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starting overcreating  community Port-­au-­Prince,  Haiti

why?

7.0 earthquake

A  in  January  2010  destroyed   many  buildings  throughout  the  city,  rendering  approximately  one   million   Haitians   homeless.   Three   years   later,   thousands   of   resi-­ dents  are  living  in  informal  homes  constructed  from  donated  tarps   and  various  salvaged  materials.  

hƩp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2f/HaiƟ_Earthquake_building_damage.jpg ŚƩƉ͗ͬͬǁǁǁ͘ĐďĐ͘ĐĂͬŐĨdžͬŝŵĂŐĞƐͬŶĞǁƐͬƉƌŽŵŽƐͬϮϬϭϬͬϬϭͬϮϬͬƚĞŶƚͲƉĞƟŽŶͲĐƉͲϳϵϲϳϱϮϰ͘ũƉŐ

design goals

a disaster  resistant,  self-­sustaining  community After   the   2010   earthquake,   many   organizations   have   helped   the   Haitian  victims.  Despite  the  incredible  assistance  of  J/P  HRO,  Red   Cross,  et  al.,  many  issues  continue  to  overwhelm  the  populations   throughout  the  country,  especially  the  dense  urban  fabric  of  Port-­ au-­Prince.  Natural  events  such  as   earthquakes,  hurricanes,  

floods, droughts,  and  landslides  wreak  havoc  on  the  Hatian   people   every   year.   These   events   can   easily   become   disasterous   due   to   the   extreme   poverty   and   limited   construction   skills   of   the   residents.  With  this  in  mind,  I  studied  the  Petionville  internally  dis-­ placed  persons  camp  in  the  heart  of  Port-­au-­Prince.  The  Petionville   camp   has   been   under   the   management   of   J/P   HRO   for   the   past   three   years,   and   at   one   time,   expanded   past   the   site   illustrated   (shown   right)   holding   60,000   displaced   Haitians.   Over   the   past   three   years,   tropical   storms   have   destroyed   temporary   housing   and  cholera  outbreaks  have  devastated  families.  Fortunately,  many   families  have  and  continue  to  rebuild,  leaving  an  estimated  10,000   residents  remaining  in  the  camp.  Source:  J/P  HRO  website  and  social  media  page

ƐƟƚĐŚĞĚƚŽŐĞƚŚĞƌĨƌŽŵŵƵůƟƉůĞ'ŽŽŐůĞ^ĂƚĞůůŝƚĞ/ŵĂŐĞƐ

on-­site prefabrication

disaster resistance

economic &  skill  development

Resist natural  disasters  such  as  earthquakes,  hurricanes,  droughts, and  landslides

On-­site, a  fabrication  facility  will  be  established  to  allow  Haitian  workers  to  develop  new  skills  and  generate  income  for   the  community.  The  facility  will  manufacture  structural  panels  (illustrated  below)  for  the  community.  Haitian  workers,   families  and  community  members  will  assemble  panels  on  resilient  structures.  Residents  will  own  the  panel,  but  have   a  99  year  lease  on  land  space  and  structure.  After  the  community  is  developed,  the  facility  can  begin  fabricating  hous-­ ing  elements  for  surrounding  areas.   F Strong   connections   and   resilient  materials  reflect   A disaster  resistance

self-­sustaining

All units  and  spaces  shall  have  the  ability  to  survive  and  support  life   off-­grid   in   the   event   of   a   disaster.   This   inclused   energy,   sanitation,   and  food  production

environmentally conscious

Design decisions  shall  emcompass  the  prospect  of  minimal  building   footprint,  on-­site  renewable  energy,  natural  comfort  strategies,  veg-­ etation  area,  et  al.    

improve skills  &  economy of  local  people Local  people  shall  be  given  the  oppurtunity  to  learn  various  con-­ struction  trades  with  on-­site  fabrication  of  the  units.  This  will  estab-­ lish  a  micro-­economy  within  the  community  

protect local  vernacular Provide  oppurtunities  for  personalization  and  a  sense  of  pride  estab-­ lished  with  the  home  and  various  communal  nodes.

B C E D

A

gypsum board

B

dimensional lumber

C

plywood sheathing

D

cement board  cladding

E

operable windows

F

window shade/protector

kevin m  walsh

m.arch final  study_committee:  dr.  mark  clayton  (chair),  dr.  phillip  tabb,  dr.  walter  peacock

community design The   community   organiza-­ tion   derives   from   the   flow   patterns  established  by  the   currect   impromptu   hous-­ ing.   The   flow   pattern   fol-­ lows  the  topography  of  the   site.

adaptability to  various global  regions Many  regions  around  the  world  can  benefit  from  this  project;;  there-­ fore,  the  project  shall  be  adaptable  for  multiple  regions.  

perm./informal markets

spiritual facility

health services

prefab facility

existing school

civil services

communal bath/cooking   areas

tap-­tap stop

constructed wetlands


starting overcreating  community

kevin m  walsh

m.arch final  study_committee:  dr.  mark  clayton  (chair),  dr.  phillip  tabb,  dr.  walter  peacock

multi-­family unit

individual unit

1 2 4 4

3

photovoltaic panels vertical  farming  guardrail structural  panels single  family  units water  storage/treatment

1

security fence grade  beams

12

6

8

9

2

exposed dimensional   lumber  frame

5

4

6

5

structural panels dimensional  lumber   base  frame

6

vertical farming   guardrail

7

cable bracing helical  piles

7

5

10 6

10 11

structural model 4

10

4 4 4

13 11 15 12

4 4

12

typical flood  plan

site section

clerestory windows communal  restrooms  -­   showers communal  cooking   area rainwater  storage deep  well  pump fire  protection

4

4

9

11

window shade  -­   protectors

14

4

9

three.2 10.50

steel reinforced  CMU  walls helical  piles  to  stabilize wall  foundations dimensional  lumber  framing

14 15

4 8

12 13

roof 12.00

designated green  space communal  gardens

8

11

roof_2 13.50

one 3.00

8 9

7

8

one.2 4.50

3

4

Rainwater is  collected  on  the  roof  of  the  structure,  and  stored  beneath  the  lower  units  to  be  used  as  gray  water  and  irrigation.  Waste   water  is  initially  treated  at  this  location  before  being  piped  to  the  constructed  wetlands  (no  standing  water).  A  security  fence  protects  this   equipment  from  thiefs  and  vandals.  A  designated  green  space  provides  communal  planting  and  social  interaction.  

two 6.00

4

photovoltaic panel corrugated  tin  roof

3

To resist   unpredictable   forces   during   natural   events   such  as  earthquakes  and  hurricanes,   housing   units   utilize   concrete   masonry   unit   (CMU)  walls  reinforced  with  ribbed  steel  members.   These   walls   are   configured   in   a   perpendicular   fashion   to   provide  lateral  strength  and  resistance  in  the  ‘X’  and  ‘Y’  axis.  Heli-­ cal  piles  driven  into  the  soil  to  the  appropriate  torque  provide  additional   stability   in   the   unpredictable   soil   conditions   and   below-­grade   forces.   Grade   beams  distrubute  the  load  across  the  unstable  soil  and  stabilize  the  sloped  soil  on  the   site.  Dimensional  lumber  members  anchored  to  CMU  walls  provide  a  stable,  yet  ductile,  plat-­ form  for  the  attachment  of  the  structural  panel  envelope  of  the  single  family  homes.  The  relationship   between  the  reinforced  walls  and  wood  members  allows  for  a  resilient  structure  with  the  ductility  to  naturally   flex  according  to  the  lateral  forces.  

two.2 7.50

1 2

9

3

7

three 9.00

2

10

4

5

1

1.5

3

section cut  plane

starting overcreating community kevinmwalsh 2013  

submittal boards for a competition within the college of archiecture at texas a&m university. the project is a condensed version of my maste...

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