village............... #3746 Greenwich Village is a neighborhood steeped in history, science, art, literature, and music. The authors who walked its streets provide rich possibilities to design and develop interdisciplinary units of study. Participants will examine a variety of resources including primary source documents that will make Greenwich Village come to life. The content meets New York State Standards in various disciplines. Through lecture, discussion, multimedia resources, literary critique, and a guided tour of the neighborhood, participants will learn the historical significance of Greenwich Village as well as its impact on society, the sciences, and the arts. Literary lions such as Mark Twain, Eugene O’Neil, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Edgar Allen Poe, O’Henry, Clement Clark Moore, and Edith Wharton

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will be featured. In addition, participants will examine the site of the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, the tragedy that changed the labor movement in the United States, explore the “Ashcan” school of art, and learn the Greenwich Village origins of many clichés such as “up the river” and “86 it!” Teachers of different grade levels and subjects will gain information, materials, and teaching methods to help develop meaningful lessons on local history and culture. Course Coordinator: Paul Tomizawa Course Speakers: Art and Susan Zuckerman, hosts of a WVOX show and contributors to the Travel Channel Open to: All Time: F, 10/3, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/4, 8:30-4:30 Location: EWS library and New York City Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

Greek Art: Our Heritage...... #3747 Many of the principles of government, literature, sports, and philosophy from ancient Greece are reflected in its art. The progression and development of these areas of knowledge are perhaps most accessible to students and certainly best illustrated through examples in vase painting, sculpture, and architecture. A better understanding of this “cradle of democracy” also leads to a greater awareness of its legacies, of particular relevance in a year of elections and Olympics. The series will focus primarily on the development of aesthetic sensibilities as applied to vase painting, sculpture, and architecture. These forms also illustrate the life styles and changing needs of the Greek civilization for which they were made, so that references to those societal concepts are part of understanding the art. In addition, ways in which the classical idiom and social beliefs have continued to inspire later civilizations, especially the West, will be explored. Course Coordinator: Helen Pasternack


Course Speaker: Lynn Mayocole, Professor, Westchester Community College Open to: All Time: Tu 10/7-21, 11/4, 11/18, 12/2, 3:305:30 Location: SHS, rm 1N4 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

New Developments in Biology .......................................... #3748 The field of biology has undergone radical change in the last 25 years, as new discoveries continue to revolutionize the discipline. To provide students the most up to date scientific knowledge, science teachers need to stay current with changes in such areas as: medical and developmental genetics, embryology, cell signaling, and molecular biology. While reading journals and attending conferences partially fulfill the need to stay informed, teachers will deepen their knowledge and enrich their practice through sessions with college and university professions engaged in scientific research. University professors with expertise in various fields of biology will lecture on their recent scientific research and findings. Some of the speakers and their topics are: Dr. James Fabrizio, developmental and molecular biology, and Dr. Robert Marion, medical genetics. Each presentation will be followed by discussion and opportunities for participants to confer with colleagues in the course. Course Coordinator: Arthur Bloom Course Speakers: Dr. James Fabrizio, Assistant Professor, Mount St. Vincent College; Dr. Robert Marion, Einstein College of Medicine; Dr. Carol Shoshkes-Reiss, NYU and NYC Medical School; Dr. Tyler Volk, NYU and author Global Carbon Cycle. Open to: 6-12 science Time: Th 12/4-11, 1/8-15, 1/29, 2/5, 3:305:30 Location: SHS, rm 288 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Grand Central: A Case Study in Change............................... #3749 New York State History Standards mandate the teaching of multiple perspectives on historical events. The course examines the impact of a political decision-making process that transformed the Grand Central neighborhood with consequences for the city and the nation. Teachers will research primary source documents as they track the monumental shifts that occurred over the last century in transportation, technology, sociology, science, art, architecture, and economics in the Grand Central area and beyond. Through multimedia resources including documentary film, photographs, books, primary source documents, Internet resources, a guided walking tour, and discussion, participants will examine the Grand Central story as a study in change over the last century. Instruction will model the case-study approach to facilitate integration of an event into enriching and meaningful lessons for students in technology, science, math, art, architecture, sociology, and economics. Highlighted in the walking tour will be Grand Central Terminal, the Chrysler, Lincoln, and Daily News buildings, and the East 42nd Street area. Course Coordinator: Mary Jane Motl Course Speaker: Carol Duncan, Social Studies Consultant Open to: All Time: F 12/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/13, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm C58; Grand Central Materials fee: $5 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 18 participants.

A Look into New York City: The Bronx........................... #3750 A mention of the Bronx often elicits stereotypical images of urban grime and crime. But the Bronx has much to offer to

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students of history and urban development as a prime example of a New York locale that is remaking its identity through changing immigration patterns. Course participants will study how New York City has evolved through an examination of the Bronx, a symbol of urban renewal and home to some of the city’s best known cultural treasures. Renowned New York City tour guides Art and Susan Zuckerman will lead the class beginning with an overview of the history of the Bronx, once the private estate of Jonas Bronck, the influence of early Jewish and Italian immigrants, and the contributions of the Caribbean groups who came later. Saturday’s on-site tours will explore the Hall of Fame of Great Americans at Bronx Community College, the Bartow Pell Mansion, Woodlawn Cemetery, and the Bronx’s own Little Italy — Arthur Avenue. A wide range of topics suitable for inclusion in many courses of study will be covered. Course Coordinator: Paul Tomizawa Course Speakers: Art and Susan Zuckerman, hosts of a WVOX show and contributors to the Travel Channel Open to: All Time: F 12/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/13, 8:304:30 Location: EWS library and New York City Fee: Museum entrance and lunch on Saturday Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

J.R.R. Tolkein: An Exploration of the Lord of the Rings.......... #3751 Many children and adults love stories about wizards, dwarves, elves, brave knights, giants, dragons, noble quests, epic battles, goblins, valiant deeds, monsters, beautiful princesses, and magical talismans. The distant worlds and exciting adventures developed in fantasy literature offer all of these things and much more. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R.Tolkein is arguably the most influential work of fantasy literature

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of the 20th century; Tolkein’s stories have inspired many later fantasy writers, including the prolific Terry Brooks and the recent Harry Potter stories by J.K. Rowling. An understanding of fantasy literature will enable teachers to draw on these stories across a variety of fields to enhance their lessons and connect with students in a way that sparks their imaginations and encourages creativity. Participants in this course will probe the Lord of the Rings by Tolkein, focusing on the uniqueness of the story and its heroes in their quest to destroy rather than secure a symbol of absolute power. Common themes, plots, and characters of fantasy literature will be compared and contrasted. Segments from the Lord of the Rings movies will provide a springboard for discussing the literature and its film adaptations. Finally, participants will work on a lesson, a multimedia project, a creative piece, or a paper inspired by the tale. Classroom applications will be highlighted throughout. Course Coordinator: Jose Toscano Open to: All Time: F 1/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/31, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm T104 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

INTERDEPENDENCE Global Encounters/Cultural Exchange............................ #3752 The Scarsdale Teachers Institute in collaboration with the Interdependence Institute offers this yearlong course. The Scarsdale Public Schools Strategic Plan states: Scarsdale graduates will live in a society and a world where economics, politics, social issues, science, and ecological concerns increasingly transcend traditional borders. In this interdependent environment, education will be the most important tool and will determine the ability to understand, compete, and contribute. Michael McGill, Superintendent The Global Encounters Cultural Exchange,


sponsored by Carnegie Hall, supports musical and educational partnerships between educators in the New York metropolitan area and educators abroad in Istanbul and New Delhi. The goal of the professional development workshops is to support integration of music from another culture into the classroom environment and to facilitate intercultural dialogue between teachers and students. This dialogue is predicated on an understanding of the intricacies of trust building, curriculum development, and creative collaboration. The Global Encounters program provides teachers with the tools necessary to engage their educational partners in meaningful cultural and musical work. In this course, participants will explore the rationale and common practices of cultural exchange work, decide on personal goals related to their partnerships, and plan a yearlong schedule of activities with their partners related to the overall program goals. Workshop topics will include: How to prepare students to engage in culturally sensitive discussions; How to successfully integrate music in the classroom; How to foster meaningful online exchange between students; How to incorporate this program into pre-existing semester syllabi. Participants will be given opportunities to reflect on and share their own practices as educators and to look for growth areas in their development. Through video-conferencing, on-line communication, concert experiences, and workshops, both at Carnegie Hall and in the Scarsdale Schools, teachers will connect their classrooms to the world with this yearlong cultural exchange program. Course Coordinators: Robert DiYanni, Stephen Mounkhall, Joan Weber Open to: SMS, SHS Time: See schedule below Location: Carnegie Hall and SHS, rm 170 Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend Turkey Section Music Concerts:, Tu, 12/16, 4/7, 10:15 am Staff Development: Tu, 9/23, 4; Sa 9/27, 11; Th 12/18, 4; Th 2/26, 4, plus one additional date

Global Encounters Teleconference: (select one) W, 4/18, 10:15 or 12:15 Staff Development: (select one) Sa 1/31, 10 or Th 2/5, 4 India Section Music Concerts: Th, 2/12; W 5/13, 9 am Staff Development: W 11/5, 4; Sa 11/8, 9:30, Tu 3/3, 4; Tu 4/28, 4, plus one additional date Global Encounters Teleconference: (select one) Th 5/14, 10:15 or 12:15 Staff Development: (select one) Th 3/5, 4 or Sa 3/7, 10

Spanish I — Conversation and Culture for Beginners.......... #3753 American history, politics, and economics are meshed with those of Spanish speakers. Nationally, there are over 42 million Spanish speakers in the United States, and, locally, elementary students in Edgemont and Scarsdale are studying Spanish from age 6. The districts’ endeavors highlight the importance of languages as an avenue to broaden horizons and deepen cultural awareness. Educators in a country where Spanish is so widely spoken have a responsibility to understand this language and culture. Knowledge of Spanish can help teachers connect with their students, support the district language initiative, and prepare children for an interdependent world. Participants will learn to converse in Spanish and will explore the varied cultures of Spanish speaking people. Course topics include the festivals, music, food, literature, and art of Spain and Latin America, and exotic cultural traditions especially the running of the bulls and flamenco and mariachi music and dance. Spanish language learners will practice basic conversations while they work in groups producing a Spanish iMovie and practicing their oral skills. Instructional activities include practical vocabulary and grammar and a consideration of techniques to integrate Spanish into curriculum across the grades.

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Course Coordinator: Jose Toscano Open to: All Time: Tu 10/7-21, 11/4, 11/18, 12/2, 3:305:30 Location: SMS, rm T104 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Encore du Français? V........ #3754 Scarsdale and Edgemont teachers come into contact with students from all over the world, and both districts place importance on multicultural understandings. Language is an essential element of culture, and the benefits of comprehending the language of another’s culture are immeasurable. The learning of a language in addition to one’s own engenders mutual respect in our diverse society. When teachers are able to demonstrate to their students an attempt to speak in another language, they model a behavior that can translate to improved relationships among people of various cultures. Equally important is the opportunity for teachers to gain insight into the experience of limited proficiency in a language spoken all around them. This course expands the basic knowledge and experience of previous courses, as participants review and deepen their awareness of French language and culture. The aim of the course is to develop a broader ability to communicate in and to understand spoken French. While the primary focus of the course will be aural/ oral, reading and written work will be included through expanded grammar study and specific vocabulary units. Culture will continue to be discussed and presented through literature, music, and cuisine. Participants will be encouraged to consider the experience of limited language proficiency, especially as it applies to students in their classes, as well as the benefits of communicating in a foreign language. Course Coordinator: Andrea Tripodi Course Speaker: Sarah Whittington Open to: Participants of Encore du Français

IV or those who have prior knowledge of French. Time: Th 10/16-11/20, 3:30-5:30 Location: SMS, rm T109 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Introduction to Beadwork and Decoupage......................... #3755 The infusion of artistic elements and design choices into curriculum challenges students to think creatively, to look at the ordinary in extraordinary ways. Daniel Pink, author of A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age, explains: “The scales are tipping away from what it used to take for people to get ahead — logical, linear, left-brain, and spreadsheettype abilities — in favor of abilities like artistry, empathy and big-picture thinking, which are becoming more valuable. Left brain skills are still absolutely necessary in our complex world. They’re just not sufficient anymore.” This course promotes the integration of right-brain artistic activities into a predominantly leftbrain environment through the application of the ancient arts of decoupage and beadwork to classroom learning. Throughout history, cultures across the globe have used a variety of materials to transform everyday objects into artistic pieces admired for beauty as well as function. Beadwork has been used universally to enhance and decorate costumes. The origins of decoupage have been traced from East Siberian tomb art, to China, and, through trade routes, to Venice and France. Inspired by examples from various cultures around the world both historic and contemporary, participants will create two projects for use in the classroom to stimulate artistic self-expression in students. The Compositional Rule of Thirds, based on proportion and measurement, will be applied in the design phase. Learning the math component of design will help students add visual enrichment to presentations and assignments while engaging the imagination. Course Coordinators: Carol Desoe, Elizabeth Ungar Open to: All

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Time: F 10/17, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/18, 8:304:30 Location: SHS, rm 250 Materials fee: $30

Cuba: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.......................... #3756 Cuba, the largest island in the Caribbean and only 90 miles from the United States, is one of the last Communist nations in the world. United States foreign policy has had the effect of isolating Cuba, and most Americans know very little about this nation. In February 2008, Fidel Castro, Cuba’s leader since 1959, passed the reigns of power to his brother, and Latin America watchers believe that Cuba is poised for major change. Cuba, past, present, and future, is a timely current event for teachers, and their students, to examine. Michelle Chase, a doctoral candidate in modern Latin American studies at New York University, has lived in and traveled extensively throughout Cuba researching gender politics of the Cuban Revolution. She will lead participants in an exploration of the history of Cuba, the importance of the Cuban Revolution and its impact on US-Cuban relations, the role of women in Cuban society, and the political influence of the Cuban community in Miami. Teachers will expand their knowledge of this Caribbean nation and its neighbors, acquire digital and text materials for classroom use, and consider with colleagues entry points in curriculum for integrating Cuban, and Latin American, history into their lessons.

Dots and Points on the Map: The Art and History of Japan..... #3757 The National Standards for Arts Education direct teachers to make connections between the visual arts and academic subjects, and the New York Social Studies Standards support the use of a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate understanding of world cultures. Courses that integrate the arts and social studies further educational standards in both areas and motivate student interest through hands-on learning and the development of critical thinking skills, innovation, and creativity. Exploration of classic Japanese art forms and an overview of Japanese design create a blend of history and the arts in a multi-sensory teaching approach that guides students to appreciate art as a window on history and culture.  An art and social studies teacher will present an overview of Japan through history and art demonstrating the sensibility that flows throughout the country’s long history. Sushi making, visuals of the tea ceremony, and a simple woodcut print will be used to emphasize the connection between art and design in Japanese life, both ancient and modern. The unique multi-sensory approach to curriculum planning modeled in the course also reaches students with different learning styles. In addition, through exploring, viewing, and discussing Japan’s art and history, participants will gain a greater understanding of the rich heritage that so many of Scarsdale and Edgemont students bring to the classrooms of both districts.

Course Coordinator: Dan Schuchat

Course Coordinators: Louise Kuklis, Jeannette Stockton

Course Speaker: Michelle Chase, Consultant Latin American History

Open to: All Time: F 11/7, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/8, 8:30-4:30.

Open to: 6-12 Time: F 12/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/6, 8:30-4:30. Location: EHS, A-School

Location: EMS, rm E-9

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course limited to 15 participants.

Materials fee: $10 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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The Study of Cultural and Generational Conflict Through Film.................................... #3758 Media is a powerful cultural force in the lives of students. The group known as Generation M, for Media, is composed of 8-18 year olds who, according to the research, spend an increasing amount of time interacting with television, computers, video, DVDs, and iPods, often simultaneously. The study of film lends itself to close analysis of media as a form of communication while examining cultural issues raised by the content.

understanding of the historical and cultural roots of people from across the globe. The integration of ballroom dancing, in particular, into curriculum provides an artistic experience that incorporates distinctive cultural interpretations and artistic styles of movement. Teachers can enrich the study of cultural heritage through dance.

Teachers will view international films that look at changes in culturally-specific “family values” over the past 10 years, the period when the European Union expanded to include Eastern European countries. The mixing of Eastern and Western economies also brought together people of different religions and moral systems creating clashes between diverse populations now living in close proximity. The discord that divides people of different cultures is also evident within individual communities and family units. Classroom study of conflicts portrayed by film characters and attempts at resolution can be a useful tool in raising awareness and understanding of global as well as personal cultural issues.

A teaching artist from the American Dance Theater leads the course. Content fosters an understanding of ballroom dance as both cultural and cross-cultural in origin and informed by the social context surrounding its development and adaptation. Sessions will combine instruction, practice, and discussion of the cultures or cross-cultural influences that gave rise to each dance form. Participants will research the origins of several dances: the merengue, lively and joyous music and dance from the Dominican Republic; the elegant waltz of Europe; the rumba and its African and Cuban origins; the polka, a fast and lively dance from eastern Europe; and the American fox trot. Through participation in group instruction, teachers will experience community building techniques to increase social awareness, confidence, and self esteem in students. Activities and assignments will be designed to connect to student learning in literacy, music, social studies, language, poetry, geography, and the visual arts.

Course Coordinator: Phyllis DiBianco

Course Coordinator: Penny Hamlet

Course Speaker: Anita DiBianco, Film and Video Artist

Course Speakers: American Dance Theater teaching artists

Open to: All Time: F 1/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/31, 8:30-4:30

Open to: K-6 Time: TBA

Location: SHS, rm170

Location: QRS auditorium

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Connecting Cultures Through Dance................................. #3759

Course limited to 30 participants.

The integration of the arts into curriculum fosters a love of learning and stimulates the development of imagination and creativity in students of all ages. The art of dance is a highly expressive art form that can infuse most subject areas with a celebration of global cultures. Through the study and performance of dance, students develop an

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Earth Links: Toward Awareness and Understanding of Current Issues ................................ #3760 The Scarsdale Teachers Institute in collaboration with the Interdependence Institute offers this yearlong seminar series.     


Scarsdale graduates will live in a society and a world where economics, politics, social issues, science, and ecological concerns increasingly transcend traditional borders. In this interdependent environment, education will be the most important tool and will determine the ability to understand, compete and contribute.      Scarsdale Public Schools Strategic Plan Michael McGill, Superintendent The Scarsdale Schools Interdependence Institute was formed to further the Strategic Plan’s goal of supporting existing activities and encouraging the creation of new programs that foster multicultural awareness in the schools. Institute teachers and administrators developed several initiatives including a lecture series on issues, both national and international, that impact the global and local communities. Speakers and topics will explore cultural and geopolitical forces that bind us together as well as pull us apart. The goal of this course is to enhance individual and collective awareness of current issues with global consequences that impact society. Participants will meet initially to consider the aims and practices of incorporating national and international newsworthy events into the curriculum, to examine activities in the schools that serve as avenues to advance an understanding of cultures, and to look for additional ways to bring multiple perspectives to bear in the classroom. Throughout the year, participants will attend lectures and participate in discussions on topics of national and global interdependence. Speakers will provide timely interpretations of events that are shaping the century; participants will meet to discuss their reactions and reflections on the lectures.     Course Coordinators: Phyllis DiBianco, Joan Weber Open to: All  Time: TBA Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Exploring Cultural Diversity Through Literature............. #3761 Teachers in a global community must understand the diverse customs and traditions of their students and colleagues. What better way is there to relate to others than through reading the stories that embed cultural perspective into the lives of real people? This course will foster a deeper appreciation of the racial, ethnic, and cultural groups within the school community, the nation, and the world. Through selected literature readings and group discussions, participants will learn about the daily lives and perspectives that exist within different ethnic, socio-economic, and cultural groups. Teachers will develop classroom activities that promote interest, respect, and understanding of the global community based upon the readings. The first book to be discussed is Under the Banner of Heaven by Jon Krakauer. Course Coordinator: Phyllis DiBianco Date: Tu 9/16, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: SHS library Open to: MS/HS Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Challenge 20/20................. #3762 The Scarsdale Teachers Institute in collaboration with the Interdependence Institute offers this yearlong course. The Scarsdale Public Schools Strategic Plan states: Scarsdale graduates will live in a society and a world where economics, politics, social issues, science, and ecological concerns increasingly transcend traditional borders. In this interdependent environment, education will be the most important tool and will determine the ability to understand, compete, and contribute. Michael McGill, Superintendent

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The Scarsdale Schools Interdependence Institute was formed to further the Strategic Plan’s goal of supporting existing activities and encouraging the creation of new programs that foster multicultural awareness in the schools. The global economy, technological advances, and increased mobility and networking have led to an increasingly interdependent world. Schools have the responsibility to educate students to become leaders in this new global environment. Challenge 20/20 brings together schools in the United States with schools in other countries. Together they identify local solutions to a global problem. The Challenge 20/20 program provides an opportunity for schools to develop globally based, experiential curricula and to build educational partnerships with schools around the world. Once paired, partner schools work together to define and research the problem, identify a workable solution for each school’s community and context, and map out steps of an implementation plan. Challenge 20/20 students form authentic bonds with students from around the globe. They learn first-hand about cross-cultural communication. This course will help to sustain the cross-cultural partnerships which are developed during the 20/20 Challenge project and beyond. Course Coordinators: Patty Dempsey, Robert DiYanni, Joan Weber Open to: All Time: TBA Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

TEACHING STRATEGIES Using Literature to Build Community at Greenacres.. #3763 Reading good books together strengthens the common bonds that form a school community. When Greenacres teachers, children, and parents read the same selections chosen from a wide range of children’s authors, themes pertinent to personal behavior and responsibility can be

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discussed at school and at home. Teachers at every grade level come together in this way to reinforce values and an awareness of issues that concern the Greenacres community. Each month participants will read and discuss a new children’s book. Participants will create activities, appropriate to the grade levels, designed to encourage discussion of the themes in the book. Responses to the literature will be shared through the building in a variety of ways: individual response bulletin boards, display of class projects, cross-class and/or cross-grade discussion, and more. Course Coordinator: Carole Phillips Open to: Greenacres Time: W 9/10, 10/8, 11/5, 12/10, 1/7 & 21, 2/11, 3/4 & 18, 4/15, 5/6, 6/3, noon-1 Location: GRA library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Celebrating Children’s Literature ........................................ #3764A This course introduces teachers to the top children’s literature from 2007-2008. The primary goal is that teachers read the best literature and discuss with colleagues their application in the classroom. Participants also learn authors’ techniques and preferred genres. Books are selected primarily from Caldecott and Newberry winners and the American Library Association. The class will meet monthly. During each session, participants are introduced to two or three of the top children’s books from 2008. Each participant chooses one book to focus on in a session and possibly use that book with students as preparation for discussion. Books include short stories, picture books, poetry, and other forms. Participants read aloud and discuss ways to use the books in their classrooms. Books being considered include: Nothing by Jon Agee, When Dinosaurs Came with Everything by Elise Broach, and Global Babies by The Global Fund for Children. Course Coordinator: Susan Hendler


Open to: Quaker Ridge Time: Th 10/2, lunchtime, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: QRS faculty lounge Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Greenville Book Club: Part IX.............................. #3764B Teachers need opportunities to share and learn from each other the ever-growing variety of children’s books and authors available to them. Books with common themes provide a stimulus for colleagues on a faculty to engage in discussions of pertinent school issues reflected in picture books chosen for this activity. Participants will work with each book selection to plan and create grade activities and opportunities for cross grade conversation. At each session, background about the author/illustrator will be provided. Participants will discuss themes, work in groups to create activities, plan for class presentations, share ideas with colleagues, and reflect on the prior selection. Course Coordinator: Barbara Horowitz Course Speaker: Stephanie Feingold Open to: Greenville Time: W 9/17, 11/5, 1/7, 3/4, 5/6, 3-5:20 Location: GRV library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Developing Reading Comprehension in an Online Age ...........................................#3765 Within the last 30 years, technology has transformed culture. Electronic media, particularly the Internet, pervades society, and generations of students are growing up in a world where access to online text and media permeates home and school. Teachers will enhance their practice by learning and applying the “new literacies,” those reading comprehension and learning skills required by the Internet and other emerging information and communication

technologies. The new literacies can be readily integrated into inquiry research in the Capstone Project, grades 1-5, as well as the balanced literacy approach. The examination and incorporation of a “New Literacies” perspective provides another avenue for teachers to support student learning in the age of technology. Lisa Zawilinski, a staff developer and a member of the New Literacies Research Team at the University of Connecticut, will guide an examination of the new literacies perspective in the classroom. Participants will also explore Action Research methodology to gather data on the impact of a new literacies approach in content. During the course, collaborative teams will explore ways in which instruction can improve the development of critical literacies and online reading comprehension. Librarians, computer teachers, and classroom teachers will consider the best method of collaborating on research that integrates the new literacies as well as effective methods to incorporate this approach across the grades. Course Coordinators: Gerald Crisci, Sue Luft, Carole Phillips, William Yang Course Speaker: Lisa Zawilinski, Staff Developer, University of Connecticut Open to: Scarsdale elementary school collaborative teams that include technology teacher, librarian, and classroom teacher. Please see course coordinators for further information. Time: Th, 9/18, 10/16, 11/13 12/11, 2/5, 4/2, 3:30-5:30 with remaining 6 sessions to be set by group Location: GRA library Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Reading Comprehension Study Group: Grades 2-6.............. #3766 Study groups provide much-needed time and opportunity for teachers to meet with colleagues to discuss new resources and strategies and to reflect on practice. Teachers of elementary students will benefit from examining current research on reading comprehension instruction available in

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professional publications. As participants read, discuss, and reflect on professional texts in collaboration with colleagues, they make informed decisions about methods and approaches that will engage children in books and foster in them a love of reading. Participants will read Strategies that Work, 2nd edition, by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis, and other recent professional articles on the teaching of reading in the elementary grades. By reading the same text, teachers find a common vocabulary for discussing reading comprehension instruction and effectiveness. Teachers will consider the content of the Strategies book, its research on reading instruction, and its connection to practice. Participants are encouraged to integrate strategies into classroom practice, to assess the results, and share findings from classroom experience with the study group. Course Coordinators: Patricia McCallion, Deborah Schroer Open to: 2-6 Time: Tu 9/16, 10/21, 11/11, 1/13, 2/10, 3:30-5:30 and two hours on a Saturday Location: GRV, rm 22 Materials: Strategies that Work, 2nd Edition, by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

LCI at STI............................ #3767 The Lincoln Center Institute is devoted to embedding aesthetic education in elementary, middle, and high school curricula through developing meaningful aesthetic education for all students. LCI offers a coherently structured program that involves teaching artists working in close partnership with classroom teachers during an intensive summer workshop and through follow-up activities throughout the school year. This course will be part of a long-term series of conversations about the arts and aesthetic education desgined to keep the conversation going among LCI summer 2007 and 2008 participants. An ancillary goal is to empower teacher teams in each building to encourage other Edgemont and Scarsdale teachers to participate in the LCI

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aesthetic education initiative in the near future and to continue integrating aesthetic education in the arts into their curriculum. The Arts and Aesthetic Education initiative, of which this course is a part, aims to sustain and intensify discussions of arts and aesthetic education across schools and across grades. This intensive course provides for a continuation of the Lincoln Center Institute for Aesthetic Education experience, its philosophy of aesthetic education, its capacities for aesthetic learning, and its practices for introducing and integrating aesthetic education into the curriculum. As Dana Gioia, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, recently noted, “Art is an irreplaceable way of understanding and expressing the world…. it addresses us in the fullness of our being…. Art awakens, enlarges, refines and restores our humanity.” In pursuing this rich experience of the arts, this course provides an opportunity for faculty to continue the work they have already begun with the Lincoln Center Institute during the July 2007 and 2008 workshops, to share their experiences and ideas about aesthetic education, and to participate in expanding the LCI initiative among Scarsdale faculty and students. The course activities will include reading and discussion of texts in aesthetic education, arts activities involving direct experience of works of art, and strategies for implementing aesthetic education into each teacher’s curriculum. Course Coordinators: Diane Celentano, Robert DiYanni, Joan Weber Course Speaker: Maxine Greene, William F. Russell Professor of Philosophy and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, emerita Open to: Participants of Lincoln Center Summer Institute Time: Th 9/25, 10/16, 11/13, 12/18, 1/15, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend


The Art of Quilt Making...... #3768 Quilts have played a significant part in the nation’s history and have deep roots in cultures around the world. They have served two roles throughout time: one functional and the other as an expression of art through unique design and colorful pattern. Today, many teachers use quilt making in their teaching as a way to synthesize learning and to assess student understanding of broad concepts. The technique of making a quilt is as meaningful as the students’ work that is being displayed. Quilts serve as an effective assessment tool of student learning for all areas of study and all grade levels. Participants learn to assemble a quilt to display and to assess their students’ work. By examining samples, participants will understand the history of quilt making and the origins of their colorful and unique designs. The changing methods of quilt making technology will be examined in a hands-on activity with quilt making supplies. The course will proceed with step-by-step instructions leading to the completion of individual quilts and ideas for classroom use of all abilities and age groups. Course Coordinators: Maureen Ball, Dawn Rivellini Open to: All Time: F 9/26, 3:30-7:30; Sa 9/27, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm T112 Materials Fee: $25 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

The Reggio Emilia Approach to Teaching: Niente Senza la Joia — Nothing Without Joy.......... #3769 In 1945, after living for two decades under fascism, the citizens of Reggio Emilia, Italy, saw the need to invent an approach to teaching and learning based on humanism and equity. Drawing on European and American progressive education pedagogy, the constructivist psychologies of Piaget and Vygotsky, and Italian regional traditions

of participatory democracy, the citizens of Reggio Emilia formed a city-parentteacher partnership and developed an innovative and dynamic education model. In Reggio Emilia, children’s intellectual and social emotional growth is fostered through a focus on exploration, expressive communication, and collaboration. The Reggio Emilia experience, a model for schools around the world, provides teachers with new ways to think about and explore the nature of the child as learner, the role of the teacher, and curriculum development. This yearlong study group is designed as an ongoing, collaborative support group in which teachers work on projects and share their experiences inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach to teaching and learning. Teachers will study the components of the Reggio approach and its relevance to American teachers. Discussions and work will focus on the essential components of education in Reggio Emilia: the child as protagonist, the child as collaborator, the child as communicator, the environment as the third teacher, the teacher as partner, nurturer, and guide, the teacher as researcher, documentation as communication, the parent as partner, and organization as foundational. Readings, videos, discussions, shares, and visits to other New York area Reggio study groups will allow teachers to grow their experience with this social-constructivist approach to learning. The study group, modeled on the St. Louis Reggio collaborative, will reach out to other regional Reggio study groups and create opportunities for exchange and research on the topic of “a new culture of childhood that places real value on the potential and creativity of children.” (Guidici, Rinaldi &Krechevsky, 2001). Course Coordinators: Lindsey Hicks, Lorella Lamonaca Open to: All Time: Tu 10/7, 11/4, 12/2, 1/6, 2/3, 3/3, 4/7, 5/5, 6/2, 3:30-6 Location: HCS library Materials fee: $10 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

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Movies in the Social Studies Curriculum.......................... #3770 Movies are effective classroom resources for the teaching of social studies. Storytelling in visual format stimulates students’ visual and auditory senses and engages their interest. When teachers hone their own media skills, they develop effective ways of reaching students who have grown up in the digital age. With knowledge of film, film editing, and film resources available on the Internet, teachers can produce engaging, multi-sensory lessons and class projects that incorporate the analysis and production of film. The course will begin with participants sharing historical dramas and documentaries that they use in class or would like to include to enrich instruction. Teachers will then learn to edit these movies and import selected scenes into multi-media presentations for instructional use. Course leaders will model a current events project in which students analyze the components of and create brief Public Service Announcements or election year campaign commercials. All levels of computer experience are welcome. Course Coordinators: Steve Goodman, Steve Scharf Open to: All Time: Tu 10/14, 11/4, 12/2, 1/13, 3:306:30 Location: SMS, B135 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Creating, Managing, and Sustaining the Reader’s Workshop: III..................... #3771 The Reader’s Workshop is an instructional strategy that promotes positive reading experiences for children. Among the guiding principles of a Reader’s Workshop are that children have a significant amount of time to read just-right books every day, select their own appropriate books, learn to respect reading in their lives and the lives of others, have daily opportunities for authentic and meaningful conversations about their reading, move beyond simply

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reading the words to making meaning from them, and create reading lives outside of the classroom that emulate the work they do during Reader’s Workshop. This course provides teachers an opportunity to enrich their knowledge of the Reader’s Workshop, explore ways to utilize it in their classrooms, and create units of study to support state and local curriculum. Participants will explore the structure of the Reader’s Workshop in a manner that is practical for use in an elementary school classroom. An important topic of discussion will be the skills that children need to be successful and strategic readers. Participants will create units of study and mini-lessons to support reading instruction for the second half of the school year. These lessons, applied to classroom practice, will serve as the focus of reporting, reflecting on, evaluating, and incorporating the Reader’s Workshop methodology of teaching reading.

Course Coordinator: Marisa Ferrara Open to: K-3 Edgemont Time: Tu 10/14, 11/4, 11/18, 12/2, 1/6, 1/20, 2/3, 3:30-5:30 Location: GRV faculty lounge Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Non-Fiction Matters........... #3772 Students increasingly turn to the Web for the ease, if not reliability, of information available to them. This trend challenges teachers to counter the Web as the sole source of data by providing up-to-date, reliable, and valuable sources for students engaged in the research process. Many fascinating and appealing titles are added to the library’s non-fiction collection yearly, titles that offer unique perspectives and current information on a wide variety of topics. Of importance to students and teachers is the editorial reliability process that non-fiction undergoes in contrast to many sources found on the Web. Teachers in every discipline who become familiar with current non-fiction will grow professionally and will be able to recommend good titles of print resources to students.


Participants will review quality non-fiction titles in a range of disciplines. They will be become familiar with reviews of books in their subject areas and will be encouraged to adapt suggestions for the inclusion of non-fiction books in their classrooms. Each session will consider a subset of this genre, among them biographies, non-fiction picture books, and exceptional titles in social studies, science, world languages, and literature. Trends in current non-fiction publication including the use of graphics, design and layout, and the characteristics that make a book appealing to a middle school reader will be discussed. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on the role of trade books in teaching and how to encourage students to include these works in addition to Web sources. Course Coordinators: Peggy Fox, Sharon Waskow Open to: 6-8 Time: Th 10/30, 11/20, 12/4, 3:30-7:30 Location: SMS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

Exploring New Literature for English Language Arts Instruction Grades 3-6........................ #3773 To promote a love of reading in students, teachers will gather together to share new children’s books, both fiction and nonfiction. As participants read and review books in collaboration with colleagues, they will determine which ones to integrate into the English Language Arts program and which support other subject areas on their grade level. Participants will read new works. In class, the literature will be discussed and related teaching strategies will be reviewed. Teachers will develop ideas to link these materials to instruction. At the completion of the course, each participant will have read several books and reflected on how to integrate them into curriculum.

Course Coordinators: Barbara Horowitz, Vivian Sonnenborn Open to: Grades 3-6 Time: Th 10/16, 11/20, 1/15, 2/26, 3/26, 4/30, 3:30-5:30 Location: GRV library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Participants should be prepared to buy/ borrow copies of new titles. Course limited to 20 participants.

Field Trips as a Teaching Tool in Social Studies..................... #3774 Field trips enrich the social studies and enliven the study of history. Students are able to feel, hear, see, and even touch the stories, voices, and objects of the past through visits to museums, historic sites, and more. Away from the classroom, students are able to learn independently, work together in groups, and forge new relationships. Field trips open worlds and make learning real and relevant. In this course, participants will learn about different resources available in the New York metropolitan area and will design a field trip from start to finish. In the first session, participants consider and evaluate what makes a museum exhibit worthwhile for students. They will also review sample materials and discuss the role of technology and assessment in the field trip experience. The next session will be spent “in the field.” Working in teams or individually, participants will visit a site, view an exhibit, and create appropriate materials for educators and students. They will meet with museum staffs and gather and annotate materials distributed by the museum’s education department. The project for this course will be to complete a field trip guide, to be shared during the third and final session of the course.

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Course Coordinators: Meghan Lahey, Marci Rothman Open to: All Time: Th 10/16, 11/6, 11/20, 3:30-7:30 Fee: Museum entrance fee Location: SMS, rm P186 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Lesson Study in Elementary Mathematics...................... #3775 Lesson Study, a professional development process that originated in Japan, is recognized by the National Staff Development Council as a powerful design for building professional learning communities. In Lesson Study, teachers systematically engage with one another in an examination of their instructional methods, content, curriculum, and student learning and understanding in order to improve classroom teaching and learning. Richard Du Four, writing in Educational Leadership 2004, notes: “The big ideas of a professional learning community are to focus on learning rather than teaching, to work collaboratively and hold yourself accountable for results.” This course will focus on student learning in elementary mathematics while enriching teacher understanding and practice of content and pedagogy. Collaborative teams of 5-6 members will research, plan, teach, observe, and reflect on an actual classroom mathematics lesson. Following the presentation of each lesson, group members will reflect on the lesson and consider methods to refine instruction with the goal of making each lesson more effective. Course Coordinators: Kathy de la Garza, Bill Jackson, Nancy Pavia Open to: K-6 Scarsdale Time: F 10/17, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/18, 8:304:30; Th 10/30, 11/13, 12/4 ,12/11, 1/8, 1/22, 1/29, 2/12, 2/26, 3:30-5:30; Four additional independent hours required Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

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Keeping Current with Young Adult Literature........................... #3776 Teachers need to stay current with high quality fiction that holds strong appeal for young readers. With the knowledge of trends and themes in age-appropriate literature, teachers can inspire enthusiasm for reading. With enhanced awareness of new titles, participants can be confident in recommending appropriate literature for young adults.   Book discussions will focus on literary elements, themes, and publishing trends in young adult literature. A list of books centered around a theme or genre will be provided for each session; participants will be required to read two titles from the lists. Relevant reading materials, activities, and speakers will be offered from time to time to supplement discussion. Course Coordinators: Liz Waltzman, Sharon Waskow Open to: 5-9 Time: Th 10/23, 12/11, 2/5, 3:30-7:30 Location: SMS Library Credit:One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 24 participants.

Expression Art: Creation and Self Expression.......................... #3777 Self-expression through the creative process is at the core of all true learning. Teachers will enrich their practice and meet individual learning styles and needs when they integrate strategies that include student self-expression across the curriculum and at every grade level. The development of creativity is enhanced through the writing of poetry and producing of visual art projects. Reflection on their own projects will help teachers understand and appreciate the individual and personal elements of the creative process while adding to their repertoire of professional practices. In this weekend course, participants will enhance their understanding of the creative process through the exploration of poetry


and visual art. The facilitator will model a variety of experiences designed for participants to explore their own creativity as they write poetry and develop art through imitation, collaboration, and personal symbology. The projects will lead teachers to a deeper awareness of their students’ diverse learning styles and the means to nurture them. Lessons infused with creativity and self-expression will engage students in processes that foster a love of learning in every subject. Course Coordinator: Lindsey Hicks Course Speaker: Phil Smith, poet and artist Open to: All Time: F 10/24, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/25, 8:304:30 Location: HCS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Art Museums as Resources for Teachers............................. #3778 In addition to exhibiting art objects, museums provide abundant resources for teachers to use at the museums and in their classrooms. Museum Web sites, teacher resource and education centers, and museum libraries offer access to electronic and print educational materials, at minimal or no cost. Web casts and opportunities for videoconferencing are also available, and they can often be tailored to the specific needs of teachers and their curricula. This course will offer participants a guide to educational resources available at museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian. Friday evening’s class will meet in a computer lab at Scarsdale High School and will introduce participants to classroom resources available through museum Web sites. The Saturday class will meet at two New York City museum Education Centers, the Uris Center at the Metropolitan Museum and another selected by class participants based on their interests. Guided tours of galleries in the museum will also be included with an overview of object-based teaching

strategies to integrate into curriculum and focal points in planning field trips for students. Course Coordinator: Beth Colleary Open to: All Time: F 10/31, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/1, 8:304:30 Location: SHS, rm 350 and NYC Fee: Museum entrance fees Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Thinking Like a Genius: Practical Strategies to Enhance Creativity .......................................... #3779 Research on learning has identified a body of work that promotes creative thinking. This course familiarizes teachers with general elements of creativity and explores the creative process in theory, demonstration, and experience. Participants will examine thinking strategies of the super-creative and review teaching methods designed to cultivate the habits of exceptional thinking in students. Teachers will learn ways to establish classroom environments that foster fluency of thought, generativity of ideas, and intellectual risk taking. This course utilizes and models a series of unique exercises that integrates rather than separates music, art, drama, and creative writing from the rest of the curriculum. Each session presents teachers specific classroom techniques and tools to generate and incubate ideas, to focus thinking, and to plan for successful implementation of new ideas. Participants will receive an extensive set of supporting materials, handouts, and reproducible resources for student use. Specific topic areas to be covered include: divergent and convergent thinking, lateral and metaphorical thinking, mind maps, enhanced sense perception, and more.

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Course Coordinator: Ilene Smith Course Speakers: Sarah Bellantoni, Drama Consultant; Owen Borda, Music Consultant Open to: All Time: F 10/31, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/1, 8:304:30 Location: EHS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Let’s Make Books: Classical Bookbinding....................... #3780 Skills enhanced by the art form of bookbinding cover a full spectrum: patience, precision, listening skills, small motor skills, and more. Making an exquisite piece of art can provide a child with a sense of accomplishment and pride. For an entire class, books can be used to increase involvement in a variety of subjects including math, science, language, social studies, and the visual arts. Hand made books can truly create a bridge between the arts and academics. Each participant will create three book structures suitable for use to chronicle a student’s achievements in any area of study. The books constructed can also be used as photo albums or as journals. Participants will use classical bookbinding materials such as paper, cloth, board, adhesives, thread, and techniques that include folding, gluing, and sewing. The constructions are readily transferable to classroom use. Course Coordinator: Nancy Closter

A Closer Look at Singapore Math with Ban Har Yeap.............. #3781 Scarsdale has recently adopted the Singapore math program for students in kindergarten through fifth grades. Teachers of these grades have requested additional support, to supplement the professional development provided by the District, as they learn the methodology, pedagogy, and structure of this new program. The course is a response to these requests, and teachers of elementary math will gain a deeper and broader understanding of Singapore math as they work with Ban Har Yeap, author of the Singapore Primary Math textbooks. Ban Har Yeap will guide teachers in an examination of three aspects of teaching Singapore math at the elementary grades: basic skills and concepts, consolidation, and problem solving. Dr. Yeap will also model strategies that effectively engage learners in math instruction. Participants will probe the unique features of Singapore Math with an emphasis on visuals, systematic topic development, variations in exercises, and challenging problems. Course Coordinators: Kathy de la Garza, Nancy Pavia Course Speaker: Ban Har Yeap, author of Singapore Primary Math textbooks Open to: K-6, Scarsdale Time: F 11/7, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/8, 8:30-4:30. Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course Speakers: Mary Dee Merrell, Art Consultant; Karin Reetz, Art Consultant

Teaching Art Through Children’s Picture Books..................... #3782

Open to: All Time: F 11/7, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/8, 8:30-4:30

Teachers know the value of infusing art into curriculum and are always looking for innovative ways to stimulate the imaginations of their students. By reinforcing the teaching of artistic styles and methods that children learn in the art room, classroom teachers can reach the inner artist in every child. Picture books, used regularly to teach about literary elements, are also a rich source of illustrations that support the mood or theme of a storybook. The mind and style of

Location: GRA art rm Materials fee: $25 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

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the illustrator can inspire children to design images that visualize and deepen meaning in their own classroom and personal writing. Through an exploration of the illustrations in children’s picture books, elementary teachers will gain new skills for incorporating art in the classroom. The works of several picture book illustrators will be used to showcase a variety of art styles, techniques, and materials. Participants will gain knowledge of printmaking, collage, mixed media, and more. The works of several author/ illustrators, familiar to classroom teachers, will be used to exemplify the power of art to enhance understanding of the written word. Course Coordinators: Sara Faranda, Jan Schorr Open to: K-6 Time: F 11/14, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/15, 8:304:30 Location: FMS art rm Materials fee: $15 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

POGIL: A Student-Centered Teaching Technique............ #3783 Educational research supports the value of student centered learning environments. The Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) approach provides a systematic structure where students are actively engaged in mastering curriculum and in developing skills by working in self-managed guided inquiry activities. The POGIL system has been researched extensively through a National Science Foundation grant team led by Dr. David Hanson, Professor of Chemistry at SUNY Stony Brook, and research results show dramatic improvement in student understanding of the science material studied in the POGIL environment. Dr. David Hanson, Department of Chemistry, SUNY Stony Brook, will lead the course beginning with an overview and demonstration of the POGIL approach to learning. Participants will explore the elements of POGIL and discuss with

colleagues ways to integrate its unique features into existing curriculum. Participants will create their own POGIL lessons for specific science curriculum areas. Volunteers will be able to perform newly created POGIL applications and receive feedback from the rest of the group on its effectiveness. Course Coordinators: Elise Hilf-Levine, Jim Williams Course Speaker: Dr. David Hanson, Department of Chemistry, SUNY Stony Brook Open to: K-12 science Time: F 12/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/6, 8:30-4:30. Location: SHS, rm 381 and rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

If I Had a Hammer: Empowering Children Through Folk Music — Pete Seeger........................ #3784 “My main power as a musician is to put songs on people’s lips, not just in their ear. People are connected to each other in meaningful ways, and by learning to sing together, by uniting hearts and voices, we can achieve peace.” Pete Seeger Folk songs embody the language and stories of different cultures and provide a vivid picture of history. American folk music has given voice to the social movements of the last fifty years. From the early union movement — Which Side Are you On? — to the civil rights movement — We Shall Overcome — and the peace movement — Where Have All the Flowers Gone?, folk music has been the expression of social justice, resistance, and humanity, and a force in its own right, raising awareness about those movements. The songs of Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, The Weavers, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and many others remain the anthems for the labor, civil rights, and peace movements. Through these songs children not only learn but experience history. Folk songs can be a learning, motivating, and transforming experience. Through documentary, readings, discussion, and

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song, participants will gain an awareness of the background and music of Pete Seeger and an understanding of his music as the expression of the heart and soul of the social movements of the twentieth century: labor, Civil Rights, and the peace movements. Through a variety of musical activities, participants will learn how to integrate folk songs meaningfully in the classroom. Folk songs are a source of excitement and creativity for children, and as Pete Seeger says, “ We must think globally and sing locally.” Participants will learn about the many opportunities for children’s social action provided by Pete Seeger’s Clearwater project and his soon to be launched environmental/sustainability camp in Beacon, New York. Course Coordinators: Lisa Forte, Lindsey Hicks Open to: All Time: F 12/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/6, 8:30-4:30. Location: EWS music rm

recipes. By sharing stories, recipes, and readings, participants will create a series of vignettes that they can model with their students, as well as with colleagues. Each session will include writing, reading, and the results of cooking each other’s family and special recipes. Writing recipes is a highly skillful exercise in process writing, a skill that all students need. Writing about food also offers teachers a way of helping their students write more vividly, concretely, and thoughtfully, while they reflect on the differences and similarities of their own and their classmates’ cultures. Course Coordinator: Jack Dean Course Speaker: Judith Schwartz, Educational Consultant, former Director of STI, former STA President, cook and writer Open to: All Time: Tu 1/8-29, 3:30-6:30 Location: SHS, rm 1N4 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Making Meaningful Murals.. #3786

Food, Family, Fables: Writing Your History....................... #3785

Murals have been an expression of culture for thousands of years. Throughout history, people have created images on walls to celebrate religious ceremonies, to commemorate important events, and to document the values of a society. The conception and planning of a mural, its design and execution, and the gathering of materials and division of work all engage participants in group cooperation and decision-making. The images and symbols in murals can be applied to all subject areas.

Good food, like good writing, engages all the senses by eliciting memory and provoking conversation. Most people have stories of how they learned to cook, of family dinners, memorable meals, and exotic ingredients that often include accounts of ancestors from distant lands. Each culture offers unique, yet universal, experiences of sharing stories while sharing food. One of the most basic of cultural norms, food preparation, cooking, and eating, engage people in cross-cultural conversations about the most fundamental of human experiences. Teachers can make use of their students’ family food histories and practices to teach both process and experiential writing across the grades. In this course participants will share their stories, write about their food memories, read writers who create meals with words, and use food as a key to personal memory and family history, and cook each other’s

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The course will begin with a presentation on the renowned Mexican muralist, Diego Rivera. With Rivera’s stunning images as examples, participants will work with others to develop a concept for a mural in their school or community, plan the procedure, and execute a painted mural. Murals may be interdisciplinary, thematic, or specific to a particular curriculum. Instruction on the elements of art will guide participants to design murals that are dramatic as well as effective. Paint techniques to be used with students of all ages will also be taught. Participants will leave with a mural


design tailored to their curriculum and students’ needs. Course Coordinator: Denise Cassano Open to: All Time: F 1/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/10, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, T17 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Materials Fee: $12 Course limited to 12 participants.

The 2009 Caldecott Possibilities at Seely Place......................... #3787 The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. The award is made in January. Months before the announcement, lovers of children’s picture books debate their choices for the award. By examining recently published books in light of their potential as Caldecott award contenders, teachers will become aware of the latest publications while enhancing their knowledge of standards in selecting quality picture books. This course develops the knowledge and judgment of teachers in selecting picture books for the classroom. Participants will read and discuss the art and text of this year’s picture books that are available to them in the Seely Place Library, and their application to the reading curriculum. In addition, participants will examine each book using the criteria set forth by the Caldecott Award Committee for excellence in: pictorial interpretation of story, theme, or concept; appropriateness of style of illustration to the story, theme or concept; and development of plot, theme, characters, setting mood or information through the pictures. Previous winners of the Caldecott will be used as reference. In this way, teachers will hone their own critical judgment in selecting picture books for their students while keeping current with picture book publications.

Course Coordinator: Patrisha Bronzell Open to: Edgemont Elementary Time: F 1/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/10, 8:30-4:30 Location: SPS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Sound, Science, and Music.. #3788 Children learn at an early age to enjoy the beauty of music, and instrumental and vocal music learning experiences are important to the education of every student. Children have intuitive skill in singing and in playing musical instruments that may be enhanced by an understanding of the physical and mathematical concepts underlying the production of sound and music. Knowledge of musical instruments and how they produce sound may also help elementary students make informed choices about the instruments they will be selecting to play. The laws of physics and mathematics can apply to the appreciation of music for both performers and listeners. Participants will explore the physical and mathematical concepts that govern the production, transmission, and reception of sound. They will learn to produce sound and to make it visible through the use of GarageBand and an online oscilloscope that transforms sound into a moving graph. The use of this technology in the classroom illustrates to students the relationships among frequency, pitch, string tension, size, and more. An important consideration will be the developmental levels appropriate to the teaching of the physics and mathematics of music. To train children to hear and appreciate the differing timbres of instruments, activities will include construction of instruments of various types and will culminate in a concert of instruments that have been handmade by participants.

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Course Coordinator: Lisa Forte

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course Speaker: Judy Famellette, Science Helping Teacher, Scarsdale Schools, retired

Course limited to 15 participants.

Open to: All Time: Th 1/8-2/12, 3:30-5:30 Location: EWS music room Materials fee: $20 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Tessellations Across the Curriculum.......................... #3789 The National Standards for Arts Education directs teachers to make connections between the visual arts and other academic subjects. Interdisciplinary art projects motivate student interest and are easily adapted to all subjects. Tessellations tap into children’s creativity as they design large patterns using small pieces of clay, tile, or other material. Tessellation design and production encourage hands-on learning, the development of spatial thinking skills, and the investigation of an historic and enticing art and architectural form. In this course, an art and elementary teacher combine forces to demonstrate how shapes and angles can be joined together to create tessellations, small squares arranged in a checkered or mosaic pattern. A tessellation is created when a shape is repeated over and over again covering a plane without any gaps or overlaps. Over the centuries, tiling and tessellations appear in architecture and art, and the geometry connection makes it a powerful and fun way to teach about angles and shapes. Participants will learn to make tessellations from various materials and to apply this design process to classroom learning. Course Coordinators: Sandy Capuano, Jeannette Stockton Open to: All Time: F 1/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/24, 8:30-4:30. Location: EHS, rm E9 Materials fee: $10

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Tools of the Trade.............. #3790 A student-learning center, organized within the classroom, includes a selection of interdisciplinary resources focused on a content theme. A learning center on the subject of colonial American tools, the model for this course, will enhance science literacy within the context of a history unit. These authentic learning environments motivate interest and encourage students of varying learning styles to discover, to research, and to make connections among subject areas. This course demonstrates the integration of social studies, science, and math through an authentic learning setting. Participants will experience and evaluate learning centers as they discuss simple machines, how they work, and their uses in Colonial America. Through multiple resources in the learning center, participants will examine simple machines and their applicability to the study of science, social studies, and math within the curriculum. Teachers will walk through learning centers, discover the concepts behind levers, pulleys, wedges, and inclined planes, analyze the centers’ effectiveness for student learning, and explore ways to develop similar integrated centers based on simple machines that correlate to their curriculum. Course Coordinators: Kathy de la Garza, Amy Kenney Open to: K-6 Time: F 1/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/24, 8:30-4:30. Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Integrating Music in the Academic Classroom.......................... #3791 Departmentalization of academic disciplines creates artificial divisions in knowledge. By integrating music into the curriculum, teachers can bridge the gap among individual subject areas and connect the arts, literature, social studies, and the


sciences. The infusion of music and the arts into existing curricula motivates student interest, participation, and enthusiasm for presentations and class projects. Every teacher, and student, can be a songwriter using music to enhance and enrich learning. This course will empower teachers to incorporate music into curriculum. Course content includes a significant body of musical works and methods to apply to lesson plans and presentations. Participants will learn simple and effective techniques to create original lyrics as a method for students to process, synthesize, and learn academic content. Facts, details, and concepts from any course of study can be used as lyrics for reading, performing, or recording. Participants will also learn how to use technology to record student performances and to add music to multimedia presentations. Course Coordinators: Steve Goodman,Chris Reali Open to: All Time: F 1/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/24, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm T22 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Picture Books in a Weekend .......................................... #3792 Children’s literature is a constantly changing field, and teachers need to stay current and informed about the newest and most notable picture books available. Teachers also need time to discuss and collaborate with colleagues. This course will explore literature as participants examine new picture books and develop ways to integrate them into their current language arts programs.  This course explores picture books published in the last three years. District librarians will highlight various titles by comparing and contrasting literary quality, artwork, pertinent themes, expressive language, curriculum connections, readability levels, and more. Participants will read and discuss a wide variety of picture books, keep readers’ journals to record personal responses to the

material, and plan how each title may be used with students. Participants will also learn about various awards for the picture book genre, including the Caldecott Medal, and discuss the important criteria that award committees consider when choosing the “best” picture book published. Course Coordinators: Scarsdale Elementary Librarians Open to: K-5, Scarsdale Time: F 1/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/31, 8:30-4:30 Location: GRA library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

Engaging Students in Building Classroom Community........ #3793 Teaching methods that involve students intellectually and emotionally in their studies further the District’s commitment to developing the minds and spirits of its students. Such methods must emphasize creative and highly interactive pedagogy that builds a classroom community in which students truly care about each other and their learning and actively participate in instruction. The Engaging Students model enhances teacher practice with new ways to create exciting learning environments that support interdisciplinary planning and practice, student choice, effective questioning techniques, and student collaboration. Dr. Rick Heckendorn, Assistant Professor at Manhattanville College, will lead this weekend course in the strategies that build supportive, dynamic environments across subjects. Central to this method is the technique of “orbitals,” a presentation strategy in which students report on topics of personal interest and connect them to English, math, social studies, and science. Suggested activities include: creating dialogue, writing and singing original songs or poems, offering assignment choice based on diversity and learning styles, developing questioning techniques. Orbital presentations broaden and deepen student research, thinking, and skill when the task

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includes connecting knowledge beyond a designated subject area. At the end of the course, each participant will leave with his or her own orbital to use as a model for students. Teachers will also have added to their repertoire of successful strategies new methods for effective questioning techniques that initiate meaningful wholeclass discussions. Course Coordinator: Steve Scharf Course Speaker: Dr. Rick Heckendorn, Assistant Professor, Manhattanville College Open to: All Time: F 1/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/31, 8:30-4:30. Location: SMS, rm P189 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Let’s Make Books: The Photo Album................................ #3794 The very special art of bookbinding has relevance in today’s world, as it has throughout history. Books can be used to hold digital images, poetry, history, stories, sketches, and mementos. Bookmaking dovetails beautifully with the state art standards incorporating knowing and using art materials, analyzing works of art, understanding the cultural evolution of the book form, and creating book structures. In this course, each participant will create three book structures suitable for use to chronicle student achievements in any area of study. Projects can also be used as photo albums or as journals. Participants will use classical bookbinding materials including paper, cloth, board, adhesives, thread, and will apply the techniques of folding, gluing, and sewing. The finished product can be used in all subjects across the grades to showcase student work. Course Coordinator: Nancy Closter Course Speakers: Mary Dee Merrell, Art Consultant; Karin Reetz, Art Consultant

Materials fee: $25 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

Learning Styles in the Classroom ...........................................#3795 In recent years, educational research and programming have emphasized the accommodation of individual student differences in the classroom. Materials, methods, and management systems have proliferated rapidly. While strategies have been developed that provide alternative learning opportunities for children and adults, the technologies needed to assess and classify children have been slower in coming. The Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children (MMTIC) was developed out of this need. Type Theory provides the knowledge and skills for recognizing why and how learning and teaching style differences occur, what they mean, and how educators can more effectively deal with these differences. Just as every teacher has a preferred style of teaching, every student has a preferred style of learning. In this course, participants will explore ways to improve student learning through the use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Before teachers can apply the MBTI to classroom use, they must learn about their type and see how type relates to the classroom. The workshop will develop activities designed to accommodate differences in teaching and learning styles in order to maximize student success. Course Coordinators: Len Tallevi, Marie Tallevi Open to: All Time: F 2/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/7, 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Materials fee: $10 for MBTI test Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Open to: All Time: F 2/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/7, 8:30-4:30

River, Earth, and Sky at the Hudson River Museum....... #3796

Location: GRA art rm

The Hudson River Museum is an area

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educational resource drawing its identity from the extraordinary river it celebrates. To teach about the Hudson River, the museum’s educational department offers a wide range of activities and exhibitions that interpret its collections, interests, and communities. The Museum is an important local resource that can enhance and enrich student understanding of the science, history, and art of the region through hands-on exploration of the natural history of the Hudson River. Specialist Steve Ruff will lead participants through several of the educational offerings at the Hudson River Museum, including Hudson Riverama, Andrus Planetarium, Glenview Mansion, and the artists of the Hudson River School. The main focus of this course will be on the interactive Hudson Riverama and Andrus Planetarium. The Hudson Riverama offers the experience of a journey down the Hudson River through the major habitats, geographic features, and historic landmarks of “America’s First River.” The importance of stewardship of the Hudson and environs is an essential part of the interactive displays, computers, videos, and actual observations of the river. At the Andrus Planetarium, participants will join ancient sky watchers and today’s scientists as they investigate the phenomena of Earth and sky, to learn about the weather, the seasons, the greenhouse effect, and to journey up through Earth’s atmosphere, to watch clouds form, to compare Earth to Venus and Mars, and to see just how special a home Earth is. Teachers will develop research projects, case studies, and related lessons for classroom application that transform the Hudson River Museum into an extension of the classroom. Course Coordinator: Cristine Gilliland Course Speakers: Hudson River Museum Program Specialists Open to: All Time: F 2/27, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/28, 8:30-4:30. Location: Hudson River Museum Fees: Admission to Hudson River Museum, Andrus Planetarium, and program supplies Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Did You Hear That? How to Listen to Music............................. #3797 Composer William Schuman said, “Listening to music is a skill that is acquired through experience and learning. Knowledge enhances enjoyment.” With an informed awareness of the elements of music, teachers can better incorporate music, and the arts, into their curriculum. By integrating music across the curriculum, teachers can help students make the connection between the classroom and the outside world and show that no subject area exists in a vacuum. Through this course, participants will develop the skills needed to further their enjoyment and understanding of any style of music. The two sessions of this weekend course will include listening and visual examples of the elements of music. Each session will conclude with a hands-on opportunity to experience these elements through the use of pitched and un-pitched percussion. Participants with previous music skills are encouraged to bring their own instruments to the sessions. Most teachers in this course, however, will not be musicians, and their experiences as learners will be very similar to that of typical students. The teacher in the role of learner gains valuable insight into the student’s classroom learning. Teachers will be encouraged to adapt the course content to their own particular classroom settings. Course Coordinator: Chris Reali Open to: All Time: F 2/27, 4:30-7:30; Sa 2/28, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS music room Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Drawing on Your Imagination .......................................... #3798 Today’s child must learn to think creatively. By incorporating drawing into the curriculum, teachers encourage their students to apply imagination in a tangible form to the thinking process. When encouraged to develop the imagination through drawing, students become critical

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thinkers, problem solvers, and effective communicators. Drawing furthers creativity as the child is given free reign to recreate and transform the world, consciously or subconsciously adding personal meaning to the image. Incorporating drawing into lessons adds a completely new dimension to what students learn and how they learn, as well as how they may be assessed. Drawing adds a visual and creative component to curriculum and supports differentiated instruction and a variety of learning styles. Participants will develop their imaginative drawing techniques to enhance curriculum. The first half of the class will be devoted to drawing skills including: use of materials; accurate representation of three-dimensional forms; creation of realistic images through line, shape, scale, and value; measurement of spatial relationships. The second half will include drawing while incorporating methods of distortion, juxtaposition, and abstraction. In addition to drawing, participants will analyze the emotional impact that words have when included in the image. The art analyzed and discussed will range from Surrealist works to old masters to picture book art. Participants will be able to incorporate drawing into their curriculum with confidence to enhance lessons and assessments and to accommodate instruction to individual learning styles and abilities. Course Coordinator: Denise Cassano Open to: All (Some drawing experience is helpful.) Time: F 2/27, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/28, 8:30-4:30. Location: SMS, rm T17 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Current Practices in Health and Physical Education.............. #3799 Through participation in the Southern Westchester BOCES Health Physical Education Consortium, K-12 Health and Physical Education teachers have access to high quality professional development experiences. There are a variety of regional presentations and workshops on a number

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of timely topics feature local, state, and national presenters. These workshops focus on the current trends and practices spanning the K-12 curricula in Health and Physical Education. Participants will attend two in-house sessions to examine current trends in health and physical education curricula and their impact on programs. Teachers will also share and review successful strategies that they have implemented in their classes. Participants will select programs from the BOCES list of Seminars and Lectures throughout the year. Course Coordinator: George Blessing Open to: PE and Health Time: Tu 10/7, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates set by BOCES Location: SHS staff cafe, BOCES Credit: One or two points salary credit or stipend

EQUITY AND ACCESS The ESL Student in the Mainstream Classroom....... #3800 The Scarsdale and Edgemont communities attract large numbers of students from other countries who, upon enrolling, are placed in classes side by side with native English speakers. Content area teachers have often expressed the need for guidance in how best to reach the ESL student and how much to expect of a student learning the English language. This course will provide mainstream teachers with a better understanding of the language acquisition process, the special situation of the English learner in the classroom, and effective instructional strategies for differentiating practice for the second language learner. Participants will develop an understanding of the stages of second language acquisition as the ESL student develops from passive to active learner in the classroom. The classroom teacher will learn how effective approaches and modifications target these different stages, helping the student to become more integrated into the classroom. Participants will also examine the cultural differences that influence learning. Additionally, the course


will address questions related to assessment and grading. Teachers will reflect on their current teaching and use the information presented in class to develop practical curriculum materials for their ESL students. Course Coordinators: Jacqueline O’Shea, Susan Silkowitz Open to: All Time: Th 10/2, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 12/11, 12/18, 3:30-5:30 Location: EHS, rm D8 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Language Processing: The Impact in Your Classroom.............. #3801 Educators in Scarsdale and Edgemont frequently encounter children classified by the Committee on Special Education as learning disabled by virtue of a languagebased learning disability or speech/language impairment. Teachers want to know more about these disabilities and their impact on a child’s functioning and learning in the classroom. Teachers and related service providers must be aware of the nature of these deficits, their potential effects, ways to recognize when a child is struggling because of these difficulties, and what can be done to enable children with language processing disorders to be productive, successful, and self-assured learners. During this weekend course participants will examine issues of language processing within the classroom setting. Topics to be addressed are: theories of normal language development including Piaget’s developmental theory; theories of language acquisition; case study presentations; methods of detecting learning disabilities in the classroom; evaluation of language impairment; accommodation of languagebased disabilities. A viewing of the F.A.T. City video will vividly dramatize the classroom experience from the perspective of a learning disabled child. Participants will have ample opportunity for discussion, sharing of knowledge, and development of lessons and strategies to help children with language-based disabilities to reach their potential as learners.

Course Coordinators: Beverley Lorie, Andrea Tripodi Open to: All Time: F 10/24, 3:30-7:30; S 10/25, 8:304:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Mean Girls.......................... #3802 The term “mean girl” entered the language from a movie title of the same name and has become synonymous with the bullying behaviors of young girls that include cliques and, more recently, cyber bullying. These behaviors are often referred to as relational aggression, and parents and teachers have expressed concerns for their impact in school and their opposition to the “Circle of Friends” ideals. This course will provide teachers resources to work with girls to help them develop empathy, engage in healthy conflict, explore feelings, and will teach and promote a positive change in female relationships where needed. Participants will explore the subject of the “mean girl” phenomena in the schools: the behaviors the term captures and the impact of those behaviors on classroom community. Resources and instruction will provide effective strategies to create a caring classroom community that is supportive of all learners. The works of Diane Senn (Bullying in the Girls’ World), Julia Taylor (The Girl’s Guide to Friends), Kaye Randall (Mean Girls: 101 1/2 Creative Strategies for Working with Relational Aggression) and Rachel Simmons (Odd Girl Out) offer an examination of social emotional development and the importance of community, with particular attention to female students. Readings will inform the discussions as well as suggest a framework for developing lessons that teach essential social skills. Participants will share their classroom experiences, adapt a strategy from the course to professional practice, and write a reflection on an activity applied to the classroom as a result of the course.

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Course Coordinator: Jennifer Turetzky Open to: All Time: F 11/14, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/15, 8:304:30 Location: HCS library

depending on grade level, or develop other programs dealing with those with physical, developmental, or other challenges. Course Coordinators: Michele Beni, Eric Bitterman

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Open to: All Time: F 1/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/10, 8:30-4:30

Empathy Through the Ages.. #3803

Location: SMS, rm B134

A Native American proverb cautions that before judging another person, one must “walk a mile in his moccasins.” In the spirit of this proverb, teachers are committed to providing classroom experiences that cultivate the value of empathy. The Earth’s Elders Program, an established interdisciplinary unit in the Middle School’s Bulter House 6th grade curriculum, builds understanding in student-interviewers for the elderly from Scarsdale who relate eye witness accounts of events from World War II to the present. In preparation for their interviews, students read and discuss issues related to the elderly, developing a sensitivity to senior citizens before meeting and interviewing them. As a result of these interviews by sixth graders, the school has gathered a rich oral history collection from community members. The success of this program can be a model to guide teachers in creating a blueprint for the study of other groups whose stories need to be told through empathic eyes.

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course leaders will model resources and activities to develop empathy in young people by reading portions of The Wisdom of the World’s Oldest People by Jerry Friedman, the basis of the Earth’s Elders project. The account of a personal journey from the steppes of Mongolia to Manchester-by-the Sea in Massachusetts reports on insights provided by super centenarians-ordinary people who achieved extraordinary ages. Course members will also tour the world from the perspective of the elderly as described by writers such as Paula Span from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and Bob Morris the author of Assisted Loving: True Tales of Double Dating with My Dad. Lastly, participants will be provided with guidelines to create particular projects dealing with human rights and sensitivity. Participants may modify the Elder’s project,

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All Kinds of Minds: A Neurodevelopmental Approach to Learning............................. #3804 Teachers continuously strive to design appropriate learning experiences in response to the wide range of student differences they encounter in every classroom. Recent research findings that link brain development with classroom learning make it possible to identify specific brain activities that are related to learning and mental productivity. These brain activities can be described in terms of eight functions often called “neurodevelopmental” functions or constructs: attention, memory, language, higher order cognition, social cognition, temporal-sequential ordering, spatial ordering, and neuromotor functions. Within the mainstream classroom, a wide range of normal variation in the development of these functions exists. Teachers with an awareness of these functions are better able to recognize and attend to learning differences among students. Dr. Paul Yellin, National Director for Clinical Programs at All Kinds of Minds, based on the lifetime work of Mel Levine, will introduce participants to a conceptual framework linking brain development with classroom learning. The goal of the course is to enable teachers to recognize, understand, and manage common classroom challenges in reading, writing, math, attention, organization, and study skills in order to identify student strengths and affinities and to build resiliency in learners. Participants will examine a series of case studies as they learn to apply the neurodevelopmental framework to the wide range of learners who comprise a classroom.


Course Coordinator: Jennifer Turetzky Course Speaker: Dr. Paul Yellin, National Director for Clinical Programs at All Kinds of Minds Open to: All Time: F 2/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/7, 8:30-4:30 Location: HCS faculty lounge Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Sign Language: Alternative Form of Communication.............. #3805 Communication comes in many forms, and teachers need to communicate with a variety of students including those with auditory deficits. Sign language is a complete, complex language that employs signs made with the hands and other movements, including facial expressions and postures of the body. American Sign Language (ASL) is said to be the fourth most commonly used language in the United States. Sign language, acquired in early childhood, is like any other language and develops in complexity as the child grows. It some cases it is the only form of communication a child may have, and, in other cases, it is a wonderful way to have quieter or non-verbal students participate in class. Maria Micioni, an American Sign Language interpreter, will demonstrate and teach the concept and application of “talking with your hands.� She will show how a teacher can use basic sign language to communicate with students in the classroom. Topics that will be covered include: colors, finger spelling, school/home life, family, and commonly used signs. The main project will be creating and participating in discussions and conversations with others. This class will also help teachers bridge the gap between the hearing and partially and fully deaf communities and will teach about the culture of students who are deaf. Course Coordinator: Pam Raines Course Speaker: Maria Micioni, American Sign Language Interpreter Open to: All

Time: F 10/3, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/4, 8:30-4:30. Location: EHS A-School Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Teaching Games to Differentiate Instruction.......................... #3806 Children must master a variety of skills in the early grades, and many students need the repetition of skills and concepts before they can achieve the mastery required of them. Games and activities can help a child learn and practice almost every skill that the curriculum mandates by providing repetition and review in a wonderfully effective manner. Games appeal to every ability level and can be integrated into reading, writing, and mathematics. Children are active learners, and games engage them in learning. The purpose of this course is to provide teachers with strategies that facilitate differentiating instruction, an important district goal. Teachers in grades K-3 will learn to create games and activities that can be used immediately in their classrooms. Throughout the course, teachers will learn and share a variety of games and activities that reinforce curriculum. An integral part of the course will be the discussion of multiple intelligences and differentiation of instruction. Teachers will examine their individual curricular areas in the primary grades to develop 8-10 games/activities as their final projects. Participants should come ready to create and apply a variety of games and should bring reference materials for the curricular concepts they would like to develop. Course Coordinator: Bevin Pagel Open to: All Time: F 2/27, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/28, 8:30-4:30 Location: EWS library Materials Fee: $15. Teachers should bring scissors. Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

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Differentiated Math Instruction: Teaching to the Middle School Student.............................. #3807 Middle School math teachers, and their students, will benefit from an ongoing forum dedicated to discussing, sharing, and evaluating best practices on differentiation. Over the past three years, Scarsdale math teachers have participated in workshops, seminars, and the District symposium on differentiated instruction. Building on these experiences, math teachers will gain additional instructional strategies and support to establish the differentiated classroom through group work, to predetermine student readiness, and to enhance presentation of content and assessment. The course will meet monthly. At each session, teachers will identify and report on new and revised classroom practices, teaching strategies, and materials they have added to their repertoire of differentiated instruction. In subsequent sessions, participants will present evaluations of the changes and enhancements they have incorporated into practice in actual classroom work. The course will draw on the expertise and experience of outside consultants to extend the group’s perspective to the work of other leading math departments elsewhere in the country. Discussion will include articulation among elementary, middle, and high school math teachers. At the end of the sessions, the group will provide feedback and formulate recommendations relating to math content and curriculum as it impacts instruction at all grade levels at the Middle School.The course could provide the impetus for the drafting of a district-specific resource in math. Course Coordinator: Steve Walsh Open to: 5-9 math and support staff Time: Tu 10/21, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates to be set by group

Race Matters...................... #3808 Today’s high school students have been identified by some pundits as a generation of young people who have transcended race. Whether accurate observation or wishful thinking, the issue of race relations persists in this generation, as it has throughout American history, under particular scrutiny in this presidential election year. Recently, Scarsdale’s Equity and Access Committee has explored perceptions of race relations and school policy in Scarsdale, and polled students, teachers, and the community on the topic. Pursuing the same inquiry, a group of Scarsdale High School teachers gathered informally to discuss the impact of race and racial perspectives in the classroom and the High School and have formed into a study group to meet regularly, to read, to discuss racial relations and perceptions and their impact on curriculum and school policy. The Scarsdale High School study group on race relations provides a vehicle for heightening awareness of racial issues through discussion, reading, and multimedia resources. Participants will examine the impact of race and racial perspectives in classroom life, in the community, and in the nation. Participants will explore their own backgrounds and take on introspective look at how biography shapes personal attitudes toward race and ethnicity. Topics will include affirmative action, the Obama candidacy, the O. J. Simpson trial, and the way in which Americans choose their neighborhoods as well as their presidential candidate. Speakers and readings include Shelby Steele, Marcus Mabry, and Tim Wise. Participants can anticipate the involvement of the Jacob Burns Center and the Facing History project. Course Coordinators: Neil Ginsberg, Fred Goldberg Open to: SHS Time: TBA

Location: SMS, rm B131

Location: SHS, rm 281

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Withdrawn......................... #3809

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SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT The School of Belonging: A Different Standard............. #3810 In this age of standards, high-stakes testing, curriculum stressors, and societal pressures on students and educators, classroom time is precious. When academic performance is the only area measured and evaluated, it can seem overwhelming to take time out of the school day to meet students’ social and emotional needs. Teachers know that when those needs are met, students feel excited about the discoveries each new day will bring, achievement soars; behaviors such as bullying, name-calling and teasing diminish; and the classroom functions more efficiently and effectively. This course will examine successful methods to provide every student a sense of belonging and safety in the classroom. In this course, K-12 teachers will learn about emotional safety, what it is, how it is created, and what is meant by its opposite, emotional violence. Participants will understand the connection between meeting a child’s emotional needs and the motivation to learn. A key aspect of the course will focus on how to teach social skills effectively through group dialogue, moral dilemma discussion, class meetings, fishbowl, common language, story telling and processing. Teachers will examine Building Classroom Communities, The School of Belonging Plan Book, The Little Book of Listening and will reflect upon and implement these resources. Participants will also explore emotional intelligence (EQ), what it is, how it is measured, and Theory U, which can move a group of students to a deeper level of connection with school, each other, and themselves. Course Coordinator: Monica Grey Course Speaker: David Levine, author, Teaching Empathy Open to: All Time: F 10/17, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/18, 8:304:30 Location: EHS library Credit:One point salary credit or stipend

Stress Management for Teachers .......................................... #3811 Stress and “burnout” are occupational hazards of all the helping professions, including teaching. The ability to recognize and remedy stressful conditions at the earliest stages is essential to enhancing a teacher’s effective classroom practice. Teachers need guidance and support in developing coping strategies and practical remedies to manage today’s accelerated pace and escalating demands. Sessions will provide a forum for teachers at all grade levels to explore ways of maintaining their personal and professional vitality. Activities will help teachers to cultivate and practice specific coping strategies for stress reduction in order to have the energy necessary to remain passionate and effective in their work. Classes will combine didactic and experimental components and will focus directly on issues of relevance to teaching and class management. The course will also provide a supportive, non-threatening network in which to flourish. Course Coordinator: Ilene Smith Open to: All Time: F 10/3, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/4, 8:30-4:30 Location: EHS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Saving the Coral Reef! A Hands-on Approach to EcoActivism............................. #3812 Public art created for display in schools can draw attention to important events and become an extension of curriculum. AIDS quilts and 9/11 memorials are two examples of participatory art work found in the schools that remind and instruct both in their creation by students and in their on-going display. In like manner, the “Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef” is a traveling exhibit inspiring school projects in which students crochet individual hyperbolic forms that are

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then combined into one huge coral reef. The purpose of the project is to publicize the threat posed to coral reefs by rising ocean temperatures and pollution. In the creation of an enormous coral reef, students collaborate on a work of art as they learn about science, mathematics, handicrafts, and social activism. The course begins with an exploration of coral reefs, what they are, the unique way they are formed, their importance to the ocean ecosystem, threats to their survival, and efforts being made to save them. Information will be provided on the math concept of the hyperbolic form in nature as participants learn to crochet threedimensional replicas of corals that resemble hyperbolic geometric shapes. Participants will each be expected to complete crocheted coral forms that will be combined to create a coral reef sculpture. Course members will also plan the involvement of Middle School students in crocheting a giant coral reef to be exhibited in the Cooper House glass case as part of a display on saving the coral reef. Course Coordinators: Maureen Ball, Mary Jane Motl, Sharon Waskow Open to: SMS Time: F 11/7, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/8, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Urban Agriculture and Community Gardening........................... #3813 One of the most pressing challenges of the 21st century is the sustainable production of food to nourish the planet’s growing population. Increasingly, people in developing countries migrate from rural areas to the cities. Urban agriculture techniques provide locally grown food to people living in cities, reduce the distance food travels from field to market, and employ methods of production that save energy through sustainable practices. An examination of agricultural techniques practiced in the local area provides teachers and their students exposure to alternative

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methods of food production that respond to needs of both a growing population and a fragile environment. This course highlights two sustainable agricultural systems in the area. Friday afternoon’s session begins at the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, a working farm dedicated to communitybased food production. The visit includes a tour of the farm and a demonstration of agriculture practices in the field; participants should dress accordingly. Friday’s session will conclude with a return to Scarsdale Middle School for a viewing of a film and an examination of school gardening projects. On Saturday, participants will visit the New York Sun Works Science Barge, a greenhouse on a barge floating in the Hudson River. The greenhouse supports the growth of fruits and vegetable using hydroponics, the culture of plants in water, which uses 20 times less land and 10 times less water than conventional agriculture, while eliminating chemical pesticides, fertilizer runoff, and carbon emissions from farm machinery and long distance transport. Educational programs at both Stone Barns and the Science Barge will guide teachers in strategies for incorporating a study of urban agriculture into curriculum, including field trips to sites visited in the course. Course Coordinators: Cara Forray, Duncan Wilson Course Speakers: Judy Fink, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture NY Sun Works Greenhouse Director Open to: All Time: F 10/17, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/18, 8:304:30 Location: SMS library and Stone Barns Farm, NY Sun Works Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Rockefeller State Park as a Resource............................ #3814 Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods, writes that, “Children need


nature for the healthy development of their senses, and, therefore, for learning and creativity.” In order to develop an environmental intelligence and a concern for the environment, students must experience and explore the outdoors. Rockefeller State Park, a legacy of the foresight and generosity of the Rockefeller family, is a local resource for students to see a variety of habitats and to experience significant wildlife and nature interactions. The Preserve land is located on a portion of the Rockefeller family estate in Pocantico Hills given to the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 1983. In this course, participants will discuss the need for and availability of outdoor experiences in the curriculum, and how these experiences can impact student interactions with the world in which they live. The Friday session will be dedicated to this discussion, as well as an overview of the history of the preserve and the means to integrate its offerings and programs into curriculum. Saturday will be spent exploring the 22-acre Rockefeller State Park. Here, participants will engage in several activities including bird watching, geology, stream studies, forestry, nature hikes, outdoor art, and invasive species/protection discussions. Participants will leave the course with teaching materials and strategies and an awareness of the curriculum possibilities a field trip to Rockefeller State Park offers. This course supports the Green Schools initiatives of the Edgemont and Scarsdale districts. Course Coordinators: Christi BrowneSibrizzi, Rachele Colantuono Open to: All Time: F 10/3, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/4, 8:30-4:30.

Institute, participants requested additional courses to deepen their knowledge of specific environmental topics. This course is a response. As teachers increasingly incorporate issues of sustainability into curriculum at all grades and through all subjects, questions of individual and collective responsibility for the planet need to be addressed and today’s students encouraged to become stewards of the Earth. Global climate change is one of the 21st century’s most urgent concerns affecting every environment and ecosystem on Earth; it is an important addition to the sustainability curriculum. Course content is inspired by the American Museum of Natural History’s upcoming exhibit, Climate Change, opening in November 2008. Throughout this weekend workshop, participants will investigate the specific ways in which a warmer climate is projected to alter the country, the planet, and everyday lives. Under consideration will be the roots of climate change, the role the oceans play in maintaining global temperatures, real environmental changes already underway, and forecasts for future change. The multiple ways in which humans contribute to global warming will be examined along with ideas and policies that call for reduced carbon emissions. The class will meet in Scarsdale on Friday night and at the Museum of Natural History on Saturday to explore the collections, exhibits, and museum educational resources firsthand. Course Coordinators: Christi BrowneSibrizzi, Rachele Colantuono Course Speaker: Mary Beth Wilson, Science Education Consultant

Fee: $5 parking at Rockefeller State Park

Open to: All Time: F 11/21, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/22, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm P183, American Museum of Natural History

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Fee: $25 to AMNH

The Heat Is On! Climate Change Through the Lens of Sustainability ...........................................#3815

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: SMS, rm P85; Rockefeller State Park

At the close of the summer 2007 Sustainability

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Reading Connection: Part V Teachers and Parents Reading Together............................ #3816 When teachers and parents share literature, they are better equipped to inspire enthusiasm for reading in their classrooms and families. The more teachers read, the better able they are to connect their reading to what they teach in the classroom and to encourage students to appreciate good literature and to become lifelong readers. The goal of the course is to expand knowledge and appreciation for literature and to enhance the family-student-teacher reading relationship. In this course, teachers and parents will read and discuss current fiction and non-fiction titles. Literature may include memoir, short stories, realistic fiction, biography, classics, and award winners. Teachers and parents will read chosen titles and take part in book discussions about them. During each meeting, participants will write a reflection on the literature and discuss ways they have connected to the writing. Course Coordinators: Pat McCallion, Deborah Schroer Open to: Edgemont faculty and community members Time: Th 10/23, 11/20, 12/4, 1/22, 3/5, 4/2, 3:30-5:30 Location: GRV faculty lounge Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Introduction to Challenge Course/ Low Ropes Edgewood........ #3817 The low ropes program is designed to introduce participants to the Challenge Course. The experience helps teachers to hone their group interaction skills, develop problem-solving activities, and stretch their physical abilities individually and with their colleagues. The course will model appropriate leadership styles and group dynamics. In this weekend course teachers will be introduced to the entire Challenge

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program but will concentrate on the initial and introductory stages of physical, social, and emotional risk-taking. This course is designed as part of the Challenge Course Workshop. Course Coordinators: Bevin Pagel, Jeff Weigel Course Speakers: Barney Foltman, Robert Keith, Kevin Roemer Open to: Edgewood Time: F 11/14, 3:30-7:30, Sa 11/15, 8:304:30 Location: SMS gym Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Parents and Teachers Working Together............................. #3818 Parent conferences are an important part of a teacher’s world. These meetings can be positive events that help both parents and teachers understand the children whose lives they share for a year or longer. Conferences can also lead to misunderstandings when communication fails or either side lacks an appreciation of the other’s perspective. Teachers can enrich their daily practice with reflection on the quality of parent contact and on the development of effective strategies and techniques to enhance responses to parents. A thorough examination of current literature will help participants gain a deeper understanding of parental concerns and build effective methods of communicating with all parents. Course members will read Rosalind Wiseman’s bestseller, Queen Bee Moms and King Pin Dads. Accounts of parental encounters narrated in the book will lead participants to deeper insights into the concerns of parents and will outline collaborative strategies for working with them. In addition, current topics challenging school districts will be examined. Discussions informed by the book will guide participants as they reflect on their interactions with parents and establish a framework for improved understanding and communication.


Course Coordinator: Michele Beni

Location: HCS computer lab

Open to: All Time: F 11/21, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/22, 8:304:30

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: SMS, rm 134 Materials fee: Participants will need to purchase Queen Bee Moms & King Pin Dads by Rosalind Wiseman. Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

TECHNOLOGY Back to Technology Basics.. #3819 Teachers recognize the ever-expanding importance of technology in their daily practice and in the lives of their students. Computers and software are powerful resources available to educators to create digital curriculum materials, to maintain electronic documents, and to enhance communication with students and parents. To stay current, staff members have requested a review of basic technology skills as a necessary foundation for applying the varied and sophisticated programs available to them in curriculum, recordkeeping, communication, and more. Back to Technology Basics will enhance the competence and confidence of technology users interested in every level of resource provided by the District. Teachers will learn numerous skills, tips, templates, and shortcuts, as well as strategies, for managing digital information. Teachers should bring their questions, problems, and ideas to the course. Topics will be shaped to the needs of participants and will include word processing documents, data base creation and use, as well as familiar applications including eBoards. Participants will learn to master computer applications as they create materials to use in their classrooms and share with each other. Course Coordinators: Jodi Giroux, Kathy Leary Open to: K-6 Time: Th 10/2, 10/16, 10/30, 11/13, 12/4, 12/18, 3:30-5:30

Web 2.0: An Online Experience ...........................................#3820 Thinkfinity, formerly MarcoPolo, is a Webbased resource that offers over 2,500 lessons for teachers, each lesson aligned with the New York State Standards in seven content areas. These lessons are organized and can be accessed according to the Learning Standards, key ideas, performance indicators, grade levels, and content areas. Thinkfinity provides teachers easy access to resources and lessons, approved by state and national organizations, with the goal of improving classroom practice using the Internet. In a two-hour orientation session, participants will be introduced to Web 2.0 and Thinkfinity as emerging disciplines that bring powerful new resources to education. Over the next four weeks, participants will complete one online task per week. During their online experience, participants will explore the Web 2.0 sites and Thinkfinity. Additionally, teachers will develop strategies for integrating Web 2.0 and Thinkfinity into lesson planning across the curriculum and will develop techniques for teaching with the Internet in a variety of instructional settings. During the final two-hour face-to-face session participants will share their experiences and their Internet lesson plans. Course Coordinators: Jerry Crisci, Ken Holvig Open to: All Time: Tu 10/14, 12/2, 3:30-5:30, with four online sessions inbetween Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Using a SMART Board in the Classroom......................... #3821 SMART Boards, interactive whiteboards connected to computers and data projectors, are being installed in many classrooms. Once a computer image is projected onto

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its surface, the SMART Board can be used as a computer operated by hand-touch on the white board. Teachers need training to achieve a working knowledge of the numerous ways to integrate SMART Board into daily lessons. This technology can add a whole new dimension to teaching and learning experiences. Participants will learn how to use a SMART Board, the benefits and drawbacks of SMART Boards, how to work with the SMART Notebook software, and how to interact with other commonly used applications. The sessions will combine lecture and presentations by the instructor and workshop time for participants to familiarize themselves with the technology and the software. Participants will be expected to develop SMART Board lessons applicable to their grade level/subject area, and to demonstrate what they have learned and how they will use class content in their teaching. Course Coordinator: Doug Vermes Open to: All Time: F 12/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/13, 8:304:30 Location: SHS, rm 352 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Photostory......................... #3822 Digital storytelling is a multimedia genre that combines photos, spoken word, music, video, and text to convey a narrative. Students and teachers can use digital narrative techniques to support many different curricular activities including writing instruction, technology mastery, and multicultural awareness. Microsoft PhotoStory enables teachers to create class units around digital storytelling projects that can be used to enrich student involvement in curriculum content. Over the course of a weekend, participants will view a number of examples of digital stories created by students and teachers. They will receive guided instruction in bringing digital photos, music, and

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the spoken word into PhotoStory and assembling them into a finished video. Each participant will compose a digital story and develop it through scripts, storyboards, and peer review. Course discussion will explore ways of incorporating this powerful new medium into the curriculum. Course Coordinator: Michael Curtin Open to: All Time: F 10/24, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/25, 8:30-4:30 Location: EHS, rm A11 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Enlivening Science Through Projection Technologies ..... #3823 Permanently mounted data projection devices are being installed in Middle School science labs. In combination with other technologies, the new projectors enable teachers to develop unique wholeclass demonstrations that are visually engaging. Teachers who have combined Keynote projects with SMART Boards and demonstrated lab results through flex cameras report increased student interest in lessons, more animated class discussions, and greater retention of content information. To develop competence with enhanced projection technologies, teachers need instruction and opportunities to share effective strategies for their optimal use in the classroom. Members of the Middle School science department will learn strategies for using the new projection equipment in combination with presentation technologies available in their classrooms. Through both demonstrations and guided instruction, participants will be trained in the projection of Keynote presentations and flex camera images onto SMART Boards. The integration of these technologies produces lessons of interest that can reach students with many different learning styles. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to develop curriculum applications that integrate projection devices, Keynote, and the flex camera in science class and labs.


Course Coordinators: Jennifer Gilbert, Cristine Gilliland Course Speaker: Doug Vermes Open to: Middle School science Time: F 10/24, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/25, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm F77 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

New Technologies Seminar.. #3824 As the field of educational technology grows, teachers look for opportunities to stay abreast of new tools, resources, and instructional practices that support instruction. In a recent survey, more than 1/3 of Edgemont teachers expressed the need for professional development in new technologies. Teachers of all subjects will enhance their practice with a basic understanding of the latest computer software and hardware, including projection technologies, and their use in the classroom. Over the course of the New Technologies Seminar course, participants will be introduced to at least six new software, hardware, or Web-based resources available for their use. The course will meet six times. At each meeting, the instructor will give a brief overview of whatever tool is being presented, including specific information on how it can be used to support instruction in the classroom. Teachers will then have the opportunity to use the tool hands-on. Throughout the course, participants will develop student-learning experiences around one or more of the resources presented, and class time will be devoted to sharing and discussing the classroom application of programs. By the end of the course, teachers will have a basic understanding of each tool, be able to make an informed decision about whether/how it can be used to support instruction, and be able to plan for additional professional learning.

Location: EHS, rm A11 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 22 participants.

Adobe Illustrator and CAM.. #3825 Adobe Illustrator used with Computer Aided Machining (CAM) enhances the technology skills of teachers and students at all grade levels. Visual aids for classroom report covers and student newsletters are just two of the many practical and creative uses for Adobe Illustrator and CAM. An additional feature can transform graphics from the Internet into vectorized drawings. This is a hands-on course that integrates Adobe Illustrator, a graphics program, with the process of Computer Aided Machining. Participants will learn the basic operations of the program while developing classroom handout sheets. To illustrate competence with the program, participants will create metal key rings using Adobe Illustrator and CAM in design and production. Course Coordinator: Steve Rambone Open to: All Time: F 10/31, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/1, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm T18 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Using the Vernier LabQuest in the Science Classroom............. #3826

Course Coordinator: Michael Curtin

Science teachers currently use the Texas Instruments Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or LabPro as a method of data collection and analysis in many lab experiments. Vernier’s LabQuest is the next generation of such data collection and analysis technology. This instrument can be used as a stand-alone data logger or connected to a computer.

Open to: Edgemont Time: W 10/29, 11/12, 12/10, 1/ 7, 1/28, 2/11, 3:30-5:30

This seminar will explore the applications of the Vernier LabQuest. Participants will first learn how to use the LabQuest in practicing a number of data collection procedures using

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different probes. Stored data will then be downloaded to a CPU and methods of data analysis will be explored utilizing Logger Pro software. Course Coordinators: Ihor Szkolar, James Williams Open to: SHS sci and math Time: F 10/17, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/18, 8:304:30 Location: SHS, rm 388 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Making Your Field Trip a Digital Day................................... #3827 Field trips and class events provide active learning experiences for students. By combining these occasions with an understanding and application of the iLife suite of software and Adobe Photoshop, teachers can create lasting documentary materials. The intention of the course is to expose teachers to a variety of ways to extend the impact of special class events and to provide a vehicle for archiving professional practices. The course will instruct teachers on an array of resources for digitally documenting a field trip, celebrating a special classroom event, or reporting about a long-term project. Before designing their own work, participants will study a selection of exemplary projects including slideshows, videos, and photobooks. Participants will learn tips and tricks for using Photoshop to enhance and manipulate digital images. The potential of Apple’s iLife will be explored as well as Keynote, Pages, and QuickTime. Teachers will gain confidence in using a variety of digital imagining techniques and enhancements to create presentations that document and preserve special class events. Course Coordinators: Linda Fisher, Ken Holvig Open to: All Time: F 11/14, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/15, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm C159

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Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Keynote: Developing Dynamic Presentations..................... #3828 Keynote is a presentation application that can be used by teachers and students to incorporate images and graphics into stunning slide shows. Knowledge of Keynote will help teachers to present information in a visually engaging manner and provide students another vehicle for showcasing projects. Keynote helps students to organize information and to add visual context to what they hear and see in the course of their learning. It also encourages individual artistic expression. In this weekend course, participants will utilize both basic and advanced product features in the latest version of Keynote to build classroom and team presentations. Participants will work at their own pace to design and create lessons or educational slideshows dependent upon their level of experience. Course work will include using transitions, inserting, editing, and animating pictures, adding video clips, and using background music and voice-overs in order to create cinema quality presentations. Course Coordinators: Steven Scharf, Steve Walsh Open to: All Time: F 10/31, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/1, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm B135 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Using Technology to Support the Writing Process.................. #3829 The New York State Learning Standards for English Language Arts require that students be able to use the writing process (prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, edit, publish) to produce a written composition. Across all content areas, students must learn to develop and refine their ideas through the


process of developing a written project. Technology can help. Participants will learn how to use computers and the Internet to support student work and learning at each stage in the writing process. Sessions will be organized around the steps in the writing process: pre-write, draft, revise, proofread, edit, and publish. After a brief review of the writing process itself, the group will look at each step and have a hands-on introduction to one or more technology tools and/or activities that can support it. These tools include advanced features of word processing software, Inspiration, blogs, portfolios, and other applications that support peer review, collaboration, teacher review and the handing in and out of assignments. Over the course of the workshop, participants will develop and share a piece of their own writing using the various tools demonstrated and create a learning experience for use in their classes. Course Coordinators: Michael Curtin, Doug Rose Course Speaker: Denise DelBalzo Open to: All Time: F 11/21, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/22, 8:304:30 Location: EHS, A11 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Photoshop Jumpstart......... #3830 Knowledge of Photoshop furthers the integration of technology in all curriculum areas. Photoshop provides teachers ways to produce effective images for print, multimedia, and Web design. Participants will start to master Photoshop’s powerful arsenal of tools and features and begin creating exciting images for presentations and projects.  Photoshop Jumpstart provides a working knowledge of Adobe Photoshop CS3. Participants will learn a wide spectrum of shortcuts, tips, and tricks, while concentrating on the essentials of becoming confident users of this multifaceted image-

editing program. The goal of the course is to develop in participants the skills necessary to creating appealing images which may be used with other presentations such as PowerPoint, Keynote, slideshows, and movies. With knowledge of Photoshop, teachers can guide students in the use of images for computer curriculum projects.  Course Coordinator: Linda Fisher, Paul Tomizawa Open to: All Time: F 11/21, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/22, 8:304:30 Location: SMS related arts room Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Comics in the Curriculum with Comic Life ..........................#3831 The combination of comics and technology has great potential for teaching and learning. Students often are already interested and engaged in the comics medium as readers and may have a fair level of visual literacy and sophistication. Learning to create comics uses a variety of skill sets to extract information, communicate ideas and emotions, and interpret both words and images. The Comic Life computer program facilitates the creation of comics. Teachers can employ this technology tool in many different contexts as an alternative approach to learning that students find fun and exhilarating. Participants will use the Comic Life program to make comics. The process of creating comics takes advantage of the natural tendency to spin stories in words and pictures and develops organizational and critical thinking skills. Making comics is writing! During the first session of this weekend course, participants will see an overview of comic styles. The program Comic Life will be introduced and tips and tricks for using Photoshop will be presented. During the second session participants will develop, design, and create high quality, curriculum-based, digital comics using multiple sources of primary and secondary

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information as well as images from art and photographic archives. Course Coordinators: Linda Fisher, Steve Goodman Open to: All Time: F 12/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/6, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

iLife in a Weekend............ #3832 Today’s computers do much more than computing. A computer may serve as a command center or hub. iPhoto, iMovie, iTunes, iDVD, GarageBand, and iWeb are examples of programs supporting digital devices that feed into this hub on a Macintosh. Apple calls this digital software suite iLife. This course will provide an overview of the six elements of the digital hub and allow participants to create dynamic, digitally enhanced lessons aligned with curriculum and with national and state standards. During the first session of this weekend course, participants will be introduced to iPhoto, iMovie, iTunes, iDVD, GarageBand and iWeb, powerful resources for education. Teachers will explore the potential of these applications and will develop strategies for integrating one or more of them into a curriculum-based lesson plan. During the second session, participants will design, develop, and share curriculum-based lesson plans using the digital hub. Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Open to: Preference will be given to firsttime participants. Dates: F 12/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/13, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

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Five Trends for the Future: Are You Ready?........................ #3833 What new types of knowledge will young people need in order to thrive in the 21st century? How can schools prepare students in response to changing expectations of them? Many education, government, and corporate enterprises have created reports that outline lists of skills students must master to be prepared for the workplace they will enter. While the skills identified often represent solid educational practice for any time period, they fail to address the real and unique changes that are transforming teaching and learning in the nation’s classrooms. A course is needed to delineate skills that today’s students must master and the pedagogy that schools must develop and embed in curriculum. Cutting edge tools from Google, as well as other Web 2.0 programs, have revolutionized the use of technology in the classroom resulting in a change in practice that identifies the distinctive character of education in this century. Five major trends in technology emerge from current research on teaching and learning in the nation’s schools. Each session of the course will examine one of these five major trends: Audience, Connections, Personalization, Place, and Power. Using an original model called The Framework for the Future, participants will examine the Five Trends through demonstrations, discussions, and hands-on computer experiences. In the final course session, participants will present a plan for enhancing their instructional program using the Frameworks for the Future model. Course Coordinator: Jerry Crisci Open to: All Time: Tu 1/6-20, 2/3-10, 2/24, 3:30-5:30 Location: TBA Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Working with Data 101...... #3834 Data analysis is an essential tool in many subject areas. The National Science Foundation standards emphasize that


students must be able to “use appropriate tools and techniques to gather, analyze, and interpret data.” The database capabilities of FileMaker Pro and Microsoft Excel are important tools as teachers guide students to compile, sort, analyze, and use information. The elementary Capstone project and secondary level research processes are examples of curriculum units that make use of both FileMaker and Excel to gather and analyze student work. Specific exit criteria for assessing student competency in research and technology can be supported through data base applications. This course will introduce teachers with little previous experience in data analysis and problem-solving to the standard database and spreadsheet applications FileMaker Pro and Microsoft Excel. Teachers from all subject areas will learn strategies to guide students in locating, evaluating, and using data from a variety of sources and applying the tools of technology to analyze their results. Course Coordinator: Doug Rose Open to: All Time: Th 1/8, 1/22, 1/29, 2/5, 2/12, 2/26, 3:30-5:30 Location: SMS, rm B135 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 18 participants.

Video on Demand: EdVideo in the Classroom......................... #3835 PowerMediaPlus.com (EdVideo), the next generation in educational mediaon-demand, offers a variety of innovative features and tools, placing it at the forefront of new technologies in education. New podcasting, current events, and interactive quizzing features join the system’s rich media collection to enhance the site’s “Curriculum at Your Command” environment. These PBS resources allow teachers to create dynamic video-enhanced lessons aligned with curriculum and with national and state standards This course will provide an overview of

the resources available online through Channel Thirteen’s EdVideo. Participants will explore the EdVideo Web site and the standards-based resources they provide for teachers in all subject areas. Additionally, they will develop strategies for integrating EdVideo videos into lesson planning across the curriculum and will develop techniques for teaching with EdVideo in a variety of instructional settings. Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Open to: All Time: F 1/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/10, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Inspiration in a Weekend.... #3836 Inspiration is a visual learning tool that encourages students to develop and organize their ideas. It supports visual thinking through mapping and outlining techniques that illustrate the relationship among objects and topics. Teachers across the grades will quickly be able to apply the applications of the program to curriculum using the valuable organizational support and strategies it offers students of all ages and learning styles. Inspiration novices and veterans alike will be served in this course. Instruction will guide newcomers as they learn the program, while those familiar with the application will be able to explore its more advanced features: the use of multimedia content, custom graphics, and the program’s integration with other programs, including word processors, presentation software, and software for creating web pages. Participants will gain confidence in the use of the program as they integrate its organizational strategies into curriculum.

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Course Coordinator: Doug Rose Open to: All Time: F 1/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/24, 8:30-4:30. Location: SMS, B135 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Making the Cut: Final Cut Express Made Simple...................... #3837 Scarsdale’s instructional technology offerings have included digital video applications for many years, and teachers across the grades use iMovie with comfort and confidence to enhance curriculum. Apple’s decision to redesign iMovie from the ground up includes significant upgrades to its powerful video editing capability. iMovie users need training to learn the next level of advanced video editing capabilities available through Final Cut Express. In this course, participants will learn the basics of Final Cut Express, Apple’s professional video editing suite designed for educators. Online tutorials will support direct instruction. Course activities will emphasize basic editing and learning how to access and use the iMovie updates that are features of Final Cut. Exemplars of classroom projects will be offered and participants will design and create their own videos and accompanying lessons. Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Open to: All with iMovie experience Time: F 2/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/7, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

SPECIAL NON-CREDIT PROGRAMS Conversational English for Adult Language Learners........ #3838A/B The Scarsdale Teachers Institute, in collaboration with the Interdependence Institute, offers this class for adults whose first language is not English. Participants practice and refine spoken English and improve communication skills in a variety of settings.

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Through a series of fun exercises, discussions, and games, participants improve their listening skills, gain pronunciation awareness, train new muscle patterns for producing speech, and learn to monitor their speech. Topics vary based on participants’ suggestions and include speaking with school personnel, asking and giving directions, and using the telephone. Course Coordinator: Meredythe Nowak Time: Section A; Tu, 10/28, 11/11-25, 12/2-16, 1/6-27, 2/3, noon-1 Section B: Th, 10/30, 11/6-20, 12/4-18, 1/8-29, 2/5, noon-1 Location: QRS Fee: No fee Course limited to 10 participants.

CPR and First Aid in the Workplace.......................... #3839 Whether in the classroom, in the halls, on the playground or the athletic field, students and adults face the potential of injury at school. The first three minutes after an injury occurs are the most critical. This is the time before the school nurse, doctor, EMT or other trained person arrives. Teachers and parents seek opportunities to inform themselves of new first aid and CPR techniques in order to understand how to react in an emergency and when to get help. Certification or recertification can be satisfied with this course. Course Coordinator: Joyce Hoffman Course Speaker: Bob Caldwell, Safety Consultant Time: Sa 11/1, 8:30-4:30 Location: QRS, rm 16 Open to: All Credit: $250 stipend for Scarsdale staff Course limited to 12 participants.


Ceramics............................ #3840

Time: 6 days a week. Registration is always open; classes meet all year.

The study and creation of ceramics heightens one’s sensibilities to design, color, form, and function. An exploration of the various multicultural and contemporary styles and techniques of creating and firing functional objects provides a deeper appreciation of all things ceramic. Learning art by creating art is a thoroughly enjoyable experience that draws on the ‘artist within,’ teaches a new craft, and provides the joy and satisfaction of creating functional and beautiful ceramic ware.

Location: Hitchcock Presbyterian Church, Scarsdale Credit: Non Credit Time & Fees: Call Nancy Gavrin 725-5513 or Sue Sekulow 725-5569 or contact www. stayfit-ny.com

Students will create everyday clay objects using hand-building techniques of pinching, coiling, and slab work, as well as the basic wheel throwing method. Instruction includes various ways of glazing through underglaze, wax resist, gloss, and matte glazes. Bisque and glaze firing processes will be taught to enhance the understanding of the full ceramic production process. Students will create pinched tea bowls and learn the Japanese aesthetic of wabi/sabi. Coil pots will include the decorative Jomon style as well as the smooth burnished look of Native American pottery. Wheel thrown pieces such as bowls, cups, mugs, will be made as well. All sessions will be hands-on studio. Course Coordinator: Maria DeAngelis Open to: All Time: Tu 10/7-21, 11/4, 11/18, 12/2, 3:305:30 Location: SHS, rm 215 Materials Fee: $15 (Participants should also bring work shirt or apron/smock to protect clothing) Credit: non-credit

The StayFit Method The StayFit, formerly Boutelle, Method is an overall conditioning program of exercise for women to improve posture, increase joint flexibility, muscle tone, and endurance. Classes are accompanied by live piano music. Leaders: Nancy Gavrin, Sue Sekulow

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Course Coordinators and Speakers

Page

Marian Absgarten, Teacher, Greenacres................................................................. 11 Maureen Ball, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................... 31, 50 Sarah Bellantoni, Drama Consultant....................................................................... 36 Michele Beni, House Counselor, Scarsdale Middle School..................................... 46, 53 Eric Bitterman, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................. 46 George Blessing, Physical Education Coordinator, Scarsdale................................. 44 Arthur Bloom, Teacher, Scarsdale High School....................................................... 21 Owen Borda, Music Consultant............................................................................. 36 Heather Brandon, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School....................................... 16 Patrisha Bronzell, Librarian, Seely......................................................................... 39 Christi Browne-Sibrizzi, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................... 51 Bob Caldwell, Safety Consultant............................................................................ 60 Sandy Capuano, Teacher, Seely............................................................................. 40 Denise Cassano, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 39, 44 Diane Celentano, Dance/Lincoln Center Coordinator, Scarsdale............................ 30 Michelle Chase, Consultant, Latin American History............................................. 25 Nancy Closter, Teacher, Greenacres....................................................................... 36, 42 Rachele Colantuono, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School......................................... 51 Beth Colleary, Teacher, Scarsdale High School....................................................... 35 Gerald Crisci, Director of Instructional and Administrative Computing, Scarsdale..................................................................................... 29, 53, 58 Michael Curtin, Instructional Technology Specialist, Edgemont.......................... 54, 55, 57 Jack Dean, Teacher, Greenacres............................................................................. 38 Maria DeAngelis, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................. 61 Trent DeBerry, Teacher, Heathcote........................................................................ 14 Katherine de la Garza, Elementary Science Enrichment Teacher, Scarsdale......... 34, 36, 40 Denise DelBalzo, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.............................................. 57 Sharon DeLorenzo, Teacher, Heathcote.................................................................. 13 Patty Dempsey, Teacher, Quaker Ridge................................................................. 13, 28 Carol Desoe, Math Chair, Scarsdale High School................................................... 13, 24 Anita DiBianco, Film and Video Artist................................................................... 26 Phyllis DiBianco, Librarian, Scarsdale High School ............................................... 26, 27 Robert DiYanni, Director of Arts and Aesthetic Education, Scarsdale ................. 23, 28, 30 Elisa Draper, Teacher, Quaker Ridge...................................................................... 16 Carol Duncan, Social Studies Consultant............................................................... 21 James Fabrizio, Assistant Professor, Mount St. Vincent College............................ 21 Rose Farrell, Teacher, Greenville........................................................................... 11 Judy Famellette, Science Helping Teacher, Scarsdale, Retired............................... 40 Sara Faranda, Teacher, Fox Meadow..................................................................... 37 Stephanie Feingold, Teacher, Greenville, retired.................................................... 29 Marisa Ferrara, Teacher, Greenville ...................................................................... 32 Judy Fink, Education Program Director, Stone Barns.............................................. 50 Linda Fisher, Arts Chair, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 56, 57, 58 Cora Five, Teacher, Edgewood............................................................................... 12 Barney Foltman, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................ 52 Cara Forray, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School...................................................... 50 Lisa Forte, Teacher, Edgewood............................................................................... 38, 40 Peggy Fox, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School........................................................ 33 Amber Frantz, Teacher, Heathcote......................................................................... 15 Jennifer Gilbert, Science Chair, Scarsdale Middle School....................................... 55 Cristine Gilliland, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School........................................ 17, 43, 55

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Neil Ginsberg, Teacher, Scarsdale High School...................................................... 18, 48 Jodi Giroux, Teacher, Heathcote.......................................................................... 53 Fred Goldberg, Assistant Principal, Scarsdale High School................................... 48 Dorothy Golden, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.............................................. 15, 17 Steve Goodman, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.......................................... 32, 41, 48 Monica Grey, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School............................................ 49 Maxine Greene, William F. Russell Professor of Philosophy and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, emerita........................................................ 30 Penny Hamlet, Teacher in Charge, Quaker Ridge................................................. 14, 26 David Hanson, Department of Chemistry, SUNY Stony Brook............................. 37 Rick Heckendorn, Assistant Professor, Manhattanville College............................ 42 Susan Hendler, Teacher, Quaker Ridge................................................................ 15, 28 Lindsey Hicks, Teacher, Heathcote.............................................................. 14, 31, 35, 38 Elise Hilf-Levine, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................ 37 Joyce Hoffman, Nurse, Quaker Ridge................................................................... 60 Ken Holvig, Head Computer Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School..............53, 56, 58, 59, 60 Barbara Horowitz, Librarian, Greenville............................................................... 29, 33 Bill Jackson, Elementary Math Teacher, Scarsdale............................................... 34 Joann Jacullo-Noto, Action Research consultant, former Director, Office of Teacher Education, Metropolitan Study Council, Teachers College, Columbia University........................................................ 18 Robert Keith, Physical Education Chair, Scarsdale Middle School......................... 52 Amy Kenney, Social Studies Helping Teacher, Scarsdale....................................... 40 Louise Kuklis, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School............................................ 25 Meghan Lahey, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................ 34 Lorella Lamonaca, Teacher, Edgewood................................................................. 31 Robyn Lane, Principal, Quaker Ridge................................................................... 14 Kathy Leary, Teacher, Heathcote.......................................................................... 53 David Levine, author, Teaching Empathy............................................................. 49 Ann Liptak, Senior Options Coordinator, Scarsdale High School.......................... 12 Beverley Lorie, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 45 Sue Luft, Teacher, Fox Meadow........................................................................... 29 Robert Marion, Einstein College of Medicine....................................................... 21 Lynn Mayocole, Professor, Westchester Community College............................... 21 Patricia McCallion, Teacher, Greenville............................................................... 30, 52 Mary Dee Merrell, Art Consultant......................................................................... 36, 42 Maria Micioni, American Sign Language Interpreter............................................. 47 Mary Jane Motl, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 21, 50 Steven Mounkhall, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.............................................. 20, 23 Art Nelson, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School................................................ 16 Meredythe Nowak, Teacher, Greenacres, Heathcote, Quaker Ridge...................... 60 Adrienne Onofri, Author, Educator........................................................................ 19 Lisa Onofri, Teacher, Heathcote............................................................................ 19 Nancy O’Rourke, Teacher, Edgewood .................................................................. 15 Jacqueline O’Shea, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School.................................... 45 Bevin Pagel, Teacher, Edgewood.......................................................................... 47, 52 Helen Pasternack, Teacher, Edgewood................................................................. 20 Nancy Pavia, Elementary Math Helping Teacher, Scarsdale.................................. 34, 36 Carole Phillips, Librarian, Greenacres................................................................ 15, 28, 29 Nicole Pisano, Teacher, Scarsdale High School ...................................................... 16 Pam Raines, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School................................................. 47 Steve Rambone, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................ 55

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Chris Reali, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School....................................................... 41, 43 Karin Reetz, Art Consultant................................................................................... 36, 42 Dawn Rivellini, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................. 31 Howard Rodstein, Teacher in Charge, Scarsdale Alternative School....................... 13 Kevin Roemer, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................. 52 Doug Rose, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................... 57, 59, 60 Marci Rothman, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 34 Cindy Sansone, Teacher-in-Charge, Greenacres..................................................... 15 Carol Schaeffer, Teacher, Edgewood...................................................................... 15 Steve Scharf, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................ 32, 42, 56 Jan Schorr, Librarian, Fox Meadow........................................................................ 15, 37 Deborah Schroer, Teacher, Greenville..................................................................... 30, 52 Dan Schuchat, Social Studies Chair, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School.......................... 15, 25 Judith Schwartz, Educational Consultant, former Director of STI, former STA President, cook and writer..................................................................... 38 Paul Sheehey, Teacher, Scarsdale High School....................................................... 20 Carol Shoshkes-Reiss, NYU and NYC Medical School........................................... 21 Susan Silkowitz, Teacher, Seely Place..................................................................... 45 Ilene Smith, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School................................................. 36, 49 Phil Smith, poet and artist...................................................................................... 35 Vivian Sonnenborn, Teacher, Greenville School..................................................... 18, 33 Jeannette Stockton, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School................................. 16, 25, 40 Jim Sullivan, Language Arts Helping Teacher, Scarsdale..................................... 13, 15,17 Ihor Szkolar, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.......................................................... 56 Len Tallevi, Social Studies Chair, Scarsdale Middle School...................................... 19, 42 Marie Tallevi, Teacher, Quaker Ridge...................................................................... 15, 42 Kim Theall, Teacher, Edgewood ............................................................................ 13 Paul Tomizawa, Teacher, Edgewood................................................................. 20, 22, 57 Jose Toscano, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................... 22, 24 Andrea Tripodi, Psychologist, Scarsdale Middle School ........................................ 24, 45 Jennifer Turetzky, Psychologist, Heathcote............................................................ 46, 47 Elizabeth Ungar, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................... 24 Andy Verboys, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.............................................. 58, 59, 60 Doug Vermes, Teacher, Scarsdale High School ...................................................... 54, 55 Tyler Volk, NYU and author Global Carbon Cycle................................................... 21 Steve Walsh, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School..................................................... 48, 56 Liz Waltzman, Librarian, Scarsdale Middle School................................................. 34 Sharon Waskow, Librarian, Scarsdale Middle School.......................................... 33, 34, 50 Joan Weber, Assistant Superintendent for Personnel and Administrative Services, Scarsdale ......................................................................................23, 27, 28, 30 Jeff Weigel, Teacher, Edgewood............................................................................ 52 Sarah Whittington, Foreign Language Chair, Scarsdale Middle School.................... 24 Jim Williams, Teacher, Scarsdale High School........................................................ 37, 56 Duncan Wilson, Assistant Principal, Scarsdale Middle School................................ 50 Mary Beth Wilson, Science Education Consultant.................................................. 51 Diane Wrobleski, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.................................................. 11,18 William Yang, Teacher, Greenacres ....................................................................... 29 Ban Har Yeap, author of Singapore Primary Math textbooks.................................. 36 Paul Yellin, National Director for Clinical Programs at All Kinds of Minds............. 47 Lisa Zawilinski, Staff Developer, University of Connecticut................................... 29 Art and Susan Zuckerman, hosts of a WVOX show and contributors to the Travel Channel............................................................................................... 20, 22

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Registration and Credit Information  You must register prior to the start of a course; registration and tuition payment ensure your place in a course. Please note that some courses have limited enrollment; register early to obtain your first choice. You may obtain a registration form from the STI office or online. You may also register by phone at the STI office, 721-2580. Checks should be made payable to the Scarsdale Teachers Institute.

How

to

Register

•Online: www.scarsdaleschools.org/sti. Receipt of payment secures your place in a course. If you register online, you must send a check to the STI office within 48 hours to guarantee your registration. •At the STI Office: Scarsdale High School, room 102 •By phone: 721-2580 Receipt of payment secures your place in a course. If you register by phone, you must send a check to the STI office within 48 hours to guarantee your registration. •By mail: send completed form and your check made payable to Scarsdale Teachers Institute to the STI, 2 Brewster Road, Scarsdale, New York 10583.

Non-Credit Courses

Courses in this catalogue labeled “non-credit” are those for which the Institute will not request Board of Education support. These courses will be supported solely by teachers’ tuition fees.

Salary Study Credit, Stipends

for

Courses

According to the STA contract, the Board of Education has agreed to approve, at the recommendation of the Accreditation Committee, courses for salary credit or a stipend and has set aside a sum of money to pay the instructional expenses of these courses. The Board approves a course for credit according to the following procedure. If a course furthers the educational goals of the District, the Institute Director submits it to the Accreditation Committee for review and recommendation and then to the Superintendent and Board of Education for approval. Assignments of salary credit will usually be announced before the course begins. Some courses will carry salary credit for teachers eligible for additional credits or a stipend for teachers at MA+75 or above. These teachers may obtain a maximum of eight credits per year for Institute courses. Upon application and approval, the eight-credit maximum noted above may be waived for STI courses where the STI Accreditation Committee determined such courses meet District goals. Two of these eight (8) credits may be taken in summer STI courses and may be applied to either the previous school year’s allotment or the upcoming school year’s allotment. In order to obtain salary credit or a stipend for an approved course, a teacher will be responsible for completing the course requirements within ninety days of completion of the course.

Emergency Closing In the event that the Scarsdale or Edgemont Schools are closed for the day or are closed during the day, STI courses for that day are cancelled. Course coordinators will arrange make-up times.

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Payment Policy

Registration Form

Please return entire page to the Scarsdale Teachers Institute, 2 Brewster Road, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Receipt of this registration form with payment secures your place in a course. The STI office will notify you if a course is not running. If you have any questions, please call 721-2580. Payment must be made before the course begins. No credit or stipend will be awarded without full payment. Please make checks payable to the Scarsdale Teachers Institute. Check must accompany registration form.

Cancellation Policy

No refunds will be issued for courses unless participant gives two-day notice to STI office. Scarsdale, Edgemont, and other Westchester residents are welcome to enroll in STI courses listed as “programs open to all.� Name _________________________________________________________________________ School _____________________________ Grade(s) _______________Tel. ext. ____________ Home Address _________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________ Home Phone _____________________________ Cell Phone ________________________________ Email Address Course #

Course Title

1.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

2.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

3.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

4.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

Amount Enclosed

Amount

$______________________

Please send this form to STI and keep a copy to remind yourself of upcoming courses for which you have registered.

Register beforehand!

Your timely registration assures your place in a course and can make the difference between a course running or being cancelled! Fee Schedule: $75 per credit for Scarsdale and Edgemont faculty and residents $45 per credit for Scarsdale and Edgemont non-teaching staff, retired teachers, and senior citizens $85 per credit for non-residents

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STI Policy Board 2008-2009 Susan Taylor, Director Kenneth Holvig, Assistant to the Director, Head Computer Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School Phyllis DiBianco, Librarian, Scarsdale High School, Policy Board Chair Valerie Abrahams, Scarsdale Parent-Teacher Council William Costanzo, Professor, Westchester Community College Gerald Crisci, Director of Instructional and Administrative Computing, Scarsdale Michael Curtin, Instructional Technology Specialist, Edgemont Michaeline Curtis, Board of Education, Edgemont John Dean, Teacher, Greenacres Linda Fisher, Art Department Chair, Scarsdale Middle School Kathleen Fox, Teacher, Seely Place Susan Groner, Resident, Scarsdale Elizabeth Guggenheimer, Board of Education, Scarsdale Penny Hamlet, Teacher in Charge, Quaker Ridge Marc Heller, Principal, Greenville Gwen Johnson, Teacher, Scarsdale High School John Klemme, Principal, Scarsdale High School Lorella Lamonaca, Teacher, Edgewood Michael McDermott, Principal, Scarsdale Middle School Trudy Moses, President, Scarsdale Teachers Association, Treasurer Lisa Onofri, Teacher, Heathcote Nicole Pisano, Teacher, Scarsdale High School Nancy Rodgers, Teacher, Fox Meadow Dan Schuchat, Social Studies Chair, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School Lynne Shain, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Scarsdale Paul Solomon, President, Edgemont Teachers Association Vivian Sonnenborn, Teacher, Greenville Jeannette Stockton, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School Sharon Waskow, Librarian, Scarsdale Middle School Joan Weber, Assistant Superintendent for Personnel & Administrative Services, Scarsdale Emma Wixted, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School Diane Wrobleski, Teacher, Scarsdale High School Gerry Young, Principal, Greenacres Fran Garafolo, STI Secretary

Policy Board Standing Committees

ACCREDITATION MINI GRANT John Dean Elizabeth Guggenheimer Phyllis DiBianco Ken Holvig Linda Fisher Gwen Johnson Mike McDermott Vivian Sonnenborn Lynne Shain Susan Taylor Vivian Sonnenborn Joan Weber Susan Taylor Gerry Young Joan Weber Past Directors of the STI  Judith Schwartz 1980-2002 Doris Breslow 1979-1980  Ralph Ricci 1975-1979 Werner Feig 1972-1975 Doris Breslow 1969-1972, founder

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Notes

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STI Fall/Winter '8-'09 Catalog  

STI Catalog

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