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HEALTHY

LIVING

HEALTHY

NATURALLY Rethinking BEAUTIFUL CITIES Transforming the Cosmetics Industry

What Makes a Community Livable

PLANET

Eat Right to Sleep Well 10 Foods that Help Us Relax and Rest

June 2018 | West Michigan Edition | NaturalWestMichigan.comJune 2018

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Social and recreational opportunities for individuals with mental illness, addictions and disabilities. Call 616.414.9111 for information or to enroll

Home of Just Goods Gifts and Cafe’

Fair trade and social cause merchandise and local baked goods. The café is a place of social interaction and integration where people of all different backgrounds can sit and enjoy a beverage or baked good, in a safe and nurturing environment.

JustGoods@ExtendedGrace.org

t!

Visi

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Enjo

y!

Monday — Friday: 10 am - 6 pm & Saturday: 10 am - 2 pm

Town Hall Meeting on Mental Illness will be held at the Grand Haven Community Center

Monday, June 25th from 6:30 pm to 9 pm Alternative Treatments and Therapies

Attend a discussion about alternative treatments and therapies with a panel of experts in the field. Alternative treatments and therapy resources will be available.

Family Support Group:

fourth Tuesday of every month at 7pm

Support Group for Parents of Teens: third Monday of every month at 7pm

SMART Recovery:

first & third Tuesday’s at 7pm Always free, always confidential

TEST — DON’T GUESS October 3-17, 2018

4Hormones 4Digestion 4Inflammation 4Fatigue

$4500 includes all accommodations, travel from Grand Rapids, meals and tips. PilgrimSpiritTours.com

L A S E R PA I N & NEURO CLINIC 4Arthritis 4Neuropathy 4Neurological Disorders 4Memory Loss

A Non-Profit grassroots social lab that builds community while solving problems. 714 Columbus • Grand Haven • 616-502-2078

4Daniel C. Gleason, D.C. 4Daniel J. Weessies, D.C., M.S.

Barbara@ExtendedGrace.org

TheGleasonCenter.com

located within the Momentum Center for Social Engagement

facebook.com/extendedgrace • ExtendedGrace.org

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West Michigan Edition

NaturalWestMichigan.com

616.846.5410

19084 Fruitport Road • Spring Lake, MI 49456


Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

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Contents 16 LIVABLE

COMMUNITIES WE LOVE

19

Good for People and the Planet

19 PETER GROS

on Preserving Wild Nature

20 ALL-NATURAL BEAUTY

Health Concerns Revolutionize the Cosmetics Industry

22 RUNNING WITH THE KIDS

Strengthens Body, Mind and Family Spirit

24 EAT RIGHT TO SLEEP WELL

10 Foods Help Us Relax and Rest

26 DOING NOTHING Why Timeouts Matter

27 WE NEED

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CLEAN WATERS

Streams and Rivers Are Life Links

ADVERTISING & SUBMISSIONS HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 616-604-0480 or email Publisher@NaturalWestMichigan.com. Deadline for ads and News Briefs: the 12th of the month. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Email articles, news items and ideas to: Publisher@ NaturalWestMichigan.com or submit online at: NaturalWestMichigan.com. Deadline for editorial: the 5th of the month. CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Calendar submissions Submit calendar events online at: NaturalWestMichigan.com. Calendar deadline is the 15th of the month prior to publication. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 616-604-0480. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakenings.com.

28 PETS WELCOME HERE Happy Places to Live and Travel Together

30 HEALTHY SUMMER HYDRATION

Kids Love These Homemade Drinks

DEPARTMENTS 5 news briefs 8 health briefs 11 eco tip 14 global briefs 19 wise words 20 healing ways 22 fit body 24 conscious

30 26 inspiration 27 green living 28 natural pet 30 healthy kids 32 calendar 37 resource guide 39 classifieds

eating

June 2018

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letter from publisher Natural Beauties

WEST MICHIGAN EDITION

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ecently I started a ketogenic like diet of low carbohydrates, moderate proteins and high good fats that shifts body metabolism to burn fat instead of sugar. I’ve also integrated intermittent fasting. The point is to eliminate all the foods that don’t serve me well and to give the body the time it needs to properly digest and metabolize intake.

During this process I naturally began to investigate specific ingredients in both my food and body care products. One that I’ve never worried about before is soy lecithin because I never felt it affected me as I know it does some women; as a phytoestrogen it can mimic the body’s natural estrogen and can cause fluctuations in hormone levels. During perimenopause in my 40s, I frequently ate organic soy bars and never had a problem. Now I’m astonished to learn that non-organic soy is in virtually everything. Deodorants, lotions, condiments, cooking sprays, tuna, mayonnaise, tomato sauces, turkey bacon, many crackers, chewing gums, candles, tea bags and the list goes on. It’s used as a binding agent, filler and preservative. It isn’t even one of the unpronounceable nasty ingredients we watch out for, but something that many people, like me, might perceive as being benign. I’m now wondering if my exposure might be having an effect on my inability to control my weight as I age, made worse by its intrusion on all fronts; more research is needed. When in doubt, eliminate. My big lesson in this is that it’s not just processed foods we need to be wary of it’s also the hidden stuff that may be effecting us too. As I work through the journey of returning my body to a cleaner, more natural state, I already feel mentally clearer and revel in increased energy.

PUBLISHER/EDITOR Pamela Gallina EDITORS Rachel Scott McDaniel Alison Chabonais DESIGN & PRODUCTION Scott Carvey CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ashley Carter Youngblood Marlaina Donato Dan Gleason Deirdre Kohley Barbara Lee VanHorssen Rachel Scott McDaniel

CONTACT US P.O. Box 330 Spring Lake, MI 49456 Ph: 616-604-0480 • Fax: 616-855-4202 Publisher@NaturalWestMichigan.com NaturalWestMichigan.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions are available by sending $30 (for 12 issues) to the above address.

NATIONAL TEAM CEO/FOUNDER Sharon Bruckman NATIONAL EDITOR Alison Chabonais MANAGING EDITOR Linda Sechrist NATIONAL ART DIRECTOR Stephen Blancett SR. ART/MKTG. DIRECTOR Steve Hagewood FINANCIAL MANAGER Mary Bruhn FRANCHISE DIRECTOR Anna Romano RANCHISE SUPPORT MGR. Heather Gibbs F WEBSITE COORDINATOR Rachael Oppy NATIONAL ADVERTISING Kara Scofield Natural Awakenings Publishing Corporation 4933 Tamiami Trail N., Ste. 203 Naples, FL 34103

To conscious living, © 2018 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. Check with a healthcare professional regarding the appropriate use of any treatment.

Pamela Gallina, Publisher

Natural Awakenings Magazine of West Michigan

NaturallyWestMI

NaturallyWestMI

Natural Awakenings Magazine of West Michigan

Natural Awakenings Magazine is ranked 5th Nationally in CISION’S® 2016 Top 10 Health & Fitness Magazines

Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soy-based ink.

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HEALTHY LIVING HEALTHY PLANET


news briefs

The Mercy Health Seaway Run

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he Mercy Health Seaway Run takes place on June 23 in Muskegon. This event has been a tradition along the Lakeshore for over three decades. The Lake Michigan Half Marathon was added to the event in 2013. The courses for the different distances all offer views of Muskegon Lake, with the 15K and Half Marathon courses also showcasing our beautiful Lake Michigan beach. With a Community 5K Walk, and three timed distances, 5K, 15K and Half Marathon, the Mercy Health Seaway Run has an event for everyone! All courses are barrier free and accessible to those with physical challenges, and volunteers will be available for assistance on race day. The Mercy Health Seaway Expo, on the Friday before the races, is offered at no cost to the community, so everyone can explore healthy options and learn how to optimize their health. Visit the expo for health screenings, food, music, kids activities, prizes, demonstrations and more. Healthy choices lead to a healthier life and a healthier community! Since 2012, the event has been a partnership between the Muskegon Family YMCA and Muskegon Rotary Club’s 1 in 21 Healthy Muskegon County initiative. The proceeds help support these groups in their efforts to make Muskegon County a healthy place to live, learn, work and play. Mercy Health came on board as title sponsor when the partnership was formed. This healthy community event is a perfect match with the organization’s wellness program for associates and with their mission to improve the overall health of our community. Location: 4th and Western in downtown Muskegon. For more information and to register, visit SeawayRun.com. See ad page xx.

From The Heart Yoga & Tai Chi Center Announces New Location

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rom the Heart Yoga & Tai Chi is pleased to announce their move from 714 Wealthy St. to 776 Leonard St. in Grand Rapids. Classes will begin at this new center in mid-June. From The Heart is an educational center rooted in the traditional practices of Yoga and Tai Chi with the understanding that they’re continually changing and evolving art forms. Heartfelt Intention is key in yoga practice. Combined with solid alignment and flowing movement, growth happens naturally. Through these practices, a deeper connection is cultivated

to the heart, to each other, and to the surrounding community. From The Heart Yoga offers courses and retreats that help expand knowledge and deepen meditation. This is accomplished by offering various techniques that access the deeper states of awareness within the heart. Location: 776 Leonard St., Grand Rapids. For more information, visit FromTheHeartYoga.com. See ad page 20.

Kids Armour Protects Users from Device Radiation

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ids Armour is engaged in the telecommunications and wireless EMF markets making available a new technology and accessory product which has been clinically tested and proven to provide a healthier phone and Wi-Fi experience. Kids Armour has a strong focus on providing a new layer of protection for children and young adults while using wireless devices. A new breakthrough technology called Energetic Quanta Cymatic Communication Technology (EQCCT) is embedded into Kids Armour. This microchip technology emits frequencies that significantly mitigate the impact of radiation on the body and its blood cells, allowing the body to function in a natural state when exposed to microwave and cell phone radiation. This simple, stick-on microchip protection doesn’t require batteries and should be used on all Wi-Fi and mobile devices, including laptops, tablets and other devices. This product is beneficial for children, who appear to be much more susceptible to the effects of radiation, as well as expecting mothers. For more information, visit OurKidsArmour.com. See ad page 13.

Pilgrim Spirit Tours Hosts Trip to Egypt

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ilgrim Spirit Tours is hosting a trip to Egypt, October 3 to 17, for anyone desiring to experience many of the sites for which the country is most famous for, as well as go beyond the famous tourist attractions. As part of the cultural immersion trip, tourists will spend two days in a Nubian village, two days at the Siwa Oasis with Bedouin people, and will visit ancient villages. They’ll also cruise the Nile River on a Dahabiay sailboat. This is in addition to the time at the Great Pyramids, the Great Sphinx, Valley of the Kings, Old Cairo, and many more historic sites. All tours are led by experienced, native tour guides. The tour fee includes airfare from Grand Rapids, as well as June 2018

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news briefs

Find Your Path to Wellness

June Events & Classes

• Wednesday, June 6th: In-Office Workshop “Autoimmune Intensive - How to Minimize Symptoms of Your Autoimmune Disorder” — 6:30p-8:00p | Dr. Ramona Wallace will lead the workshop. You will leave this workshop with the confidence to know which questions to ask your primary care doctor, what important lifestyle changes to make and a 30 day food plan. | $30/person • Tuesday, June 12th: Hormones Class with Dee Kohley, RPh — 6:30p-7:30p | FREE • Tuesday, June 26th: Why Supplement? Class with Dee Kohley, RPh — 6:30p-7:30p | FREE • Wednesday, June 27th: In-Office Workshop “Keto for Diabetics - Manage Your Blood Sugar with Food” — 6:30p-8:00p | Dr. Ramona Wallace is the diabetes guru! Get off the blood sugar roller coaster and feel better! Receive a 30 day blood sugar balancing diet plan. | $30/person REGISTRATION FOR ALL EVENTS IS REQUIRED

accommodations, transportation, and most meals and tips. Pilgrim Spirit Tours is an expression of Extended Grace, which is a nonprofit, grassroots social lab that builds community while solving problems. Extended Grace has no religious or political affiliations. Participants believe that improvement to the world can occur by extending more grace to each other. Extended Grace operates the Momentum Center for Social Engagement and Just Goods Gifts and Café. Cost of the trip is $4,500. For more information, contact Barbara@ ExtendedGrace.org or call 616-502-2078. See ad page 18.

The Sacred Healing Art of Reiki Course

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lue Horizons Wellness is hosting The Sacred Healing Art of Reiki Levels I and II course from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., June 2 and June 3, at their center in Muskegon. Reiki is a simple, natural, and safe method of physical and spiritual healing, which has been practiced for centuries around the world. Every living thing can benefit from Reiki because of its calming, balancing, and stress-reducing effects. During this course, participants will learn about Reiki, discover how to effectively tap into this subtle form of healing energy, receive Reiki Level I & Reiki Level II attunements, and have plenty of practice time. Upon completion, attendees will receive their Reiki Level I and Level II certificate and a certificate of their lineage. They will be able to perform Reiki on themselves and others with confidence. Participants will also be able to perform in person and distance sessions and will be armed with all pertinent information to open their own Reiki practice. Everything needed for the class will be provided, but attendees can bring blankets, massage tables, or other personal items. Participants should wear comfortable clothing. Anyone interested should come with an open heart and be prepared to relax, while meeting new people embarking on this wonderful healing journey. Cost for the course is $325. Location: 1991 Lakeshore Dr., Muskegon. For more information and to register, visit BlueHorizonsWellness.com. See ad page 24.

Town hall explores alternative treatments, therapies for mental illness

Ramona Wallace, D.O. Dee Kohley, RPh 231.730.5211 • 616.296.2422 17212 Van Wagoner Road Spring Lake, MI 49456

BluewaterWellnessTeam.com

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West Michigan Edition

NaturalWestMichigan.com

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he latest in a series of discussions of mental illness will explore alternative treatments and therapies. The town hall meeting t is scheduled June 25 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the Grand Haven Community Center and is coordinated by Extended Grace. Panelists include Dr. Gary Cool, who is an acupuncturist, homeopath, and herbalist; Rebecca Neil, holistic medicine/massage


news briefs therapist; Sandy Parker, On the Path Yoga; Monica Verplank, North Ottawa Wellness Foundation; and Dr. Michael Weiss, who is a chiropractor. Extended Grace Executive Director and Experi-Mentor Barbara Lee Van Horssen will facilitate the town hall. Practitioners of alternative treatments and therapies may register to display their materials at the townhall at no cost. Practitioners interested in having a table should send an e-mail to barbara@extendedgrace. org. The registration deadline is June 15. In addition to the panel discussion, participants can complete free QPR Training (suicide prevention) from 5 to 6 p.m. Training will be provided by TCM Counseling. Preregister for training by calling 616-842-9160.

Best. In addition, Lakeshore Art Festival was just awarded the 2017 Sustainability Champion Award for its sustainability efforts and the “Keepin’ it Green” Program. New this year is The Door Project and the Kayak Sculpture Public Art Project: The Door Project will include 15 local schools decorating and painting refurbished doors. The doors will then be displayed during the festival. Additionally, Nuveen Art Center will host a door painting celebration for guests to decorate during the show. The Kayak Sculpture Public Art Project will be a unique downtown art experience in the form of public artworks incorporating real kayaks. Several kayak sculptures will be on display throughout downtown. Kayaks are being provided by KL Outdoor, the world’s largest kayak manufacturer. Learn more at lakeshoreartfestival.org. See ad page 10.

Town hall sponsors are Grand Haven Area Public Schools, North Ottawa Community Health System, and Ottawa County. Refreshments will be provided by Wild Blue and Health Hutt. See ad page 18.

Annual Art Festival

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he Lakeshore Art Festival will take place Friday, July 6 and Saturday, July 7 in beautiful Downtown Muskegon, Michigan. This award-winning festival features a unique blend of 350+ fine art and craft exhibitors, street performers, an artisan food market, interactive art stations, children’s activities and so much more. The Lakeshore Art Festival has been getting national attention since its inaugural year in 2013. Just this year, Lakeshore Art Festival was ranked #27 in the nation and #1 in the state by the Sunshine Artist Magazine 200

June 2018

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Energy Drinks Hurt Youth Health More than half of teens and young adults that have slaked their thirst with energy drinks report consequently suffering negative health consequences, reports a new study from Canada’s University of Waterloo. Of 2,055 Canadian participants between ages 12 and 24, 55.4 percent said they had negative health events afterwards. Of these, 26.5 percent trembled and felt jittery, 24.7 percent had faster heartbeats and 22.5 percent noted “jolt and crash” episodes—a spell of alertness followed by a sudden drop in energy. Another 5.1 percent experienced nausea or diarrhea and 0.2 percent, seizures. Most respondents said they drank only one or two energy drinks at a time. 8

West Michigan Edition

NaturalWestMichigan.com

Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com Maksym Povozniuk/Shutterstock.com

In the first scientific study of facial exercise, 27 middleaged women that performed specific facial muscle movements looked an average of two-and-a-half years younger in 20 weeks based on a standardized scale called the Merz-Carruthers Facial Aging Photoscales. By doing the exercises for 30 minutes each day or every other day, the fullness of both the upper and lower cheeks, in particular, of the women were significantly enhanced, report Northwestern University researchers. “The exercises enlarge and strengthen the facial muscles, so the face becomes firmer and more toned and shaped like a younger face,” says lead author Murad Alam, a medical doctor. Some of the study exercises can be found by searching the topic of Happy Face Yoga on YouTube.

Cardiovascular exercise improves a person’s healthy gut microbes even without making dietary changes, University of Illinois researchers report. In a study of 32 people, 30 to 60 minutes of exercise three times a week for six weeks boosted levels of healthy intestinal bacteria, especially for lean subjects, and less so for the obese. The healthy bacteria produced shortchain fatty acids that reduce the risk of colon cancer. “The bottom line is that there are clear differences in how the microbiome of somebody who is obese versus somebody who is lean responds to exercise,” says Jeffrey Woods, Ph.D., a kinesiology professor at the university.

Seek 15 Minutes of Device-Free Time When we’re feeling angry, stressed or overexcited, just 15 minutes of being alone without a device can put us into a more peaceful state, reports a University of Rochester study. Young adults, sitting in a comfortable chair away from their devices, were given something to read, told to think about something specific or not given any instruction. Some were asked to sit alone for 15 minutes a day for a week and keep a diary. In all cases, such solo time away from devices helped reduce intense emotions afterward.

d1sk/Shutterstock.com

Facial Exercises Ease Midlife Signs of Aging

Exercise Boosts Good Gut Bacteria

Stanisic Vladimir/Shutterstock.com

health briefs


Advertorial

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Preterm Births Down After Coal Plant Shutdown After a polluting coal-fired power plant in Pennsylvania was shut down in 2014 by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulatory action, the chances of women living 30 miles downwind having a preterm birth fell by about 28 percent, report Lehigh University researchers. While the plant was operating, women in affluent New Jersey communities downwind had a 17 percent greater risk of having babies of very low birth weights— less than 5.5 pounds—than did women in other similar affluent areas.

anyaivanova/Shutterstock.com

Scientists Discover Alcohol-Cancer Link Alcohol has been linked to seven types of cancer, including breast and bowel, and scientists at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, in Cambridge, UK, have tracked down a possible cause. In lab tests, they found that when the body processes alcohol, acetaldehyde is produced. Acetaldehyde alters and damages DNA within blood stem cells, leading to rearranged chromosomes and a greater likelihood of cancer.

Sergio33/Shutterstock.com

Mangoes Carry Health Benefits Mangoes contain potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties that may prove useful in treating gastrointestinal disease, cognitive decline and diabetes, report scientists at the University of Palermo, in Italy. Also, Texas A&M researchers have found that 300 people with Crohn’s disease that ate 200 to 400 grams of commercially available frozen mangoes daily for eight weeks had fewer digestive symptoms, improved inflammation biomarkers and less colon cancer-linked molecules in their digestive tracts.

New Healthy Coffee Alternative Success by Health (SBH), a new, re-branded company in the healthy lifestyle industry with its Reishi Mushroom-infused coffee products, now offers two healthy coffee products—Café Noir and Café Latte—in the natural beverage niche market for sales affiliates. They are formulated with the Reishi (Ganoderma) Mushroom, to help eliminate unhealthy caffeine in coffee, and with it, the unpleasant metabolic crashes associated with conventional coffee products. They smooth out the traditional highs, lows, jitters and resulting negative pH levels in the body. SBH is the latest direct marketing company started by Jay Noland, a former professional baseball player well-known in the direct selling industry. His business model eliminates the retail middleman through individual, independent sales affiliates. Each affiliate purchases a packet of Café Noir, the standard black coffee, for 68 cents a cup, and asks others they know and meet, “Do you drink coffee?” It’s an easy way to initiate a dialogue about the latest in healthy coffee. SBH founding members and independent affiliates are Dr. James Marinakis, an internationally recognized alternative medicine practitioner, in Boca Raton, Florida, and Jo Dee Baer, an age-group record-setting triathlete and health coach in Central Florida. To join the SBH team as an affiliate and improve health while increasing wealth, call 800-681-4926 or email 68CentsACup@gmail.com. See ad page 40. June 2018

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People that Don’t Slight Sleep Eat Better

A spate of recent worldwide studies reveal several cholesterol-healthy alternatives to olive oil. Ingesting 15 milliliters a day of virgin coconut oil for eight weeks increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) “good cholesterol” levels in 32 young adults by an average of 5.72 milligrams/deciliter, researchers at Thailand’s Chiang Mai University found. Walnut oil slashed heart disease risk in 100 Type 2 diabetes patients that swallowed capsules containing a total of 15 milliliters of walnut oil a week—the amount of oil obtained from 4 to 5 servings of the nuts. They experienced significant drops in total cholesterol, low-density (LDL) “bad cholesterol” and triglycerides after 90 days, reported Iranian researchers at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Camelina oil from the Camelina sativa plant, also called false flax, lowered LDL levels in 79 men with prediabetic symptoms, whereas diets high in either high- or lowfatty fish did not, according to the University of Eastern Finland. The men consumed 30 milliliters of the oil for 90 days.

Those that sleep more than seven hours a night are likely to eat better the following day, according to researchers from King’s College London. In the study, 21 people known to typically sleep fewer than seven hours increased their sleep time by 47 minutes after receiving tips on sleep hygiene such as drinking less caffeine and going to bed neither too hungry nor too full. The following day, they consumed almost 10 fewer grams of sugar in food and drinks on average and also consumed less fat and fewer carbohydrates than a control group.

A UNIQUE & ARTFUL EXPERIENCE FEATURING

Fine Art Handcrafted Goods Entertainment Children’s Lane Wine & Beer Garden

On an Energy Medicine Journey?

Follow Your Path 3-Day EnergyTouch Basics Prerequisite Training Dates

June 01, 02, 03, 2018 September 28, 29, 30, 2018 October 19, 20, 21, 2018 November 02, 03, 04, 2018 JULY 6 & 7, 2018 | Downtown Muskegon lakeshoreartfestival.org

w w w.energytouchschool.com info@energytouchschool.com

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616 233 3001

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Healthy Oils Improve Good Cholesterol

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health briefs


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eco tip

JULY

Coming Next Month

AntiInflammatory Foods Rail Trails

Summer Vacations with a Fun Twist

This summer, consider the convenience and relaxation of watching the world go by outside a panoramic side window instead of focusing on driving the road ahead. Train travel is also more cost-effective, affordable and eco-friendly than flying. SmarterTravel.com highlights railroad discounts for children, seniors, students, AAA members, military personnel and other demographics. Additional advantages include accessible central city terminals, a generous luggage policy and less time waiting until departures. If a station has an unattended parking lot, arrange to be dropped off. Amtrak (Amtrak.com) encompasses 300 daily trains on more than 21,000 miles of track to more than 500 destinations. Particularly scenic routes include the California Zephyr that winds through the Rocky and Sierra Nevada mountains between San Francisco and Chicago; and the Adirondack train between New York City and Montreal, Canada, offering spectacular views of both its namesake national park and the historic Hudson River Valley. Amtrak’s 75 vacation packages (AmtrakVacations.com) range from three days to two weeks. Sights include the Grand Canyon and Glacier, Yellowstone and Yosemite national parks. Most long-distance routes provide sleeping accommodations with passenger amenities for day and night. Advanced technology electric locomotives began enhancing Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor runs in 2016. Designed for maximum energy efficiency with a regenerative braking system that feeds back into the power grid, this innovation saves electricity and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Amtrak’s partnership with CarbonFund.org allows passengers to offset the carbon emissions footprint from their rail travel. Custom contributions can be made via the Rail Calculator or short- or long-distance traveler or Amtrak Trainiac preset options on Amtrak’s website. Many travelers also enjoy narrow-gauge, short-rail junkets. Popular options include Colorado’s Durango & Silverton Railroad (DurangoTrain. com), a nostalgic trip back to the mining days of the Old West; the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad (CumbresToltec.com), a 45-mile ride along the New Mexico/Colorado border; and the Conway Scenic Railroad (ConwayScenic. com) in New Hampshire, within two hours of both Portland, Maine, and Boston, Massachusetts. Neighboring Canada affords many scenic trains including trips connecting Toronto with Vancouver and Calgary. Visit RockyMountaineer.com and ViaRail. ca.

Plus: Organic Farmers Growing America’s Health

To advertise or participate in our next issue, call

616-604-0480 June 2018

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Some Benefits of Colon Hydrotherapy: ~ Remove Toxic Waste from Ones Body ~ Relieves Cons�pa�on ~ Removes Stomach Bloat ~ Increase Ones Energy

Therapeu�c Massage Also Available

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What are the truths behind Cell Phone Radiation and Solutions?

Advertorial

It’s a Fact:

Wireless Cell Phone technology presents health dangers from radiation (electromagnetic frequencies, or EMF). This is especially true for children who are most vulnerable to the long-term effects of EMF radiation. It’s no longer a secret, and we have learned that, in addition to other risks from radiation, long-term exposure causes cancer. Several trials, tests and studies, which had prompted recent announcements from the World Health Organization, the California State Health Department, and others, had proven Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) radiation emitted by cell phones cause adverse changes to the human body. It has been clearly demonstrated, when using a cell phone, body tissues heat up, and blood cells become stressed, especially in children. The body’s blood cells enter a state of Rouleaux after a short time of being exposed to the EMF, and increases with longer exposure. Rouleaux is an unhealthy blood condition that is related to a number of blood disorders and could lead to various diseases. It has been suggested by several health officials that kids not be exposed to wifi radiation except for emergency situations. The California State Health Department had issued warnings about cell phone use in late 2017, and the above recommendation was among others listed at that time. Is the removal of cell phones the only protective solution? No, the product, Kids Armour (e-Armour/Cel-Factor), has a baseline of materials and components embedded on composite conducting or semi conducting materials. When placed in close proximity to humans, living organisms, or biomaterials, it serves as a natural and precise communication method. The cellular level communication aids the human immune system in fighting the negative effects from Electro Magnetic Radiation. We tested the product via a placebo based double-blind studies at Jasper Research Clinic. The purpose was to validate and confirm the product’s ability—after attaching the product to a cell phone—to keep head tissue temperatures cooler and blood cells in a more normal state when using any cell phone or wifi device. The clinic had reviewed 68 separate performances on subjects who were both female and male between the ages of 16 to 30. Neither the subjects nor the researchers had known if the cell phone being used had a placebo product attached to it, or the actual Kids Armour product. The phones used in the study were owned by the subjects and were purchased from various manufacturers such as Apple, Samsung, HTC, Sanyo, Virgin, Kyocera, Huawei, etc. Each subject underwent a two-day evaluation period with the subject’s baseline thermographic and baseline blood measurements being recorded. The baseline was then compared to a thermographic and blood analysis of the subject after talking on a cell phone for exactly 15 minutes. This comparative analysis recorded if the subject’s cell phone was equipped with the Kids Armour product or a placebo device. The tests were conducted and concluded over a week-long trial period. Of the 68 separate measurements of the subjects’ blood and thermographic results, only one subject did not show the radiation neutralizing effects in the analysis. The results of this double-blind trial proved that researchers had a better than 98% success rate in being able to identify which subjects were being protected by Kids Armour. The protected subjects showed significant lowering of head tissue temperatures with their blood remaining in a healthier state. The double-blind, evidence-based study corroborates the protective technology as having the ability to fight the negative effects of EMF radiation. Based on the trial’s results, Kids Armour’s claims of lowering the head’s tissue temperature and helping the blood stay in a healthy state when using a cell For more information and to order, visit phone, are true and correct.

OurKidsArmour.com – Ross E. Pope-Owner. June 2018

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global briefs

Quick Quarters

Simple Eco-Houses on the Upswing

A new Ukrainian homebuilding startup called Passivdom uses a 3-D printing robot to produce parts for tiny houses. The machine can print the walls, roof and floor of the company’s 380-square-foot model in about eight hours. The windows, doors and self-contained plumbing, sewage and self-electrical systems are then added by a human worker. Solar energy is stored in a battery. Filtered water collects from humidity in the air. Prices start at $64,000 per house (Passivedom). M.A.DI., in Italy, produces prefabricated A-frame houses in five sizes that can be set up anywhere. The basic model is rated an energy class B, but can be upgraded with an option of adding solar panels to make the structures energy-independent. Homes made by Lifehaus blend low-cost, off-grid appeal with holistic living and luxurious details. The Lebanon company is pioneering energy-neutral dwellings made from locally sourced and recycled materials. Green home dwellers will also be able to generate electricity and grow their own food.

At the North American Climate Summit in Chicago last December, more than 50 mayors from around the globe signed the Chicago Climate Charter, intended to guide cities toward reaching greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals similar to the Paris climate accord. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says each mayor will pursue a customized plan, noting, “We’re all going to get to the same destination in our own way.” President Trump’s intended exit from the Paris agreement has sparked an uproar from leaders worldwide, especially mayors in cities long committed to reducing emissions. Dozens of cities are committed to 100 percent clean and renewable energy goals and pledged to promote clean transit through using zero-emissions buses. Emanuel believes, “Climate change can be solved by human action.” Cities’ actions now may well pay off in the long run.

Deadly Cargo Oil Spill Threatens Ocean Ecology

Experts are warning that the Iranian tanker Sanchi oil spill in January in the East China Sea could potentially be one of the worst in decades. Scientists from the UK National Oceanography Centre and the University of Southampton are monitoring the disaster, believing it could 14

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severely impact important reefs, fishing grounds and protected marine areas in Japan. They are also concerned by the toxic nature of the ultra-light, highly flammable oil and unknown impacts. Simon Boxall, with the centre, notes, “It’s not like crude, which does break down under natural microbial action. This stuff actually kills the microbes that break the oil down.”

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Cincinnati has contracted with the energy company Dynegy to purchase 100 percent renewable energy to operate most of its municipal facilities through at least 2021. The green energy will power police and fire stations, health clinics, recreation centers and most administrative buildings, including city hall. The city’s greenhouse gas emissions will be cut by more than 9 percent and its utility rates by more than $100,000 annually. The deal will bring the city closer to its goal of running on 100 percent renewable energy by 2035.

Mayors Worldwide Sign Climate Charter

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Green Energy Reduces Utility Costs

Independent Action

photo courtesy of passivdom.com

Lower Overhead


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Eco-Villains

Cleanup Cites Worst Plastic Polluters

A week-long beach cleanup and audit at Freedom Island in the Philippines last September exposed the companies most responsible for plastic pollution in the critical wetland habitat. The Greenpeace Philippines and #breakfreefromplastic movement audit, the first of its kind in the country, revealed that Nestlé, Unilever and the Indonesian company PT Torabika Mayora are the top three contributors of plastic waste discovered in the area, contributing to the more than 2 million tons of mismanaged plastic waste in the Philippines, the third-biggest source of plastic ocean pollution per year. See the whole list at Tinyurl.com/TopTenPolluters.

Boston Ban Vasiliy Ptitsyn/Shutterstock.com

Plastic Bags Get the Boot

Boston will join 59 other Massachusetts municipalities and hundreds of others across the nation, including Seattle, Washington, and Washington, D.C., in banning single-use plastic shopping bags by the end of this year. Instead, Boston shoppers must bring their own totes or pay store owners five cents or more for a thicker, compostable plastic bag or a larger paper bag with handles. “This new ordinance protects the health of our neighborhoods and environment, while at the same time easing the burden on taxpayers and saving local retailers millions,” says Kirstie Pecci, director of the Conservation Law Foundation’s Zero Waste Project.

Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

Click on a Campsite Website Opens Up Private Land to Campers

A Portland startup online at LandApart. com is expanding the share-economy Airbnb-model concept to private landowners and campers. People that want to camp or rent a cabin in a beautiful area can pay a private landowner for access. CEO Ven Gist says the move is in part a response to sometimes crowded public lands that often cannot be reserved. He says, “We’re basically collaborating with landowners to open up new wild spaces that people can find and book for truly secluded, unique outdoor experiences.” Prices average between $30 and $40 per night. Find an introductory video at Gust.com/companies/landapart.

Green Team Seattle Mariners Win Eco-Award

CenturyLink Field and Safeco Field, homes of the National Football League Seahawks and Major League Baseball (MLB) Mariners, respectively, introduced a Strawless in Seattle campaign last September. More than 100 local businesses joined with the Lonely Whale Foundation to help eliminate plastic waste. Safeco Field is the most sustainable baseball facility today, recycling 96 percent of all waste generated last season. As a result, the Mariners earned MLB’s Green Glove Award for 2017. Every food service item is recyclable or compostable, and cleaning crews manually separate waste items from recyclables after every game. The Mariners have been playing under energy-efficient LED lights since 2014, the first MLB ball club to do so. The team also added a 450-square-foot urban garden before the 2016 season that provides fresh vegetables and herbs for the concession stands.

You don’t learn to walk by following rules. You learn by doing, and by falling over. ~Richard Branson

June 2018

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Good for People and the Planet by John D. Ivanko and Lisa Kivirist

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any people define a livable city as one that is easy to get around in by foot, bike or public transportation. Many also prioritize ready access to fresh, local, organic food via farmers’ markets and community gardens. Others champion affordable housing and cost of living factors, safe neighborhoods with a diversity of people, careful stewardship of clean air and water, and plentiful amenities, including considerable open space and natural settings. Many work to preserve and enhance a sense of place suited to the locale. Partners for Livable Communities, a national nonprofit in Washington, D.C., that renews and restores communities, maintains, “Livability is the sum of the factors that add up to a community’s quality of life, including the built and natural environments, economic prosperity, social stability and equity, educational opportunity and cultural, entertainment and recreation possibilities.” The American Association of Retired Persons considers livable communities as age-friendly for young and old alike. 16

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Along with economic opportunities, a leading stimulus in moving to urban centers is, “More people are looking for a sociable environment where they can walk out of their door to the shops or transit and be among others they recognize who also recognize them,” observes Suzanne Lennard, director of the International Making Cities Livable Conferences, LLC, in Portland, Oregon.  “People who have traveled abroad, especially to Europe, and tasted the quality of life possible in a truly livable, walkable, beautiful and sociable city, often want to find such a place to live themselves.”   Following are a few examples of America’s many livable cities. More are transitioning and evolving as city planners, government officials, businesses and nonprofit community organizations strive to make their hometowns both people- and planet-friendly, often through public and private partnerships.  

Street-Scene Renaissance

In Pittsburgh, revitalization is transforming 10,000 parcels of vacant or abandoned land—some where steel mills formerly

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LIVABLE COMMUNITIES WE LOVE

operated—into greenspace, bike lanes and other enticing and productive public areas. “Biking and our food scene have exploded,” says Chris Sandvig, director of policy with the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, which advocates for equitable urban revitalization through their Vacant Property Working Group, helping communities access blighted areas for pennies on the dollar. “We’re now one of the top 10 bicycling commuter cities in the country. People also come here as food tourists due to vibrant local agricultural activity.”   “A related ideal is to create compact, human-scale, mixed-use urban centers in the suburbs that are less expensive to construct— and thus remain more affordable—while placing shops, schools, parks, services, workplaces and public transit within walking and biking distance,” Lennard notes. “This ensures a healthy, affordable and high quality of life for all; suburban, as well as urban.”   Fast-growing Carmel, Indiana, just north of Indianapolis, is following suit. “After years of watching the suburbs sprawl into subdivisions with large lawns, privacy fences and cul-de-sacs, we created a vibrant central core with apartments, townhomes, condos and new options for smaller homes—all within walking distance or a short bike ride to new places to work, shop and dine,” explains Mayor James Brainard. The design efforts serve people instead of cars. “Carmel has spent the last 20-plus years building more than 900 miles of trails and multi-use pathways, enabling residents to commute by bicycle to work and enjoy easy access to a growing number of parks and recreational areas,” says Brainard. To facilitate traffic flow, some 100 roundabouts replaced stoplights and four-way stops. “Reducing traffic congestion has improved our air quality, and saved gasoline and lives.” A new, mixed-use downtown Arts and Design District includes a Center for the Performing Arts with a Center Green that hosts a farmers’ market in summer and an outdoor Christkindlmarkt and outdoor skating rink in winter.   “The old way of doing things in which cities and towns sat back and let the market dictate how a community should be grown must come to an end,” remarks Brainard, advocating the benefits of local governance.  


Smart City Advantages

Key elements of smart cities—sensors, cameras, data analytics and powerful networks that capture and relay vital information— help them become more energy-efficient or quicker to respond to environmental and residential issues. Such products highlighted the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas. Reducing traffic can also contribute to safer highways and shorter commutes with decreased greenhouse gas emissions. “Citizens are using apps to monitor issues and alert city managers, improving the livability of their communities,” explains Steve Koenig, senior director of market research with the Consumer Technology Association.   In Boston, the app BOS:311 allows residents to instantaneously notify government departments of pollution concerns, like blocked drains and other environmental or community needs, feeding the information directly into the city’s work order system via their mobile phone. This real-time collaboration results in a cleaner, safer and healthier city.   The Envision Charlotte project encompasses interactive kiosks in 64 businesses and government buildings citywide, gathering energy usage data for office buildings to increase energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. So far, energy consumption has dropped 19 percent, saving companies about $26 million. The program has strengthened economic competitiveness and environmental sustainability.  

Nature in the City

Some cities have focused on the natural environment for improving local livability while mitigating contributions to climate change. Forested open spaces, wetlands and protected watersheds improve air quality, protect drinking water and buffer intense storms. Such areas also connect more people with nature and engage them in communal and healthy outdoor recreation. Portland, Oregon, boasts more than 10,000 acres of parks, plus an innovative Biketown sharing program that has facilitated 160,000 bike trips since its launch in 2016. The city’s Bike Bill requires all new streets to accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians by design. Portland also embraces urban gardens and allows residents to raise chickens, bees, goats or rabbits in their backyards.

No one wants to live where pollution runs unchecked or water is unsafe to drink. Philadelphia’s Green City, Clean Waters program works to keep stormwater out of sewers and reduce rainwater runoff through decentralized soil-based and plant-based systems, including pervious pavement, green roofs and rain gardens. Begun in 2011, its goal is to reduce rainwater runoff by 85 percent by 2036. Rainwater has become a valuable community resource. The program is just one of many ways that the City of Brotherly Love is transforming itself into one of the greenest in the United States. Overseen by the city’s Office of Sustainability, Greenworks Philadelphia devises long-term sustainability strategies that encompass eight facets, including clean and efficient energy, carbon-neutrality and zero waste. Preparations are already underway to cope with a hotter, wetter future.

Preserving a Sense of Place

Making communities livable goes beyond infrastructure. Actions usually involve preserving, protecting and enhancing what appeals to residents. Santa Fe, New Mexico, is one example of many where livability priorities are guided by the values of its residents and its sense of place. “From our historic public square and marketplaces to outdoor cafes, farmers’ markets and community festivals; from human-scale architecture and balanced transportation to pedestrian and bicycle networks, this place represents shared values,” says Mayor Javier M. Gonzales. “Santa Fe is also full of public art. The city is designed to be safe, creative and inspiring for young and old, families of all kinds and everyone else that comes to see us.”

Good Life as Kids See It

Ultimately, making cities move livable for children can make them highly livable for all. “Children need the same things from a city that we all need, but their needs are greater than ours,” says Lennard. “The environment a child grows up in shapes their health and their mental and social development for the rest of their lives. Our modern, unwalkable suburban environments are contributing to childhood obesity, which has been widely linked to

chronic diseases that in the past were only associated with old age.” She notes, “Children need the exercise of walking or biking to school. They need safe streets so they can become independent and explore their neighborhoods; sidewalks and other outdoor areas where they can play, meet friends and interact with adults in the community; easy access  to nature; beauty in their environment; and intriguing architecture, works of art and other places to stimulate their affection and imagination. As they become teenagers, they need access by foot or bike to a wide variety of resources to broaden their horizons. Don’t we all need these things?”   John D. Ivanko and Lisa Kivirist, co-authors of ECOpreneuring, operate the Inn Serendipity, wholly powered by renewable energy, in Browntown, WI.

LIVABLE COMMUNITIES TOOLBOX International Making Cities Livable hosts conferences in the U.S. and Europe. LivableCities.org Consumer Technology Association’s Smart Cities, an overview of the latest technology in making cities more smart and livable. Tinyurl.com/SmartCitiesTechnology AARP Livable Communities fact sheets, helpful for communities looking to become more livable. Tinyurl.com/LivableCommunityFacts AARP Livability Index, a livability rating of U.S. localities according to housing, neighborhood, transportation, environment, health, engagement and opportunity. LivabilityIndex.aarp.org Toward Sustainable Communities: Solutions for Citizens and Their Governments, by Mark Roseland. The fourth edition offers a comprehensive guidebook for creating vibrant, healthy, equitable and economically viable places. June 2018

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wise words

Peter Gros on Preserving Wild Nature

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by Sandra Murphy

eter Gros, co-host of the original Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom TV show, wildlife expert and environmental conservationist, now educates groups of young people that spend more time on their handheld devices than they do outdoors. His message impresses upon the next generation the importance of wildlife and open spaces as they gift us with heartfelt awe and balance, and engage us with nature to offset manmade lives. His 30 years of field experiences include serving as a wildlife lecturer and licensed U.S. Department of Agriculture exhibitor. An active member of the American Zoo and Aquariums Association and the Zoological Association of America, Gros is also on the board of directors of the Suisun Marsh Natural History Association and a trustee for the Cheetah Conservation Fund. He lives in Seattle and spends time in national forests when not speaking to groups.

Which animals are most often displaced by development so that we now share space with them? Deer, raccoons, alligators and coyotes are common neighbors, depending on where you live. The deer population used to be controlled by natural predators like wolves; without wolves, deer can overpopulate. The best thing to remember is that animals go where there’s a food supply. Gardens attract deer; cat or dog food left out

brings raccoons. Coyotes and alligators must lose their fear of humans in order to eat. Don’t feed, tease or interact with them. Take photos from a distance. Call your local government animal agency for help or referral to a licensed animal rehabber before “rescuing” an abandoned baby; mothers often spend periods of time away hunting for food.

Why are some animals in danger of being killed on sight? We react to snakes, wolves and bats from a place of unfounded fears: snakes don’t have facial expressions, are seen as cold or slimy and move quickly; wolves are dangerous; bats can tangle in your hair. These are all tall tales. Animals want to avoid us. We’ve reacted to our own fears with needless snake roundups, bounties on wolves and panic when a tiny bat swoops by. Historically, there have been no attacks on humans by wolves, and reintroducing them into Yellowstone National Park has restored a natural balance. Snakes keep disease-carrying rodents away. Bats use their radar to steer clear. We need to understand each animal’s purpose and place in nature. Feeding wildlife corrupts natural behaviors and removes their fear of humans. When we deem them a nuisance or inconvenient, we treat them like they’re disposable and have no value. It’s better for everyone to enjoy the fact that animals are there and keep our distance.

Who else is working to educate people about the importance of wildlife and habitat? Zoos used to be concrete-enclosed collections of animals. Now they are education centers, offering enrichment programs and improved natural habitats to keep the animals active and interested. Waterfalls, swimming pools, trees, puzzles and toys that prompt animals to mimic hunting behaviors help keep a resident animal’s mind and body active. Breeding programs help maintain endangered species. We’re able to study and learn about a species while caring for them. One breeding program I worked with focused on spotted and striped big cats: the leopards and tigers. In another, we used incubators to hatch eggs among a threatened ostrich population. In Big Sur, California, condors have been raised with puppets so they wouldn’t imprint on humans before being released. Nature and science centers across the country are also teaching people about the importance of animals.

What makes you hopeful for the future? Each of us can make a daily difference in preserving our natural world. I’ve been fortunate in being able to showcase wild animals, help endangered or protected species and share what I’ve learned in educational forums. Good news includes sighting of the black-footed ferret, once thought to be extinct. Mountain lions are recovering. We are learning from past mistakes. A big lesson is that what nature provides isn’t in endless supply, so we must be wise and frugal with all of our natural resources.

What are you most passionate about? No one should have a wild or exotic animal as a pet. The animals I show to audiences were bottle-raised or rescued. They can’t be released and so have become animal ambassadors. When people see them, they better understand the importance of nature and wildlife to people and the planet. I’m passionate about preserving wildlife and open spaces. Connect with freelance writer Sandra Murphy at StLouisFreelanceWriter@mindspring.com. June 2018

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healing ways

All-Natural Beauty

Health Concerns Revolutionize the Cosmetics Industry

F

by Marlaina Donato

rom red carpets to Teen Vogue magazine, the natural beauty trend has taken the industry by storm. Consumer whims may have sparked its beginnings more than a decade ago, but demand is now spiking profits into the billions. “Consumer need is influencing retailers to offer cleaner formulas reflecting firm ecovalues,” says Karen Behnke, the pioneering entrepreneur who founded Juice Beauty, in San Rafael, California. Behnke aimed to create meaningful change in the industry when she assembled her dream team 13 years ago. The company now owns a trailblazing patent and sets the standard for clinical organics. “We’re excited that traditional department stores such as Bloomingdale’s, Neiman Marcus and Holt Renfrew are adding our products to their beauty departments,” says Behnke, who attributes Juice Beauty’s tremendous growth in recent years to a surge of interest in chemical-free, luxury alternatives.

Natural Replaces Toxic A recent Green Beauty Barometer online survey revealed that more than half of women want their skincare products to be 20

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all-natural, a result likely driven by the scientific information age (see KariGran.com/ pages/greenbeauty for details). Reputable scientific studies revealing parabens in breast cancer biopsies have demonstrated that everything applied to the skin also enters the bloodstream, hence the effectiveness of dermal nicotine and birth control patches. Thus, it can be alarming to realize that the average woman will unknowingly consume seven pounds of lipstick containing petroleum-based emollients, synthetic preservatives and artificial dyes during a lifetime, undoubtedly another reason consumers are switching to natural options. Katey Denno, a Los Angeles makeup artist to the stars, noticed cosmetic red flags early in her career. “The first time I turned over a palette that most makeup artists carry and saw specific colors that couldn’t be used on eyes or lips, I was confused; if something isn’t safe for lips or eyes, how can it be good for any part of us?” queries Denno, who switched from social work to makeup artistry 11 years ago. “The change in the industry has been substantial. Now green is mainstream, and


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Find a guide to toxic personal care products at Tinyurl.com/CosmeticIngredientsGuide. ~Vibrant Wellness Journal most artists have included some green beauty brands in their kits.” Millennials continue to drive consumer demand for higher standards. “Retailers understand that the skincare/makeup landscape is changing,” advises Behnke. “Traditional brands are no longer attracting younger consumers that are demanding organic, clinically validated products.” Denno concurs, stating, “The spotlight on clean products comes from the growing acknowledgement that we can and must do all we can to lower our overall toxic load.”

Demand Escalates Women are fueling the natural beauty movement, yet more men than ever are also seeking healthy alternatives. Grooming products with unisex packaging and fragrances are among top sellers. Informed teen and 20-something buyers are inclined to choose people- and eco-friendly brands that are also cruelty-free. A wide selection of aluminum-free, natural, personal care products including underarm deodorants are showing up in supermarkets. Women are ditching toxic hair dyes and going silver to avoid thinning hair and allergies, and unwittingly, creating a new fashion statement. Plus, there’s growing interest in DIY cosmetics using everyday good-for-you ingredients found in the kitchen. Artisan perfumes are gaining popularity among women that want the mystery and allure of fragrance without the side effects of manmade, chemical-based brands. “Some new customers are frustrated by commercial products giving them headaches, while others say that they just don’t like perfume, when what they actually don’t like is synthetic fragrance chemicals,” says Ananda Wilson, a botanical perfumer and owner of Gather Perfume, in South Hadley, Massachusetts. “It’s inspiring when they smell real plant scents and see how their world lights up! The molecules in natural perfumes are active and interact with personal chemistry, so they unfold differently on each

wearer, creating a unique signature and experience.” Wilson ventured into botanical blends when both awareness and supplies of appropriate ingredients were scarce. “Perfume history is largely rooted in natural materials, but until recently, there was a mass blackout of this precious lineage. When I started, there was barely anything available, and only through a handful of aromatherapy companies,” she explains. Now, Wilson bases her products on botanical infusions from plants she’s grown or collected, including wild beach roses, clover and spring poplar buds. It only takes a whiff to dispel the myth that natural perfumes lack sophistication or tenacity. “Naturals have a breadth of possibilities—opulent white florals, fresh and clean, or dirty and smoky,” expounds Wilson. Eco-beauty is emerging from conscious lifestyle choices and creating the next era of cosmetics. “It’s fun to be called a pioneer in organic beauty,” muses Behnke. “Our products, employees and happy customers comprise an encouraging accomplishment.” Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist. Connect at MarlainaDonato.com.

616.834.2480

Celebrities Go Natural Nina Dobrev Senator Dianne Feinstein Kate Hudson Miranda Kerr Metallica: Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Robert Trujillo, Lars Ulrich Gwyneth Paltrow Alicia Silverstone Christine Taylor Shailene Woodley

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June 2018

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“The important thing is to show up. It’s about participation, not breaking personal bests,” Pullen continues. Kids can play a game while running, such as silently counting steps, trees or other runners.” Mindfulness can also include sharing how it feels to run and meeting challenges along the way. Bloom suggests tuning in to nature. “Being in beautiful surroundings or watching for animals can promote mindfulness,” he says. “It can be spiritual.”

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fit body

Safe Start

RUNNING WITH THE KIDS Strengthens Body, Mind and Family Spirit

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by Marlaina Donato

ombining regular exercise with quality family time can be an enjoyable and fun way to realize a healthier lifestyle. Running together in fresh air, preferably in natural settings, allows children as young as 5 to safely join in.

Physical and Emotional Perks

Families and coaches agree that running benefits both body and psyche. “Running as a family is an incredibly bonding experience, putting aside some of the usual conflicts and perceived hierarchies and just coming together,” says William Pullen, a London, England, psychotherapist and author of Running with Mindfulness: Dynamic Running Therapy (DRT) to Improve Low-mood, Anxiety, Stress, and Depression. “Running also gives us a place where we can develop skills like building confidence and competency.” Marc Bloom, of Princeton, New Jersey, author of Young Runners: The Complete Guide to Healthy Running for Kids From 5 to 18 and The Runner’s Bible, concurs, stating, “Running as a family can give parents the opportunity to be good role models by instilling values of health, fitness and togetherness.” Experts emphasize the fun factor. Pullen encourages both parents and kids to get out of their heads and into their bodies. “Concentrating on breath, posture, sensation and location all help make running mindful,” he suggests. 22

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For beginners, experts recommend approaching running as a desirable pastime and adopting a slow, easy pace. “Always make running fun, not a chore,” encourages Bloom. “Frame it as being outside, playing and sharing with friends and family. Make a game of it as much as possible.” Whether a family chooses to run in the park or in a community race, experts stress the importance of not setting goals. “Make it pleasurable. Don’t worry about time and distance. Start with short distances, maybe a block or two for novice runners or very young children,” advises running coach Jeremy Sanders, from Winchester, Virginia. “Be patient. Some days, the kids will get cramps. They may whine or get moody. Other days, they will be happy and content. Don’t let one bad run ruin the opportunity to try again another time.” Running coaches and seasoned runners agree that it is wise to tailor runs according to age and fitness levels. “Kids can begin at school age, 5 or 6; but start them with a few minutes and then add more, up to 15 minutes to a half an hour or so a few days a week. Always mix in sprints for short attention spans. Keep it simple. No fancy running shoes are needed when starting, just regular sneakers,” advises Bloom. “For teens, 30 to 45 minutes at a time a few times a week is fine, provided that they have bona fide running shoes.”

Inspiration

Finding inspiration as a family can include running for worthy causes; most communities host charity runs. “This can become a focal point for getting in shape, raising money and running for the greater good, not just yourself,” says Bloom. Mindful running presents regular opportunities to explore new places, focus on details that often go unnoticed and make exercise an active meditation for all involved. “Show kids how to notice what is going on around them when they run,” suggests Pullen. “You can read up and educate yourselves on trees, geology or the change of seasons so they feel a powerful sense of connection and freedom.” Whether running as a family is motivated by a desire to stay fit, get someplace or simply share more quality time, being in the present moment is most important. “Life is not about striving all the time,” exhorts Pullen. “Take the kids out. Keep it fun and make it into an adventure.” Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist. Connect at MarlainaDonato.com.


Breathing While Running William Pullen: “Mindful breathing is simply making the observation of one’s breath being the priority over thoughts. Each time the mind interrupts, gently return to the breath. Learning how to do that gently is what it’s all about—it means letting go of forcing, wishing and striving—and just gently doing.” Marc Bloom: “I’m not a fan of instructing young kids how to breathe while running because thinking about a must-do task can spoil the fun, and also seem like homework. Runners breathe naturally through their mouths, with an occasional deep breath through the nose. You can get technical with this, but not for kids. Be aware if breathing gets labored. If kids feel out of breath they’re probably running too fast. Kids love to start off fast, often too fast. Also, normal breathing might feel ‘out of breath’ and wrong to them because they’re not accustomed to it. Explain this to newbies beforehand by telling them what to expect.” Jeremy Sanders: “Everyone is different. Your breathing changes with effort and the more you run, the more you learn what works for you. You can experiment by breathing through only your nose or only your mouth, or in combination, in through the nose and out through the mouth. You can also alter the number of steps between each breath to get a comfortable rhythm going.”

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10 Foods Help Us Relax and Rest

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etting enough sleep—or not—has a trickle-down effect. A study in the Journal of Obesity shows that good quality shut-eye helps us reduce stress, lose weight and function better. Research also shows that most Americans would be healthier, happier and safer going about their daily activities if they slept 60 to 90 more minutes each night, accord-

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by Judith Fertig

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ing to the American Psychological Association. A consistent sleep routine helps enable a good night’s rest, with activities like going to bed at the same time whenever possible; shutting down the Internet, email and text messaging at least an hour before bedtime; and limiting intake of caffeine and alcohol. Another best practice is eating foods that help us relax, fall and stay asleep. Four

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conscious eating


primary sleep-promoting vitamins and minerals naturally found in foods are tryptophan, magnesium, calcium and vitamin B6. Some of these help the body produce melatonin, the hormone responsible for regulating the body’s sleep/wake patterns called circadian rhythms. Others enhance serotonin, which carries nerve signals and relays messages in the brain related to mood and sleep. Some foods are naturally packed with these essential vitamins and minerals, and eating certain foods at certain times can help us tip the scale towards a successful night of restful sleep.

1

Kiwi. Full of vitamins C and E, serotonin and folate, kiwi can help us sleep longer. In a study at Taipei Medical University, in Taiwan, researchers had participants eat two kiwifruits one hour before bedtime for four weeks. Total sleep time improved by 13.4 percent.

2

Soy. In a Japanese study published in the Nutrition Journal, researchers surveyed 1,076 participants between 20 and 78 on how often they ate soy products, which are rich in sleepenhancing isoflavones. Those that ate the most soy foods enjoyed deeper, more sustained sleep. Researchers concluded that soy’s isoflavones help regulate the sleep/wake cycle.

3

Tart cherry juice. A study by the University of Rochester, in New York, found that older adults drinking two, eight-ounce servings of tart red cherry juice daily, one in the morning and one at night for two weeks, enjoyed moderate sleep improvement, comparable to taking the herb valerian and melatonin.

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4 5

Fish. Salmon, halibut, mackerel and tuna help boost the production of vitamin B6, which helps make melatonin. A recent study from the University of Pennsylvania published in Scientific Reports found that eating more fish led both to better sleep and improved cognitive function in children.

Fiber-rich foods. Choices such as chia seeds, nuts and whole grains help promote restorative “slow-wave” sleep, according to the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

6

Calcium-fortified yogurt. According to Dr. William Sears, a pediatrician in Pasadena, California, and author of The Baby Sleep Book: The Complete Guide to a Good Night’s Rest for the Whole Family, “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid

tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are some of the top sleep-inducing foods.”

7

Bananas. Rich in potassium, magnesium, tryptophan and vitamin B6, which are used to make melatonin, bananas help promote good sleep. A study in the Journal of Pineal Research found that men that ate two bananas at a time for a week had a rise in melatonin that reached a peak two hours later; pineapple juice and orange juice also raised those levels.

8

Walnuts. Eating a handful of walnuts an hour before bedtime provides fiber- supporting, restorative, slow-wave sleep, concluded a study in the journal Nutrition. Plus, walnuts are a good source of tryptophan, which helps make serotonin and melatonin; University of Texas researchers also found that walnuts contain their own source of melatonin.

9

Dark leafy greens. Kale, spinach and collard greens are among the magnesium-rich greens that can help us de-stress and go to sleep, says Dr. Raj Dasgupta, a professor of pulmonary and sleep medicine at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

10

Almonds and dates. Nerina Ramlakhan, Ph.D., a London sleep therapist and author of Fast Asleep but Wide Wake: Discover the Secrets of Restorative Sleep and Vibrant Energy, counsels her clients to start at breakfast by eating eight almonds and two dates. These two fiber-rich foods are able to slowly help produce melatonin for later in the day. Judith Fertig writes cookbooks and foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

June 2018

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inspiration

DOING NOTHING Why Timeouts Matter by April Thompson

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n a harried world where our work is never done, it’s tough to take timeouts to do nothing. Yet, when we pump the brakes on Americans’ obsessive drive, we discover fresh productivity, creativity and contentment. “We’re socialized to pride ourselves on accomplishment and achievement, yet when you step back, you realize doing nothing produces a valuable currency, especially in enhanced mental health,” says Colleen Long, a Boston psychologist and author of Happiness in B.A.L.A.N.C.E: What We Know Now About Happiness. Italians call it la dolce far niente, or the sweetness of doing nothing, while the Dutch word niksen translates as “doing something without a purpose”. Here are a few tips to reclaim the art of be-ing over do-ing.

Create a “do nothing” ritual. Set

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aside a special time and make it known. It can start the morning or wind down an evening. It may be meditating a few minutes or enjoying a bit of aromatherapy, wherever the heart leads.

Relax into the moment. Acknowledge

guilty feelings when they arise, but don’t heed them. It takes time to undo mental programming and learn to quiet the voice urging, “Don’t just stand there, do something!”

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Mindfully do nothing. It’s not about

vegging out with passive activities like watching TV or checking email. It’s a time to come alive to our senses and surroundings, whether listening to music or peoplewatching, free of distractions from phone calls or anxious thoughts.

Doing something is okay. The aim

is to let go of the compulsion to check off every item on our to-do list—but that doesn’t mean blankly staring off into space. These are purposeful moments without a specific purpose. Doodle in a sketchbook, wander around the neighborhood or lie in the grass and look at clouds. Spontaneously go with the flow.

There’s no one way or right way to do nothing. “Just by carving out space,

you’ll get a benefit even if it doesn’t feel like you’re doing it right or perfectly,” advises Long. It looks different for different people. “Before I had kids, my ‘nothing time’ might be just being out in nature or simply doing one thing mindfully at a time, like washing dishes. Now I incorporate the principle into family time. One day a week, I shut off the phone, get on the floor with my kids and just let life get messy.” Connect with April Thompson, in Washington, D.C., at AprilWrites.com.


We Need Clean Waters Streams and Rivers Are Life Links by Avery Mack

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reeks, streams and rivers flow into ponds, lakes and oceans, carrying pollution. Keeping large bodies of water clean starts with local waterways. As awareness of this need rises, some rivers in Africa, India, New Zealand and elsewhere are being protected and recognized as living entities, with rights, values and the legal status of people. While court cases brought by commercial interests are challenging such decisions, progress continues on many fronts.

Cleanup Success Stories

“The Fox River’s been our treasure since Native Americans paddled there,” says Barbara Smits, part-owner of Old Northwest Frontier Tours, provider of self-guided auto, bicycle and walking tours via eBook, in De Pere, Wisconsin. “To see people sail, boat, ice fish or sightsee here again is a joy.” The Fox River Cleanup Project, a multi-year effort covering 13 miles that began in 2009, reduces the health and environmental risks from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in the sediment. Lake Winnebago, source of the lower Fox River, is currently stewarded under the 2000 Lake Sturgeon Management Plan. Recent meetings have sought citizen input for updates in managing sturgeon stock. In Athens County, Ohio, Michelle Shively, in Trimble, is Sunday Creek’s watershed coordinator. “Every minute, 850 to 1,000 gallons of polluted water from

an underground mine pool flows into the creek, turning the water orange from iron waste. Once the iron is removed, you need to do something with it,” she says. Guy Riefler, Ph.D., an associate professor of civil engineering, and John Sabraw, professor of art and chair of a painting and drawing program, both with Ohio University, in Athens, found a way to wash, dry and pulverize recovered iron. It will be sold to Gamblin Artists Colors to make oil paints for artists in mustardy ochre, rusty red and violet tones. Not yet widely available, 500 sample tubes of Reclaimed Earth Violet were featured at an initial fundraiser. “Cleaning water is expensive, but now we’ve turned the problem into a method to fund more work,” says Shively. Throughout history, river dams have been built to provide power or irrigation, prevent flooding and provide municipal water needs. Of approximately 80,000 three-foot-tall or higher U.S. dams, only about 2,500 produce hydropower. Removal of old dams no longer serving their original function can restore entire watershed ecosystems, provide habitat for fish and wildlife, add jobs, improve water quality, reinstate natural sediment and nutrient flow, and save taxpayer dollars. Built in 1929 and abandoned after World War II, demolition of an Eklutna River dam, in Alaska, began in 2016. Curtis McQueen, an Eklutna tribal leader and

CEO of Eklutna Inc., which now owns the dam, reported that 300,000 cubic yards of sediment had amassed there, along with junked cars, TVs and other trash. The tribe is the first in the nation to be involved in such a massive project, intended to restore its historic salmon population. In 2017, dams were removed in Alaska, California, Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. A map at Tinyurl.com/DamRemovals shows dams taken down since 1916. “The good news is that in meetings like the St. Louis River Summit, in Superior, Wisconsin, in March, clean water wasn’t viewed only in a strictly scientific sense, but added the human factor to produce more diverse solutions,” says Wallace J. Nichols, Ph.D., the Monterey Bay, California, author of Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better at What You Do. “The bad news is that most projects are funded, directly or indirectly, by the federal government. Cuts add challenges and stress to looking for solutions.” Cities like Pittsburgh, Superior and Duluth are among many that are protecting, restoring and rejuvenating riverfronts with increased public access, thus rekindling residents’ love for and recognition of the mental and physical benefits provided by their waterways. “We’re in a period of big ideas,” says Nichols. Two can be easily implemented. First, he explains, don’t build right on the water; instead, sit in the “second row”. Second, gain perspective by experiencing changes in waterways. “One way to do this is to spend an hour a day, or even an hour a week, in, on or near the water. Take someone new with you each time,” suggests Nichols. “You’ll see how best to value, promote and defend our right to clean water.” Then teach the kids. Connect with the freelance writer via AveryMack@mindspring.com. June 2018

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green living


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natural pet

Pets Welcome Here Happy Places to Live and Travel Together

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by Sandra Murphy

s of last year, 90 million dogs lived in American homes. Including cats, birds, fish, small animals and reptiles, the grand total is 393 million, reports the American Pet Products Association. Pets are considered family members by 95 percent of their people. Accordingly, pets are a key consideration in choosing a friendly place to live or visit. The personal finance website WalletHub analyzed the most pet-friendly U.S. cities encompassing criteria inclusive of access to veterinarians and cost, pet insurance rates, pet-friendly restaurants, pet-centric businesses, dog parks and animal shelters. SmartAsset, a personal finance technology company, ranked cities by dog parks, pet-friendly restaurants and stores, walkability, weather and housing costs. Unsurprisingly, many high picks are in warmer climates.

What to Seek

“First, look for pet-friendly landlords. Space to play, socialize and exercise animals is next on my list, followed by breweries and restaurants that allow dogs on their patios,” says Alexandra Bassett, a professional dog trainer and owner of Dog Savvy Los Angeles. “I hike off-leash in Runyon Canyon and we visit the Pawbar at Pussy & Pooch, a pet lifestyle boutique, to mingle and sample treats. Food is the fastest way to make a dog comfortable in just about any setting.” 28

West Michigan Edition

Irvine and Carlsbad, California, and Portland, Maine, are among the first cities to ban use of toxic pesticides in public areas and homes, following pressure from local groups. Being closer to the ground and smaller in size, pets suffer adverse reactions faster than humans. Contact local environmental groups to help ban harmful insecticides and herbicides in public areas. In Pasco County, Florida, Epperson Community homes exemplify eco- and pet-friendly planning, with open spaces and solar power-lit trails for jogging and walking. Birdhouses throughout the property welcome wild feathered friends. A centerpiece lagoon enhances scenic walks and uses less water and energy than a traditional pool or golf course. Separate paths allocated for bikes and driverless cars keep dog walkers safe. Colony Cove, in Ellenton, Florida, is a 55-plus retirement community that allows multiple pets, including some breeds banned elsewhere. It maintains a large dog park, and at summer’s end, dogs are welcome to take a dip in the pool. Further, the association offers mobile groomers, photos with Santa and costume contests. All species are welcome at Rose Villa Senior Living, in Portland, Oregon, where residents’ request for an off-leash dog park play area was granted. One resident owns two dogs, two cats and an African gray parrot.

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The largest-ever Canadian residential project to earn Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design platinum certification, Calgary’s University District, embraces ecological conservation, habitat restoration and long-term conservation management principles. Designed for residents to age in place with their families, recreational fitness amenities include on- and off-leash dog parks, a pet-friendly activity space and paths leading to parks.

Favorite Activities

Sara Nick, chief content officer at Sidewalk Dog Media, in Minneapolis, suggests experiencing unique adventures. Dog paddling takes on new meaning via stand-up paddleboarding with a pooch at Minnesota’s Split Rock Lighthouse and Tettegouche state parks. Whatever the weather, equine-friendly pups can ride along in a horse-drawn carriage from Doubletree Carriage Company, in Spring Valley. Dogs are welcome to watch or snooze through film showings at the Long Drive-In, in Long Prairie. Birgit and Jim Walker, authors of Keep Your Paws on the Road: A Practical Guide to Traveling with Dogs, travel by RV in summer with their three dogs to favorite stops like Tombstone, Arizona. “Some tourist areas don’t welcome dogs, but in Tombstone, dogs can go for stagecoach rides and down into a mine with you,” she says. Kim Salerno, president and founder of TripsWithPets.com, in Wake Forest, North Carolina, recommends Kimpton or Aloft hotels. “Kimpton accepts any pet, any size, weight, breed or species. Amenities include a bed, treats, a water bowl and toys with no additional pet fee,” she says. Salerno continues, “In Asheville, dogs are allowed on the grounds of the Biltmore Estate. The Ernest Hemingway House, in Key West, Florida, allows small, cat-friendly dogs. Boutiques, feed stores, wineries and art galleries may say yes to pets. Ask first and make sure your pet is well-behaved.” Whether at home or traveling, families can enjoy many opportunities to share new experiences with pets. Just be sure they mind their manners to have a good time. Connect with freelance writer Sandra Murphy at StLouisFreelanceWriter@mindspring.com.


Sara Bard’s Story Triathlete Outlives Expiration Date

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riathlete Sara Bard continues to outlive her expiration date and chooses to view every day as a gift. Bard has a rare cancer called Neuroendocrine Tumor, a condition similar to what Steve Jobs had. While training for a half marathon in September 2013, Bard became concerned about on-going stomach problems she’d experienced and finally decided to get it checked out. “For this type of cancer when symptoms start to show they are often ignored,” Bard says. Symptoms of this type of cancer often mimic other diseases like IBS, Crohn’s disease, asthma, making it hard to recognize. Bard notes, “Unfortunately, as was my case, many people are diagnosed when they are already at Stage Four.” Bard views life differently in light of her reality and explains, “When you are faced with a situation like mine, you can’t just say ‘I’ll do that later’. I don’t have later.

Reality is, tomorrow isn’t truly guaranteed for anyone. But for me, I just don’t want to live with regret.” Despite having to bear the weight of her disheartening situation, Bard still participated in six triathlons a year from 2013 to 2015. In recent years, Bard continues to live a healthful lifestyle and stays active through triathlons for as long as she can. Bard says, “I don’t want to look back and say I wasn’t active when I could have been.” After competing in the Grand Rapids Triathlon and Michigan Titanium Triathlon, Bard qualified for USAT Age Group Nationals in the 55-59 group. Despite Bard’s incredible strength and motivation in life, she recognizes the importance of support and accountability. “My husband is my number one cheerleader,” Bard notes, “I also give a lot of credit to my trainers at TRIMARNI, who really keep me motivated”. Bard works to grow in her weak areas by training hard and attending triathlon camps. “I’m going to a camp in North Carolina to work on biking. It is my hardest discipline, doing the same thing for that long is challenging for me.” Even though triathlons are a big part of Bard’s life, she has had to redefine her priorities. “It is always important to assess why you are doing a race” Bard says, “Because of my condition, my priorities have changed.” Bard has had to learn to say no to certain races in order to be present in other areas of life. Bard loves to educate whoever she can about Neuroendocrine Tumor Cancer and states, “My advice would be to pay attention to your body and get checked out if something isn’t right. Don’t wait.” Rather than making her condition an excuse to become dormant and lose passion in life, Bard decides to live out of thankfulness for the time she has, treating every day as if it is her last. The 2018 Grand Rapids Triathalon will be held on Sunday, June 10th in Ada. For more information go to: GrandRapidsTri.com. See ad page 18. June 2018

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HEALTHY SUMMER HYDRATION

Kids Love These Homemade Drinks

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by Judith Fertig

t day camp or the pool, on the playing field or in the backyard, kids can get really thirsty, especially as temperatures climb. Although filtered water is always a good choice, sugary, carbonated, artificially colored and flavored beverages can be tempting. Hav-

ing homemade options ready can entice kids to stay hydrated in a healthy way.

Clued-in Professionals “As a sports nutritionist and mother of active kids, I know there’s a lot of misinformation out there, and I get all kinds of

Mom Picks Michele Olivier, the mother of daughters Elliette and Parker, views herself as both a lover of food and a control freak. The Denver, Colorado, recipe blogger started off making food for her baby and toddler. As her kids grew and their nutritional needs changed, she created new recipes, including healthy sports drinks that both balance electrolytes and hydrate. While Elliette loves water and has no trouble staying hydrated, Parker loves

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questions from parents about what drinks are best for kids,” says Jackie Berning, Ph.D., a registered dietitian, sports nutrition consultant and professor of health science at the University of Colorado, in Colorado Springs. “Parents need to know that all beverages are not created equal when it comes to hydrating them. The best [healthful] beverages taste good when your child is active, so encourage their drinking more of them,” she says. According to the National Alliance for Youth Sports, the recommended beverage contents for active kids during sports and other activities should contain at least 100 milligrams (mg) of sodium and at least 28 mg of potassium per eight ounces. It should be noncarbonated. We asked two moms keen on nutrition how they include these elements in drinks that kids will like.

healthy kids


Judith Fertig writes cookbooks plus foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. ~Lao Tzu

HEALTHY HYDRATING RECIPES Blackberry + Lemon + Mint Electrolyte Drink photos by Stephen Blancett

juice, so Mom had to “make something that looks like juice, but is healthy,” says Olivier. Four main ingredients are a little frozen fruit left over from breakfast smoothies, a bit of honey for sweetening, a dash of Himalayan sea salt and water, or herbal tea or coconut water. She might also add fresh mint, ginger or other natural flavorings (BabyFoode.com). Heather Dessinger, a mom of three and blogger of recipes and natural mothering tips from Santa Fe, Tennessee, makes a drink based on coconut water with lime juice, raw honey and sea salt for older kids that play soccer or other warm-weather sports. Dessinger describes herself as a researcher and healthy living DIY fan (Mommypotamus.com). With homemade drinks, we know exactly what is—and what isn’t—in them. They can be made in batches and kept in the refrigerator. Dessinger relates, “I’ve found that when I make a batch with honey, which is naturally antimicrobial, and store it in the coldest part of the fridge, my homemade sports drink lasts for at least a week.”

Coconut & Lime Sports Drink Yields: about 4½ cups of bolder taste for older kids

Yields: 4 cups 4 blackberries, fresh or frozen ½ lemon, juiced 1 mint leaf 1 Tbsp honey ⅛ tsp Himalayan pink salt 4 cups water, herbal iced tea or coconut water Place all ingredients in a blender and set on high for 45 to 60 seconds or until fruit is completely puréed. Add ice to a water bottle and pour electrolyte water on top to serve. Popsicle Option: Follow the same instructions, but add an additional tablespoon of honey, and then pour the electrolyte drink into popsicle molds and freeze overnight. 

3 cups coconut water 1 cup water or more, based on preference in strength of flavor) ½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice (lemon is also delicious) ¼ tsp Celtic sea salt or other unrefined sea salt with trace minerals 2 Tbsp raw honey or maple syrup (or more to taste) Few drops of Concentrace mineral drops (optional) Mix all ingredients together and store in a sealed glass container in the refrigerator for up to one week. Adapted from a recipe courtesy of Heather Dessinger, Tinyurl.com/MoreSports Drinks4Kids.

Courtesy of Michele Olivier, Tinyurl.com/4SportsDrinks4Kids.

Natural Awakenings recommends using organic, non-GMO (genetically modified) and non-bromated ingredients whenever possible.

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calendar of events

WEDNESDAY JUNE 6

BVI School of Ayurveda Accepting Applications: Ayurvedic Consultant Certificate Program. Webinar and On-Site Courses, one weekend a month. State Licensed. NAMA Member. The Sambodh Society, Inc. 6363 N. 24th St., Kalamazoo. Info and Catalog: AyurvedaMichigan.org or 269-381-4946.

In-Office Workshop: Autoimmune Intensive – 6:30-8pm. Dr. Ramona Wallace will teach attendees how to minimize symptoms of their autoimmune disorders. Guests will leave with the confidence of knowing which questions to ask their primary care doctor and what important lifestyle changes to make along with a 30-day food plan. $30 per person. Bluewater Wellness Center, 17212 Van Wagoner Rd, Spring Lake. Must Register: 616-296-2422.

FRIDAY – SUNDAY JUNE 1-3

THURSDAY JUNE 7

ALL MONTH LONG

7th Annual Midwest Women’s Herbal Conference: Conference speakers include Tieraona Low Dog, M.D., Isla Burgess, Dr. Jody Noé and many more. Come for a gathering of the feminine; a wide spectrum of Internationally acclaimed herbalists and earth-based speakers, plant walks. Over 60 workshops and plants walks. Plus a kids’ camp and Teen Camp. Includes pre-conference classes, workshops and walks, singing, dancing, meals, swimming, and red tent communal space. Camp Helen Brachman, Almond, WI. Info: MidwestWomensHerbal.com

SATURDAY JUNE 2

Community Quiet Day and Labyrinth Walk – 10am-3pm. Come for a time and place set apart for contemplation, centering prayer, healing prayer, and walking meditation. Attendees can come and go as the day allows and experience the gift of healing peace. Refreshment for body and spirit. Donation only. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, corner of Third & Clay, across from Hackley Park in downtown Muskegon. Info: LindaReynolds21@comcast.net, 231-744-0377.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY JUNE 2-3

The Sacred Healing Art of Reiki: Levels I and II Course – 10am-4pm. During this course, participants will learn about Reiki, how to effectively tap into this subtle form of healing energy, receive Reiki Level I & Reiki Level II attunements, and have plenty of practice time. Upon completion, attendees will receive the Reiki Level I and Level II certificate plus a certificate of their lineage. Everything is provided, but attendees are allowed to bring blankets, massage tables, or other personal items. Please wear comfy clothing. $325. 1991 Lakeshore Dr, (in Lakeside shopping district) Muskegon. Must Register: info@bluehorizonswellness.com.

MONDAY JUNE 4

Easygoing EcoTrek Fitness: Outdoor Group Workout – 9-9:45am. Lisa VanDonkelaar will teach a fitness class covering strength and stretching. $7 drop-in. Thatcher Park, 3547 Main St, Ravenna. Sign up: Signup@EcoTrekFitness.com.

TUESDAY JUNE 5

Conscious Breathing – 6-8pm. Stress, panic, and anxiety don’t have to be the story of your life. Anxiety is an energy that can be redirected. The movement releases the attachment to the worry. In this class taught by Lindsay Balgooyan, attendees will turn anxiety into calmness, learn how breathing controls emotions, let go of stress and panic, and understand how breath can enhance feelings of gratitude towards ourselves and each other. $30 at door, $25 if registered by June 4. 1991 Lakeshore Dr, (in Lakeside shopping district) Muskegon. Register: BlueHorizonsWellness.com, 231-755-7771.

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West Michigan Edition

World Of Possibility: Star Shine - Mindfulness Meditation & Free Tea Party – 7:15-8:30pm. Living in Possibility means there are always answers. There is always hope. There is always possibility. Come shine with us! Dress comfortable. Cookies and tea provided. This event is led by Jeannine Proulx. Donations accepted. Bodhi Tree Yoga & Wellness Studio, 208 W 18th St, Holland. Register: MiBodhiTree.com, 616-392-7580. Reiki Share – 10am-12pm, 6-8pm. Being offered twice in one day! Come check out what Reiki is all about, and have a mini session done. Open to those that know Reiki and those that don’t. Donations welcome. The Remedy House, 5150 Northland Dr, Grand Rapids. Register: 616-443-4225.

SUNDAY JUNE 10

Grand Rapids Triathlon – This triathlon event is a chance for athletes of all skill levels to compete on a scenic riverside course, perfect for the novice through the seasoned triathlete. This USA Triathlon sanctioned event promises heart pounding excitement from start to the finish. Info: GrandRapidsTri.com. Eckankar: Spiritual Freedom – 10-11am. ECK Light and Sound Service, second Sunday each month. Free. Dominican Center at Marywood, Room 4, 2025 E Fulton, Grand Rapids. Info: ECKMI.org, eck.mi.info@gmail.com, 269-370-7170.

MONDAY JUNE 11

Easygoing EcoTrek Fitness: Outdoor Group Workout – 9-9:45am. Come for a fitness class taught by Lisa VanDonkelaar covering strength and stretching. $7 drop-in. Sullivan Twp Park, 8138 Heights Ravenna Rd, Ravenna. Signup: Signup@ EcoTrekFitness.com.

TUESDAY JUNE 12

Hormones Class – 6:30-7:30pm. Dee Kohley will discuss the best course of action to take regarding hormone imbalance. Free. Bluewater Wellness Center, 17212 Van Wagoner Rd, Spring Lake. Must Register: 616-296-2422.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 13

Get Real Results Class: with Full Spectrum Hemp Oil & CBD – 7-9pm. Want to learn about CBD and the health benefits of hemp? Come learn about this amazing plant, how it works in the body to promote health, healing and harmony. Free. GR Wellness Collective, 1324 Lake Dr #4, Grand Rapids. Info: HempHealth.myhalelife.com, 616-292-6331.

MONDAY JUNE 18

Easygoing EcoTrek Fitness: Outdoor Group Workout – 9-9:45am. Come for a fitness class taught by Lisa VanDonkelaar covering strength and stretching. $7 drop-in. Muskegon County Fairgrounds, 3690 S Hilton Park Rd, Fruitport. Sign up: Signup@EcoTrekFitness.com.

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TUESDAY JUNE 19

Morning Tai Chi – 9-10am. This is being offered by Certified Personal Trainer, Connie Prins. Class will be held out on the patio facing the lake. $10. The Remedy House, 5150 Northland Dr, Grand Rapids. Register: 616-443-4225.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 20

Sound of Soul by Eckankar – 7-8pm. Third Wednesday each month. Experience singing HU, an age-old, universal name for God, for inner peace and creativity. Free. Dominican Center at Marywood, Room 4, 2025 E Fulton, Grand Rapids. Info: ECKMI.org, HU4Heart@gmail.com, (269) 370-7170. 2nd Annual Wonder Women Wellness Event – 6-8pm. Come explore how to become a Wonder Woman with your personal wellness. This fun event will include henna tattoos by Happy Henna, Angel Card readings, live music on the patio facing Versluis Lake, and healthy treats. Explore women’s wellness options with a naturopathic doctor and learn basic organic tools and options to nurture the Wonder Woman in you. Free, treats and additional activities start at $4. The Remedy House. 5150 Northland Dr NE, Grand Rapids. Info: 616-443-4225.

THURSDAY JUNE 21

Are We Awakened Yet? Sustaining the Earth – 6:30-8:30pm. Ilka Handshaw will teach practical steps that make a difference in sustaining the earth. Being overwhelmed by the enormity of global, climate, and environmental issues may lead to inaction, even though there’s a desire to make a difference. By providing credible and current data on the earth’s imbalance, Ilka will raise the level of consciousness to that of urgency for action. This contemplative talk reveals how local actions matter and contribute toward bringing balance to the environment. $15. Dominican Center at Marywood, 2025 Fulton Street E, Grand Rapids. Info: DominicanCenter.com, 616-514-3325. Rainbow Therapy Weekly Class: Series for Adults – 10am-12pm or 5-7pm. This 9-week class is designed to give proactive support to those who are struggling with day-to-day pressures of anxiety and depression through a holistic approach. Come tap into the seven main energy centers of the body, known as the Chakras, teaching ways of understanding, coping, and developing emotions throughout troubled times. $275, fee includes all materials needed. Pre-register by June 16. The Remedy House, 5150 Northland Dr NE, Grand Rapids. Info: 616-443-4225. Rainbow Therapy Weekly Class - Series for Ages 13-18 – 3-5pm. This 9-week class is designed to give proactive support to those who are struggling with day-to-day pressures of anxiety and depression through a holistic approach. Come tap into the seven main energy centers of the body, known as the Chakras, teaching ways of understanding, coping, and developing emotions throughout troubled times. $275, fee includes all materials needed. Pre-register by June 16. The Remedy House, 5150 Northland Dr NE, Grand Rapids. Info: 616-443-4225. Rainbow Therapy Weekly Class - Series for ages 10-13 – 1-3pm. This 9-week class is designed to give proactive support to those who are struggling with day-to-day pressures of anxiety and depression through a holistic approach. We will tap into the seven main energy centers of the body, known as the Chakras, teaching ways of understanding,


coping, and developing their emotions throughout troubled times. $250, fee includes all materials needed. Pre-register by June 16. The Remedy House, 5150 Northland Dr NE, Grand Rapids. Info: 616-443-4225.

SATURDAY JUNE 23

Bird Watching at Huff Park – 8am. Huff Park is a perfect place for bird lovers and a great place to learn about birding. Join the Grand Rapids Audubon Club for a 1-2 mile hike (around 90 minutes) surrounded by songs of birds making a colorful morning. Dress for bugs and wear shoes that can get muddy. Binoculars are recommended. Rain Date is Saturday, June 30. Free. Huff Park, 2399 Ball Ave NE, Grand Rapids. Info: commreq@grpl.org. Reiki I and II class – 9am-5pm. Introduction to Reiki, become attuned to the universal energy, learn how to give treatment to self and others and meet your Reiki guide. $250, fee includes a $50 deposit due at registration. The Remedy House, 5150 Northland Dr NE, Grand Rapids. Register: 616-443-4225. The Mercy Health Seaway Run – With a community 5K walk, 5K, 15K and half marathon, the Mercy Health Seaway Run has an event for everyone! All courses are barrier free and accessible to those with physical challenges, and volunteers will be available for assistance on race day. 4th and Western, downtown Muskegon. Info: SeawayRun.com.

SUNDAY JUNE 24

Advanced Reiki class – 9am-5pm. Enhance energy work to a new level. Learn how to perform psychic surgery and how to set up and utilize a crystal grid with energy work. $275, fee includes a $50 deposit due at registration. The Remedy House, 5150 Northland Dr NE, Grand Rapids. Register: 616-443-4225.

MONDAY JUNE 25

Town Hall Meeting: Alternative Treatments and Therapies for mental illness – 6:30-9pm. Come for a discussion about alternative treatments and therapies with a panel of experts in the field. Alternative treatments and therapy resources will be available. QPR Training will be held from 5-6pm. Free. Extended Grace, 421 Columbus Ave, Grand Haven. Info: office@extendedgrace.org. Roses, What’s New? – 6pm. The Lakeshore Garden Masters welcomes gardeners of all levels to their June meeting. Come for a discussion about identifying new cultivars and colors and why roses aren’t as fussy as they used to be! The potluck begins at 6pm. Please bring a dish to pass and a table setting and beverage. Attendees can come only for the presentation at 6:30pm. $5 per meeting or yearly dues $15. White Lake Community Library, 3900 White Lake Dr, Whitehall. Info: Susan Thorpe at holbox04@gmail.com, 248-310-2312. Easygoing EcoTrek Fitness: Outdoor Group Workout – 9-9:45am. Come for a fitness class taught by Lisa VanDonkelaar covering strength and stretching. $7 drop-in. Conklin Park, 3443 Blackmer Rd, Ravenna. Signup: Signup@EcoTrekfitness.com.

on going events NOTE: All calendar events must be received via email by the 10th of the month and adhere to our guidelines. Email NAcalendar@NaturalAwakenings.com for guidelines and to submit entries. No phone calls or faxes, please. Or visit NaturalWestMichigan.com/submit-calendar-events/ to submit online.

Sunday Meditation-Self Realization Fellowship – 1011am. Every Sunday we gather to meditate, chant, & explore the wisdom of the Hindu/Yoga tradition as taught by Paramhansa Yogananda. Free will offering. Marywood Center 2025 Fulton, Grand Rapids. Info: Fred Stella 616-451-8041, GrandRapids.srf@gmail.com, GRSRF.org Sunday Worship and Youth Services – 10:30am. A warm and inviting New Thought Spiritual Community, inclusive and accepting of all, honoring diversity, for those seeking spiritual truth. Unity of Grand Rapids, 1711 Walker Ave. NW, Grand Rapids. Info: UnityGRoffice@gmail.com or 616-453-9909. Celebration Services – 10:30am. Join us each Sunday for our Sunday Celebration Service. Unity is a positive, peaceful path for spiritual living. We offer spiritual teachings and programs that empower a life of meaning, purpose, and abundance in all good things. We seek to discover the “universal” spiritual truths that apply to all religions. Unity Center for Spiritual Growth, 6025 Ada Dr SE, Ada. Info: office@Unitycsg.org or 616-682-7812.

Hot Yoga – 5-6:15pm. Sweat with this active, energetic, athletic style of yoga with traditional poses in a hot room. Not recommended for people with heart or lung conditions or those not engaged in regular exercise. $12 drop-in. Hearts Journey Wellness Center, 6189 Lake Michigan Dr, Allendale. Info:HeartsJourneyWellness.com or info@ HeartsJourneyWellness.com Spirit Space Sunday Worship – 10:30am. An interfaith, non-denominational gathering place for worship and spiritual enrichment. Join for inspiring messages called Reasoning’s. Spirit Space, 3493 Blue Star Hwy, Saugatuck. Info: 616-836-1555 or Spirit-Space.org Sunday Series – 6pm. Explore spirituality, universal truths, self-mastery and balanced, positive, loving and joyful living with The Coptic Center and their ongoing offering of enlightening ministers, teachers and guest presenters. Love offering. 0-381 Lake Michigan Dr, Grand Rapids. Info: TheCopticCenter.org

Monday Restorative Yoga – 6:45-8:00pm. All levels are welcome and encouraged to come learn gentle

TUESDAY JUNE 26

Why Supplement? – 6:30-7:30pm. Dee Kohley will discuss how supplements help achieve life goals. Free. Bluewater Wellness Center, 17212 Van Wagoner Rd, Spring Lake. Must Register: 616-296-2422.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 27

In-Office Workshop: Keto for Diabetics – 6:307:30pm. Dr. Ramona Wallace, the diabetes guru, will teach how to manage the blood sugar with food. Get off the blood sugar roller coaster and feel better! Receive a 30-day blood sugar balancing diet plan. $30 per person. Bluewater Wellness Center, 17212 Van Wagoner Rd, Spring Lake. Must Register: 616-296-2422.

THURSDAY JUNE 28

Get Real Results Class: with Full Spectrum Hemp Oil & CBD – 7-9pm. Want to learn about CBD and the health benefits of hemp? Come learn about this amazing plant, how it works in the body to promote health, healing and harmony. Free. GR Wellness Collective, 1324 Lake Dr #4, Grand Rapids. Info: HempHealth.myhalelife.com, 616-292-6331.

FRIDAY JUNE 29

Free Dinner and Movie Night – 6pm. All are welcome for a community-wide dinner and movie! The meal will be grilled hamburgers and hot dogs. Attendees can bring a dish to share, or just come and enjoy dinner at 6pm. The movie will start at 7pm. Free. Extended Grace, 714 Columbus Ave, Grand Haven. Info: office@extendedgrace.org.

yet powerful poses for the body, mind and spirit. Through these postures one will be seeking and finding balance. This balance will recharge, refresh and rejuvenate. Restorative Yoga is an antidote to stress. Various pricing. Bodhi Tree Yoga & Wellness Studio, 208 W 18th St, Holland. Info: MiBodhiTree. com, 616-392-7580. 3rd Monday Support Group – 7-8:30pm. This support group is available for parents, guardians and caregivers of teenagers and pre-teens facilitated by Nicki Kubec, LMSW. Free. Momentum Center, 714 Columbus Ave, Grand Haven. Info: 616-414-9111. A practice of A Course in Miracles – 7-8:30pm. Learn miracle-mindedness. Got joy? This is how to have it. Hint: You already do. All are welcome. Free. Fountain Street Church, 24 Fountain St. NE, Grand Rapids. 616-458-5095.

Tuesday Serenity Yoga – 4-5:30pm. This is a very gentle class geared toward developing and maintaining balance and includes very gentle movement to build balance and strength. As always, class will end with a 20 to 30 minute guided restoration/meditation. By donation. 1991 Lakeshore Dr, (in Lakeside shopping district) Muskegon. Must Register: BlueHorizonsWellness.com, 231-755-7771. SMART Recovery Group – 7-8pm. 1st and 3rd Tuesday of every month. Recovery through SelfEmpowerment: The purpose is to help participants gain independence from any addictive behavior. The meetings encourage participants to take responsibility for their own recovery and supports their capacity to regulate their behavior. As participants

June 2018

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progress in recovery their focus can shift to enjoying the activities of a healthy and productive life, including the satisfaction of assisting new participants the program. Free. 714 Columbus Ave, Grand Haven. Info: Office@ExtendedGrace.org. A Course in Miracles – 6:30-8pm. A Course in Miracles begins. Nothing real can be threatened. Nothing unreal exists. Herein lies the peace of God. As its title implies, the course is arranged throughout as a teaching device. It consists of three books: Text, workbook for students, and manual for teachers. The order in which students choose to use the books, and the ways in which they study them, depend on their particular needs and preferences. Come for a study group. There’s an open door policy, meaning guests can come anytime. Guests do not have to attend every week. Love offering. 6025 Ada Drive SE, Ada. Info: Office@unitycsg.org. Chair Yoga – 10:30-11:30am. Chair Yoga uses a chair for greater support and stability within the practice. With an emphasis on the breath, alignment, and moving at one’s own pace. Chair Yoga brings simplicity to the practice and easeful connection with the healing and restorative benefits yoga offers. Taught by Kathy Julien, certified yoga instructor. $10/session. Dominican Center at Marywood, 2025 Fulton St East, Grand Rapids. Info: DominicanCenter.com, 616-514-3325. Lunchtime Yoga – 11:45am-12:30. This class is about relaxation and refreshment to help provide extra energy to get through the day! Lunchtime yoga is a great way to kick start the mind to focus on the future tasks at hand. All Levels welcome and encouraged. $10. Bodhi Tree Yoga & Wellness Studio, 208 W 18th St, Holland. Info: 616-392-7580, mibodhitree.com. Tibetan Buddhist Meditation/Study Group – 7:15-8:30pm. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free. Jewel Heart, 1919 Stearns Ave, Kalamazoo. Info: Call 734-368-8701 or 269-9441575 or email: GregSupa@gmail.com Gentle Hatha Yoga –7:45-9am & 9:15-10:30am. With Mitch Coleman. Drop-ins welcome. White River Yoga Studio, 8724 Ferry St, Montague. Info: 231-740-6662 or WhiteRiverYoga.com Beginning Yoga & Meditation – 9:30-10:45am. This class will introduce you to basic postures, breathing techniques, and mindfulness with an emphasis on building body awareness. Gentle yet relaxing in nature, you will leave feeling relaxed, rejuvenated and having a greater sense of health and well-being. $12 drop-in. Hearts Journey Wellness Center, 6189 Lake Michigan Dr, Allendale. Info: visit us at HeartsJourneyWellness.com or info@ HeartsJourneyWellness.com Nourishing the Lakeshore – 7pm. Meetings the second Tuesday of each month. Open to the Public! Formed to provide education on the health enriching benefits of traditional diets, to increase access to clean, nutrient dense foods, and to teach traditional preparation and storage methods. Nourishing the Lakeshore of West Michigan is a chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation serving Ottawa, Muskegon, and Oceana counties. The main purpose is to act as a resource for local, clean, nutrient dense food. We also provide informational meetings on health related topics, often those which are politically incorrect. Nourishing the Lakeshore

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West Michigan Edition

respects that everyone is at a different point on the path to better eating. Our goal is to educate and enrich the wellness of our community. Location: The Century Club on Western Ave, Muskegon. Info:Meetup.com/Nourishing-the-Lakeshore-ofWest-Michigan-Weston-A-Price 4th Tuesday Support Group – 7-8:30pm. Free support group for family members, caregivers and loved ones of individuals with mental illness. Free. Momentum Center, 714 Columbus Ave, Grand Haven. Info: 616-414-9111. A Course in Miracles – 9:30-11am. A complete self-study spiritual thought system. It teaches that the way to universal peace is by undoing guilt through forgiving others. The Course focuses on the healing of relationships and making them holy. It expresses a non-sectarian, non-denominational spirituality. Unity Center for Spiritual Growth, 6025 Ada Dr SE, Ada. Info: Unitycsg.org. 616-682-7812. $20 off BioMeridian Assessments – Food allergies, environmental allergies, organ function and real food menus and shopping lists for families that are healthy and kid-approved. Grand Rapids. 616365-9176. IntegrativeNutritionalTherapies.com.

WEDNESDAY Yoga for Veterans and First Responders: Military, Fire, Police, etc. – 5:30-7pm. Enjoy yoga for 50 minutes and then a guided iRest Meditation. These practices help support one’s wellbeing on and off the mat. iRest Meditation has been shown to reduce symptoms associated with PTSD and trauma. The instructors are trained through Warriors at Ease. By donation. 1991 Lakeshore Dr, (in Lakeside shopping district) Muskegon. Must Register: BlueHorizonsWellness.com, 231-755-7771. A Course in Miracles – 9:30-11am. A Course in Miracles begins. Nothing real can be threatened. Nothing unreal exists. Herein lies the peace of God. As its title implies, the course is arranged throughout as a teaching device. It consists of three books: Text, workbook for students, and manual for teachers. The order in which students choose to use the books, and the ways in which they study them, depend on their particular needs and preferences. Come for a study group. We have an open door policy, meaning guests can come anytime. Guests do not have to attend every week. Love offering. 6025 Ada Drive SE, Ada. Info: Office@unitycsg.org. The Law of Attraction Speaking Club – 6:308pm. A Chartered Toastmaster Club. Do you want to become a confident public speaker and strong leader? We provide a supportive and positive learning experience in which members are empowered to develop communication and leadership skills, resulting in greater self-confidence and personal growth environment that allows you to achieve your goals at your own pace. Toastmaster Dues. Unity Center for Spiritual Growth, 6025 Ada Dr SE, Ada. Info: office@Unitycsg. org, 616-682-7812. Meditation – 6-7pm. Every Wednesday we meet in our meditation room from 6-7pm. We begin and end meditation time with live, native flute music. Join us for the full hour or any part of the time. Call 616-836-1555 for more info or visit our meditation page to learn more. 3493 Blue Star Highway, Saugatuck. Info: Info@Spirit-Space.org.

NaturalWestMichigan.com

Thursday Restorative Yoga – 7-8pm. Calm the mind and nourish the body with Restorative Yoga. Restorative poses are held on a mat and deeply supported with yoga props. The practice seeks to balance the physical, mental, and spiritual while also experiencing profound rest and relaxation. Taught by Kathy Julien, certified yoga instructor. $10/session. Dominican Center at Marywood, 2025 Fulton St East, Grand Rapids. Info and register: DominicanCenter. com, 616-514-3325. Gentle Yoga – 5:30 - 6:30pm. This gentle class offers a peaceful session to gradually build strength and range of motion. With this quiet practice, experience how mindful movement and breath work can deliver much needed nurturing, rest, and clarity. Taught by Kathy Julien, certified yoga instructor. $10/session. Dominican Center at Marywood, 2025 Fulton St East, Grand Rapids. Info and register: DominicanCenter.com, 616-514-3325. Chair Yoga – 4-5pm. Chair Yoga uses a chair for greater support and stability within the practice. With an emphasis on the breath, alignment, and moving at your own pace, Chair Yoga brings simplicity to the practice and easeful connection with the healing and restorative benefits yoga offers. Taught by Kathy Julien, certified yoga instructor. $10/ session. Dominican Center at Marywood, 2025 Fulton St East, Grand Rapids. Info: DominicanCenter.com, 616-514-3325. Emotions Anonymous – 12-1pm. This is a 12-step program for recovery of mental and emotional illness. Free. The Momentum Center, 714 Columbus Ave, Grand Haven. Info: 616414-9111.

Friday Gentle Yoga – 10:30-11:30AM. This class is designed with every “body” in mind. Appropriate for those wanting a softer, nurturing, slow paced, well supported and relaxing practice, this class includes carefully orchestrated movement, controlled pressure and well measured stretches. The postures are approached in gradual steps with time to focus on breathing and repetition. With an individualized approach, this class is a compassionate, non-competitive environment that’s welcoming to all. All levels welcome and encouraged. 208 W 18th St, Holland. Info: MibodhiTree.com, 616-392-7580. 3rd Friday Narcan Training and Distribution – 12-2pm. Red Project offers Free Narcan Training and Distribution for those interested. This event is held the Third Friday of every month from 12:00pm-2:00pm. Free. The Momentum Center, 714 Columbus Ave, Grand Haven. Info: 616-414-9111 or Office@ ExtendedGrace.org

SATURDAY Community practice – 10-11am. Come experience fun and exercise. Free. 99 East 8th St, Holland. Info: Mibodhitree.com.


1st Saturday QiGong Class – 3-4pm. Instructor Raymond Wan teaches about internal energy, self-healing breathing exercises, and meditation techniques. Participants are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing, bring a cushion or pillow to sit on, and to not eat a big meal one hour before class. Donation based. Academy of Alternative Healing Arts, 3790 28th St SW Ste B, Grandville. Info: AOAHA.com or 616-419-6924. 3rd Saturday Inpire Event – 10am-1pm. SeptMay. Everyone is invited to this collaborative community event. Brunch/lunch served. Registration not required. Extended Grace, Momentum Center, 714 Columbus, Grand Haven. Info: 616-502-2078 or online ExtendedGrace.org Hot Yoga – 7:30-8:45am. Sweat with this active, energetic, athletic style of yoga with traditional

poses in a hot room. Not recommended for people with heart or lung conditions or those not engaged in regular exercise. $12 drop-in. Hearts Journey Wellness Center, 6189 Lake Michigan Dr, Allendale. Info: HeartsJourneyWellness.com or info@ HeartsJourneyWellness.com Gentle Hatha Yoga – 9:15-10:15am & 11-12:15am. With Mitch Coleman. Drop-ins welcome. White River Yoga Studio, 8724 Ferry St, Montague. 231740-6662. Info: WhiteRiverYoga.com Sweetwater Local Foods Market – 9am-1pm. A double-up bucks and bridge card market. Hackley Health at the Lakes building on Harvey St. Located inside during inclement weather. Muskegon. 231861-2234.

mark your calendar SUNDAY – TUESDAY, July 15-17

save the date CALENDAR EVENTS

Must be submitted online each month at NaturalWestMichigan.com. Events priced $80 or more require a corresponding display ad. There is a $40 charge per listing, up to 50 words. Current advertisers, distribution sites or nonprofits, use this listing in place of your two free listings.

mark your calendar FRIDAY – SATURDAY, July 6-7

The Lakeshore Art Festival – 10am-6pm. This award-winning festival features a unique blend of 350+ fine art and craft exhibitors, street performers, an artisan food market, interactive art stations, children’s activities and so much more. Downtown Muskegon. Info: LakeshoreArtFestival.org.

mark your calendar THURSDAY, July 12

The Amazing Honey Bee – 3pm. Learn how bees make honey and how it’s harvested. Discover the three types of bees in a hive and their respective roles. View live bees in an observation hive. Participate in a question and answer session with an experienced beekeeper in a fun, fast paced presentation that’s entertaining and educational. Teens ages 11-18 can examine live bees in an observation hive, taste honey, and craft a hand-rolled beeswax candle. Free. Grand Rapids Public Library Main Branch, 111 Library Street NE, Grand Rapids. Info: commreq@grpl.org.

Fly Fishing Wellness Retreat – 4pm, Sun1pm, Tues. Fly fishing wellness retreat for women battling and surviving any type of cancer. $30. Grayling. Info: FishOn.org, 616-855-4017.

mark your calendar MONDAY – TUESDAY, July 16-17

20th Asia Pacific Diabetes Conference – 9am-6pm. Diabetes Asia Pacific 2018 is an international platform for presenting research about diabetes management and therapeutics, exchanging ideas and contributing to the dissemination of knowledge in the management of the disease. This event aims to provide and share knowledge, along with networking opportunities between a large number of medical and industrial professionals. The meeting gathers renowned scientists, physicians, surgeons, young researchers, industrial delegates and talented student communities in the field of diabetic medicine under a single roof. $899. Sydney, Australia. Info: diabetesasiapacific@ endocrineconferences.com.

mark your calendar THURSDAY, July 24

Michigan Native Plants in Your Home Landscape – 7pm. Learn how to transform your landscape into a beautiful haven using native Michigan plants. Give our pollinators room to grow, feed and reproduce while developing a sense of place specific to West Michigan. Discover the native plants of Michigan and bring home a native seed activity. Free. Grand Rapids Public Library Main Branch, 111 Library Street NE, Grand Rapids. Info: commreq@grpl.org.

on Natural Awakenings Magazine of West Michigan

mark your calendar SATURDAY, August 18

Health & Wellness Fair Building Healthier Communities – 12-4pm. “Celebrating Health Centers: Home of America’s Health Care Heroes,” this event will include: blood pressure screenings, diabetes checks, oral exams, height, weight, sickle cell screening and BMI’s. There will also be live entertainment, plenty of door prizes, food, vendors, and Zumba & Dancing and more. Muskegon Family Care, 2201 S. Getty St, Muskegon Heights.

mark your calendar THURSDAY-SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6-8 & SUNDAY-MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9-10 Hands of Light & Mahakundalini workshops and channeling sessions– DNA activation is the next quantum step in humanity’s evolutionary process of ascension. Learn & experience these powerful techniques for self-healing and self-discovery and self-realization. Explore and expand your consciousness to embody more of your true-self for divine expression. Michigan City, Indiana. Download brochure: www. FrequenciesOfLight33.com. To register contact: lisa@frequenciesoflight33.com

mark your calendar SUNDAY, October 7

Grand Rapids VegFest (Plant Based Roots) – 10:30am-5:00pm. Learn about a plant-based diet and lifestyle through delicious food, educational lectures, cooking demonstrations, many local vendors and organizations, plus, children’s activities. Grand Rapids VegFest. Location: DeltaPlex Arena, 2500 Turner Avenue NW, Grand Rapids. Info: GRVegFest.com June 2018

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community resource guide

EMF RADIATION PROTECTION

Connecting you to the leaders in natural healthcare and green living in our community. To find out how you can be included in the Community Resource Guide email Publisher@NaturalWestMichigan.com to request our media kit.

ACUPUNCTURE GRAND WELLNESS

Vikki Nestico, R.Ac. Located at Renewal Skin Spa 6080 28th St. SE, Grand Rapids 616-940-1177 • GrandWellness.net Grand Wellness uses the wisdom of traditional Chinese medicine to provide holistic healing and natural pain relief. Call to schedule a free consultation to discuss how acupuncture may be an effective treatment for you.

ASTROLOGY KAREN S. KLEMP MA.

Astrology/Numerology The Therapy Center 3501 Lake Eastbrook Blvd, Grand Rapids • 616-916-0121 KlempK@yahoo.com KAREN220.com Over 20 year ’s experience. Readings available in her office, by skype or by phone. Also available for lectures at solstice gatherings. Make an appointment by phone or on the website.

BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION WOOD & SAW

Andrew Gielczyk Licensed Builder 616-834-2480 • WoodAndSaw.com Wood & Saw is focused on creating a sustainable high quality of life for our clients. Building simple, costeffective, energy-efficient, toxic-free homes and remodels that achieve the healthiest possible indoor air quality. See ad, page 21.

CHIROPRACTIC CARE DYNAMIC FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC Dr. Ronda VanderWall 4072 Chicago Drive, Grandville 616-531-6050 • DynamicChiro.com

Family owned and operated in the heart of downtown Grandville, Dynamic Family Chiropractic focuses on lifestyle improvements through living a maximized life. A safe and natural approach to health through the combination of exercise, nutrition, detoxification and chiropractic care.

THE GLEASON CENTER

Dr. Dan Gleason DC & Dr. Dan Weessies, MS, DC 19084 North Fruitport Rd, Spring Lake, MI TheGleasonCenter.com 616-638-6234

An alternative, holistic approach combining chiropractic and kinesiology as well as the latest in metabolic and hormone testing. Cold Laser Pain and Neuro treatments for: spectrum disorders, injuries, chronic pain, and pre/post surgical rehab. See ad, page 18.

COFFEE SHOP / FAIR TRADE JUST GOODS GIFTS AND CAFE’ 714 Columbus, Grand Haven 616-414-9111 justgoods@extendedgrace.org www.extendedgrace.org

Just Goods Gifts and Cafe’ is located within the Momentum Center for Social Engagement. Fair trade and social cause merchandise. Local baked goods and beverages. Open 9am to 6pm M-F and 10am to 2pm Sat. A creative space for community integration and the end of stigma. See ad, page 18.

COLON HYDROTHERAPY HARMONY ’N HEALTH

Mary De Lange, CCT, LMT 1003 Maryland Ave, N.E., Grand Rapids 616-456-5033 • HarmonyNHealth.net Certified therapist since 1991 offering colon therapy in a sterile and professional environment. Using a holistic approach, colonics relieve constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, poor digestion, back pain, body odor and more. See ad, page 12.

COUNSELING INNER PEACE COUNSELING, PLC

Ashley Carter Youngblood, LMSW, LMFT Owner/Therapist 4155 S 9th Street, Suite D, Kalamazoo, MI 269-254-1211 • Kalamazoo-Counseling.com Ashley Carter Youngblood is a licensed therapist who provides a holistic approach to counseling by empowering others to d i s c o v e r h o w o n e ’s i n n e r wisdom can contribute to the healing of the mind, body, spirit, and relationships.

PROTXS EMF SHIELDS & H2O DROPS Clara Vanderzouwen clara.vanderzouwen@gmail.com PROTXS.com/?AFMC=22 616-481-8587

PROTXS contains a proprietary blend of natural products that efficiently reflect, absorb and mitigate the harmful biological and technological impacts of invisible RF/EMF/Wi-Fi radiation. Living Healthy in a Wireless World. “All who touch Protxs will be blessed” Dr. Mike Halliday.

ENERGY HEALING TONYA NICHOLS, RPH

Certified Energy Medicine Practitioner 332 S Lincoln Ave, Lakeview 989-352-6500 Info@THCOFLakeview.com THCOFLakeview.com Do you feel like you have no energy? Do you feel disconnected and out of balance? Let Tonya help you find your center again. Combining Emotional Clearing with Full Spectrum Healing, Tonya helps her clients to remove emotional, mental, and energetic blocks that are keeping her clients stuck and preventing them from reaching their full potential for a healthy, happy, and meaningful life. See ad page 30.

ESSENTIAL OILS BE YOUNG ESSENTIAL OILS

Clara Vanderzouwen • 616-481-8587 BeYoungth.com/partners/claravz Independent Sharing partner clara.vanderzouwen@gmail.com Be Young Essential Oils are exclusive E.O.B.B.D. guaranteed 100% pure & safe for your entire family and pets! Wondering what to use? Just call or email me, I’m here to educate you!

MOONDROP HERBALS, LLC

Cottage of Natural Elements 351 Cummings, NW Grand Rapids 616-735-1285 • MoondropHerbals.com Your local source for all things natural and botanical. Essential oils, bulk herbs, tea, hand-crafted bath & body products, raw ingredients, containers, local artwork, unique gifts. Practitioner discounts. Space rental and artisan consignment. See ad, page 29.

June 2018

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YOUNG LIVING ESSENTIAL OILS Marilyn York Independent Distributor # 489656 877-436-2299 myYL.com/naturalhealth4u

Essential Oils – Revered for thousands of years for their naturally-enhancing support of body, mind, and spirit. Become a Young Living Essential Oils Member/Customer, and/or an Independent Distributor. See ad, page 7.

HAKOMI THERAPY KEN PORTER CST, CHT 3355 Eagle Park Dr. NE Ste. 107, Grand Rapids 616-262-3848 BodyAndSoulGR.com

Hakomi Therapy can truly change your life. It’s a mindfulnessbased, experiential therapy for transforming the unconscious patterns that keep you from the love, joy, and fulfillment you deserve. Offered with exquisite care and attentiveness.

HEALING SERVICES THE REMEDY HOUSE

Jodi Jenks Natural Health Practitioner, Reiki Master 616-443-4225 TheRemedyHouse.org Certified in bodywork, lymphatic drainage, raindrop therapy, CranioSacral, reflexology, iridology, natural health consultations including a zyto bio-communication scan. Emotional clearing with essential oils and energy work, reiki, Energy Touch. See ad, page 23.

HEALTH / WELLNESS CENTER THE HEALING CENTER

332 S Lincoln Ave, Lakeview 989-352-6500 Info@THCOFLakeview.com THCOFLakeview.com Naturopathic/Holistic Practitioners and retail health store. Natural health consultations, classes, oils, herbs, homeopathy, hypnosis, foods, candles, crystals, books, CDs, massage, reflexology, emotional clearing, foot detox, DOT/CDL health cards for truck drivers. See ad, page 30.

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West Michigan Edition

VITALITY HEALTHCARE

Dr. Steven Osterhout 5717 Oakland Drive, Portage 269- 323-4473 - DrOchiro.com Vitality Healthcare offers a cutting-edge approach to medicine. We integrate the best medical approaches with the most advanced natural therapies to address the underlying causes of poor health. We offer: Physical and Functional Medicine / Chiropractic and Massage / Metabolic and Hormone Evaluations / Nutrition and Detoxification / Food Sensitivity and GI Issue Testing / Medical and Natural Weight Loss. Our highly-qualified team of doctors, nutritionists and therapists have extensive training to serve all your healthcare needs.

HUMAN RIGHTS/ SOCIAL JUSTICE EXTENDED GRACE

barbara@extendedgrace.org 616.502.2078 • ExtendedGrace.org Extended Grace is a nonprofit grassroots social lab that builds community while solving problems. It does so through: Community Conversations including Inspire! and Deeper Dive events and Town Hall Meetings on Mental Illness; Mudita Gifts; Pilgrim Spirit Tours cultural immersion experiences; Momentum Center for Social Engagement; Just Goods Gifts and Cafe’. See ad, page 18.

LGBTQIA COUNSELING DILSWORTH COUNSELING AND THERAPY SERVICES

Sue Dilsworth, Ph.D, E-RYT 500, C-IAYT 6189 Lake Michigan Drive, Allendale Sue@drdilsworth.hush.com 616-307-1617 • HeartsJourneyWellness.com Counseling services tailored to meet the needs of the individual. Through various treatment modalities including Cognitive Behavioral, Mindfulness and EMDR, individuals will have an opportunity to explore personal challenges in an open, receptive, and supportive environment. Member WPATH. Most insurance accepted including Medicare and Medicaid.

LIFE COACH LIA COACHING AND CONSULTING

Pamela Gallina, MA CMC PamGallina@LIAConsulting.org 616-433-6720 • LIAConsulting.org/coaching Pam works with highly– motivated individuals as they aim for their highest self. Focusing on Small Business Development, Major Life Crisis and Change, Weight Loss & Fitness, Relationships, Budget Management & Reorganization, Decluttering Home and Life. Helping you to achieve your very best life! See ad, page 36.

NaturalWestMichigan.com

MASSAGE THERAPY DYNAMIC FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC & MASSAGE THERAPY Jaci Timmermans, MT 4072 Chicago Drive, Grandville 616-531-6050 DynamicChiro.com

Offering Swedish massage with integrated techniques, chosen specifically for your unique body. Relieve those tired and sore muscles and rejuvenate. Call for on-going monthly specials and discounts.

HARMONY ‘N HEALTH

Mary De Lange, CCT., LMT. 1003 Maryland Ave. NE, Grand Rapids 616-456-5033 HarmonyNHealth.net

Over 24 years of professional experience and trained in a complete range of modalities. Whether you are seeking relaxation, renewal or treatment for a specific condition, Mary will help find an approach that is helpful for you. See ad, page 12.

MIDWIFERY FULL CIRCLE MIDWIFERY SERVICE, INC.

Patrice Bobier, CPM Hesperia: 231-861-2234 FullCircleMidwifery.com Jennifer Holshoe, CPM Grand Rapids area: 616-318-1825 WestMichiganMidwifery.com In private practice since 1982 – specializing in home birth and a team approach. Over 1,600 births attended. Offering midwifery care that maintains a family-centered, safe birth experience. Empowering women to stay healthy during pregnancy, give birth naturally and parent in the best ways. Free initial consultations including prenatal check-up.

PAIN MANAGEMENT THE LASER PAIN AND NEURO CENTER AT THE GLEASON CENTER 19084 North Fruitport Rd. Spring Lake, MI 49456 info@thegleasoncenter.com 616-846-5410 • TheGleasonCenter.com

Cold laser therapy can provide drug-free pain relief. This noninvasive treatment is for those suffering from arthritis, sciatica, plantar fasciitis, inflammation and other pain syndromes. Our MLS cold laser also treats neurological degenerative conditions like Parkinson’s, ADHD, spectrum disorders and peripheral neuropathy. See ad, page 18.


SALON SERVICES

SPIRITUAL GATHERINGS

LONDON STUDIOS SALON

classifieds

UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER

Sally Ann Loew, Hair Artist/Educator Organic Colour Speciality 6455 28th St. SE, Suite 1, Grand Rapids 616-299-1796, LondonStudiosSalon.com

Unity of Muskegon 2052 Bourdon St., Muskegon

London Studios Specializes in: Organic Color Systems, Color Corrections, Multidimensional Hair Color, Restorations for Vo l u m e a n d L e n g t h , Organic Keragreen Keratin Treatments, European Cutting Techniques, Natural Hair Extensions, I n t e g r a t i o n , B r i d a l S e r v i c e s , We d d i n g Consultations and other services.

SCHOOL / EDUCATION

Gather to nurture your Sacred Self on Sunday’s at 11am. We host a variety of classes and workshops on all areas of holistic living. For more information, visit us online at UnityMuskegon.org or call 231-759-7356.

THERMOGRAPHY ADVANCED THERMAL IMAGING OF WEST MICHIGAN Julie Bennett 616-724-6368 AdvancedThermalImagingllc.com

BVI SCHOOL OF AYURVEDA Ruth Small, Ph.D., Director 269-381-4946 Ayurveda@SambodhSociety.us AyurvedaMichigan.org

School of Ayurveda. State licensed. Certificate program for healthcare professionals, doctors, nurses, yoga teachers, wellness educators, massage therapists, holistic health specialists, chiropractors, dieticians and those seeking to learn selfhealth-care. Instructors highly qualified (B.A.M.S.).

Thermography is a safe, tested, painless, and effective procedure providing information for breast cancer risk assessment, breast cancer prevention and early detection, possible hormone imbalance, thyroid dysfunction, diabetes, musculoskeletal inflammation, and neurological problems.

Fee for classifieds is $1 per word\per month. To place listing, email content to Publisher@naturalwestmichigan.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month.

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer Instructors – Mental illness is a community issue and it requires a community solution. The Momentum Center for Social Engagement offers social and recreational activities for people with mental illness, addictions and disabilities. We are seeking people willing to share their skill, hobby, vocation, or interest with our members once a month or as often as available. We welcome yoga, tai chi, exercise, dance, self-defense, cooking, sewing, and so much more. Extended Grace, 714 Columbus, Grand Haven. Info: Call Jenna, if you want to be part of the solution, at 616-414-9111 or email office@extendedgrace.org

CHILD CARE Childcare - EuraAuPair Intercultural Child Care Programs. Learn about your new childcare alternative and apply online at: Euraupair.com

NATUROPATHIC INSTITUTE OF THERAPIES & EDUCATION 503 East Broadway St, Mt. Pleasant 989-773-1714 Contact@NaturopathicInstitute.info NaturopathicInstitute.info

U.S. $XX.XX ITY

...a new twist on interpreting the law of attraction, which states that whatever energy you put out is the energy you get back. By using the information provided in this book and making a few alterations in the way you think and act, you can RELIGION - SPIRITUAL

Life Change Your Change a Letter, the on interpreting is a new twist that ion, which states law of attract the you put out is whatever energy using the By back. energy you get in this book ed provid information in the few alterations a making and turn and act, you can way you think of a constant state your life from need you want and lacking what it all. to one of having

TURN YOUR LIFE

YOUR LIFE

from a constant state of lacking what

TO ONE OF HAVING IT ALL.

D. L. KLINE

your life.

trapped that keeps you the locked door in that can open an ultimate goal That magic key for change, having actually is having a desire in your old life goal before you can reach that seeing. believing you mind, and then believing before this entire book: the theme of see it. That is lf to get yourse begin, you have gful change can se to Before any meanin expect the univer belief. You can’t is of complete believe there into a mode you can totally g different until then the show you anythin looking at crap, If you insist on see. is to nt that e becaus something differe g you more crap to keep showin universe is going attraction. your point of

TER, CHANGE

based a PennsylvaniaD.L. KLINE is ordinary lived a fairly author who at the c awakening life until a psychi r. ed things foreve age of 60 chang a series of books He is now writing help al journey to about his spiritu In paths. their own others along about advice offers this book, he ion al Law of Attract using the univers into al abundance spiritu to bring

CHANGE A LET

Educational programs offered: Natural Health Program: four years (one weekend a month); Massage Therapy Program: one year (two weekends a month); Holistic Doula Practitioner Program: six months (one weekend a month). Individual classes available. See ad, page 12.

you want and need

A Matter of and

Death The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. ~Lao Tzu

Life

What really happens when our bodies cease to function? How can we plan our lives to make the most of our time on Earth? After an unexpected awakening, D. L. Kline writes about his own spiritual journey to help others find their own paths. written by D.L. KLINE, a Pennsylvania-based author

That magic key that can open the locked door tha

in your old life is having aNOW. desire for change, havin Both books are available mind, and then believing you can reach that goal Order your copy at: Amazon.com see it. That is the theme of this entire book: belie or DaveNJasper.com D.L. KLINEBalboaPress.com is a Pennsylvania-based author who lived a fairly ordinary life until a psychic awakening at the age of 60 changed things forever. He is now writing a series of books

Before any meaningful change can begin, you h

into a mode of complete belief. You can’t exp

June 2018

39

show you anything different until you can tota

something different to see. If you insist on lookin


More Than Just A Mouth Wash

Good health begins in the mouth. Bleeding Gums? Painful Teeth? Sore Throat? When your mouth needs help, get Oral & Dental Therapy. With prolonged swishing, it penetrates oral biofilms to kill difficult bacteria. Stop gingivitis, bad breath, and sore throat caused by strep.

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SIBO? Leaky Gut? IBS?

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USE COUPON CODE DRK20 FOR 20% OFF DIGESTIVE REHAB KIT

Order online at MyNaturesRite.com or call 800-991-7088.

40

West Michigan Edition

NaturalWestMichigan.com

Natural Awakenings Magazine ~ June 2018  

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health,...

Natural Awakenings Magazine ~ June 2018  

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health,...