Page 1

1 Katherine
Brou
 Classroom
Management
Plan
 
 Philosophy
 


My
philosophy
is
a
good
mix
of
a
lot
of
different
ideas.
It
is
greatly
influenced
the


Dreikurs
Model,
the
Skinner
Model,
the
Jones
Model,
the
Glasser
Model,
the
Ginott
Model
and
 the
book
The
Power
of
Guidance
by
Dan
Gartrell.
I
believe
that
children
always
have
a
reason
 for
what
they
do
and
it
is
my
job
as
the
teacher
to
try
to
figure
out
that
reason
and
act
 accordingly.
I
believe
that
“misbehavior”
is
actually
often
mistaken
behavior.
The
Dreikurs
 model
is
closely
related
to
my
view
of
mistaken
behavior.
According
to
Dreikurs,
there
are
four
 instigators
of
mis/mistaken
behavior:
seeking
attention,
gaining
power,
taking
revenge,
and
 displaying
inadequacy
(Andrius
2011).
Each
of
these
has
the
same
goal,
to
elicit
a
response
from
 the
teacher
or
others.
Using
the
ideas
of
this
model
we
know
if
a
teacher
takes
the
time
to
 understand
where
the
child
is
coming
from
and
why
he/she
is
acting
a
certain
way,
then
this
 mistaken
behavior
can
be
addressed
appropriately
for
long‐term
instead
of
stopped
just
for
the
 short
term.

 The
Ginott
Model
focuses
on
teacher’s
providing
an
environment
conducive
to
learning
 and
when
mistaken
behavior
occurs,
to
look
at
the
child’s
feelings
and
social/emotional
 development
(Andrius
2011).
This
to
me
means
to
have
a
loving
understanding
atmosphere
in
 the
classroom
and
to
not
focus
on
the
child’s
character
but
instead
on
his/her
feelings
at
the
 time
in
order
to
understand
where
he/she
is
coming
from.
Ginott
was
adamant
about
teachers
 modeling
the
correct
behavior
in
the
classroom
so
as
to
promote
acceptance
(Andrius
2011).

 Guidance
techniques
help
teach
children
problem‐solving
skills
that
will
develop
“the
 social‐emotional
skills
[they]
need
to
function
as
healthy
and
productive
adults…
[and]
the
life



2 skills
they
need
as
citizens
of
democracy:
respecting
others
and
one’s
self,
working
together
in
 groups,
solving
problems
using
words,
expressing
strong
emotions
in
acceptable
ways,
and
 making
decisions
ethically
and
intelligently”
(Gartrell,
2005,
pp.
19‐21).
These
guidance
 techniques
will
give
the
child
the
power
of
learning
self‐control.
This
is
very
much
related
to
the
 Fred‐Jones
Model.
This
model
is
all
about
helping
students
learn
self‐control
and
using
body
 cues,
incentives,
and
individual
assistance
as
discipline
techniques
(Andrius
2011).
I
like
the
idea
 of
allowing
the
children
to
learn
their
own
self‐control
because
this
is
a
skill
they
will
need
 throughout
their
life.
I
think
I
already
use
body
cues
and
faces
a
lot
to
convey
my
approval
or
 disapproval
in
the
classroom.
I
did
not
like
the
Jones’
idea
of
individual
help
because,
although
 he
is
trying
to
make
time
more
efficient,
he
is
not
allowing
time
for
the
child
to
process
 something
in
his/her
own
way.
Telling
the
child
what
he/she
should
be
doing
instead
of
asking
 the
right
questions
to
help
him/her
figure
it
out
is
not
something
I
believe
in.
Lastly
the
Fred
 Jones
model
included
talk
of
incentives,
which
is
closely
related
to
the
Skinner
model
or
 behavior
modification
theory
which
involves
rewards,
punishments,
and
restrictions.
I
believe
 that
these
things
work
to
modify
behavior
to
a
certain
extent,
but
they
are
just
dealing
with
the
 behavior
instead
of
understanding
and
trying
to
change
it.
I
believe
that
there
is
a
time
and
 place
for
this
model
on
an
individual
basis,
however,
as
a
classroom
policy
it
is
no
good.

 The
Glasser
Model
helps
to
show
what
I
believe
will
help
meet
as
many
of
the
children’s
 needs
as
possible
so
as
to
prevent
the
mistaken
behavior
altogether.
The
Glasser
Model
also
 reaffirms
my
belief
that
if
the
children
are
interested
and
engaged
in
what
they
are
learning
 and
seeing
in
the
classroom,
then
mistaken
behavior
will
be
minimal
and
only
for
the
four
 instigators
mentioned
before
in
the
Dreikurs
Model.
Glasser
also
focuses
on
self‐control
 believing
that
“students
[can]
make
appropriate
behavioral
choices
that
lead
ultimately
to



3 personal
success”
(Andrius
2011).
I
believe
in
using
guidance
techniques,
such
as
classroom
 meetings
mentioned
in
the
Glasser
Model,
as
opposed
to
purely
discipline
techniques
to
 address
all
mistaken
behavior.
Using
guidance
as
opposed
to
discipline
will
help
prevent
 mistaken
behavior
through
teacher
understanding,
instead
of
addressing
it
after
the
fact.

 Overall
I
believe
that
it
is
my
job
first
off
is
to
provide
a
loving,
understanding
and
 accepting
environment
that
keeps
children
engaged,
interested
and
that
is
conducive
to
 learning.
This
will
prevent
as
many
mistaken
behaviors
due
to
boredom
and
lack
of
interest
as
 possible.
I
also
believe
that
being
clear,
assertive,
and
direct
about
my
expectations
with
my
 body
language/cues
and
words
will
prevent
unnecessary
mistaken
behavior
due
to
 misunderstandings
or
confusion.
I
also
believe
that
when
mistaken
behaviors
occur,
it
is
my
 duty
to
first
try
to
understand
the
behavior
and
the
feelings
or
needs
behind
this
behavior
in
 order
to
address
it
appropriately.
When
addressed
appropriately
with
guidance
on
self‐control,
 mistaken
behaviors
can
not
only
be
understood,
but
prevented.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



4 Policies
 1. If
a
child
acts
out
in
class
in
order
to
get
attention
my
classroom
policy
will
be
to
explain
 to
the
child
the
expectations
and
find
a
way
to
provide
him/her
with
the
necessary
 attention
in
an
appropriate
way.
 2. If
a
child
acts
out
in
class
in
order
to
get
something
other
than
attention,
I
will
remind
 the
child
of
our
classroom
rules
and
tell
him/her
that
I
will
help
him/her
get
whatever
it
 is
they
need/want
at
a
more
appropriate
time.
 3. If
the
child
is
upset
because
of
something
that
happened
with
another
child,
my
 classroom
policy
will
be
to
talk
to
both
children
and
help
them
come
up
with
a
solution
 to
the
problem
together.
 4. If
the
child
is
upset
because
of
something
that
I
(the
teacher)
has
said
or
done,
I
will
take
 the
child
aside
at
an
appropriate
time
and
work
through
the
problem
with
him/her
 remembering
to
be
thinking
about
his/her
feelings
and
needs.

 5. If
the
child
is
bullying
others,
I
will
observe
and
talk
with
the
child
to
determine
what
it
is
 that
he/she
its
getting
from
the
bullying
and
work
to
help
him/her
find
another
way
to
 get
that.
 6. If
a
child
is
being
bullied
then
my
classroom
policy
will
be
to
provide
the
child
with
the
 resources,
stability,
and
esteem
to
learn
to
stand
up
to
the
bully.
 7. If
a
child
has
a
lack
of
self‐esteem
and
does
not
want
to
try,
my
classroom
policy
will
 involve
talking
to
the
child
and
giving
him/her
small
tasks
that
he/she
can
achieve
to
 build
up
his/her
self‐esteem.

 8. If
a
child
is
acting
out
because
he/she
is
always
finished
early
or
bored
with
the
lesson,
I
 will
find
something
more
engaging
and
challenging
of
the
child
to
do
while
at
the
same
 time
re‐examining
my
teaching
to
better
suit
the
differences
among
students
in
my
class.
 9. I
will
practice
guidance
as
opposed
to
strictly
discipline
throughout
my
classroom
hoping
 to
understand
and
prevent
any
mistaken
behaviors
through
helping
children
learn
self
 control.

 
 
 
 
 



5 Guidelines
–
Classroom
“Rules”
 
 
 Pre‐K
through
Kindergarten
 1. We
are
all
friends
who
work
together
 2. We
use
words
to
solve
our
problems
 3. We
use
gentle
touches
only
 4. We
use
walking
feet
and
talk
in
quiet
voices
while
inside
 5. We
take
turns
and
share
with
one
another
 
 
 
 
 First
Grade
 1. We
are
all
friends
who
work
together
 2. We
are
respectful
of
ourselves
and
others
 3. We
are
responsible
for
our
own
work
and
belongings
 4. We
cooperate
and
compromise
with
one
another
 5. When
someone
is
talking
we
listen
without
interrupting
 6. We
use
the
classroom
and
our
friends
to
help
us
solve
problems
 
 
 Second
through
Third
Grade
 1. We
are
all
friends
who
work
together
 2. We
are
respectful

 3. We
are
responsible

 4. We
cooperate
and
compromise

 5. When
someone
is
talking
we
listen

 6. We
help
one
another
solve
problems

 7. We
are
ready
to
ask
questions
and
learn
new
things
 8. We
are
able
to
be
ourselves
and
appreciate
those
around
us.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



6 Activities/Lesson
Plans
 
 I
think
it
is
important
to
note
that
while
these
are
my
classroom
guidelines,
each
year
I
 would
go
over
these
guidelines
with
the
students
and
ask
if
they
had
a
problem
with
any
of
 them.
We
then
would
work
together
to
change
it
as
necessary
through
compromise.
 
 1. We
are
all
friends
who
work
together
 
Have
the
class
work
together
to
make
a
book
about
friendship.
 Allow
them
to
write,
draw,
color,
etc…
but
the
topic
needs
to
be
 about
friendship.
 2. We
use
words
to
solve
our
problems
 •

Make
a
human
knot
and
have
the
class
work
together
to
undo
it.
 If
that
is
too
advanced
for
younger
children,
have
them
work
 together
to
solve
some
sort
of
problem.
OR
Present
the
class
with
 a
few
problems
and
have
them
talk
it
out
to
come
up
with
a
 solution.
 3. We
use
gentle
touches
only
 •

Have
the
children
come
up
with
act
out
why
this
is
an
important
 rule.
 4. We
use
walking
feet
and
talk
in
quiet
voices
while
inside
 •

Tip
toe
around
the
room
whispering
demonstrating
walking
feet
 and
quiet
voices.
 5. We
take
turns
and
share
with
one
another
 
 •

Play
games
such
as
connect
four
that
require
taking
turns
and
talk
 about
why
that
is
an
important
rule
(for
younger
children).
OR
Use
 a
felt
board
to
make
up
a
story
about
taking
turns
and
sharing.

 6. We
are
respectful
of
ourselves
and
others
 •

Have
a
class
discussion
and
possibly
allow
students
to
act
out
 situations
in
which
this
rule
would
apply
(have
several
pre‐made
 situations
in
a
hat).

 7. We
are
responsible
for
our
own
work
and
belongings
 •

Have
a
class
discussion
and
possibly
allow
students
to
act
out
 situations
in
which
this
rule
would
apply
(have
several
pre‐made
 situations
in
a
hat).



8. We
cooperate
and
compromise
with
one
another
 •

Talk
about
what
it
means
to
cooperate
and
compromise.
Possibly
 compromise
on
the
rules
if
the
class
wants
to…



7 9. When
someone
is
talking
we
listen
without
interrupting
 • Talk
about
respect
and
why
it
is
necessary
to
listen.

 10. We
use
the
classroom
and
our
friends
to
help
us
solve
problems
 Pose
a
few
hypothetical
“problems”
and
have
the
class
use
the
 room
and
each
other
to
come
to
a
solution.

 11. We
are
ready
to
ask
questions
and
learn
new
things
 •

Talk
about
how
we
should
respect
one
another’s
questions
and
be
 excited
about
them
so
that
we
can
learn
new
things
from
the
 questions.
 12. We
are
able
to
be
ourselves
and
appreciate
those
around
us.
 •

Discuss
being
appreciative
of
those
around
us
and
how
beautiful
 differences
can
be.
Maybe
find
some
natural
occurring
differences
 that
turn
out
to
be
beautiful.

 
 
 ***
For
the
younger
grades
(PK/K),
hands
on
activities,
pictures,
and
role
play
are
necessary
to
 them
understanding
the
rules.
For
first
grade,
the
same
applies,
but
a
little
bit
more
abstract
 discussion
can
be
added
in.
For
2nd
and
third
grade,
discussions
are
all
that
is
necessary,
 however,
examples
and
activities
will
only
help
reinforce
the
guidelines.

 •


 
 
 
 
 
 
 



8

Resources
 Andrius,
J.
(2011).
Teacher
matters.
Retrieved
from
http://www.teachermatters.com/
 Gartrell,
D.
(2005).
The
Power
of
guidance:
teaching
social‐emotional
skills
in
early
childhood
 
 


classrooms.
Canada:
Delmar
Learning
‐
Thomson
Learning
Inc..



Classroom Management Plan Grades 1-3  

This is my classroom management plan for the primary grades

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