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Studio Tschlin

Building Studies Communicating Through Drawings

University of Washington College of Built Environments Department of Architecture

The purpose of this document is to illustrate techniques that will assist in developing drawings that attain a high degree of legibility, accuracy, and conceptual clarity.

Beyeler Museum, Renzo Piano

Building Studies Drafting Technique

Kirchner Museum, Gigon & Guyer

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Depth Drawing Techniques Line weights are used to show depth. Lines in the foreground are darker thanStudio those in the Tschlin University of Washington background. Contrast between line weights is an important aspect of a drawing.

College of Built Environments

Department of Architecture Depth Drawing Techniques Line weights are used to show depth. Lines in the foreground are darker than those in the Technique background. Contrast between line weights is an important aspect of a drawing.

Depth Depth

Line weights usedare to used showtodepth. in the foreground are dimensions. darker thanForeground those in the Line are weights convey Lines three dimensional depth in two lines are darker than those in the background. Expressing contrast between weights are an important background. Contrast between line weights is an important aspect ofline a drawing. aspect of clear drawings.

Profile Lines Lines describing the edge between solid and void should be the darkest lines in the drawing. These profile lines should be drawn as continuous deliniations of space. Profile Lines

Profile Lines the edge between solid and void should be the darkest lines in the drawing. Lines describing

Lines whichshould distinguish between and void deliniations should be the darkest lines in the drawing. These lines These profi le lines be drawn assolid continuous of space. should be drawn as continuous delineations of space.

Profile Lines Lines describing the edge between solid and void should be the darkest lines in the drawing. These profile lines should be drawn as continuous deliniations of space.

Unclear definition of solid & void

Building Studies Drafting Technique

Unclear defi definition between solid void Unclear nition of solid &and void

Clear spatial edge

Unclear definition of solid & void

Adjacent Lines If multiple lines bleed into one another, they are either too heavy or too close together for the scale of the drawing. All lines should be individually legible. Consider the effect of adjacent Adjacent Lines Multiple lines that bleed into areviewed either too heavy too close together for the scale of the lines on the perceived boldness of aeach lineother when from faroraway. Adjacent Lines

drawing. Each line in a drawing must be individually legible. The perceived boldness of adjacent lines

If multiple lines bleedfrom intoa one another, are either too heavy or too close together for the when viewed distance shouldthey be considered. scale of the drawing. All lines should be individually legible. Consider the effect of adjacent lines on the perceived boldness of a line when viewed from far away. Adjacent Lines If multiple lines bleed into one another, they are either too heavy or too close together for the scale of the drawing. All lines should be individually legible. Consider the effect of adjacent lines on the perceived boldness of a line when viewed from far away.

Lines bleeding into each another

Lines bleeding into each another

Lines bleeding into each another

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Defining Lines Defi Defining ning Lines Lines

Line

Line Weights Studio Tschlin Defi ning Lines Defi Lines University of Washington Line weights different elements Defining ning Lines can be divided into three basic categories corresponding to Line Weights College of Built Environments Line Weights of the drawing. These sizes are guidelines and should be altered as necessary based on the Department of Architecture Line weights be divided into Line weights can can be divided into three three basic basic categories categories corresponding corresponding to to different different elements elements characteristics of the drawing. of the drawing. Weights of theWeights drawing. These These sizes sizes are are guidelines guidelines and and should should be be altered altered as as necessary necessary based based on on the the Line Weights Line characteristics of the drawing. Line Weights characteristics of the drawing. Line weights weights can can be be divided divided into into three three basic basic categories categories corresponding corresponding to to different different elements elements Line Line canThese be divided intoguidelines three basic categories corresponding to different of the theweights drawing. sizes are are and shouldplans, be altered as necessary necessary basedelements on the the of drawing. These sizes guidelines and should be altered as based on -Profi les / Cuts .40 .50 sections Linedrawing. weights drawing are fundamentally divided three be groups, which correspond based to the elements of the sizes are guidelines andinto should altered as necessary on the characteristics ofThese the drawing. drawing. .50 .60+ details characteristics of the in a drawing: -Profi les .40 plans, characteristics -Profi les // Cuts Cutsof the drawing. .40 -- .50 .50 plans, sections sections .50 .60+ details .50 - .60+ details • Profiles / Cuts .40 - .50 plans and sections -Profiles les // Cuts Cuts .40 -- .25 .50 plans, sections sections + -Profi .40 .50 plans, -Elements in Elevation / .15 .50 .60 details -Profiles / Cuts .40 plans, .50 --- .50 .60+ detailssections Highlighted Elements .50 .60+ details -Elements .15 .50 -- .25 .60+ details -Elements in in Elevation Elevation // .15 .25 Highlighted Elements Highlighted Elements • Elements inElevation Elevation // -Elements in -Fills / Patterns -Elements in Elevation / -Elements in Elevation HighlightedElements Elements / Highlighted Elements Highlighted -Fills // Patterns Highlighted Elements -Fills Patterns

-Fills Patterns -Fills /// Patterns • Fills / Patterns -Fills Patterns

Building Studies Drafting Technique

.15 .15- .25 .25 .03 - .08

.15 .25 .03 .15 -- .08 .25 .08 pattern line wall/floor hatches .03 .03 -- .08 .08 .08 .08 pattern pattern line line wall/fl wall/floor oor hatches hatches .03- .08 .08 .03 --- .08 .03 .03 .08 .08 pattern line pattern wall/flline, oorwall/floor hatcheshatches .08 pattern .08 .08 pattern line line wall/fl wall/floor oor hatches hatches

Line Styles Line styles should be chosen to represent specific element types in the drawing. Line styles Line Styles Line Styles Line Styles should always be maintained from one drawing to the next for clarity. Line styles Line styles should should be be chosen chosen to to represent represent specifi specificc element element types types in in the the drawing. drawing. Line Line styles styles should always be maintained from one drawing to the next for clarity. Lines styles should be chosen to represent specific element types in a drawing. This convention should always be maintained from one drawing to the next for clarity. Line Styles Line Styles should be maintained from one drawing to the next for clarity Line Styles Line styles should be chosen to represent c element types in the drawing. Line styles Line styles should be represent specifi types in -Elements Above .15 - .25specifi Line styles should be chosen chosen to tofrom represent specificctoelement element types in the the drawing. drawing. Line Line styles styles should always be maintained one drawing the next for clarity. should always be maintained from one drawing to the next for clarity. • Elements above .15 .25 should always be maintained from one drawing to the next for clarity. -Elements Above .15 .25 -Elements Above .15 - .25 -Elements Below .15 - .25 -Elements .15 -Elements Above Above .15 -- .25 .25 Above -Elements Below .15 -- .25 • Elements below .15 -Elements Below .15- .25 .25 -Column Lines .08 -Elements Below .15 -- .25 -Elements Below .15 -Elements Below .15 - .25 .25 -Column Lines .08 -Column Lines .08 • Column lines .08 -Column Lines -Column -Column Lines Lines

Notations

.08 .08 .08

Information on drawings for presentations and notation should be clear and legible, but not overpower Notations the line work or design intent. Presentation information and notations should be legible but not overpowering to the design. Notations Notations Presentation Presentation information information and and notations notations should should be be legible legible but but not not overpowering overpowering to to the the design. design. Notations • Dimensions, Targets, /Room Notations -Targets / Dimensions etc. Tags, etc. .08 - .15 Notations Presentation information information and and notations notations should should be be legible but but not overpowering overpowering to the the design. Presentation -Targets // etc. .08 Presentation information and notations should be legible legible but not not overpowering to to the design. design. -Targets // Dimensions Dimensions etc. .08 -- .15 .15 -Detail Bubbles .35 • Detail Bubbles -Targets // Dimensions Dimensions // etc. etc. .08 -- .15 .15 -Targets .08 -Detail .35 -Targets / Dimensions / etc. .08 -Detail Bubbles Bubbles .35 - .15

-Detail Bubbles Bubbles -Detail -Detail Bubbles

.35 .35 .35

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Drawing Creation Patterning / Toning Studio Tschlin University of Washington Except in diagrams or early schematic drawings, patterns and hatches should not extend over Drawing CreationThey should not dominate the appearance of the drawing. College of Built Environments solid elements. Department of Architecture

Patterning and Toning

Patterning / Toning Except in diagrams or early schematic drawings, patterns and hatches should not extend over Adding patterns, or hatches, and tones to a drawing can help convey materiality, spatial areas, and solid elements. They should not dominate the appearance of the drawing. diagrammatic content. In general, all patterns and tones should be kept separate from line work on design layers that can be easily turned on and off.

Hatch extending over wall

Hatch extending over a wall

Scales Hatch extending over wall

Different drawings should be created for at least three separate scale categories. These scales may vary depending on the project size, but drawings should always be tailored to the scale at which they will be printed (i.e. a 3”=1’-0” detail should not be copied and placed as-is into a 3/4”=1’-0” wall section). Scales Drawing Scales Different drawings should createdare forneeded at leastwhen three printing separate at scale categories. scales If slight adjustments in thebe drawing different scales,These consider may vary depending on the project size, but drawings should always be tailored to the scale adding a separate class for fills which can be turned on/off as necessary. at which they will be printed (i.e. a 3”=1’-0” detail should not be copied and placed as-is into a Different drawings should be created for at least three separate scale categories. Scales may vary 3/4”=1’-0” wall section).

depending on the size of the building, but the drawings should always be tailored to the scale at which

they will be printed. (i.e. 3” = 1’-0” linework should not besections copied and placed as-is into a -Building Drawings 1/4”detail = 1’-0” i.e. plans, If slight 3/4” adjustments the drawing1/2” are =needed printing at plans, different scales, consider = 1’-0” wallinsection). 1’-0” wheni.e. enlarged interior elevations adding a separate class for fills which can be turned on/off as necessary. • Building Drawings -Enlarged Drawings -Building Drawings

Building Studies Drafting Technique

• Enlarged Drawings

-Details -Enlarged Drawings

• Details

-Details

= 1’-0” i.e. Plans and Sections 3/4”1/4” = 1’-0” i.e. wall sections 1/4” = 1’-0” i.e. sections = 1’-0” i.e. Enlarged plans, Interior elevations 1” =1/2” 1’-0” i.e. plans, millwork drawings 1/2” = 1’-0” i.e. enlarged plans, interior elevations 3/4” = 1’-0”

i.e. Wall sections

= 1’-0” i.e. Millwork drawings 3” =1”1’-0” 3/4” = 1’-0” i.e. wall sections 1” =3”1’-0” i.e. millwork drawings = 1’-0”

3” = 1’-0”

Schematic vs. Construction Drawings Drawing Types

Drawings from all phases of a project should adhere to the same principles. The only difference Drawings from phases in a project should the same principles. should will be the amount ofallinformation included andfollow its relationship to whatThe willdrawings eventually beonly built. vary in the amount of information included and in relation to what is intended to be built.

Schematic vs. Construction Drawings Drawings from all phases of a project should adhere to the same principles. The only difference will be the amount of information included and its relationship to what will eventually be built. Under-developed Under-develped

Schematic Schematic

Construction Construction

Under-developed

Schematic

Construction 0906:KD


Drawing Examples Drawing Examples

Studio Tschlin

University of Washington College of Built Environments Department of Architecture

In each case, the following drawing examples offer two methods of representing the same

In each case, the following drawing examples offer two methods of representing the same Drawing Examples information. Consider the legibility, accuracy, and clarity of each drawing. information. Consider the legibility, accuracy, and clarity of each drawing.

In each case, the following drawing examples offer two methods of representing the same information. Consider the legibility, accuracy, and clarity of each drawing.

Typical Curtainwall Plan, 1/4”=1’-0” Typical Curtainwall Plan, 1/4”=1’-0” Typical Curtainwall Plan, 1/4” = 1’-0”

Lack of contrast between line weights of contrast between weights Lack ofLack contrast between lineline weights

Building Studies Drafting Technique

More accurate description of curtainwall design

More accurate description of curtainwall design More accurate description of curtainwall design

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Studio Tschlin

Enlarged Drawing Examples Enlarged Drawing Examples

University of Washington College of Built Environments Department of Architecture

Typical Curtainwall Plans, 1/4”=1’-0” (enlarged here at 1 1/2” = 1’-0” for clarity)

Drawing Typical Examples Curtainwall Plans, 1/4”=1’-0” (enlarged here at 1 1/2” = 1’-0” for clarity) Typical Curtainwall Plan, 1/4” = 1’-0” (enlarged here at 1 1/2” = 1’-0” for clarity)

Unclear delineation of solids, voids, and materials

Unclear definition of solids, voids, and materials

Unclear delineation of solids, voids, and materials

Building Studies Drafting Technique

Accurate description of curtainwall design, clear delineation of solid and void

Accurate description of curtainwall design, clear relationshiop of solid & void Accurate description of curtainwall design, clear relationshiop of solid & void

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Tschlin Drawing Class  

A class assembled for University of Washington students participating in the Switzerland Summer Design Program.

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