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HILLSDALE

THURSDAY | NOVEMBER 19, 2009

DAILY NEWS

GVSU’S THOUGHTS ON THE REMATCH SPORTS, 6

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HILLSDALE

INSIDE ALZHEIMER’S VIGIL

BB vandals sentenced

LOCAL NEWS, 3

Jail time, restitution, community service among terms By THOMAS MARCETTI thomas.marcetti@hillsdale.net

WEIRD SCIENCE ENTERTAINMENT, 9

Three Hillsdale teens were sentenced to a combined 20 days jail, about $9,000 in restitution and 240 hours community service for their part in a vandalism spree in September. Robert Henthorne Jr, 17, Devin Nevins, 19, and Tory Leutz, 18, had a majority of the charges against them dropped

Wednesday when they pleaded no contest to malicious destruction of property. The three were arrested in early October for using BB guns and slingshots to shoot out 15 windows throughout Hillsdale on Sept. 22. The three will share responsibility for the $8,928.51 restitution. SEE VANDALS, 5

Sentences

Robert Henthorne

Tory Leutz

Devin Nevins

• Robert Henthorne Jr., 10 days jail (4 days credit) 80 hours community service, $655 fines and costs. • Devin Nevins, 5 days (1 credit) 80 hours community service, $655 fines and costs • Tory Leutz, 5 days (1 credit) 80 hours community service, $755 fines and costs All share responsibility for about $9,000 in restitution.

JONESVILLE PITTSFORD

COMING FRIDAY

Village’s finances get clean opinion

The end of a football era

By THOMAS MARCETTI thomas.marcetti@hillsdale.net

The Jonesville Village Council received another clean audit during its meeting Wednesday night. Greg Bailey of Bailey, Hodshire & Co. P.C. said the village has gotten clean opinions for the past several years. “(The village) is financially sound and run efficiently,” he said. Village President Dave Steel said he was glad to hear there were not areas of concern in the audit but wondered if Bailey saw any trends or areas that might become problematic in future years. “Is there something we should pay attention to?” he said. Bailey said the village is in the same boat as every municipality in the state and is facing uncertainty about revenue sharing and general economic hardship. He said Jonesville’s finances are sound and the departments are run efficiently. Village Manager Adam Smith said the audit was a tribute to the hard work of the finance committee, Finance Director Lenore Spahr and the entire village staff. “It is because of their hard work we were able to realize a positive fund balance increase,” he said. The village began the fiscal year with a general fund

HEAR AGAIN IN HEALTH

SMILE OF THE DAY

Bob Clement stands next to a game ball from his 100th win, a 1996 Coach of the Year trophy and a game-used ball from Pittsford’s 1996 state title game victory. DAILY NEWS / RJ WALTERS

Area’s longest tenured coach steps down after 37 years By RJ WALTERS

I’M SMILING BECAUSE:

rj.walters@hillsdale.net

“I’m with my friends at recess.” Jayley McCafferty of Litchfield

The Daily News welcomes submission of photos of smiling faces. For more information, call Editor Jim Pruitt at 517-437-7351 or e-mail at james.pruitt@hillsdale .net

After 37 seasons, 202 wins, 16 playoff appearances and a Class DD state championship Bob Clement is finally handing in his playbook for good. The Pittsford head football coach announced his decision to his players following the team’s district finals loss to Colon on Nov. 6 and he gave his official letter of resignation to Pittsford athletic director John Hoeft the following week. The 62-year-old Clement started as a junior varsity football coach in 1973 and has worn every hat from junior high track

coach to high school principal to counselor in the Pittsford district ever since. He took a buyout and retired from teaching five years ago and he said it was only a matter of time before he decided to trade in his headset and collection of game-film for more time with his wife Jill, and their grandchildren. “This year was just a perfect year. The kids, they just accomplished so much and they worked so hard and I guess that’s just kind of the way I wanted to remember it,” he said Wednesday, sitting on a porch overlooking 165 acres of family property, wearing a blue Pittsford T-shirt. “I’m afraid some people do

things so long they’re sick of it and that’s how they remember it and I don’t want to do that.” Clement said he and his wife had many discussions about his retirement the past several years, but he didn’t make up his mind until early October. “Of course my wife and I knew, and I told my son Frank Clement who coaches with me,” he said. “I told them with probably two or three weeks left in the season that this was going to be it.” To those closest to the winningest coach in school history it was no surprise, but some of the players and Hoeft were caught a

More on the legend of Clement Check out Saturday’s sports section for a deeper look at his career, including his wife’s contributions, the state title run, dealing with a tragedy, and what he has learned about life over the years.

SEE CLEMENT, 5

SEE VILLAGE, 5

QUOTABLE “The kids, they just accomplished so much and they worked so hard and I guess that’s just kind of the way I wanted to remember it.” Bob Clement on his decision to retire from coaching football

WEATHER Today Tonight Tomorrow Details

50 38 48 2

INDEX Calendar Classified Comics Movies NASCAR

3 12 10 9 14

Obituaries Opinion Region Sports Weather

Volume 100 Number 274

2 4 3 6 2

The piece of equipment is one among many on the Litchfield playground that will be improved with funds from a grant and a fundraiser organized by a local gas station and the school’s parent teacher organization. From front to rear: Taylor Beckman, Hailey Strauss, Zandy Nipper and on the merry-go-round is Joshua Gray.

LITCHFIELD

Group pumped about fund drive By AMY BELL amy.bell@hillsdale.net

Parents and community members in Litchfield are pooling their resources together to help make improvements to the school’s playground. The school’s parent teacher organization and Sam Bash, a local gas station owner, have been organizing fundraisers

since August with the goal of gathering $28,000 by January 2011. “It’s entirely possible if we keep plugging away at it,” said Jennifer Yinger, the organization’s secretary. The contribution is required for a grant the city of Litchfield has applied for from the Michigan Department of Natural

Resources. After the donation, the DNR will also contribute $28,000. The funds will be used to improve the fall areas beneath the playground equipment, modify and add a new piece of equipment and for other projects related to the school’s recreation area. Bash, owner of BP JP

DAILY NEWS

DAILY NEWS / AMY BELL

SEE PLAY, 5

HILLSDALE

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HILLSDALE

E-Edition

MONDAY | SEPTEMBER 15, 2008

PACKERS TAKE DOWN THE LIONS SPORTS, PAGE 6

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INSIDE HILLSDALE COLLEGE SPORTS SPORTS, PAGE 6

HILLSDALE COUNTY

Gypsy moths a problem Extension office concerned reports might mean another outbreak By THOMAS MARCETTI thomas.marcetti@hillsdale.net

IKE HITS TEXAS NEWS, PAGE 9

COMING

A number of reported cases of gypsy moths in the county is raising some alarm among area officials. Mark Williams, Hillsdale County Michigan State University Extension director, gave a presentation on the gypsy moth and outlined

some of the dangers they pose to the Hillsdale County Board of Commissioners Tuesday. “I’m bringing this to your attention so you can take the information to your townships so we can monitor the situation,” he said. Williams said the extension office had received numerous calls over the

summer from people who had discovered the moths on their property or were concerned about them. Gypsy moths generally feed on hardwoods, he said and can take up to three years to kill a healthy oak, but softwoods like pine trees can be killed in less than a year. Williams said an outbreak

in the 1990s required a multiple stage spray program to contain and recent calls to the extension office is raising concern another program might be needed in coming years. Williams encouraged homeowners to check around their yard for the egg SEE MOTH, PAGE 8

What to look for: • Brown patch about the size of a half-dollar. • Each egg sack contains thousands of Gypsy Moths.


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