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6

In-Depth

The Correspondent

May 18, 2012

Herse ier ing redi aments

Students debate multiple piercings, display creativity Abby Fesl Ears, noses, eyebrows, navels, lips, and tongues are common places for students to get piercings. Many girls get ear piercings in younger years of grade school. “I got my ears pierced in second grade but they closed in third,� junior Sarah Mulroe said. “I got them repierced freshman year.� Ears, commonly pierced at Claire’s at a young age, are free, but the earrings cost anywhere from $20 to $60. “I was in fourth grade, and I got my ears pierced at Claire’s for Christmas,� junior Amanda Petro said. However, once high school begins, boys start to get ear piercings as well. “I have one

[ear] pierced because I wanted to [get it done],� junior Mateusz Obstoj said. As students go through their high school years, it is common for more piercings in more visible places. Senior Natalie Byron has her ears, cartilage, nose and belly button pierced. “I got them because I could, and I like the way they look.� While some teens have no problems with piercings, other students can’t have them. Rejection is one common side effect of a piercing. According to poundedink.com, rejection is how the body removes something it is not used to having in it. Junior Allie Mueller got her belly button pierced, but metal was rejected by her body. “[I was upset] a little but then I never had

to worry about infections or getting it caught on anything,� Mueller said. Some students, however, are not satisfied with the piercings they have and wish for more. Junior Andrea Marti has her ears pierced but wishes for her belly button and nose to be pierced. “I think they look cute, and it’s something to do when I’m young,� Marti said. “I was thinking about getting my cartilage but everyone has that, so I got my industrial,� junior Carla Casillas said. Anywhere a piercing is, they show something about a person, whether it be their uniqueness or style.

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In-Depth

May 18, 2012

The Correspondent

7

ey Get

s Inked

Tattoos leave lasting impression (Ouch!)

Students brave pain to reflect maturity and individuality Ashley Hawkins Kevin Hyde The decision to get a tattoo is difficult to make. Having a needle pierce the skin and leave a permanent design is not something to take lightly. But for senior Lauren Lemanski, the decision was easy. Lemanski has been involved with Camp Soar for the past six years. Here she spends two weeks working with special needs kids. The symbol for Camp Soar is a kite, which is what Lemanski got inked on her torso. “I had the design all planned out. At the tattoo place, they did the finishing touches,” Lemanski said. “The words [included on the tattoo]-Find the possibilities, conquer the impossible-I thought of those. They came to me, sort of representing everything I’ve been through.” It took Lemanski about six months to finalize the tattoo. “I always drew it out during class,” Lemanski said. Once the procedure began, Lemanski had two thoughts going through her mind: pain and permanence. But she was able to endure the pain throughout the 30 minutes. “It really hurt. But once it started, there was no going back,” Lemanski said. Senior Ismael Najera has a cross with wings tattooed on his arm, the words ‘In Memory of Adan’ are above it. Adan was his cousin, a person who Najera found very inspiring. Adan also had a tattoo of a cross with wings; Najera wanted something similar. “He helped me and my family out,” Najera said. “He changed my life and made me the person I am today. When he died, I knew I wanted to get the tattoo that my cousin had.” Other students have found other meanings to get inked. Whether it be for personal reasons or reflection, more and more students are beginning to get these permanent pieces of art on

“I think that I am going to get a cross on my wrist or somewhere on my arm. It represents my faith, and it’s a constant reminder for me. Certain events have happened that require faith, so I think this cross is a good option for me. I know it’s a big deal and it’s permanent, but I think it’s worth it,” junior Carly Bell said. Lemanski is aware of the consequences that may follow in the future, but she doesn’t seem to mind. “ A s camp goes on, I gained friends and memories that I won’t tCOURTESY OF LAUREN KELLEY forget. My other siblings have bove: senior Lauren Kelley embraces the pain in order to get her tattoo. tattoos. The permanence ight: senior Lauren Lemanski’s tattoo doesn’t afreads, “find the possibilities, confect me bequer the impossible.” Lemanski drew her cause the inspiration from her past experiences at memories places like Camp Soar, which is why the are permawords are attached to a kite. nent,” LetCOURTESY OF LAUREN LEMANSKI manski said. Being a their bodies. high school student, rebellion and growth are Junior Sarah Majcher recently got a tattoo two instinctive characteristics that also reflect on the side of her body. The words “pure trust” the tattoo process. are surrounded by birds, something that Majch“I don’t know what I’m going to get, but I er thinks will help keep her motivated throughknow that I want to get one eventually. I guess out her upcoming endeavors. it shows that I’m all grown up. High school is “I think that pure trust is something that’s all about change, and I think I’m definitely manecessary. By getting it tattooed, it’s just a conturing, so making the decision to get a tattoo is stant reminder. I mean, you need trust for everyan example of that. It’s my decision and I think thing, like boyfriends, friends, and other things. that’s really nice,” junior Jenna Callahan said It helps keep me motivated,” Majcher said. Students often feel that getting a tattoo is a Like Majcher, other students are beginbig step towards adulthood. Each tattoo reflects ning to ponder the thought of acquiring tattoos. a personal, intrinsic meaning that helps foster Most students recognize that the commitment is maturity. large, and are thinking the decision over before getting one.

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4

The Correspondent

Things To Do

January 13.

Vietnamese cuisine dishes out alternative Kevin Hyde

Though it may seem like Noodles and Company and Panda Express are two of the restaurants of choice amongst students, the mass market appeal is less than satisfactory. On top of that, it is almost impossible to not run into fellow Hersey students. At certain times, it’s nice to just have a meal without being reminded of school and its inhabitants. In that case, just a short drive down Northwest Highway, a hidden gem can be found at Dung Gia Vietnamese Restaurant. Rather than the run of the mill Chinese food that in all actuality is quite repulsive, this Vietnamese cuisine is a bit of a departure from the rest of the food that teens would be dining on. Even if you are new to the cuisine, there is most definitely something for everyone whether it be a traditional chicken dish, or a more daring spicy dumpling plate. Bubble tea and smoothies can also be purchased, adding to the appeal and creating an alternative to places like Jamba Juice and Starbucks.’

t.ADELINE WEBER

Adventure grows at Spring Valley Nature Center Madeline Weber

tMADELINE WEBER

For most teens, a trip to a nature sanctuary or farm sounds more like torture rather than a fun and free alternative to going to the mall or seeing a movie. Little do they know that spending a day surrounded by indigenous plants, farm animals and other hidden treasures, found at Spring Valley Nature, can either be an escape from one’s troubles or a time to spend a day goofing around and discovering interest-

ing things with friends in a unique environment. Whatever mood the day begins with, Spring Valley can always guarantee an adventure no matter what time of year. In the surprising location of downtown Schaumburg, Spring Valley is practically neighbors with Woodfield Mall, the classic go-to for many bored teens. This option is definitely out of the ordinary for students, but going into it open minded will result in a positive experience.

Fun at IKEA: no assembly required Claudia Caplan

As children, it seemed that being entertained could be completed within minutes: the simplest of jokes, effortless to watch television programs, and straightforward group games. As teenagers, finding fun throughout the city or even state is most definitely not as easy as when we were five. A game that seems not to have lost interest in the minds of children and high school students is the acclaimed Hide and Seek. To bring this game to the extreme, bringing along a group of friends and taking a trip to the modern Scan-

dinavian store, IKEA is just what my friends and I did. One of the all time simplest ruling games is coming back for the big leagues to jump into. Finding a place that will challenge the veterans is a large location with multitudes of interesting hiding places. Full of tiny crooks and dark places full of crap to jump into, hide behind, or disappear into. Finding friends in between carpets, behind dressers, and underneath beds was almost impossible to accomplish with my friends in this mega store. This game brings back pastimes that will sure to throw you down memory lane.

Break out of the Saturday night norm

As the new year rolls in, so do the abysmal social schedules that most students groan about. It is not uncommon to receive texts or Facebook statuses during these months consisting of, “OMG I am so bored. There’s nothing to do in this town.” Instead of repeatedly complaining about the lack of things to do and sitting in friends’ basements, students need to open their eyes to the various opportunities around them. Just a few towns over, teens can easily find new and exciting things to do. Towns such as Schaumburg, Des Plaines, and Palatine can offer exhilarating options that teens can partake in. That’s not to say, however, that there is nothing to do in their own towns. Arlington Heights, Mount Prospect, and Prospect Heights all have plenty of places to go, it just may take a little searching and going out of the comfort zone in order to fulfill each students’ seemingly endless need. Yet another dilemma that students run into is that of going to the same old neighborhood haunts. We get it- those places get boring after a while and it seems

like students always run into certain individuals that they would much rather not be in close quarters with. That said, students need to venture out and find suitable alternatives to these types of places. For example, instead of frequenting Noodles and Company every night, why not try a lesser known Vietnamese restaurant. Not only will students receive a much needed dose of culture, but they will also be able to quell their whining of not having anything to do. Anything that gets teenagers out of the house and away from the boring night of aimlessly driving around and asking each other, “What should we do?” will be beneficial. So instead of the whining and complaining, students can heed this advice and visit new and exciting places that they may not have otherwise thought of.

tMADELINE WEBER


January 13. 2012

Things To Do

The Correspondent

5

CLICK A LINK TO FIND OUT MORE

http://dunggiarestaurant.com/

Things ] to  do

http://www.parkfun.com/spring-valley

http://g.co/maps/3v3zr

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6

9/11

The Correspondent

September 16, 2011

a rising Hope: ten

Memorials give tribute to events of 9/11 Julia Kedzior

Each year, Americans remember the victims 9/11. The day that made a strong country vulnerable was a shock to billions of people around the world. The unimaginable happened, and every American’s life changed forever. “The terrorists didn’t just try to target one group; they got all of America,” freshman Jackie Stassen said. Ever since the tragedy happened, families participate in special events and memorials all across the country to make sure that the horrid day will be more than just a flashback to the past. “I think it’s a very sad and emotional experience, and it gets sadder each year,” sophot.$5)'"8&#-/ more Tomi Laja said. ver 2,996 individuals perished Every year as a result of the attacks on 9/11. since the attacks, Of those, approximately 1,609 people the people who lost a spouse or partner. gave their lives along with their

loved ones are honored in ways that show patriotism and sympathy for what they went through. From Sept. 11 to Sept. 16, the Shedd Aquarium offers free admission to active-duty military personnel, as well as Chicago police officers, firefighters, and their families. This tribute to the important men and women show how much they are needed in the public’s daily lives. Another special commemoration is the exhibit at the Field Museum, called Ground Zero 360. “I think we’ve done a good job of remembering all the victims and heroes,” sophomore Daniella Ballarino said. Perhaps the most talked about and anticipated event that truly shows how hard this country has worked to honor the ones who died is the construction of the “Freedom Tower.” It’s the lead building of the new World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan and will soon be the tallest building in the United States. “It [9/11] brought us closer. Everyone had to work together to get over the pain,” freshman Isabelle McGuinnis said. The pain of the tragedy will always stay in our minds, but with the hope of a better future and a safer environment, it might be easier for people to deal with the whole situation. “I think that with the way things are going right now, 9/11 will never be forgotten,” said sophomore Shaniah Duff. “We will always remember it.”

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Security measures continue to remind Americans of tragedy Michael Miller The tragic events of Sept. 11 are usually seen on a timeline of some sort, with the exact minute of a particular part of the tragedy mapped out. But the timeline of 9/11 really doesn’t end on that one day, or that month, or even in the years after. Events like the death of Osama bin Laden last May show that the timeline really hasn’t ended, and even beyond particular moments like that, the far reaching effects of 9/11 have led to changes for the U.S. and the world. Some of these changes, like government policy, may seem far away from students in the building. “The TSA is doing more security theater than actual security, and it has become a hassle to fly,” sophomore Kevin Kapinos said. After the attacks, all airplanes were grounded to prevent the possibility of more hijacked planes. Once airports were back up and running, the security procedures required a major overhaul to reduce the chances of future attacks. The increased security can still be seen today, such as the controversial full body scanners and pat downs that the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has implemented at airports. Even without those specific methods, some travelers still feel the heightened security. “TSA officers are a lot more suspicious than before, and whenever you enter the U.S. from another country, there’s a lot more security,” said Sophomore Rose Katz, who has flown internationally to countries such as Great Britain, Germany, and France. The extra security does create a sense of safety. “More security does make me feel safer at

the airport,” Katz said. Even beyond airports, another effect of 9/11 still around today that can be seen all over is increased patriotism. The party-like response to Osama Bin Laden’s death, whether justified or not, showed that people still feel much more patriotic because of 9/11. People fly flags and have American bumper stickers, and sports teams honor America and our soldiers, especially around Sept. 11. Students do this, too- at last Friday’s football game, instead of the fans participating in the usual orange-out or white-out, they wore red, white, and blue in a spectacular show of pride and patriotism. “I think it is a good way to pay tribute to our country,” junior Erica Hill said. The events of 9/11 and immediately afterwards were of a huge magnitude in meaning to this country, but their far reaching effects aren’t just limited to New York or any one particular place. The effects reach all, but considering all of the people who come to the football games, that sea of red, white, and blue would be pretty hard to miss.

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9/11

September 16, 2011

years later Letters to remember:

English teacher reminds students of impact

The Correspondent

7

u o y e r e w e Whwehern it happened?

9/11/01

Division head of social sciences and foreign language

Ashley Hawkins wrote the letters,� Driscoll said. The 10 year lapse of time from the tragic Kevin Hyde

As televisions broadcast the horrors of the Twin Towers crumbling down on 9/11, students and staff stared at the screen in awe, not knowing how to act or what to think. English teacher Kathy Christenson acted in a frenzy, having her students take out a piece of notebook paper and write a letter to themselves. “When 9/11 happened, we watched it live. It was one of my most profound teaching days ever. Everything we were teaching was turned upside down. I didn’t know what to do. But I knew the day was important, so I had the students write a letter to themselves,� Christenson said. Once the students wrote out a sequence of events, their feelings, the impact of the attacks, Christenson had told her students that in 10 years, she would mail students their letters. Though the idea seemed a little unrealistic at the time, Ladies First choreographer Katie Driscoll, then a freshman in Christensen’s class, received her letter that she wrote 10 years prior, this past Saturday. Not only did Driscoll write the letter in Christenson’s class, but was also alerted of the attacks while sitting in the classroom. “It’s kind of funny- I don’t remember actually writing it, so when I got the letter, it was such a surprise,� Driscoll said. “The class clown started telling us about the events that were taking place, but no one believed him. Mrs. Christenson was the one who actually verified it.� Driscoll knows that she was not the only one that received her letter that she wrote as a freshman. “I made a post about it on Facebook ,and I got a few responses from people that also

events of 9/11 to now did not seem to phase Christenson from getting the letters sent out. Not only does this attest to the memory of Christenson, but also her character. Last May, Christenson was diagnosed with cancer, so the fact that she is still thinking about these letters has exemplified her good character. “It speaks volumes of her character and her as a teacher. She went above and beyond, even though she hadn’t even heard from most of us after we graduated,� Driscoll said. “She did, and I believe still does, want us to make a difference.� Both students and coworkers were inspired by Christenson’s actions. “Mrs. Christenson is truly a treasure. Whether it’s in one of those classes that she starts every day with a poem, or on the slopes where she brings the Ski and Snowboard Club, what she gives to her students reveals how invaluable she is to our community. She’s an inspiration to all of us,� division head of English and fine arts Dr. Venegoni said. “What a great idea for a teacher to do that. I am very moved by that,� substitute teacher Edward Moon said. “I am very proud to know what a wonderful teacher she has become and as one of her mentors, she brings a great smile to my face.� Other current students feel that the deed Christenson had done shows her generous and caring heart. “What she did was amazing,� junior Roya Zandi said. “I wish I was old enough to have a teacher who made me write a letter, so that in future generations, if someone asked what I thought of the day, I could show my own letter.�

Youth causes lack of remembrance Megan Boyle

Senior Tommy Naughton was only in second grade when the acts of 9/11 took place. “My dad stayed home from work that day and the news was playing on all our TVs. We didn’t do anything that day when I got to school,� Naughton said. M a n y students have similar stories to this one. Ten years ago students w e r e barely old enough to hold a c o nv e r sation let alone unders t a n d t h e problems of the world. Growing up during the 9/11 era has its effect on all of us. “I don’t really remem$PSSFTQPOEFOU-JWFPSH ber anything

that happened on the actual day because I was really young, but once learned about it, I was shocked that somebody could do something that bad,� junior Meredith Ward said. Parents and teachers have done a lot to help students understand what happened ten years ago, and the tragedies of 9/11 are something this generation will have to live with for the rest of their lives. Many students posted statuses on Facebook and Twitter on Sunday giving their prayers to families of 9/11 and reminding people to never forget. “I spent the day with my family, and we put the American flag out,� senior Chase Monckton said. “My uncle is a firefighter, and he even was invited back to New York because he was sent there to help ten years ago to help with the clean up.� America as a whole came together last Sunday. Students feel that living through this part of history has also brought them closed together and taught them valuable life lessons. “Growing up after 9/11 has made me appreciate the time I have with my family and friends a whole lot more because you never know when it’s going to be taken away,� senior Kevin Compton said. “The most important thing to remember from 9/11 is that we can never think America is invincible,� Ward said. Students also feel more pride for their country in general. “When I was younger I didn’t really understand what was going on, but now I see it as a symbol of America’s strength. They can attack us, but we will stand strong,� Monckton said.

Paul Kelly

“It was my second day of teaching and it really brought the teaching staff together since we didn’t really know each other. I felt disgusted and amazed with what we were hearing, but couldn’t understand what exactly was happening.�

Senior

Kevin Druffel

“I was at church at St. Emily’s Grade School. I just remember my mom taking me out of school when it happened.� Biology teacher

Nicole Mitch

“I was walking into math class in high school and was already absolutely shocked. I heard the Sears Tower was going to get hit too, I was worried since my mom was in it.�

Freshman

Jack Hoffman

“I was in preschool taking a nap and saw two teachers watching the towers fall on TV.�


6

The Correspondent

In-Depth

Popular app builds vocabulary letter by letter Erin Kinsella

Of all the trends teenagers get hooked on, a new one is popping up that may actually be beneficial to the academic lives of students. While teachers struggle to get their classes to improve vocabulary and it is nearly impossible for some sophomores to open the infamous yellow book of root words, words seem to be catching on. Words with Friends, that is. A new application, Words with Friends is essentially an online version of Scrabble, one that can be played against friends near and far. The creator of the game, Paul Bettner, explains Words with Friends as “gaming meets text messaging. It’s a weird cross between communication and playing a

April 29, 2011

game.� While apps are used by millions for things as simple as the weather forecast to tasks as obscure as checking in for a flight, this one in particular has taken the technological world by storm. “Words with Friends� creates a competitive yet friendly rivalry as players can add opponents by searching for their username or picking them up from a list of available players. It is common for players to be involved in many games at once; this way they can switch inbetween games while waiting for a particular opponent to play their turn. Because players are not playing face to face and there is no time limit on a word, it may take a long time for the other person to get

back to the game, as life tends to sometimes get in the way. This isn’t a damper on Ethe game at all though, PL the Word buffs. TRIto according D WOR E have a bunch of “I always SCORon at once, so Lthat games going I UB E can switch from one toDOtheRDother WO up when the board gets clogged E or SCORword my partner hasn’t played their yet,� senior Erin Kelleher said. When 1.6 million people play daily, this game has been ranked in the top 50 game apps for the iPod in 2011 by TIME. Users spend a full hour on average each day building words and trash talking, therefore, must LE Bthere DOU on R be some positive effect vocabuE T LET E lary. SCOR The app itself is similar to the original Scrabble board game, but the difference comes in the con-

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People always have their phones, iPods, Facebook access, etc. right on their hip wherever they go. So now, they have their Words with them too. This increases the exposure LE they get to new vocabuOUB D D lary without the player putting WOR E forth Sany effort. R O C BLE “It helps somewhat DOU D because you have to put together WOR Eso many different letter combinations that SCOR LE you start thinking of words you DOUB D may have never thought of before. WOR E SCOR I do it to kill time, but it’s actually pretty fun. And unlike most other games, I think you can actually learn something from Words with Friends,� senior Tom Sutrinaitis said.

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Summer  and  Fall  ACT  prep  courses Summer Course: June 29-­Sept. 9

prepares students for the September/October ACT

Fall Course: Sept. 12-­Dec. 9

prepares students for the December ACT.

Website:  www.actspan.com current Website:  www.spantestprep.com

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The Correspondent

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In-Depth

April 29, 2011

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make sense when used in the real world. However, they have seemingly caused a bit of confusion among students. These words, now BLE a staple in a strange DOU ER dialect heard TT LEhere, through the halls E have become SCOR for adults and increasingly difficult certain students to understand. “Whenever I hear the slang, I’m always kind of taken aback. Is it good or bad?� Social science teacher Andrew Walton said. “Back in the day, words like bad became good. It’s tough to keep up with!� Words change constantly, tak-

“bangin’� in the 80’s, to “the bomb� in the 90’s, and finally to then current usage of “flame,� teenagers are always looking for new ways to express themselves with words. “ ‘Might’ means definitely not... ‘Might not’ means definitely yeah,� sophomore Joey Bealieu said. “Might,� like “bad,� has taken on an opposite meaning. Now, it’s sarcastically used to mean the opposite of what it should. For example, “The school colors might work well together. They might not completely clash,� junior

Words are used differently internationally, nationally, and locally. The same language is, at times, spoken incomprehensibly between countries: Americans use bathrooms, while the British use the Loo. On the national level, states show off their different flavors with variations in vocabulary as well. With all of these changes, it’s not unexpected that words differ from school to school as well. High schools are known to have vocabulary that may not always be understandable in the district over. Things are no different here. For Hersey, the words have

become a part of everyday vocabulary that most students understand. “The whole thing with ‘might’ is used in a smart aleck way, usually by boys,� Walton said. “I use those kinds of words because they make people visibly upset, and I find that funny,� senior Evan Reynolds said. Some people may find the slang annoying at times, but it’s an interesting way to spice up conversations. It’s also a fun way for students to express their individuality. “It’s awesome to talk like that,� Bealieu said, “Everyone started to do it. It’s fun to say, so why not say it?�

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November 5, 2010

In-Depth

The Correspondent

A Day In The... Blind sophomore visualizes success

Emily Swanson

i

Junior finds inspiration through drawing, Disney

Teagan Ferraresi

Not many high school students can say that they have art published in multiple children’s books, but junior Emilie Lindberg can. Her art has been featured in many books published by Random House. For a student with autism, Lindberg has many strengths. Anyone who knows her would agree that she excels in anything pertaining to art, cartoons, or Disney. Because of her condition, Lindberg has an instructional assistant with her throughout the day that attends all of her classes. In the morning, this is Katie Pardun. Due to her disorder, Lindberg has a different school schedule which allows her to partake in classes specific to her style of learning. Along with that, Lindberg gets three 15 minute breaks throughout the day. This time is reserved for her to do something that will keep her relaxed, like drawing. “I start first period with Graphics [class],” Lindberg said. Every semester she is placed in some sort of art elective courses because those are the classes in which she excels and enjoys the most. “She’s always in some kind of art class, whether its graphic arts, hand drawing art, choir, or drama,” Pardun said. During her second and third periods, Lindberg helps the cafeteria staff with their daily needs. “I have my kitchen job. I wrap bagels with saran wrap,” Lindberg said. Lindberg receives pay for her work during those periods, just like at any other job. “I spend my money on Legos,” Lindberg said. After her lunch period, Lindberg spends sixth period in resource. “Sometimes I do listening or other things like yoga,” Lindberg said. These activities help her relax and improve in all areas of her academic and social life. When seventh period rolls around, Lindberg can be found in the foods room. “I like foods with Ms. Garcia,” Lindberg said.

Mike Lechowski

She wakes up every morning right around 6:30, just like everyone else. She goes downstairs to eat breakfast, just like everyone else. She gets her backpack and gets on the bus, just like everyone else. But senior Katie Gruber isn’t like everyone else; she has cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy is a form of paralysis that results in impairment of muscular function and weakness of the limbs. Speech and learning problems accompany this disorder as well. Gruber uses a red scooter to get from class to class; maneuvering her way through the crowded hallways. “Getting around used to be hard, but through the years I’ve gotten stronger. I’ve found some shortcuts, but sometimes I still need help,” Gruber said.

Deaf ed student tackles challenges

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Sophomore Zach Sarbekian wakes up every morning at 6 a.m. to the sound of his talking alarm clock. The clock tells him the weather and the time every morning because he cannot read. Sarbekian has been blind his entire life. He walks to class on his own everyday using a cane to get through the hallways. Known for being upbeat and positive throughout his days at school, Sarbekian is extremely greatful for everything he has, despite the hardships that accompany the handicap. “I love my parents and my sister Zoey, I’m also so grateful for my vision teacher.” Sarbekian said.

Cerebral palsy fails to stop senior

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Kevin Hyde

One of the most basic senses humans have is hearing. However, not every individual is fortunate enough to have such a trait. 27 students are enrolled in the deaf education program, and with 1,997 fulltime students, that is only about one percent of the student body. Though all of these students are applauded for their individual accomplishments and integration in the “hearing world,” one student exemplifies this in a way of his own. Sophomore Sahir Bhayani shows his integration into the world of hearing and represents the deaf and the hearing loss community. An active member of the deaf education program in school, Bhayani set out to prove himself to fellow students and the rest of the “hearing world.” Last year, Bhayani played on the freshman B football team. “I had to depend on a lot of visuals, as well as the players and my interpreter,” Bhayani said, with the help of one of his interpreters, Rachel Griffin. Bhayani usually wears hearing aids to help improve his level of hearing, but was not able to on the field. “Because of that, I taught some of the other players some sign language, and also relied on reading their lips,” Bhayani said. Teammates agree that Bhayani knows how to play like the rest of them, and doesn’t show a lack athletic ability due to his hearing loss. “He fit in with all of us. He also was a good contributor to the team,” sophomore Nick Trossen said. The sophomore’s condition did not stop him there, as he also was on the volleyball team last spring. “Volleyball is a little easier for me, because I can use my hearing aids and read lips easier,” Bhayani said. Aside from athletics, Bhayani doesn’t let his hearing loss get to him.“In everyday life, I read lips and use my voice. Without my hearing aids, I can hear a bit, but they really help,” Bhayani said.


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A Day in The Correspondent

In-Depth

Sarbekian has a supportive family and teachers that help him daily. Getting around the halls is not easy for people who can see, so it’s fair to assume that getting around the halls without vision would be even harder, however Sarbekian proves all assumptions wrong. “I leave my classroom three minutes early to get through the halls to my next class,” Sarbekian said. “It’s pretty easy to get through the hallways of Hersey.” Students have been shocked by his efficiency as he flows through the halls on a daily basis.“Zach gets through the hallways so fast,” sophomore Jessica Jreisat said, “I have no idea how he does it.” “I’m used to it,” Sarbekian said. Being blind doesn’t hold him back while he makes his way around school. Sarbekian’s fellow classmates see him as a sweet and kind person. “I went to middle school with him at River Trails,” sophomore Brianna Ulbert said. “He was really nice and smart. Everyone thought he was really funny. He’s just a normal kid.” Sarbekian does all of his homework, takes the same tests as his classmates, and comes to school everyday. He doesn’t miss a beat, and seems to bestow happiness and laughter on the people he comes into contact with. “He’s so funny!” Jerisat added. “He used to be in my math class and always has something to say.” Sarbekian has adapted to blindness throughout his life. “I learned how to read in braille when I was really little. I can’t imagine doing anything else,” Sarbekian said. Every teenager has a passion, and Sarbekian is no exception. “If I could do anything I would just sit and listen to music,” Sarebekian said. “I love it.” “I had chorus with him at Trails,” sophomore Annie Cannata said. “He always contributed and did his best to keep up with the whole class. He is such a nice guy.” Sarbekian is extremely grateful for everything he has and everyone that helps him. Sarbekian’s biggest complaint sets him apart from other students. “The worst thing about being blind is not being able to drive,” Sarbekian said. Despite not being able to see, Sarbekian attends many school activities and finds ways to keep his head held high. “Zach amazes me everyday,” physical education teacher Ms. Freeman said. “His entire outlook on life is amazing. Nothing holds him back. He goes to the football games and everything. He is truly determined to make the best out of what he has.”

Q:

How can students make it easier for you to get around in the halls?

A:

Kids are doing fine, especially since I get out early.

Q: A:

November 5, 2010

When talking to Lindberg, it is easy to see how much she loves Disney. Most conversations find their way back to Disney movies or characters. Her favorites are “Monsters, Inc.” and “Toy Story 3,” and she can frequently be seen dressing in the colors or styles of characters. “People with autism have something called a ‘preferred item.’ It’s something that they really, really like and they prefer to talk about, think about, and it helps them get through the day,” Pardun said. “[Emilie’s] preferred item is Disney.” Lindberg will turn 17 years old on Nov. 22, and for her birthday she plans on going to the place where dreams come true. “I’m going to Disney World in Orlando, FL for my birthday. I have gone before and it will be my tenth time going,” Lindberg said. Another one of Lindberg’s passions is drawing. She enjoys sketching pictures of her favorite cartoon characters and makes them her own by adding different features to them. At last year’s “Fun Olympics,” Lindberg drew caricatures of the participants and was able display her talents. Along with being gifted in the arts, Lindberg is also very intelligent. “She has a very high IQ, which is why she’s in regular education classes,” Pardun said. Because Lindberg will attend school here until she is 19, she gets to take her classes at a slower pace than students that are graduating in four years. “We want to encourage her to minimize negative behavior,” Pardun said. “Sometimes she’ll yell out or go up to a random group of kids and start yelling, but she’s not yelling at them; she’s mad about something she saw on the Disney Channel and she just walks up to the first person she sees and talks about it.” Although Lindberg is autistic, she is still aware of what goes on around her. “She doesn’t care what people think of her to a point. She knows if people are laughing at her she’ll go up to them and say, ‘Hey, stop laughing at me,’ but it doesn’t bother her,” Pardun said. In the hallways Lindberg acts differently every day. Some days she’s very outgoing and friendly, and other days she acts reserved and keeps to herself. On bad days, students should be aware of how to help her. “If it’s a bad day, just give her space. Suggest she go to class and defer her to a staff member because is if she’s having a bad day, safety comes first,” Pardun said. “Help her find someone or you just find someone to help her like a staff member to get her to class, but don’t try and make her.” With patience and some guidance, Lindberg is capable of achieving any task handed to her.

Whats the hardest part of your school day? Working in the kitchen second and third periods


the...

November 5, 2010

In-Depth

The students at this school have earned a good reputation when it comes to helping the community through annual events like the food and toy drive. Yet when it comes to their own fellow classmates, many are not willing to offer a helping hand. Gruber experiences this in her day to day activity, but she doesn’t let it discourage her. Instead of hanging her head in defeat, Gruber uses her own disabilities as motivation to help others. She goes to the Gary Morava Recreation Center in Mt. Prospect every morning to work with kids aged three to six. “I love working with kids. I help them do crafts; I just love it,” Gruber said. Gruber gets picked up from the center and is brought here for her fourth period resource class. She has two core classes; English and advanced algebra. “I have a lot of friends in my English class,” Gruber said. Not everyone is as tolerant to difference, though. “There are some people who pick on me. It makes me feel sad. They don’t understand half the stuff I have to do everyday,” Gruber said. But, Gruber does not plan on letting her disability affect her future goals. “I plan on studying special education or medical sciences in college. My main goal is to help physically handicapped children. [My disability] motivates me to help my friends with cerebral palsy.” Always focusing on the future and learning and growing, Gruber attends meetings every Tuesday to go over the challenges that she’s had during the past week. It is here that she establishes new goals to strive for as she faces new challenges everyday. Gruber, like many other students, has spent her time working with others that have disabilities. “A few summers ago I helped out at a camp,” Gruber said. Even though she has a disorder that affects her daily life both in and out of school, there is only one thing Gruber truly wants. “I just want to be accepted,” Gruber said.

Q: A:

What could students do to make your day easier? Don’t stare or pick on me, just talk to me.

The Correspondent

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Bhayani also faces challenges when he leaves the comforts of the deaf education program at school and ventures out into the somewhat unreceptive world. “My family doesn’t know sign language, so when I am at home, I only communicate by using my voice. If I go to the store, I can read lips and use my voice, or sometimes my sister helps me out,” Bhayani said. When it comes down to challenges he faces as a student with hearing loss, pronunciation is key in understanding another person. “Sometimes I can’t understand what people are saying. Two words can easily sound the same,” Bhayani said. For example, when someone says ‘fifty’ it becomes difficult to decipher if they are saying ‘fifty’ or ‘fifteen,’ and likewise for ‘fifteen.’ “This is a big deal because when it comes time to pay for something, it makes a difference,” Bhayani said. The environment in which a deaf or hard of hearing student is in also greatly affects how well he or she can decipher what someone is saying. “It usually depends on how noisy it is and how many people are in the room. If it is loud and I can’t read lips, I usually will have an interpreter,” Bhayani said. Acceptance and reception by hearing students is what most deaf students really appreciate. “They are all pretty accepting, for the most part. Sometimes deaf students do encounter problems with hearing students, in the halls for example, but I would say it is rare and it hasn’t happened to me,” Bhayani said. The reception from the deaf education program regarding Bhayani speaks highly of his reputation. “Sahir is a very social person, so he takes advantage of everything that is available to him,” on-site coordinator for the deaf education program Pam Wechman-Mueller said, “I think that is why our students are here: to be a part of the community and show that hearing loss is not a disability.” According to the World Federation for the Deaf, only one in every 1,000 people in the world have hearing loss, 0.1 percent, proving that the deaf community is vastly outnumbered and can be considered a minority group. Until more awareness to the deaf community is raised, we leave it to the students themselves to set the record straight. “The appropriate terms are either deaf or hard of hearing. It’s not hearing impaired, because out hearing is not ‘broken’,” Bhayani said. If students are to be left with one thing regarding the deaf community, it involves a necessary and mutual understanding. “Deaf and hard of hearing people can do whatever anyone else can do, and we have a true ability to communicate with others,” Bhayani said.

Q: A:

How do you communicate with others? I usually read lips and use my voice.

InDepth  

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