Page 1


WELCOME to our

WO R K S H O P T H I S I S W H E R E W E TA K E G R E A T IDEAS, MAKE THEM BETTER, AND THEN BRING THEM TO LIFE.


1

2

3

4

5


6

CONTENTS

7

9

Featured Project: Boilo

006

Letter from the MFA Coordinator

007

Welcome to our Home

008

Image Makers

011

Alumni Profile: Andrea Pippins

014

Telling our Story

018

Featured Project: Virtuoso

020

Alumni Profile: Caleb Heisey

022

Featured Project: Freetime

024

Alumni Profile: Mirim Seo

028

Generating Positive Change

030

St. James School Partnership

032

Alumni Profile: Noopur Agarwal

036

Featured Project: Nashta Exchange

038

Building Relationships

040

Alumni Profile: Jeremy Holmes

044

The Hatchery

046

Featured Project: Pieces

049

Alumni Profile: Lydia Nichols

050

Admission Requirements

052

Faculty

054

8

1–5 THE GRAD LAB The space we call home. 6 THE GREEN HALLWAY Not a bad commute at all with a coffee in your hand. IMAGES 7–9 THE GRAD LAB Books, books, more books, and the table where we meet to discuss ideas.

5


F E AT U R E D P R O J E C T

BOILO Josh Schott, 2014

Fun Fact: There is real Boilo in every bottle. The photos in the companion booklet were the documentation of making a huge batch for the final product.

What inspired this project?

What type of research did you conduct?

Boilo has been a tradition in my region of Pennsylvania for the longest time. Since I am a sucker for packaging and history, I thought it would be a fun opportunity to brand and design what Boilo might look like if it were a commercial product.

First and foremost I tried to connect with as many people of Lithuanian decent in my area as possible. Luckily, I came across some great folks who shared their insight and some family stories with me. Most people have had some experience with

Boilo where I’m from, so hearing how it plays different roles in family cultures was really interesting. Also, seeking out legitimate old family recipes for Boilo was key when making this project because I wanted to keep everything as authentic as possible. What were the goals of the project? The goal was to create a visual system for what I thought Boilo was really about: families. The visuals needed to be rugged but not too chiseled and

refined enough to portray the generations of family traditions. My ultimate goal was to make Boilo feel like your great grandmother from Lithuania passed down a family tradition from the old country and now it’s your turn to partake in the festivities. Boilo is made with tough love from the coal region.


Dear Prospective Applicant, So you are interested in obtaining an MFA degree? Maybe you want to go into teaching, perhaps you know you have more potential than your current job allows for, or it could be that you have big ideas that need help bringing them to fruition. Whatever your personal reasons are for choosing a graduate program, we understand that this is a big commitment and that you want to be sure you select the right program for you. Here is what I can tell you about the Graphic and Interactive Design MFA at Tyler School of Art. The program is small with class sizes that guarantee you more one-to-one contact with faculty and peers. Our internationally recognized faculty work closely with students, pushing you to do the best work you have ever produced while managing the challenge of self-authoring work that you care deeply about—work that matters. You will have access to the best equipment, including a digital fabrication studio, with vinyl cutting, laser etching, custom embroidery, and 3d printing. Access to the heart of Philadelphia with its rich arts and culture scene—museums, events and services—is just a 5 minute train ride away.

ABOVE GRADUATE PROFESSOR, JOSEPH SCORSONE (MFA PROGRAM HEAD 1982–2009) AT AN MFA THESIS EXHIBITION WITH KRISTINE HERRICK (MFA 1983) AND CURRENT PROGRAM HEAD, KELLY HOLOHAN. (KRISTINE HERRICK DESIGNED THE TEMPLE T LOGO AS A GRADUATE STUDENT.)

Graduate school at Tyler is a chance to be creatively selfish for two years. It’s an opportunity to create work you never though was possible. Full disclosure—it’s intense, but it’s worth the investment in your creative self and your ongoing growth as a designer and a person. Maybe Tyler’s MFA in Graphic and Interactive Design is right for you? Check us out and see for yourself.

Kelly Holohan MFA Program Head Graphic and Interactive Design

7


WELCOME TO OUR HOME This is where it all happens, our crucible, our workshop, our incubator. Whatever you want to call it, it’s where we explore form, develop technique, and generate ideas that will resonate far beyond these walls. Tyler’s MFA program in Graphic and Interactive Design [GAID] is an intensive two-year immersion in the practice of design. The program is highly selective, seeking students whose work demonstrates conceptual depth and experimentation, strong visual skills, and an exceptional degree of self-motivation. The program emphasizes the role of designer as author and designer as entrepreneur, with students defining the content and form of large-scale, semester-long projects in a wide variety of forms such as books, posters, folios, games, clocks, wearable design, interactive narrative, web sites and experiential design. Extensive research, writing, image making and editing, as well as exploration of form and technique, are integral to the process. Small graduate class sizes allow for direct inter­action with internationally recognized faculty members, other design students, and MFA students in many other Tyler programs. The

1

2

3

4

environment is intense, yet supportive, with students forming close relationships with faculty, staff and peers. Students form lifelong friendships during their two years with us. Graphic and Interactive Design MFA candidates share a large open studio space with state-ofthe-art equipment. Each student is assigned a workstation with computer as well as their own space for creating. The studio includes a smart classroom where graduate classes are held, as well as a kitchen and lounge area. Our alumni network is widespread, with people working in many design fields across the country and internationally. Former Tyler students find work in studios and agencies both large and small. They work in diverse design disciplines, including illustration, editorial design, publishing, advertising, web design, interaction design, experiential design, social design, design for film and television, among others. Many Tyler MFA graduates go on to open their own studios and create and market their own entrepreneurial projects.

IMAGES 1–4

FAR RIGHT

PRETZELVANIA Emily Colburn Graduate Project, Fall, 2013

EMILY COLBURN AND MFA COORDINATOR KELLY HOLOHAN REVIEWING SKETCHES

“ If they are looking to develop their critical thinking and design thinking skills, to be a part of a strong creative community, to have access to top-notch creative thinkers and to high quality resources, then Tyler is definitely for where they need to be.”

– A N D R E A P I P P I N S , M FA 2009

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


9


TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


M A K I N G R E L E VA N T

IMAGES WITH OUR CRAF T

WE ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO EXPLORE MANY FORMS OF IMAGE MAKING AT TYLER. We do not advocate for a particular style, but instead believe form should be appropriate to the content. MFA students have many opportunities to experiment with ways of visualizing their concepts during their time with us. In addition to their graduate coursework, MFA students take elective courses, allowing for creative exploration with both traditional and digital media regardless of the deliverable.

WALK IN BEAUTY: A TYPEFACE David Jones Graduate Project, Fall 2012

11


1

2

1 CRIT DAY Grads and MFA Coordinator Kelly Holohan review Caleb Heisey’s PA State Patch Sketches. 2 LENDING A HAND Grad student David Jones instructs sophomore undergraduates on the finer points of creating clean mock-ups. 3 REVIEWS Recruiters and alumni at a portfolio showcase. 4 HANDS ON Grad student Lydia Nichols in the studio. 5 SHOW TIME Grads help prepare one of the exhibition spaces for an upcoming reception. 6 PEER TO PEER First and second year MFA students work together to review each other’s work. 7 PEER TO PEER Hatchery director, Bryan Satalino reviews logo iterations with MFA student, Noopur Agarwal. 8 EXPERT OPINION Graduate Faculty member Dermot MacCormack gives his two cents on an interactive project.


3

4

5

6

7

8


ALUMNI PROFILE

“ I felt safe, supported, and grateful for being able to express the challenges with my professor and classmates.”

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G

– A N D R E A P I P P I N S , 2009

1 I LOVE MY HAIR Student Project

4 CARIBBEING POSTER Professional Project

2 CAMPAIGN TO SUSTAIN POSTER Student Project

5 BLACKSTAR FILM FESTIVAL Professional Project

3 BROWN BETTY INTERIOR Professional Project

6 TV LAND ROCKS Professional Project


1

2

ANDREA PIPPINS MFA Class of 2009 Where are you working professionally now, and what are you working on? I just wrapped up a special year contract at Maryland Institute College of Art where I was teaching courses in graphic design. I will continue teaching there as an adjunct professor but my focus is now on developing my own creative studio. I am currently working on graphics for the BlackStar Film Festival, this is my third year working with them, a series of Instagram animations for Carnival Cruise, and an illustration project for USAID. 3

For a thesis project during my third semester in the GAID program I created a series of hair illustrations for a poster campaign called I Love My Hair. After posting images online the “brand” picked up a lot of recognition which resulted in a line of t-shirts, limited edition prints, and used as a greeting card for Hallmark Cards. Most recently I signed a deal with Random House/Schwartz & Wade to illustrate an adult coloring book called I Love My Hair. Like the original concept, the book will celebrate the hair we were born with through fun lettering and illustration that can be colored-in. It’s a dream project that was birthed out of an open-ended graduate design course. How did Tyler prepare you for the work you are interested in? I have a unique experience because I also attended Tyler as an undergraduate design student. The design program really prepared me for the various studio work I would be doing as a design professional. From doing illustration at Hallmark Cards to designing on-air spots and print collateral at TV Land/Nick@Nite, Tyler prepared me with a broad range of skills.

4

5

After five years of working in the industry, I returned to Tyler to pursue my MFA in graphic design. With my work experience I entered the program with a fresh perspective, and my goal was to immerse myself in work I really wanted to create. The flexibility in the projects allowed me to engage in topics that I wanted to explore, but were also rigorous in a way that challenged how I solved design problems. The professors were always enthusiastic and supportive and generous with their time and resources. My time in the graduate program pushed my creative process through experimentation and collaboration. What memories can you share from your time at Tyler?

6

Because our class sizes were small, we were able to have intimate conversations as a group, which I always loved. Oftentimes, because our projects were usually personal, our discussions would involve personal stories that were sensitive and sometimes emotional. I remember a time when we were having a discussion about me being the only person of color in the program at the time and what that meant to me, and I felt safe, supported, and grateful for being able to express the challenges with my professor and classmates. What would you tell a prospective graduate student about Tyler’s program? I would tell a prospective student that if they are looking to gain or perfect their creative skills, whether in design software or analog, Tyler is a great place to practice and create. If they are looking to really develop their critical thinking and design thinking skills, be a part of a strong creative community, have access to top-notch creative thinkers, and have access to high quality resources, then Tyler is definitely for where they need to be. 15


1

2

1 ALIBI SPIRITS David Jones Graduate Project, Spring 2013 2 ALIBI SPIRITS: THUMBNAIL One of the early sketches that ended up spurring the final design. 3–6 EX, Y, Z: AN ALPHABET BOOK OF FORGETABLE BOYFRIENDS Stephanie Werning Graduate Project, Spring 2014 7–9 PAPER HEROES Stephanie Werning Graduate Project, Fall 2015

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


3

4

7

5

8

6

9

17


USING OUR OWN

VOIC E to T E L L the S T O R Y

SELF AUTHORSHIP IS AN IMPORTANT FOCUS OF THE MFA PROGRAM IN GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN. Tyler faculty help students find their own voices and develop original content that communicates their ideas verbally and visually. Parameters on assignments are intentionally loose to allow students to find their own path through experimentation that is encouraged and expected. Whether working on authorship projects that encompass personal expressions or entrepreneurial ventures, collaborating with other disciplines or affecting positive social change—Tyler’s design students are passionately engaged in their work.

BOILO HANDBOOK Josh Schott Graduate Project, Spring 2014

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


19


F E AT U R E D P R O J E C T

VIRTUOSO Caleb Heisey, 2012

What is Virtuoso? Virtuoso is a trivia based board game in which you answer questions and progress around an orchestra-shaped board. I wanted the game to look and feel like highly-crafted musical instruments — using visual language from piano and violin construction. Who was it designed for? The game is meant only for those who have a firm

understanding of basic music theory. The goal is to have Virtuoso in high school and college classrooms where students can practice and enjoy music theory. How do you play? Some of the cards you might draw are “fate” cards based on music-geek jokes and terminology. These cards can either hinder or help you on your pursuit around the board. Also, unique

to Virtuoso is the “audition” in which players can challenge fellow players in a lightning round of questions in order to progress faster across the board. This is based on the real life experience of moving up “chairs” in an orchestra. It is more desirable to be the 1st chair of your instrumental section - it carries prestige and honor. In addition, the dice of the game are not normal dice. They are based on musical time signatures and beats per measure.


How does someone win the game? The biggest honor of the orchestra (besides conductor) is the 1st chair violin called the “concertmaster.” In Virtuoso, the game is won by achieving the final chair to become concertmaster. What were some of the challenges you faced when designing the gameplay? By far the most challenging aspect of the game was crafting and finding the right materials to

emulate the “preciousness” of musical instruments. It was a fine line to walk when designing graphics for such beautiful raw materials. The gameplay itself came quite quickly. Once I cracked into that classical music language, the connections to board game mechanics seemed to be a natural fit.

What kind of recognition has the project received? I have received an overwhelming response to the game since it debuted online. There is a huge demographic of people who do enjoy classical music trivia. The board game has been featured on thedieline.com, NPR, lovelypackage. com, FastCoDesign, Gizmodo, and Designboom.


ALUMNI PROFILE

CALEB HEISEY MFA Class of 2013 Where are you working professionally now, and what are you working on? Bluecadet in Philadelphia. I primarily work on interactive touchscreens, developing a compelling visual style and crafting compelling user experiences. How did Tyler prepare you for the work you are interested in? Tyler’s MFA program, focusing on authorship, has allowed me to expand my role as a designer. In any given project, my roles could vary between graphic designer, copywriter, product designer, strategist, producer, or illustrator. Having that versatility gives any Tyler student a leg up on others with a more traditional experience. Did Tyler help you develop your own voice? During my time at Tyler, I discovered my voice in illustration. While working on the visual pacing of picture books, I developed an illustration style that has influenced my work ever since. It was essential to have that focused time to play and experiment with image making. What memories can you share from your time in with us? A story about an interaction, a project, a professor, a peer, a class? Paul Kepple was an amazing instructor and mentor. In one of our classes together, I was being extremely rigid with my project trying to force the visuals to match my ideas. Paul told me, “don’t be a slave to the concept.” Ever since then, when I feel like forcing the design, I remind myself to think outside of my comfort zone— be ready to throw out versions 1 through 5 and start with a fresh perspective. What would you tell a prospective graduate student about Tyler’s program? The individual attention that you get in the program is a unique and rewarding experience. Graduate class sizes are rarely over 8 students. You get a focused and intense education.

1 WEDDING IN THE WOODS ICONS Professional Project

5 NORFOLK SOUTHERN PATCHES Professional Project

2 AUTHOR SERIES POSTERS Graduate Project

6 CADEJO Graduate Project

3 DARWIN BOOK SERIES Graduate Project

7 PA PATCHES Graduate Project

4 FOLKSAGA Graduate Project


1

2

3

“ The individual attention you get in the program is a unique and rewarding experience. You get a focused and intense education.”

– C A LEB H EI S E Y, M FA 2013

4

5

7

6

7


F E AT U R E D P R O J E C T

FREE TIME David Jones, 2014

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G

What inspired this project? I’ve always been an avid traveller. My parents and I emigrated to the States while I was young and I think that they’ve instilled a European sense of vacation in my siblings and I. What I mean by that is that there is this mindset in which a summer holiday based around travel is seen more of as a right than the guilty pleasure. An article in Time Magazine describing this more or less American mindset towards vacation as being an indication

of laziness or lack of commitment caught my eye a few years ago and I decided to use it a springboard from which to conduct some research. What did your research indicate? That the “problem,” if you wish to call it that, is actually fairly acute. The US is the only industrialized nation in the world without any type of guidelines regulating the amount of paid vacation days employers must provide to their employees.

We rank at the bottom in terms of how much time the average worker takes off and in many cases, the paucity of vacation days most American workers do have are not used for fear of being replaced in the workplace. Although this project is nearly two years old, this topic is actually starting to gain quite a bit of traction recently. Why is this important? There is a tremendous amount of literature


regarding the benefits of travel and time off. Aside from the seemingly contradictory fact that employees who take regular, substantial vacations tend to be more productive, they also bring valuable perspectives and insight back to the workplace, enhancing the skills they in turn are then able to provide their employers. I think Mark Twain put it best, and I’m paraphrasing a bit, when he said that, “travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness.”

How did all this shape the final piece? Once I had the topic and the information the script wrote itself. I defer to a kind of dry humor whenever I can since I’m more comfortable being a bit snarky honestly. I think that the 50s black and white, Leave it to Beaver-style PSA announcement being written from the point of view of someone more or less dismissing this issue as frivolous allowed me to lift it out of a bit of a rut, tonally speaking, into something that would be a bit more

entertaining. The characters and the graphics are all done to kind of capture that analog, Americana feel which I thought was critical in the sense that it was the time of the “American Dream” and that sense of hard work and no play juxtaposed nicely against the admittedly somewhat entitled argument I was making. In the end, I was very happy with the results.

25


1

2

3

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G

4


5

6

7

8

9

1-4

NURA MURA : THE GAME OF ABORIGINAL EXPLORATION Student Project, Bryan Satalino

5 GUIDE TO ROME Student Project, Emily Colburn 6 CLEAN BREAK CANDY PACKAGING Student Project, Kathy Mueller 7 

8 

10

FERIVALE Student Project, Kathy Mueller

9 CADEJO  Student Project, Caleb Heisey 10 

PHIL LATELY Student Project, Lydia Nichols

HIP HOPTIMISM Student Project, Zan Barnett

27


ALUMNI PROFILE

MIRIM SEO MFA Class of 2012 Where are you working professionally now? I currently work at Anthropologie, URBN inc. where I’m a Brand Artist in the Art Department. I’m responsible for creating art for Anthropologie marketing. How did Tyler prepare you for the work you are doing? The Tyler GAID MFA program focused on Authorship. We created our own content for our designs. This required research about our subject matter and taking responsibility for all parts of the project, including concept development, writing, design, and making final mockups. With this program, I learned not only graphic design skills but it also helped me find my own voice. How did Tyler help you develop your own voice? I am interested in environmental issues and keep trying to solve problems through graphic design. During my time in the program, I tried to find ideas from nature to solve environmental issues. Tyler faculty helped me figure out how to develop simple ideas and create professional prototypes. The program demands very high quality results. One of my student works, SEW, may be published with Chronicle books. What memories can you share from your time in Tyler? Tyler students, faculty and alumni in Philadelphia are all connected to each other. During my MFA study, I spent an entire 2 years with classmates and we became a family, as it is a small group. My peers helped me so much to settle in a foreign country and we are still hanging out very often. They are my family in the U.S. What would you tell a prospective graduate student about Tyler’s MFA program? This program has completely changed my life. Studying abroad is much more challenging for foreigners but totally worth doing. I highly recommend this program to anyone who is ambitious. Working in small groups under the keen guidance of the professors will help your efforts pay off.

1 ANTHROPOLOGIE PACKAGING Professional Project

5 ANTHOPOLOGIE 2015 Professional Project

2 CHOMP Graduate Project

6 A TO ZOO Graduate Project

3 LANDFILLS AT A GLANCE Graduate Project

7 A TO ZOO (DETAIL) Graduate Project

4 SEW Graduate Project

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


1

2

3

4

5

7

6

“ This program has completely changed my life.”

– M I R I M S E O, M FA 2012

29


TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


G E N E R AT I N G P O S I T I V E

CHANGE THROUGH DESIGN

DESIGN FOR SOCIAL, CULTURAL, POLITICAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS HAS ALWAYS BEEN A PART OF THE TYLER DESIGN MFA EXPERIENCE IN GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN. Past projects have included creating an awareness campaign to encourage women of color to stop using damaging chemicals on their hair, celebrating women of STEM as a way of encouraging girls to consider these careers, and connecting students in India to U.S. high school students through food culture. MFA students in Graphic and Interactive Design are strong advocates for social causes and groups of people. We strongly believe this is some of the most important work designers can do.

BIM BAM BUM BOP A graduate project from Noopur Agarwal in which rhythm-based teaching games were developed and designed for use in the instruction of students with learning disabilities.

31


P

A

R

T

N

E

As part of their Graduate Thesis course at Tyler School of Art, first year MFA students were prompted to come up with a group project that would center around a collaboration with the St. James School, a middle school in the Allegheny West neighborhood of Philadelphia. After meeting with the St. James administration and learning about their mission, culture, and immediate needs, the MFA students were impressed by the importance placed on the arts in the St. James curriculum. This inspired the MFA class to create a project that would showcase their passion for art education. The MFA Design class conceptualized a collaborative silkscreen poster project in which the St. James students learned about design, the creative process, and exhibiting work. Each graduate design student worked closely with small groups of students to conceptualize and design a silkscreen poster. The final outcome was a large-scale poster exhibition. The St. James students created posters with positive themes inspired by the St. James student pledge. The pledge, which all St. James students learn to recite, highlights the core values of the school community. The MFA class wanted to incorporate these principles into the project, and asked students to pick their favorite themes from the pledge. The final themes were knowledge, envisioning the future, and positive change. Over the course of the semester, the MFA students developed close relationships with the St. James students through repeated visits between the two schools. During these visits students developed ideas, experimented with design, took field trips, screen printed their posters, and finally, celebrated their achievement at the culminating exhibition. In the last stages of the project, the MFA class worked on promotional materials for the exhibition. They branded the show “Dreams on Screens� and created an identity to be applied to posters, postcards, digital ads, notebooks, pencils, stickers, and other promotional materials. These items were sold at the show (along with the posters) with all proceeds benefiting St. James School. The exhibition took place at Tyler School of Art in a highly visible gallery space that is open to the public. The MFA students curated and installed the show, which included diptychs of the St. James student posters and the MFA student posters hung side by side. Additionally, the exhibition included project photos, videos, posters displaying the St. James pledge, and process artwork made by the students. Small runs of each poster were available for purchase along with promotional souvenirs. St. James students also helped run a printing station so exhibition guests could print their own postcards to commemorate the show.

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G

R

S

H

I

P


33


TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


35


ALUMNI PROFILE

NOOPUR AGARWAL MFA Class of 2014 Where are you working professionally now, and what are you working on? I am the lead marketing designer at Snapchat in Los Angeles. My focus is to help support the organization as it positions itself as a major player in the media industry. My role is business focused |as opposed to consumer facing (the app itself). I am helping to shape what advertising looks like on Snapchat and helping to brand our value proposition to potential advertisers. This includes an all-encompassing brand campaign with editorial content, logo, info graphics, high-end leave-behinds, video, print and digital assets. It is highly collaborative, really fast-paced and a lot of problem solving. How did Tyler prepare you for the work you are interested in? In every aspect of my professional career I have had to wear multiple hats. Due to the nature of Tyler’s program—focused on authorship, and taking things from concept to completion, I was forced to learn and cultivate all aspects of the storytelling process—writing, image making, technical skills, and more importantly how to surprise and delight your audience. I learned the value of a good pun and was exposed to many artists and work that I continue to look up to. Long hours and long nights also taught me to start drinking coffee again and that 10 years into my career I am still able to pull all-nighters to get the job done. Did Tyler help you develop your own voice? Through the freedom and gentle guidance given during each semester we were really afforded a freedom to explore and create for whatever topic or medium we chose. Because of this, like most authors, we “write what we know.” My peers, who worked with me throughout my two years in the program, pointed out common themes in my work. It was then that I realized I had developed a voice. My tendency was to draw on personal experiences, my heritage, and a mostly overbearing need to help people by force-feeding them.

1 RIKKI TIKKI TAVI Graduate Project 2 LETTING GO KITE Graduate Project 3 THE BOTTOM LINE Graduate Project 4 SEASONALITY CLOCK Graduate Project

5 LEARN YOUR HOMOPHONES Graduate Project 6 LETTING GO REEL Graduate Project 7 WE ARE SISTERS Graduate Project

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


1

2

What memories can you share from your time in at Tyler?

3

By far my most outstanding memory from grad school would have to be my art history seminar/ study abroad in Rome. The program challenged students to be thought leaders. There was no better way than meeting new colleagues while studying art and philosophy to inspire us to be keen observers of the world. I left the summer, challenged and refreshed and ready to get back to my studio practice.

4

The final MFA show that we had at the end of our graduate tenure will always serve as a milestone in my career. Again I was unable to see common themes, and growth in my work until it was all up in one room. We were able to show our friends and family, who were unintentionally neglected for pixels, pencils, and paints, what we had been up to for the past 2 years. What would you tell a prospective graduate student about Tyler’s program? Tyler is an intimate program. You develop lasting friendships with your professors and colleagues. Once you are part of the family, you immediately tap into a network of students, alums and industry professionals. Perhaps one of the most rewarding parts of Tyler’s program was the opportunity to mentor undergraduate students.

5

6

7

“ Once you are part of the family, you immediately tap into a network of students, alums and industry professionals.”

– N O O P U R AG A RWA L , M FA , 2014

37


1

F E AT U R E D P R O J E C T

NASHTA EXCHANGE Noopur Agarwal, 2014 What is Nashta Exchange? Research shows that students living in poverty in Mumbai end up dropping out of school when earning a small wage takes precedence. There is a better attendance rate in educational programs that

offer meals to their students. Through Nashta Exchange, U.S. high school students learn to cook and sell Pav Bhaji, a popular Indian dish, at their very own food stall where all of the proceeds go towards buying meals for underprivileged high schoolers in India. Nashta Exchange provides the students with tool kits featuring everything they need to get started. Through social media the program provides a platform where both student groups can interact.

Who can participate? Nashta Exchange targets high school students around the ages of 14–16. There is currently a student group from Plymouth Whitemarsh High School, located in a Philadelphia suburb, participating with a group of students from the Akanksha Foundation’s Cuff Parade, Mumbai After School Program. We wanted to work with freshman and sophomores in particular so that they could grow together and develop lasting

friendships over many years. Through communication, leadership, service, and awareness we were optimistic that this opportunity might help with their college prep. We hope to one day expand the pilot project and include more schools, students, teachers, and partnerships. What are the goals of the project? Originally we set out to help the classroom in Mumbai sustain a food program and thereby


encourage attendance. For our American counterparts we hoped to provide exposure to other cultures and experiences, health and cooking. Our goals have since evolved from being just food focused, as we realized there was a need across both groups to practice their communication skills. Through the blog, both groups practice writing— and speaking English, if that is their second language—and learn to use technology.

What has the response been so far? Both students and teachers are more enthusiastic than I could have ever imagined though we are still trying to convince the rest of the student body population at Plymouth Whitemarsh High that Pav Bhaji is not all that weird if you just try it. Despite the hesitation, we were able to raise enough money to provide a weeks worth a meals for our Mumbai students, and send 3 of them to a basic computer skills class.

After spending time cooking and selling with the American students and visiting the Indian students, I realized that both groups have rallied together like family. Even students who have left the program for one reason or another, always come back to visit if there is an event. Parents too have gotten involved. We have received a lot of encouragement and support from the faculty at both institutions in order to keep growing the program.

The project received a Design Ignites Change student grant, how will this allow the project to grow? The grant we received from Design Ignites Change got the initiative off the ground by allowing us to pilot the first program. World Studios also paired us with several mentors, from food service professionals, to business consultants who really forced us to document and plan and think about what it would mean to actually scale Nashta Exchange into a sustainable and franchised venture.


BUILDING AND

STRENGTHENING R E L AT I O N S H I P S

WE VALUE THE CLOSE-KNIT RELATIONSHIPS THAT ARE FORMED BETWEEN TYLER STUDENTS, ALUMNI, FACULTY, AND DESIGN PROFESSIONALS. Tyler MFA graduates in design build lifetime connections with their peers and faculty in our program. We frequently invite alumni back to Tyler to speak and jury design exhibitions. Our design alumni are generous and always willing to help out a recent graduate relocating to a new city. One of the exciting ways the MFA program in Graphic and Interactive Design connects with design professionals is through our MFA workshop. For almost two decades, we have invited renowned designers and/or illustrators to work on a project for a two-day long workshop with our MFA students. The projects given in the workshop are in the invited professional’s area of expertise. These workshops give MFA candidates the opportunity to work with some of the design industry’s most prestigious practitioners.

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


MFA ALUM AT THE BARNES

Graphic and Interactive Design alumni and faculty come out to support a presentation by Andrea Pippins of her philosophy and work at the Barnes Museum. From left: Bernardo Magulis (MFA 2010), Neha Agarwal (MFA 2006) , Steve Decusatis (BFA 2002), Beth Shirell (MFA 2009), Professor Kelly Holohan, Andrea Pippins (MFA 2009), and Professor Alice Drueding. Photo by Stanley T. Morgan III (BFA 2004)

41


1

2

3

4

5

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


6

GUEST SPEAKERS Tyler’s Graphic and Interactive Design program has hosted a number of artists through the years. The following list includes some of the people who have inspired Tyler MFA students over the years.

7

1 ROBYNNE RAYE Robynne poses for a photograph along with Grad students lucky enough to participate in a two day workshop in 2014.

4

2 LOUISE FILI Louise with MFA Coordinator Kelly Holohan in 2013.

5 ROBYNNE RAYE In action offering insight to students and faculty alike during her workshop.

3 PAULA SCHER An alumna of Tyler, she gives her perspective on a recent installation in Tyler’s “Temple Contemporary” Gallery Space.

4 DEBBIE MILLMAN Greeting a student before announcing her decision in a from jurying a student show.

Gail Anderson

Headcase Design

Jonathon Rosen

Melinda Beck

The Heads of State

Laurie Rosenwald

Polly Becker

House Industries

Anthony Rudka

Matteo Bologna

Jordan Isip

Stefan Sagmeister

Calef Brown

Alexander Isley

Paula Scher

Charles Burns

Chip Kidd

Robert Sedlack

Mike Calkins

Robin Landa

Lanny Sommese

Design Army

Luba Lukova

Joe Sorren

Roberto de Vicq

Debbie Millman

James Victore

Steven Doyle

Christoph Niemann

Carin Goldberg

Maurizio Poletto

Todd and Esther Watson

Louise Fili

Robynne Raye

Steven Guarnaccia

Scotty Reifsnyder

Craig Welsh Richard and Judith Wilde

ROBERTO DE VICQ DE CUMPTICH Roberto directed a book cover project in his workshop with students. One of the solutions was chosen by the publisher to be produced.

4 PAULA SCHER Paula during her MFA workshop with students and faculty.

43


ALUMNI PROFILE

JEREMY HOLMES MFA Class of 2005 Where are you working professionally now, and what are you working on? I’m currently an author/illustrator creating children’s books out of my home studio. I’m working on my next picture book, which just so happens to be a seed planted while at Tyler. The working title is “What in the World is a Thingamajig? I’m also working on a wonderful chapter series titled, “The Secrets of the Dragon Tomb,” by Patrick Samphire. I’d tell you more about both, but I can’t and we both know what will need to happen if I do. How did Tyler prepare you for the work you are interested in? I knew I wanted to become an author/illustrator of children’s books. Tyler helped me build the level of portfolio needed to get my foot in the door of all the major publishing houses. It not only elevated my authoring and image-making capabilities, it also fine-tuned my overall process and work ethic. Did Tyler help you develop your own voice? Tyler taught me how to discover, author an execute an idea. Sounds simple. It’s, by far, the most challenging thing I’ve ever done.

1 SPRING SHADOWS Professional Project 2 TEMPLETON TWINS Professional Project 3 THERE WAS AN OLD LADY WHO SWALLOWED A FLY Graduate Project 4 THINGAMAJIG Graduate Project 5 POEM-MOBILES Professional Project

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


1

What memories can you share from your time in Tyler? Prior to grad school, I worked at SK Designworks in Philly. Here and there we’d work with the infamous and uber-talented Paul Kepple on a project. His work is on another level. It blows my mind. So you can imagine my nerves as I signed up for his art direction class at Tyler.

2

It’s the end of my final semester. I apprehensively walk into my children’s book review with Paul, my hands clammy. I’m the most nervous I’ve been for any review. Paul looks down at my book, “There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly,” and slowly, quietly, begins to turn each page. He doesn’t say a word, he just meticulously examines each and every creative decision I’ve made. As he flips the final page and the mechanisms of the book close the Old Lady’s eyes, laying her to eternal rest, he turns to me and says, “Jeremy, I thought this might end up one of the corniest ideas I’d ever seen, but instead, it’s one of the best.” At that very moment, I could have swallowed a fly and contentedly died.

4

What would you tell a prospective graduate student about Tyler’s program? Tyler’s Graphic and Interactive Design MFA program will push you to your outermost creative limits. You’ll go places you never knew existed. You’ll build impossible things.

3

“ Tyler is the reason I’m able to do what I love.” 5

– J ER EM Y H O L M E S , M FA 2005

45


E V O LV I N G P R O J E C T S I N T O

MARKETABLE PRODUCTS

THE HATCHERY IS A NEW INITIATIVE WITHIN THE GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN PROGRAM THAT HELPS STUDENTS SHAPE THEIR PROJECTS INTO REAL, MARKETABLE PRODUCTS. No longer limited to traditional design disciplines like print or web, designers now have the opportunity to explore design across myriad applications. Student projects like laser-cut typographic wood coasters, printed mugs, clocks, and even custom dartboards have been incubated by The Hatchery.

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


THE ANNUAL POP-UP MARKET

The Hatchery hosts its annual pop-up market in October as part of the citywide DesignPhiladelphia festival that also coincides with the Tyler Art Market. Students involved with The Hatchery participate in building and selling limited runs of their designed goods to shoppers in the Tyler Atrium. More museum store than craft table, much thought is put into the actual design and layout of the retail experience as well as the products themselves. Integral to this entrepreneurial experience is students having their creative work so directly valued by customers.

47


1

2

ENTREPRENEURSHIP Tyler Graphic and Interactive Design has produced countless design entrepreneurs over the years. Jessica Hische, Mary Kate McDevitt, and The Heads of State all embody the spirit of design entrepreneurship—designers who create for themselves and produce their creation for others.

3

4

Building a business around an well-designed idea has never been easier. The internet has made it possible to reach audiences in a way never before possible, and many of the difficult aspects of connecting to customers to products—e-commerce, inventory, shipping, etc.—have been streamlined into simple, easy to use apps. Even with a great idea and these new digital tools, an entrepreneur still needs structure. At Tyler we go beyond design to explore the real world applications of running a creative business. Building a business plan, marketing, and figuring out fulfillment are key to making your goals a reality.

5

6

Designers have always worn many hats. We often see a client’s idea through inception, prototyping, branding, marketing, selling, and even delivery. These skills and experiences can translate to our own projects as well. The Tyler Graphic and Interactive Design MFA Program will not only prepare you to build a feasible and viable project, it will help you turn that project into a reality.

1 WAVES Students in and Entreprneurship class 2 COZY KID SCARFS Zan Barnett, Hatchery Project, 2015 3 MIND YOUR P’S AND Q’S Joshua Schott Hatchery Project, 2015 4 ANDRO WRISTWEAR Nikki Eastman Hatchery Project, 2015 5 HALF FULL COASTERS Karen Watkins Hatchery Project, 2015 6 BOOK MARKS Stephanie Werning Hatchery Project, 2015 7 COFFEE CUP CREATURES Stephanie Werning Hatchery Project, 2015 8 THE CLUCK Jess Ruggerio Hatchery Project, 2014

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G

7

8


F E AT U R E D P R O J E C T

PIECES Katie Savage, 2015 What is Pieces? Pieces is a parent company that currently features three lines of wooden art puzzles; Hex, Modello, and Visage. The goal of Pieces is to create an interactive work of art that the consumer can enjoy at home.

What inspired this project?

What type of research did you conduct?

What type of market plan have you developed?

My main motivation for our entrepreneurship class was to take advantage of a laser-cutter and to use wood as the material for creating a product. From there I landed on fine art puzzles; I drew inspiration from cubism and artists including Modigliani and Picasso. I wanted to create a “work of art� that you can own and enjoy interacting with.

Aside from visual references, a major component of this project was sourcing materials. Our professor was very knowledgeable and helpful in finding vendors for wood, magnets, and different types of finishes. The hard part was figuring out (through trial and error) the best methods to create a finished product. I also was careful to research any competition, to ensure the different products that I developed were unique.

In terms of marketing, the main goal was to start small on a site featuring handcrafted goods, like Etsy, with a built in audience. Ultimately, they would sell through a Shopify store, and promote and connect to a hand-craft community on Instagram. One of my goals for Pieces is to enter into the museum gift store market. I plan to adapt certain works of art from specific museums into puzzles, that could then be sold in the museum gift shop.


ALUMNI PROFILE

LYDIA NICHOLS MFA Class of 2013 Where are you working professionally now, and what are you working on? I’m in the middle of transitioning from full-time freelancer to Google Doodler! It’s been a crazy, wonderful year with projects ranging from alphabet posters to reindeer baseball cards. There have many, many anthropomorphized animals and objects! How did Tyler prepare you for the work you are interested in? My favorite part about Tyler was both the freedom and the parameters. It sounds a bit like an oxymoron, but pushing constraints is what yields interesting ideas and solutions. Remembering that is a valuable lesson when returning to the client driven work world. Did Tyler help you develop your own voice? Every project at Tyler was an opportunity to flex all my muscles— design, illustration, research, problem solving. It was never just one aspect of design. When I started at Tyler, I was just an illustrator with an interest in design, but when I left, I was a holistic, balanced image-maker and storyteller. What memories can you share from your time in Tyler? Many, many, many hours of work, but always lots of laughter within those hours. I was lucky to leave Tyler with an MFA and a handful of goofy, dependable, and lifelong friends. What would you tell a prospective graduate student about Tyler’s program? The inclusivity of Tyler’s program is what makes it so unique and dynamic. MFA candidates come from all different backgrounds— design, journalism, illustration, painting, marketing, etc. Not only are all of these perspectives exciting and different, they make for better, more informed critiques which in turn leads to more thoughtful work. It was such a treat to work among so many amazing individuals, each with different strengths and talents. This isn’t a program that churns out generic portfolios or designers—it’s a program that lets you find your voice and run with it.

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


1

2

“ This isn’t a program that churns out generic portfolios or designers – it’s a program that lets you find your voice and run with it.”

3

– LY D I A N I C H O L S , M FA , 2013

4

1 GOOGLE DOODLE FOR THE NETHERLANDS KING DAY Professional Project 2 GOOD FIZZ KOMBUCHA PACKAGING Graduate Project 3 PAUL BUNYAN FOR THE FAIRY TALES SERIES BY FAMILY TREE Professional Project 4 GRID MAGAZINE COVER “BIRDLAND” Professional Project

5

5 DYSTOPIAN NOVELS Graduate Project

51


The graduate program in Graphic and Interactive Design is a two-year, 60-credit program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Authorship of large-scale design projects is central to the program. MFA students create the content of their work in seminar and thesis classes. The execution of work in the MFA program is expected to meet the exacting visual and technical demands of the graphic design profession.

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


ABOUT THE PROGRAM Time Limit for Degree Completion 4 years Campus Location Main Full-Time/Part-Time Status Full-time status is required. Interdisciplinary Study The focus in Graphic and Interactive Design is augmented and balanced by specially designed graduate-level Art History courses and seminars; a required interdisciplinary seminar and studio electives that ensure cross-disciplinary contact among students.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND DEADLINES Application Deadline Fall: January 15 Applications are evaluated together after the deadline date. Letters of References Three letters of recommendation should be obtained from college/university faculty members, art directors, and/or designers familiar with the applicant’s academic and artistic competence. Coursework Required for Admission Consideration 40 undergraduate studio credits and 12 art history credits are required.

Accreditation This degree program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

Bachelor’s Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline A baccalaureate degree and a portfolio specific to Graphic and Interactive Design are required.

Areas of Specialization The design faculty at Tyler is made up of practicing graphic and interactive designers with established reputations in the field. It is the goal of the design faculty to challenge students to achieve the highest level of excellence in their work.

Statement of Goals Approximately 500-1,000 words include your interest in Tyler’s program, your research goals, your future career goals, and your academic and artistic achievements.

Job Prospects Graduates from the MFA program have been extremely successful in the field. They work for print and web design companies, advertising agencies, publishing companies, and design departments of major corporations. They also work in film and television, music packaging and promotion, product design and packaging, museum exhibition design, hand lettering, and as freelance illustrators. Non-Matriculated Student Policy MFA courses are restricted to matriculated students. Financing Opportunities The principal duties of a Teaching Assistant (TA) include assisting faculty members in the classroom or laboratory; preparing apparatus, software, or material for demonstration; conducting tutorials and discussion sections; teaching classes; and monitoring and maintaining studio and computer facilities. In addition, an Academic Intern (AI) may assist in the Publications Office.

Creative Direction and Design Kelly Holohan and David Jones

Standardized Test Scores TOEFL: 79 iBT or 550 PBT minimum Portfolio As a Master of Fine Arts applicant, you must submit a portfolio that consists of 20 images representative of the immediate direction of your work. Portfolios are to be uploaded at https://temple.slideroom.com/, as instructed at the website. SlideRoom requires an additional fee for this service. Original work, slides, CD-ROMs, catalogs, photographs, books, and/or binders are not acceptable substitutes for the SlideRoom portfolio and will not be reviewed or returned. Resume Current resume required.

Transfer Credit Upon approval of the Department Coordinator, the student’s advisor, and the Vice Dean, up to 9 credits of graduate work completed at Temple University within a five-year period may be transferred into the program. Up to 6 credits of graduate coursework taken at other accredited institutions within the prior five years before matriculation may be considered for transfer into the program after the student has enrolled. No decisions are made until students have successfully completed 15 matriculated credits at Tyler.

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Number of Credits Required to Earn the Degree 60 Required Courses GAD 8001/8002 Visual Design Graduate Seminar1 (4 terms) 12 Credits

Culminating Event An approved thesis exhibition, written statement, and slide portfolio are required at the final review in order to meet MFA requirements. Approval of the student’s graduate committee is required.

CONTACTS Program Web Address tyler.temple.edu/programs/ graphic-interactive-design Department Information Tyler School of Art Graduate Admissions Office 2001 N. 13th Street Philadelphia, PA 19122-6016 tylerart@temple.edu 215-777-9090 Submission Address for Application Materials temple.slideroom.com

GAD 8083 Graphic Design Graduate Projects (3 terms) 9 Credits

Mailing Address for Official Transcripts Tyler School of Art Graduate Admissions Office

GAD 8095/8096 Visual Design Thesis1 (4 terms) 12 Credits

2001 N. 13th Street Philadelphia, PA 19122-6016

TYLE 8001 Graduate Professional Practices (1 term) 3 Credits Art History Courses2 12 Credits Studio Electives3 12 Total Credit Hours 60

Department Contacts M.F.A. Program Director Kelly Holohan kholohan@temple.edu 215-777-9145 Department Chairperson Dermot MacCormack dermot@temple.edu 215-777-9145 215-777-9179

1 Courses are sequenced to be taken in the Fall and Spring terms. The sequence is repeated a second year for a total of four courses taken over four terms.

2 Of the four required courses, two must be Art History Seminar classes chosen from a range of graduate offerings (5000 to 5800 or 8000 to 9980). 3 Course descriptions can be viewed on the Class Schedule. Please note that taking any course under the 5000 level for graduate credit requires prior approval from the studio area head.

Copy Editor Alice E. Drueding

Photography Sam Fritch, David Jones, Stephanie Knopp, Stanley T. Morgan, and Margaret Sommer 53


GAID FACULTY

GAID ADJUNCT FACULTY

Alice E. Drueding Professor

Sean Jordan Assistant Professor

BA, Brown University BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

Abby Guido Assistant Professor BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University Kelly Holohan Associate Professor, MFA Program Head BS, College of Saint Rose MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

Paul Kepple Associate Professor BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University Jason Kernevich Assistant Professor BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University Soonduk Krebs Associate Professor

Stephanie Ann Knopp Professor

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

BA, Newcomb College of Tulane University MFA, Pennsylvania State University

Mary Kate McDevitt Assistant Professor

Scott Laserow Professor BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University Dermot MacCormack Associate Professor BFA, National College of Art and Design, Dublin Bryan Satalino Assistant Professor BFA, College of Saint Rose MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University Joseph Scorsone Professor Emeritus BFA, State University of New York, Buffalo MFA, University of Illinois Paul Sheriff Professor BA, West Chester University BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University Keith Somers Assistant Professor BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University Dustin Summers Assistant Professor BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

RIGHT FROM THE GROUND UP This project was completed by Bryan Satalino, MFA 2013. Like many designers in the MFA program, Bryan spent time freelancing and sought to streamline the process of running a small design business for his fellow artists. What came out of this idea was “From the Ground Up,” a comprehensive guide covering everything from business privilege licenses to small business tax code. So many of the legal obstacles that snag novice freelanceers are deftly simplified and organized in this beautiful, self authored and illustrated handbook. BELOW PROFESSOR DERMOT MACCORMACK INSTRUCTING A CLASS


“ The inclusivity of Tyler’s program is what makes it so unique and dynamic. MFA candidates come from all different backgrounds. Not only are all of these perspectives exciting and different, but they make for better, more informed critiques which in turn leads to more thoughtful work.”

— LY D I A N I C H O L S , M FA 2013

55


TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G


THE DESIGNERS who will work BESIDE YOU WILL GROW TO BE MORE T H A N P E E R S , M O R E T H A N C L A S S M AT E S — THEY WILL BECOME YOUR

FA MI LY

57


TYLER SCHOOL OF ART of TEMPLE UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN [GAID] 2001 North 13th Street Philadelphia , PA 19122 tyler.temple.edu/programs/graphic-interactive-design

TYLER GRAPHIC AND INTERACTIVE DESIGN MFA | CATA L O G

MFA Graphic & Interactive Design Catalog  

Tyler’s MFA program in Graphic & Interactive Design [GAID] is an intensive two-year immersion in the practice of design. The program is high...

MFA Graphic & Interactive Design Catalog  

Tyler’s MFA program in Graphic & Interactive Design [GAID] is an intensive two-year immersion in the practice of design. The program is high...

Profile for kholohan6
Advertisement