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Water front Landscapes

Waterfronts continually evolve, moving through phases and meanings. Today, the landscape urbanism and waterfront reclamation movements are inextricably linked and are now as inevitable as the rising sun. More than seams between city and water, waterfronts are metaphorical links between our past, present and future. The book selects and showcases 46 latest projects of waterfront landscape designs all over the world. These projects respond to different design challenges with a commitment to providing responsible and innovative solutions. With lavishly illustrated images, professional design drawings and limpid texts, the book offers readers a large variety of methods and visions for approaching waterfront landscape design.

Waterfront Landscapes DESIGN MEDIA PUBLISHING LIMITED

DESIGN MEDIA PUBLISHING LIMITED


Waterfront Landscapes

DESIGN MEDIA PUBLISHING LIMITED


CONTENTS

Promenades

86 The CityDeck Phase I

188 General Maister Memorial Park

4 Preface

90 Sjövik Square

192 Sam Fiszman Park

6 Promenade Samuel-De Champlain

96 Mendelssohnufer River Bank

198 Rhine Park, Duisburg

12 Dover Esplanade

102 New White Tower Square

204 Barcelos Fluvial Park

18 Surfers Paradise Foreshore Redevelopment

108 Rheinauhafen Cologne

208 Appel Park

24 Mooloolaba Foreshore Stage 2

116 Aalborg Waterfront

214 Sandgrund Park

30 Vinaròs Promenade

122 Sonnenbrücke Nord

220 Volmepark Hagen

34 Schloss Promenade on Lake Burgsee

128 Stadthafen Schleswig

228 Clinton Cove Park, Segment 7, Hudson River Park

132 Wasserplatz Kiel Waterfront Squares 138 Tel Aviv Port Public Space Regeneration

234 Riverside Park South

144 Waterfront Toronto

240 Sugar Beach

38 National Harbour 44 Tjuvholmen, Oslo 246 HtO 50 Urban Dock LaLaport Toyosu

Waterfront Parks 252 Southport Broadwater Parklands

56 Old/New Harbour Bremerhaven

150 Southeast False Creek 258 Los Angeles Waterfront

62 Riva Split Waterfront

156 Ballast Point Park 264 Ipswich River Heart Parklands

68 Elwood Foreshore

162 Erie Basin Park 270 Index

72 Storaa Stream

168 Mangfallpark Rosenheim

76 The Blue Square

174 Sydney Pirrama Park

82 Erie Street Plaza

182 East Side Park


PREFACE

Washed Ashore – Infinite Opportunities

Thomas Balsley

Education: Bachelor of Landscape Architecture SUNY Syracuse Bachelor of Science at Syracuse University Registration: Registered Landscape Architect National CLARB Certification Affiliations: ASLA–Fellow AIA–Honorary Member GSA–National Register of Peer Professionals Institute of Urban Design Urban Land Institute Landscape Architecture Foundation

Having arrived in New York City to launch my studio in 1970, I was appalled with the state of the “world's greatest” city's waterfront; rotting piers and inaccessible post-industrial sites were severed from the city by ribbons of highway. Sound familiar?Countless cities across the globe have suffered a similar state of neglect. Recent public demand for waterfront accessibility, coupled with development pressure, has led to a rediscovery, reclamation and revitalisation movement. In some cases, with minimal regulations, environmental c o n t ro l s o r p u b l i c a p p ro v a l s , s o m e g o v e r n m e n t s p o n s o re d development plans have brought about extraordinary waterfront parks seemingly overnight. Other waterfronts, however, have moved at what seemed to be a glacial pace. After many failed attempts to redevelop an extraordinary 65-acre Manhattan rail yard site on the Hudson River, our team proposed a plan for Riverside Park South in which a 26-acre park would be the site’s centerpiece. The park plan was approved in 1991 yet only had its first water edge phases completed in 2008! Unbelievably, a core element of the plan, the relocation of an elevated highway that visually divides the community and upland park from the river, is still mired in a bureaucratic morass and likely to be years away from completion. Across town, Brooklyn Bridge Park, first conceived nearly 20 years ago, only had its first phase completed in 2010. It’s clear, designing waterfronts is not for the faint-hearted or impatient, but the payoff is spectacular!  Today, the landscape urbanism and water front reclamation movements are inextricably linked and are now as inevitable as the rising sun. Signifying shared values and cultural ambition, waterfronts provide a unique lens by which the viewer, depending on their position, is able to see across a seemingly intimate expanse. Perhaps it’s the dialogue between oppositional environs, or simply the feeling of being against a great precipice constantly in motion, that brings a magical attraction to waterfronts. Whether it’s the offer of land or water, refuge or prospect, here or there; it stirs the emotions. These aqueous edges create one-of-a-kind experiences, which in turn provide transactions that can be both innate and otherworldly. As the waterfront movement has gained momentum, expectations have risen. Whereas 25 years ago, we might have been satisfied with simply staking a claim at the water’s edge and forging a few informal trails, today’s educated public demands truly remarkable civic gestures that strike dramatic poses on the edges of our cities and define our future aspirations as a society. The design of contemporary public landscapes requires both sensitivity to context and the ability to convey, often with clarity and restraint, qualities that are most special. Indexing a site, and specifically the ways in which recreation, art, architecture, and culture interact with the natural world within both near and broader geographic contexts, allows one to create a new alchemy of space.

As plural environments, the design of waterfront parks requires a dynamic process involving collision and collaboration. This rich plurality presents the greatest opportunity to form singular, largescale transformations where landscape, infrastructure, and urbanism are woven into a unified whole. More than seams between city and water, these sites are metaphorical links between our past, present and future. In order to avoid monotony these linear landscapes most often require the definition of distinct zones that have the ability to treat individual areas like episodes in a narrative while providing breathing room for the in-between. Encoded in these delightfully episodic waterfront systems are the collective ambitions of the local communities through which they pass as is evident in the design for the Promenade Samuel-de Champlain. Recounting the coastal environs and the local timber industry, this highly expressive park repurposes a waterfront site and conveys a history unique of place through a contemporary design language, much in the same way that Riverside Park South takes on a rich narrative about the coexistence of rail systems and waterfronts in the industrialised city. To change the paradigm of what a waterfront should be often involves moving constituents away from their initial ideas of a single purpose site and into a dialogue about the contemporary culture of public open spaces. The choice need not be “past or future”, “active or passive”; it can be all, a richly layered space, regenerative and resilient, springing to life by inviting human and natural processes to co-exist. Registering deeply in the psyche of the visitors, these types of landscape typologies enrich the visitor experience, forging stewards of the resilient ecological systems where land meets water.  Southport Broadwater Parklands is a project that features an extensive co-mingling of ecology and social systems, evoking both native ecosystems and regional cultural landscapes. The site gives vast acreage to natural processes while maximising its value to the visitor and community. While many waterfronts are fast becoming large scale sculptures that often appear as no more than one-liners, the question deserves asking; “Will these landscape sculptures have enough public input to be the truly democratic spaces that endure the test of time?”  Having chaired the competition jury that selected HtO Park, I offer an unequivocal “yes”. Urban waterfronts need not feel as if they are obligated to recreate a “Garden of Eden” detached from natural history; instead the new waterfront can design with nature, allowing natural processes to melded with cultural expressiveness, and remain relevant and accessible while also preserving the transcendent quality of the open space.  These expressive spaces draw crowds, add iconography to cities desperate for character, and capture the public imagination by remixing the familiar in new and unexpected ways. To sustain this success, contemporary designers have embraced a process in which outreach, stakeholders and collaboration are valued as vital components of this design process, along with art and innovation.

Water fronts continually evolve, moving through phases and meanings. Whereas many waterfronts were originally developed as industrial zones that drove urban growth, their purpose is changing. The financing of this transformation is also moving away from private or public entities into public/private partnerships where their motivations and end-goals are more varied than ever before. A complicated weave (and sometimes conflict) of natural ecology, tourism, culture, leisure, transport, security, and politics is taking hold and their boundaries are becoming more obscure. Notions of global sustainability are manifesting themselves on the shores of every coast. The opportunities are infinite. It’s clear from this book’s extraordinary curation of waterfronts of all shapes and sizes that the door of design opportunity opened wide for these designers and they have stormed in! What designers, sponsors and advocates do with this newfound public trust and artistic freedom should be of collective concern to the design community. Will we overextend our design muscles again at the expense of public benefit and urbanism goals, similar to the mid-century modernist architecture movement that lost public support, or will we fuse our design passions with the 21st century principles of environmental and social sustainability? Thomas Balsley, FASLA New York, July 2011


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Promenade Samuel-De Champlain Location : Quebec, Canada Designer : Daoust Lestage Inc., Williams Asselin Ackaoui, Option Aménagement Photographer: Marc Cramer Length: 2.5 km linear Completion date: 2008

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1. Quai des Cageux/Pavilion/Tower 2. Coastal Promenade/Marsh/Bridge 3. Boisé Tequenonday/Stair Way/Pavilion 4. Quai No.5/Rest Area 5. Intersection/Rest Area 6. Soccer Field/Pavilion 7. Intersection/Rest Area 8. Quai No.10 9. Quai de Brumes 10. Quai des Flots 11. Quai des Hommes 12. Quai de Vents 13. Relocated Champlain Boulevard

Award description: 2010 Médaille du Gouverneur Général en Architecture 2009 Award of Excellence – l’Ordre des Architectes du Québec – Category Urban Design 2009 Urban Leadership Award, Canadian Urban Institute – Category City Renewal 2009 National Honorable Mention, CSLA Awards – Category Design 2009 Best of Jury of Project Management Institute – PMI Montreal 2008 Best of Category Award – National Post Design Exchange Awards – Category Urban Design and Landscapes Architecture

The project reclaims a neglected infrastructural fringe into a generous public, leisure oriented naturalised environment, thus reactivating the city’s access to St. Lawrence River and revitalising its shoreline. Drawing on the site’s unique past and genius loci, the project uncovers and showcases vestiges of natural and coastal heritage, while balancing the soft, luscious coastline greenery with the evocative artificial landscape. The sinuous 2.5 kilometres course of the Promenade consists of a continuous leisurely river boardwalk and a rythmed sequence of four diverse thematic gardens. Each of these singular, dense landscape attractors captures and magnifies the material and poetic qualities of local coastal environment. They celebrate the mist, the wind and the sensory pleasures of water, as well as the memory of docklands' archetypes. The rich, sublime atmospheres and textures are materialised as much with stone boulders, timber assemblies and corten steel thresholds, as with native plants and trees, and as with vapour haze, thick shade, mellow light glows and water reflections. Immersed into an all-encompassing green tide, the gardens are linked by a pedestrian and bicycle path, acting as the project’s connecting spine. The urban furniture, specifically designed for this project, maintains the robust simplicity of maritime, harbour heritage, paramount to this site’s genius loci. The linear rhythm of benches and lights is complemented by freely disposed furniture, dotting the landscape as rafts in the sea of greenery. The project’s underlying, yet seamless achievement is its strong contribution to the restoration of the uniquely rich and diverse, albeit fragile coastal eco-system, and to the renewed accessibility of the river.

Right: Quai des Hommes


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Upper left: Promenade – layered textures Lower left: Shelter in wood cladding Upper right: Quai des vents – wind structure Lower right: Quai des flots – water wall


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Left: Quai des Flots – Ice-brake patterns Upper right: Quai des Flots – water walls, waves and ice-brake patterns Lower right: Quai des Flots – wood raft


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Dover Esplanade Location: Kent, Great Britain Designer: Tonkin Liu Photographer: Robert Polley and Mike Tonkin Completion date: 2010 Site area: 6,000 sqm

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1. Lifting Wave 2. Resting Wave 3. Lighting Wave 4. Oak Weathered Benches 5. Sculpted Grass Mounds 6. Shingle Garden with Indigenous Plants 7. Existing Pavilion Retained 8. Sea Sports Centre

Award description: 2011 Royal Institute of British Architects Award

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The Dover Esplanade harnesses the architectural language of Dover's identity; the gentle nature of waves on the sheltered beach, the rhythmical sweep of the Georgian Seafront Terrace and the undulating topography of the White Cliffs of Dover. The creation of three new waves brings a new interactive dynamism to esplanade. The Lifting Wave is a repeated formation of sculptural ramps and staircases made of pre-cast white concrete that rise and fall to connect the Esplanade to the lower shingle beach. The Lifting Wave combines ramps formed of miniature steps that create a lightcatching textured surface. The gentle ramps both allow access for all and the sinuous line brings dynamic forms to the beach. The Resting Wave is a sculptural retaining wall that runs the length of the Esplanade, providing bay spaces with seating sheltered from the south-westerly wind and orientated towards the sun. The Resting Wave’s form tilts back and forth in a system of convex and concave forms. Undulating raised lawns follow the curving line of the wall providing a setting for picnics. The Lighting Wave is a sculptural line of white columns with artwork that complements the sweeping form of the sea wall and terrace, bringing improved amenity lighting and programmed lighting sequences to the Esplanade. Along the length of the Esplanade the columns rise and fall like the froth on the bubbling crest of a wave. The interactive low-energy LED lights have been specifically programmed to create a dynamic wave movement, bringing a sense of delight to the seafront.

Right: Resting Wave and Lighting Wave


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Upper left: Panoramic view of Dover Esplanade Lower left: The interactive low-energy LED lights have been specifically programmed to create a dynamic wave movement Upper right: The Lifting Wave is a repeated formation of sculptural ramps and staircases Lower right: The Lifting Wave combines ramps that create a light-catching textured surface


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Left: The Lighting Wave complements the sweeping form of the sea wall and terrace Upper right: Benches along sculptural retaining wall providing bay spaces with seating Lower right: Undulating raised lawns follow the curving line of the wall


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Location: Queensland, Australia Designer: PLACE Design Group Photographer: Gold Coast City Council Completion date: 2011 Site area: 27,000 sqm

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1. Soft Green Edge to Park Zones 2. Toilet 3. Beach Shelter, BBQ & Art Element 4. Dune Area Low Planting & Existing Trees 5. Lifeguard Tower 6. First Aid Room 7. SLSC Equipment Storage

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Surfers Paradise Foreshore Redevelopment

Surfers Paradise has iconic status in Australia as a playground for vast numbers of locals and tourists of all different ages, interests, cultures and backgrounds. It is a place for fun in the sun, splashing in the surf or simply relaxing in the shade and watching the world go by. The design intent for Surfers Foreshore is to create a dynamic and vibrant public promenade beachfront experience that befits its iconic status. The site incorporates three distinct zones – an urban plaza, urban beach and urban park. The urban plaza is the central area, consisting of a 20m wide pedestrian promenade and bikeway, with seating and a shared vehicular and pedestrian zone. The urban plaza zone includes terraces, ramps and stairs leading to the beach. The beach volleyball courts include broad terraced beachfront spectator seating. The urban park zones incorporate grassed areas, large quantities of existing retained trees, picnic tables, barbecues, beach shelters, beachfront markets and on street parking. A key principle of the overall design is about access to the beach – it is what it is all about. At each street end node beach goers are provided with a clear view and outlooks over the beach, shelter towers, toilets, showers and wide staircases and ramps providing direct access to the beach destination. Beach towers and viewing build outs have been positioned along the entire frontage of the Esplanade. All of the beach towers and toilet blocks contain large super graphic images depicting the changing scenes of Surfers through history.

Upper right: Access to the beach - the genius loci of the place is paramount Lowe right: Picnic furniture and BBQs are the essential part of the infrastructure


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Upper: Clearly identifiable nodes at the adjacent street ends assist with user legibility and interface with the beach. Lower left: The area affords a significant vista to the beach, as well as being available for public events and celebrations Lower right: Beachfront showers have been placed in strategic locations so the experience of showering is part of the animation: on a platform with a view of the beach


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Left: A key principal of the design was accessibility for all, with extensive ramps for variety of access Upper right: Super-graphic imagery of historical surfers paradise photos on shade structures and public amenities have been used to animate the structures and provide a lively sense of cultural heritage for this iconic place Lower right: A key emphasis of the design is about a clear interface with the beach and the provision of facilities for the enjoyment of all


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Mooloolaba Foreshore Stage 2 Location: Queensland, Australia Designer: PLACE Design Group Photographer: Aperture Photography Completion date: 2007 Site area: 2,800 sqm

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1. Central Beach Stairs 2. Equitable Access Ramps 3. Upgraded Barbeque Terrace with Tables and Shelters 4. Lower Picnic Terrace with Tables 5. Toddler Playground

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PLACE Design Group was engaged by the client Sunshine Coast Council to provide design development and construction documentation, landscape architectural services for the beachfront park adjacent to the popular Mooloolaba Sur f Club on the Esplanade. The park is a compact foreshore park which experiences concentrated and focused use and demand by residents and visitors alike. The brief was to provide an innovative, creative and functional design in keeping with the established strategic direction and vision for the area. The design needed to capture the essence of the Mooloolaba style which required sensitive manipulation of existing levels and integration of established trees. Coastal She-Oak, Pandanus and Nor folk Pines were retained as essential character and shade elements throughout the parkland. Community and visitor expectations and the demand for a balance between different uses and their space requirements including pathways, BBQ areas, lawns, tables, a playground, beach showers and seating were considered in detail. Several design options were investigated during the design development phase, based upon multiple-use principles to maximise the potential of the limited space. To protect the existing trees, decks were designed over the existing root zones ensuring a continuity of character and protection of these important assets. The resulting space is heavily utilised by the public and has been a very successful project.

Right: Pedestrian and cycle pathway with water fountains along the way


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Left: Beach access and pedestrian pathway Upper right: Roodside pedestrian and pathway with beach views Lower right: Etched artwork panel by Sunshine Coast Council on stair railings


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Upper left: Bar style seating looks out to the ocean Lower left: Equitable access ramp Upper right: Picnic tables amongst green space, elevated to see the beach below Lower right: Pedestrian and cycle pathway


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Vinaròs Promenade Location: Vinaròs, Castellón, Spain Designer: Guallart Architects Photographer: Guallart Architects Completion date: 2009 Site area: 3,400 sqm

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1. Trees 2. Buildings 3. Street Lamps 4. Car Parking Entrance

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Reform of the seafront promenade, as the interface between the centre of the town and the sea, offered a great opportunity for a public initiative to define the desired standards of urban quality for future growth. The main decision here was to transform the entire promenade into an area for pedestrian use, in order to take full advantage of the place’s latent tourist and civic potential, restricting vehicle access for loading and unloading to certain times of the day, and allowing freer access out of season, when this is compatible with the reduced level of pedestrian activity. The structure of the town’s road system is such that traffic in the part closest to the port could be routed behind the buildings on the streets parallel to the promenade. However, the absence of any such parallel streets in the central and northern sectors prompted the decision to construct a tunnel between the end of the promenade and the 250-place car park to be laid out beneath the central plaza. It was also decided to eliminate the concrete wall separating the beach from the promenade to enable the whole area to be perceived as a continuous space composed of a variety of materials. Another significant decision was that the promenade, which at present has an irregular topography, should have a constant level that would set off its eight-hundred metre horizontal line against the natural line of the sea’s horizon. This serves to resolve the difference in level between the beach and the promenade by means of a system of tiers that can be occupied in a variety of ways.

Right: General view of the promenade


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Upper left: Aerial view of the promenade Lower left: Playing area for the children Upper right: Paving details on the promenade Lower right: Sculpture, trees and street lamps


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L o c a t i o n : S c h w e r i n , G e r m a n y D e s i g n e r : H Ä F N E R / J I M E N E Z B ü ro f ü r Landschaftsarchitektur Photographer: Hanns Joosten Completion date: 2008 Site area: 5,400 sqm

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Schloss Promenade on Lake Burgsee

The Graf-Schack-Allee and the Schloss-promenade on Lake Burgsee form one of the most prominent entryways to the inner city of Schwerin. A new concept for the Schlosspromenade has been called for in the context of the National Landscape Exhibition, the Bundesgartenschau, to be held in 2009. HÄFNER / JIMENEZ Büro für Landschaftsarchitektur designed for this 992,195 Euro project. The street and the promenade are a spatial unit and the completion of the historic old town to the Lake Burgsee towards. Similar to a mediterranean beach promenade, allee and promenade are able to absorb the resulting traffic flows, but to also serve as place to stay. Areas of fear can be avoided by the openness of the promenade and increased its attractiveness. The promenade is underlined as the balcony of the city by a wall ledge from which Lake Burgsee, the gardens of the 21 th Century and of course the Palace can be observed in all their splendor. At this level, the effect of the views to the water surface and to the opposite shore, are reflected in a calm, reserved fashion. All in all it is a timeless, unpretentious landscape with low up-keep requirements and future value. The wall edge is on account of the difficult foundation soil at the lakeshore, both constructive and creative element. The balcony on the promenade provides the quality of stay. The clear edge of the promenade stages the Schwerin Castle. The planting between the promenade and the Graf-Schack-Allee has been adapted to this place.

1. Palace 2. Historic Gardens 3. Gardens of the 21 Century 4. Burgsee 5. Schloss Promenade 6. Graf-Schack-Allee

Right: Planting along the promenade


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Upper left: View to the castle Lower left: Wall edge Upper right: Promenade and the lake view Lower right: Cycling on the promenade


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National Harbour Location: Maryland, USA Designer: Sasaki Associates Photographer: Craig Kuhner, Ed Wonsek Completion date: 2008 Site area: 1,214,057 sqm

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1. Marina 2. National Plaza 3. The Balcony 4. American Way 5. National Gateway

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National Harbour is a mixed-use complex located along the Potomac River just south of Washington, DC. While convenient to key tourist sites, National Harbour is a resort and convention destination that offers an alternative to the urban experience of Washington proper. The project is evocative of the region’s great urban places such as Georgetown, Annapolis, Maryland and the Baltimore Inner Harbour. The vehicular entrance to National Harbour – called the National Gateway – is designed to provide a sense of transition and arrival. Motorists pass through a monumental gateway portal featuring a site-specific sculpture by Albert Paley, across a series of cobblestone paving bands and under the dappled light of a densely planted birch grove before arriving at the project’s urban street grid. A major pedestrian thoroughfare called Grand Avenue, inspired by Barcelona’s famed Las Ramblas, establishes the primary spine for the project. Defined by an allee of majestic plane trees, Grand Avenue showcases multiple iconic fountains, numerous pieces of public art, and a series of small-scale vendor kiosks. The colour and texture of the avenue’s paving set the stage for its terminus – a waterfront plaza which steps down to a natural sandy beach along the Potomac. Both this avenue and the waterfront plaza are designed as flexible spaces – capable of hosting the activities of daily life while also accommodating major festivals. These key urban spaces are framed by retail storefronts and restaurants, promoting both street activity and urban interaction.

Right: Rising from the banks of the Potomac River in Prince George’s County, Maryland, National Harbor is a mixed-used development


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Upper left: A granite staircase - lined with public art and flags - steps down to the National Plaza, the beach, and the River Lower left: Granite furnishings and paving signal pedestrian priority at key intersections Upper right: A stream of visitors arrives at National Harbour from the water taxi service from Alexandria Lower right: A dining terrace along the plaza overlooks the River


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Upper left: American Way, the project’s unifying spine, takes inspiration from the great streets of the world like the Ramblas in Barcelona Lower left: Visitors arriving by water enter the project’s signature plaza, lined with diverse entertainment and retail uses Upper right: Public art - here two eagles atop poles and a terrazzo map of the Chesapeake Bay - provide a gateway between American Way and the Potomac River Lower right: Lined with retail, seating, lush planting, custom furnishings and a series of fountains, the American Way provides a shady place to shop, watch and relax


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Tjuvholmen, Oslo Location: Oslo, Norway Designer: Bjørbekk & Lindheim AS Photographer: Bjørbekk & Lindheim AS Completion date: 2010 Site area: 1,785 sqm

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Oslo's waterfront, now called the Fjord City, is under transformation with the implementation of a comprehensive plan under the auspices of the local gover nment of Oslo. The harbour and waterfront area have been released to open up the city to the water front and free the area for the development of a futureoriented urban environment. The essence of urban planning for Tjuvholmen is defined by the promenade along the water front from City Hall and from the neighbouring district of Aker Brygge, which was transformed from a shipping wharf into a dynamic commercial and residential area between 1980 and 1990. Tjuvholmen is the end point of urban development along the waterfront to the southwest. The street network of the district is laid out in a fan shape creating changing patterns of sunshine throughout the day. The terrain on Odden has deliberately been created with the highest point at the central square, Olav Selvaag Place. Three water features and a central tree create character with water features representing water’s different characteristics: a still pond in massive dark granite, a fountain with six water jets and a third feature of rippling, splashing water inside a hollow pillar of rhomb porphyry. Water runs from the fountains in channels through the streets towards the fjord. Street furnishing, lighting, planters for trees and edge stones offset height difference and are consciously designed so that they provide positive aesthetic touches and offer seating and places to dwell. The goal of the project, to create a varied and rich urban experience reflected in buildings and the urban structure, lies at the core of the wish to create a peaceful and cohesive street and floor plan. A solid floor in light tones was designed. The final floor materials consist of granite and concrete with steel elements moulded in. The use of these materials was chosen to reflect the history of the area with elements from the original pier and industrial communities.

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1. Traffic Area 2. Arrival Area and a Water Fountain 3. Wooden Wharf and Outdoor Restaurants and Cafés 4. Wharf along the Canal 5. Small Park with Undulated Lawn and Trees 6. Open Area with a View towards the Oslo Fortress and the Sea 7. Central Square 8. Central Pedestrian Street Right: Water features in the square


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Upper left: Olav Selvaag’s square Lower left: Granite stair and wooden deck Upper right: Wooden wharf and outdoor restaurants and cafés Lower right: Details of the water feature


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Upper left: Small park with undulated lawn and trees Upper right: Wharf along the canal Upper right: Concrete stairs Lower right: Little beach


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Urban Dock LaLaport Toyosu Location: Tokyo, Japan Designer: EARTHSCAPE Photographer: Koji Okumura/ Forward Stroke, Shigeki Asanuma Completion date: 2006 Site area: 67,499 sqm

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1. Wave Garden 2. Memorial Dock 3. Kids Wave 4. Dock 5. Dog Run 6. View Terrace Seat 7. Industrial Heritage

Award description: 2007 Good Design Award

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In the early 16th century, when people still didn't have a complete understanding of world geography, European global expansion and the Age of Exploration began. Subsequent discoveries of new seaways and new continents played a large role in Europe's development after that. Skip to the 21 st century, Tokyo Bay Area, Toyosu, the shipyards once in this area also provided "discoveries" to the people of the world through the ships they produced. Now, this location will be reborn as new landscape that provides new “discoveries.” The plan for this project considers the entire landscape as an ocean, and the people who travel through the area as voyagers. This site was previously a shipyard, and this project will be constructed by reclaiming two old docks. Three waves of "green," "water," and "earth" are layered over the reclaimed land, with a cafe, radio station, and museum scattered throughout to resemble several "islands," and white benches with foam and coral motifs floating above the waves. Voyagers travel freely through the space, experiencing new discoveries and encounters, sometimes letting their bodies be swept in the current, and sometimes navigating through with purpose. The overall vision of the landscape in this project was to create opportunities for a wide array of discoveries and encounters – including new lifestyle discoveries, a rediscovery of Tokyo, and a discovery of new places of interest – while working within the parametres of a symbolic background of the old shipyards, from which the entirety of Tokyo Bay can be seen, as well as a contemporary city setting and Toyosu.

Right: Industrial heritage


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Upper left: Memorial dock Lower left: Wave garden and waterscape Upper right: Wave garden Lower right: Industrial heritage where people can take a seat


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Left: Island stage at memorial dock Upper right: View terrace seat where people can see the sunset Lower right: Island stage


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Old/New Harbour Bremerhaven Location: Bremerhaven, Germany Designer: Latz + Partner Photographer: Christa Panick, Markus Tollhopf, Latz + Partner Completion date: 2009 Site area: 200,000 sqm

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1. Entry 2. Old Harbour 3. New Harbour 4. Lloyd Dock 5. Lock Garden 6. Bank Weser 7. Zoo at the Sea 8. Building Plot 9. Hotel

Award description: 2010 IULA International Urban Landscape Award, Special Commendation 2009 National Award for Integrated Urban Development and Urban Culture 2008 The International Architecture Award 2007 International City. People. Light Award, Special Mention 2006 IIDA International Illumination Design Award of Merit

The spatial, ecological and technical renewal of the harbour site becomes the core of a new town quarter – with residential and recreation areas, with public squares and promenades. The project follows the strategy of a metamorphosis out of traditional elements and refers to the existing urban pattern. It works with surface materials common in the place, thus characterising it with a continuous carpet of natural stone. Metamorphosis and new development reveal historical links reaching out from the city to the port and from the port to the city, making it possible to experience and grasp them both spatially and visually. Historical and new landmarks such as the Simon Loschen tower and the radar tower are presented via visual links in terms of both axis and perspective. The long quays, the rows of tall masts for flags and lights, enhance the effect of the port’s characteristic north-south orientation, drawing the eye out towards the gigantic gantry cranes and the new commercial port. The old street lamps have been replaced by new multifunctional masts. An energy-efficient lighting system allows the streets to be lit in an economically and ecologically sound way, and improves the urban environment. In illumination terms, the light’s colour and brightness and vertical and horizontal arrangement come together with the dark sky and the reflections in the water of the river to create three levels. Natural stone paving covers the quays and squares with a continuous carpet that conveys a sense of calm and lavishness in relation to existing and future heterogeneous development.

Right: The Lloyd Square is situated like an inlay within the stone carpet and represents the entrance to the harbour


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Upper left: Developed especially for this site, the Flow Bench is both, seat and sculpture Lower left: The surface material consists almost only of recycled natural paving stones which by use get more and more attractive Upper right: The structure follows a consistent layout in west-east direction from the town centre to the River Weser, thus creating orientation and a strong appearance Lower right: Sawn paving stones with smooth surfaces cover the main walking areas whereas the rough surfaces of cobbled zones along the edges of the quays signal “attention� and caution for pedestrian traffic


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Upper left: A new wooden bridge crosses the historic entrance to the Lloyd dockyard, thus creating a continuous pedestrian connection and a new landmark within the urban context Lower left: The deck of the Lloyd Square rises nearly 20centimetres above the stone carpet Upper right: The “Lock Garden“, shaped by the wind and facing the sea, has been formerly and still today an intimate meeting place Lower right: Timelessness has been the goal: materials are primarily durable and show regional expression


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Riva Split Waterfront Location: Split, Croatia Designer: 3HLD Photographer: Damir Fabijanic Completion date: 2007 Site area: 24,707 sqm

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The city of Split and its waterfront, the Riva, as the paradigm of its history and character, are among the most interesting and most specific sites in the Mediterranean. Split waterfront is an urbanised, public, open and accessible space, 1,700 years old. It stands in front of Diocletian’s Palace, once the home of the Roman emperor. The modular Roman form of the palace in the latter phase became the framework that shaped the city and directed its expansion; in the same way, the dimensions, materials and form of the modular network of concrete elements laid on Riva directed the arrangement and positions of all the other elements of the public space. The waterfront is the focal point where the city meets the sea. 250 metres long and 55 metres wide, it is also the main public square, the space for all kinds of social events, promenade by day, parade by night, the site of sport events, religious processions, festivals and celebrations. The project rearticulates the space for all the mentioned events and harmonises them on a new integrated surface. The solution uses not only architectural design, but also materials, to respond to all the challenges of utilisation set before the Riva. All urban elements and equipment was specially designed for this project and they try to meet local spirit and atmosphere.

1. Trees 2. Shading Support 3. Benches

Right: Aerial view of Riva Split


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Upper left: Exterior faรงade Lower left: Palm trees Upper right: Overall view Lower right: Bench detail


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Upper Left: Resting area with benches Lower Left: Shading support Right: Close view of benches


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Elwood Foreshore Location: Elwood, Australia Designer: ASPECT Studios Photographer: Andrew Lloyd Completion date: 2009 Site area: 10,000 sqm

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The Elwood Foreshore is the focus of the beach activity for residents of the Elwood area and beyond. The project includes a new regional cycle way, beach plaza, indigenous plantings, and a new car park with water sensitive urban design (WSUD). The design created shared pathways and surfaces, introducing a continuous and safe cycle path. The roadway and car parking systems were rationalised to minimise conflict between bicycles, pedestrians and motor vehicles. The City of Port Phillip and ASPECT Studios keenly pursued an integrated approach to water, with planning and installation of water tanks for the various clubs and restaurants in the foreshore and full WSUD for the renovated car park. The design provides elegance and sustainability within the limits of its scale and budget. Recycled ashalt was used for pavements to car parks, existing subgrades were used for pavements where possible. Existing furniture such as BBQ’s and site furniture were served and reused to minimise material wastage. This project demonstrates that a seamless connection can be made between functional design (ie cars, bikes, walkers, boats, cleaners) and design elegance. The design has provided back to the community an open and inviting foreshore place, that can be used from causal to large scale, surf life saving and sailing club festivals.

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1. Elwood Sea Scouts 2. Elwood Angling Club 3. Elwood Sailing Club 4. Elwood Life Saving Club 5. Sails on the Bay (Restaurant) 6. Loading Zone 7. Access Road

Right: Overall view of Elwood Foreshore


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Upper left: Pedestrians Lower left: Water facility Upper right: Safe cycle path Lower right: Bench with lighting effect


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Storaa Stream Location: Holstebro, Denmark Designer: OKRA and Schul Photographer: OKRA Completion date: 2009 Site area: 23,000 sqm

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The project makes a major difference in the city and a connection between the two parts of the centre. The north part and the south part of the centre of Holstebro will be linked by a new focal point. The public spaces around the cultural buildings, like cinema and dance theatre, provide new ĂŠlan to the city by transforming them into an outdoor stage. The project is the catalyst of changing the riverside from a backside with functional connections into a "place to be". Previously, the riverside was neglected and the city had turned its back towards the water. Even just after the opening one can notice that the riverside is already attractive that the quality of public space will be a catalyst for further development. On the north side of the project, new developments in the next years will create frontages towards the riverside, where it is now just the backside of commercial activities and parking places. In the further future, it can be envisioned that more private owners want to turn their faces towards the river scenery. It can be envisioned that some extension of the buildings combined with underground parking supplies in a future second phase, where parks, playgrounds and small planted squares will form an extension of the beautiful riverside area.

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1. Cycle and Pedestrian Bridge 2. Quay Side Seating 3. Storaa Stream 4. Water Podium 5. Planting Area 6. New Dance Theatre 7. Movable Planting and Seating on Rails 8. Water Floor and Fountain 9. Dance Theatre Square 10. Dance Theatre Park 11. Cycle Path 12. Parking Area

Right: A view to the theatre and bridge at night


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Upper left: A view at night to the bridge Lower left: The bridge is a link, yet there is also room for informal seats Upper right: The river, now separating two parts of the centre, will become a public stage Lower right: The water floor confines the square and the bleachers along the high lawn


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The Blue Square Location: Drammen, Norway Designer: Arkitekt Kristine Jensens Tegnestue Photographer: Arkitekt Kristine Jensens Tegnestue Completion date: 2007 Site area: 12,900 sqm

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In the new park of knowledge in Drammen will be framing an adult education centre and a library. The connections between the new main building and the existing heritage buildings is created by a continuous city floor, called the Blue Square. The floor surface and materiality is developed as a metaphor on an enlightened surface of water, so the unity of the plaza is perceived as a long, flowing course towards the river. The surface is made in different shades of grey granite, in which the blue tint is accentuated by narrow stripes of glass and aluminium in blue nuances. Outdoor zones are created on each side of the main building, so that one can always find a lovely place for a break in the sun. Adjacent to the river a big stair is build, and on the south bank there is created a big activity zone with furniture placed in the lee of cherry trees. All furniture is specially designed for the project. The overall placement of the furniture was initiated by the idea of note lines organising, specifying and keeping the different elements into place. The continuous course is even accentuated by the repetition of steel, as a paper chain bended and turned creating various spaces. Light poles with coloured light underlines the blue shade in the evening hours.

1. Waterfront Deck 2. Chairs on the Square 3. Furniture 4. The Square

Right: The wooden waterfront deck allows people to enjoy the beautiful view


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Left: The blue tint is accentuated by narrow stripes of glass and aluminium in blue nuances Upper right: Light poles with coloured light underlines the blue shade in the evening hours Lower right: Light details


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Upper left: The surface is made in different shades of grey granite Lower left: The continuous course is even accentuated by the repetition of steel Upper right: The specially designed furniture allow parking bicycles Lower right: Bench details


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Erie Street Plaza Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA Designer: Stoss Landscape Urbanism Photographer: Stoss Landscape Urbanism, Vetter Denk, James Dallman Completion date: 2010 Site area: 1,208 sqm

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The project grows from three hybrid ecologies that step down across the site towards the water: radiant grove, flexible field, and steel marsh.The radiant grove occupies the upper end of the vegetal gradient, at the plaza’s urban edge. The poplar grove is positioned to shelter the rest of the plaza from cold winter winds yet are deliberately transparent to allow for views and safety. The grove maintains a dense straight line parallel to street edge but opens up toward the river. The primary element – the flexible field – is a hybridised plaza-green, with pavers and lawn surfaces that allow for both intense activity and more passive use. The plaza is articulated as an eroded field of custom pre-cast pavers distributed to maximise variability and flexibility. The plaza’s indeterminacy is accentuated by the erratic scattering of seatwalls and luminous fiberglass benches, which capture and reflect ambient light and project light from within. Their irregular placement allows for multiple and diverse social groupings or solitary retreats, in shade or full sun, protected or exposed. The luminous qualities of the fiberglass are accentuated as night falls, projecting light from within and reflecting the passing headlights of automobiles. The glowing benches have become a signature element of the project. The variegated surface extends into the steel marsh, which occupies the lower end of the plaza gradient at the river’s edge. Capturing and cleaning site stormwater, the steel marsh is key to the site's stormwater management strategy. Lowering the grade behind the bulkhead wall allowed for the collection of site stormwater in a perched position above the river, newly protected from industrial activities and barge wakes.

1. Federal Channel to Lake Michigan 2. Concrete Pavers 3. Poplar Grove 4. Seating 5. Restaurant and Condominiums 6. Erie Street

Right: The variegated surface extends into the steel marsh, which collects and cleans stormwater from the site


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Upper left: Along the boardwalk the grove opens up intermittently, allowing passage through to the heart of the plaza. The benches glow at night and have become a signature of the project Lower left: The grove is positioned to protect the site from cold lake winds, yet it is deliberately transparent to allow for views and safety Upper right: View from the upland terrace across the plaza to the lower wetland and the river beyond. Heavy rainfall collects in the steel marsh, making environmental cycles legible to plaza visitors Lower right: View from Erie Street towards the river. The poplar grove holds a straight line parallel with the street edge, opening up into a looser configuration toward the river


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The CityDeck Phase I Location: Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA Designer: Stoss Landscape Urbanism Photographer: Stoss Landscape Urbanism Completion date: 2010 Site area: 10,117 sqm

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1. Transient Docks 2. Pine Street Steps + Stage 3. Interactive Water Feature 4. Lawn 5. Cherry Street Landing 6. Grove

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The project starts as a simple boardwalk deployed at the edge of city and river. The highly articulated wooden boardwalk undulates, folding in response to technical, code, and programmatic issues. At the scale of the human body, these folds create diverse seats, benches, and chaise lounges that allow for choice and flexibility. The idea was to give people many choices about where to sit, depending on their own desires, their body type, their mood, and their attraction to various ambient light, heat, or weather conditions. The wood surface folds up and over the existing bulkhead wall at the north end of the site, rising to form a dramatic overlook perched above the river on piles – a great place to watch passing lake barges and small recreational boats. At the city edge, the surface folds up again, affording adjacent buildings required protection from flooding and creating retail and dining terraces, seating, and communal chaise lounges looking out to the water. A flexible upland plaza floats atop fill between the perched terraces and the undulating boardwalk, creating a free-zone to be inhabited by festivals, vendors, and spontaneous activity; it doubles as an informal amphitheatre for performances and is marked at its southern end by an interactive play fountain. Lawns are located at both north and south ends of the project, allowing for casual play and picnicking. Groves and scatterings of gingkos, elms, and coffee trees offer shade in the hot summer sun and reduce adjacent buildings’ cooling loads. During football season, the trees turn bright yellow, half of the green and gold color scheme of the city’s beloved Green Bay Packers football team. The green is manifested in custom-designed concrete pavers (with a green aggregate), shaped to resemble fish scales and perforated to allow for stormwater infiltration.

Right: View looking south along The CityDeck from the Main Street Bridge


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Upper left: Larger and longer bench forms allow for gathering and group sun-bathing Lower left: The wooden surface expands at the Shopko Landing, rising up as a dramatic overlook and fishing pier Upper right: In the fall, the gingkos, Kentucky coffeetrees, and Liberty elms all turn bright yellow Lower right: Overview of the southern end of The CityDeck, near the Walnut Street Bridge


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Sjövik Square Location: Stockholm, Sweden Designer: Thorbjörn Andersson Landscape Architect Photographer: Åke E:son Lindman, Patrik Lindell Completion date: 2010 Site area: 12,000 sqm

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Sjövik square is situated right on the quay of Årstadal. It opens up towards the water and thus includes the larger landscape in its design. To underscore this basic idea, the square is laid out as a flat plane which has then been tilted towards the view. Two recreational lawns furnish the upper part, outlined with a broad granite edge for seating. The lawns are horizontal and rise gradually from the ground plane, clarifying the plaza slope. Two 100-metre-long wooden boardwalk promenades frame the plaza and direct the view. They have a Y-shaped configuration, where the western leg steps down towards the water in series of sun terraces. The eastern leg is a pier which passes the quay edge by 40 metres, hovering over the water. To balance the openness of the triangular square, an equally triangular grove of semi-transparent Gleditsia trees has been added at the western perimeter of the plaza. The trees stand in a gravel surface, which also hosts a small playground and lanes for bouclé games. The grove transcends into a sunken garden with horticultural content, shadowed by cherry trees. Included in the design is also a 35 metres wide water feature, with a thin layer of water rushing over a shingled surface of Norwegian slate, as well as an environmental sculpture by artist Jan Svenungsson. This artwork consists of three very large boulders, one of them engraved with headlines fetched from the daily newspapers of the day the square was opened to the public.

1. The Square 2. The Benches 3. The Grass Garden 4. Grove

Right: The square is tilted 3 % towards the water in order to give focus on the view


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Upper left: The square has an edge definition by two long wooden decks, laid out in a “V�-configuration Lower left: A site-specific artwork by artist Jan Svenungsson consists of three very large boulders with inscriptions from daily newspapers Upper right: Terraced sun decks at western side of the square Lower right: The lawns are accessible for the disabled at their upper side


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Upper left: The east wooden deck is planted with Gold Rain/ Laburnum Lower left: The surface of the square has a pattern composition as a textile fabric with granite imported from China, complemented by lines of steel Upper right: One of the boulders is placed in a wide water feature with streaming water occurring as a thin layer Lower right: At dusk, the lake surface reflects last rays of the sun


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Mendelssohnufer River Bank Location: Leipzig, Germany Designer: GFSL Clausen+Scheil Landscape Architects Photographer: Gunter Binsack Completion date: 2007 Site area: 7,500 sqm

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The redesign of the green space known as the "Mendelssohnufer" commemorated the former Gewandhaus choirmaster and founder of the first German music conservatory with a bust and the expression of the access down to the waterway as musical staves with the theme of the E-minor violin concerto. The old Gewandhaus, which was destroyed in the war, stood on the same spot as the music academy that today bears his name. Before the redesign, the square in front of the former Reichsgericht and the old Gewandhaus sites was a triangular lawned area surrounded by traffic and was generally unused or just treated as somewhere to walk the dog by the local population. The construction of the new Humanities centre has transformed the area where the destroyed Gewandhaus once stood. The introduction of the underground car park and the repositioned entry and exit routes reduced the impact of traffic in this residential district. By redesignating road space as green space, the location becomes a much a more pleasant place to sit or linger. More details: -By rearranging the traffic flows using traffic calming measures on the residential area. - The creation of a landscaped park to form areas for relaxing and communication - Opening of a further length of the PleiĂ&#x;e, which had been culverted in 1950s - Formation of a wide planted bank zone with access to the water by appropriately shaping the buried structure of the underground car park. - Commemoration of the old Gewandhaus destroyed during the war by the inclusion of the Mendelssohn bust.

1. Grass 2. Planting Area 3. Seating Area 4. Concrete Paving Stones 5. Recommended Location of Mendelssohnmemorial 6. Column Lights

Right: The open space includes the watercourse bank with its step seating as musical staves and cubes as notes in its design


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Upper left: Panorama Lower left: The defining features of the watercourse bank are its wide, grassy step seating, which can be occupied for walking or relaxing right down to the water’s edge Upper right: By redesignating road space as green space, the location becomes a much a more pleasant place to sit or linger Lower right: Path leading to the the Bundesverwaltungsgericht


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Left: The park is primarily used by students from the neighbouring colleges but also by walkers, tourists and officials from the court Upper right: The open space makes reference to the generous gable front of the Bundesverwaltungsgericht Lower right: Commemoration of the old Gewandhaus destroyed during the war by the inclusion of the Mendelssohn bust, who is the first director of the orchestra


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New White Tower Square Location: Thessaloniki, Greece Designer: Katerina Tsigarida Architects Photographer: Yorgis Yerolumpos Completion date: 2008 Site area: 24,000 sqm

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The project’s main objective is the reconstitution of public space around the White Tower – important historical monument and landmark at the waterfront of the city of Thessaloniki. The new square required the partial deviation of the waterfront avenue in order to provide adequate space in front of the monument. The restoration of the surrounding space on its initial foundations’ level was additionally proposed. The synthetic design procedure explores the principles of centrality, monumentality, strict plane geometry, axis continuity, while refraining to a minimal intervention. The architectural discipline and the design austerity focus more on their long-lasting effect in the city, rather than on the implementation of ephemeral design styles. Special care was taken so as to provide a realistic and viable result. A trapezoid square is ultimately generated, perspectively opening towards the sea, materialising a system of multiple geometry originating whether from the monument itself, the water front pedestrian zone or the tangential East Cultural Axis. Level height difference creates coherent sub-areas at selected locations and of clear and legible shape. The architectural elements that organise the square constitute of green plots that at the same time operate as zones for sitting. In remembrance of the East City Wall – part of the old city’s fortificationa series of limestone pillars function as a linear kinetic sculpture that seems to move as one walks along. An alley with big trees runs parallel to the pillars as a symbolic exit towards the sea at the point where the old city meets the new.

1. Entrance to the White Tower 2. Remaining of Byzantine Fortification 3. Alley of Trees 4. Limestone Pillars Tracing the Old City Wall 5. Public Toilets 6. Limestone Carpet 7. Green Carpet 8. Pebble Dash Carpet 9. N. Votsi Statue 10. Old City Waterfront 11. New City Waterfront

Award description: 2008 Architectural Awards of the Hellenic Institute of Architecture

Right: View of the White Tower from the west


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Upper left: Aerial view to the east side of the square Lower left: Walking through the alley of trees Upper right: View of the White Tower from northwest Lower right: View from the entrance towards the city


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Left: Stairs to the entrance of the White Tower Upper right: View towards the sea Lower right: Ramp to the entrance of the White Tower


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Rheinauhafen Cologne Location: Cologne,Germany Designer: FSWLA Landschaftsarchitektur GmbH Photographer: Manuel Kubitza Completion date: 2011 Site area: 118,500 sqm

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1. Boardwalk 2. Central Axis 3. Urban Space 4. Play and Recreation

Award description: 2010 Germany Urban Planning Award

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When port activities were transferred to other areas of Cologne, a new urban design challenge arose for Rheinauhafen. The area that once served as the river port is to acquire new functions. As part of the restructuring process, a competition for the open spaces was held in 1999. FSWLA Landschaftsarchitektur GmbH emerged as the winner and was commissioned with planning the open spaces. Rheinauhafen is very close to the town centre of Cologne, with a direct link to the Rheingarten redesigned in the 1980s, and stretches for about 2 kilometres down to the popular southern district of the city. This much favoured location within the urban context is to be reinforced by an attractive, structured design of the open space. The interplay of historical and modern architecture sets up a tension echoed in the outdoor terrain. The historical significance of the port area is linked into the modern architecture by combining historical materials such as natural stone paving, old rail track and restored cranes with large concrete slabs, glass, steel and a sophisticated lighting design. This will enable Rheinauhafen to present a new face to the world while retaining its original character as a port.

Right: The Rhine promenade viewed from Southern Kranhaus to the southern cape


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Upper left: Modern design and historical materials create a unique atmosphere Lower left: The new Elisabeth-Treskow-Square Upper right: Large scaled concrete slabs and natural stone pavement define a corporate design for the open space Lower right: Hedges sculptured as blocks and large scaled slabs structure at the “Siebengebirge�


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Left: The central passage in the southern part Upper right: Spacious seating sculptures invite to stay Lower right: Generously proportioned steps


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Left: The new Elisabeth-Treskow-Square with a piece of art in the centre and the “Rhine bastion” Upper right: The “Wohnwerft” in the middle of the Rheinauhafen Lower right: The so called “sail-lamp” provides indirect light to avoid blinding


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Aalborg Waterfront Location: Aalborg, Denmark Designer: C. F. Møller Architects and Vibeke Rønnow Landscape Architects Photographer: Helene Hoyer Mikkelsen Completion date: 2010 Site area: 170,000 sqm

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1. Football Court 2. Pedestrian Path 3. Ramp

The master plan for Aalborg Waterfront links the city’s medieval centre with the adjacent fjord, which has previously been difficult for citizens to access due to the industrial harbour and the associated heavy traffic. By tying in with the openings in the urban fabric, a new relationship between city and fjord is created. The qualities of the approximately one-kilometre stretch of quayside are emphasised with a tree-lined and unusually detailed boulevard to accommodate cyclists and pedestrians. The medieval Aalborg Castle once again becomes the harbour’s centrepiece through the establishment of an extensive green area to frame the historic embankments. At the same time, Aalborg receives a harbour promenade with steps and recessed terraces, allowing people to get close to the water. Various kinds of urban gardens facilitate activities such as markets, ball games and sun-bathing. The aim is to create robust and attractive spaces to benefit many different users. The central activities field is designed to accommodate various games and sports, from beach-volley in the summer to ice skating rink in winter, surrounded by dramatically angled netting and lighting masts. The adjacent gardens are a calm, slightly sunken green space with a dense planting of trees and flowers. The materials chosen are as raw as the fjord itself, including asphalt, rubber, cor-ten steel, concrete and wood, while at the same time containing subtle references to the sea through wavy pavement patterns - an architectural quote of the famous Copacabana beach promenades by Roberto Burle Marx.

Right: The gardens are situated along the city's new harbour promenade. They are divided by wide tali-wood decking areas


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Upper left: Various kinds of urban gardens facilitate activities such as markets, ball games and sun-bathing. The aim is to create robust and attractive spaces to benefit many different users Lower left: Special attention has been given to a mix of functional and ambient lighting of different colour temperatures using efficient low-energy fixtures Upper right: The flower garden is a lush, colourful oasis for all ages - primarily designed for quiet pursuits and as a recreational space for Aalborg's new harbour pool Lower right: Wavy pavement patterns along the boulevard create subtle references


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Upper left: Concrete is used throughout, most notably in the new quay, featuring wide in-situ cast sitting steps. Cast into the concrete steps are a multitude of fiber-optic "starspangles", the intensity of which is regulated by an anemometer Lower left: Materials chosen are as raw as the fjord itself, including asphalt, rubber, corten steel, concrete and wood Upper right: Outlook posts provide tourists with great opportunities to overlook the fjord Lower right: The sunken gardens are framed in concrete "bastions", incorporating stairs and ramps for full accessibility


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SonnenbrĂźcke Nord Location: Berlin, Germany Designer: Henningsen Landschaftsarchitekten BDLA Berlin Photographer: Christo Libuda Completion date: 2010 Site area: 1,300 sqm

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1. Entrance 2. Granite Stair Complex 3. Fountain Covered with Slates 4. Wooden Decks 5. Waterfront Promenade 6. Lawn Slope 7. Apple Trees 8. Lavender and Roses 9. Beer Garden

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In the context of the German urban development programme "Stadtumbau West", the area beside the bridge "SonnenbrĂźcke" in Berlin-NeukĂśln was turned over to the public after one year construction period as a new attractive plaza with fountain and an open stair complex at the waterfront. Henningsen Landscape Architects planned these previously rundown waterside area as an urban public open space for residents and visitors. Beside the waterfront, the grand scaled stair complex made of light grey Portuguese granite stone with its numerous wooden decks invites the visitors to stay and relax. The wide staircase resolves and stages the huge level difference between the street and water channel. Some extant robinia trees, a row of apple trees at the stair head as well as lavender and roses planted at the slopes frame the otherwise stony setting of the stair complex. In addition to the nearby water channel, the topic "water" can also be found at the plaza as a water play, which is installed even to the ground in a covering of dark grey German slates. Close to the water play lies a big open sand surface, which can serve the neighbouring beer garden with beach chairs and deck chairs as comfortable living zone. Light orchestrations of the water play and the wooden decks with built-in lights as well as light-bands underneath the hand rails and stairs set a course during the evening hours.

Right: Water feature


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Left: Stairs with wooden deck Upper right: Side view of the square Lower right: Fountain at night


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Upper Left: Whole scene of the square Lowe left: Wooden deck Right: Wooden deck as a planter


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Stadthafen Schleswig Location: Schleswig, Ger many Designer: BHF-Landscape Architects Photographer: BHF-Landscape Architects Completion date: 2007 Site area: 10,000 sqm

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1. Lawn 2. Bench 3. Car Parking 4. New Pavement 5. Parking Area for Mobile Homes

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The office BHF-Landscape Architects received the direct contract for the re-designing of the promenade (approx. 200 metres long), the area around the harbour gastronomy, the parking area for mobile homes, and a central square at the harbour head. The town harbour is the central home-port for luxurious yachts of the brand “Comfortina�. The promenade along the town harbour in Schleswig was completely redesigned following a renovation of the quay wall. The quay wall received a broad flat head of in-situ concrete. In addition lies a double band of granite paving stones The existing shed has been converted into a fish snack with numerous outdoor seats. To protect the shed against floods, the built-in under the shed roof containers were placed on a pedestal, which was enclosed with large size ashlars of fair-faced concrete. Here people can wind-protected sit and look at the fjord. The shipping buoy in the harbour apron was installed on the top of a small grass hill. Despite the small difference in height of one metre, can be seen from here even better the bustle of the harbour. Here to the waterside fair-faced concrete ashlars were also built as the seat blocks. In the appropriate steps flat LED lights are integrated.

Right: The shipping buoy on the square


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Upper left: Seating area and lookout Lower left: Yachts and crane Upper right: Aerial view Lower right: Promenade pavement


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Wasserplatz Kiel Location: Kiel, Germany Designer: BHF-Landscape Architects Photographer: BHF-Landscape Architects Completion date: 2008 Site area: 3,500 sqm

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The waterside square is a new development at the “Germaniahafen”. This square is directly adjacent to the “Norwegen-Terminal” on the east side of the “Kieler Förde”, and forms, together with the 3-segment bascule bridge over the “Hörn”, an important connection between the city, with the main station on the west side, and the district “Kiel Gaarden” on the east side. The square negotiates a height difference of approx 6 metres and connects the promenade with “Gaardener Ring” and the following pedestrian bridge over the “Ostring”, a heavily frequented main road in Kiel. A generously designed stepway, with two flights and an integrated slow-rising ramp, enable pedestrians to negotiate this height difference. The “lower deck” offers opportunities to sit, the openair gastronomy and freenet-centre offer time to linger. “Seefarers” can watch the bright life of the harbour in the shade of trees. The sculpture “Adam and Eve” by Björn Norgaard stands in the centre of the square.

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1. Square North 2. Barrier-free Way 3. Square Centre 4. Square South 5. Sculpture 6. Steps 7. Seating Element 8. Bicycle Way 9. Bicycle Stand

Upper right: View to the historical fishing boats in the Germania-Hafen Lower right: City life on two levels


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Upper left: The Wasserplatz in the spring sunshine Lower left: Corten steel sheet as reminiscence at the former shipyard Upper right: Biking, rest in front of the sculpture “Adam & Eva” by Bjørn Norgaard Lower right: The retaining walls are planted with parthenocissus tricuspidata “Veitchii”


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Upper left: Evening atmosphere at stairs Lower left: Corten steel with integrated turtle light Upper right: Night view of the Wasserplatz Lower right: Detail of Corten steel sheet with integrated turtle light


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Location: Tel Aviv, Israel Designer: Mayslits Kassif Architects Photographer: Daniela Orvin, Adi Branda, Galia Kronfeld, Albi Serfaty Completion date: 2008 Site area: 55,000 sqm

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Tel Aviv Port Public Space Regeneration

Situated on one of Israel's most breathtaking waterfronts, the Tel Aviv Port was plagued with neglect since 1965, when its primary use as an operational docking port was abandoned. The recently completed public space development project by Mayslits Kassif Architects, managed to restore this unique part of the city, and turn it into a prominent, vivacious urban landmark. Remarkably, despite city planning being dominated by market forces, and because of its immense popularity among the public, the project has been able to circumvent massive development schemes intended for the port's 50,000 square metres area. The suspension of all the area's rezoning plans set a precedent for creating an urban transformation not propelled by building rights, but by an alternative design strategy gearing towards the public space. The design introduces an extensive undulating, non-hierarchical surface, that acts both as a reflection of the mythological dunes on which the port was built; and as an open invitation to free interpretations and unstructured activities. Various public, political and social initiatives – from spontaneous rallies to artistic endeavors and public acts of solidarity – are now drawn to this unique urban platform, indicating the project's success in reinventing the port as a vibrant public sphere.

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1. Existing Hangers 2. Parking Park 3. Undulating Deck Surfaces

Award description: 2011 Winner of Domus Russia ARCHIP Prize 2010 The Rosa Barba European Landscape Prize – Nomination as One of the 9 Finalists of the 6th European Biennial of Landscape Architecture 2008 Israel 'Rechter Award' for an Outstanding Architectural Achievement by the Israeli Ministry of Culture 2007 Israel 'Ot Haitzuv Award' for the Best Urban Architectural Project in Israel

Right: Wooden deck ©Adi Branda


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Upper left: Close view of GRC elements © Adi Branda Lower left: Parasols © Daniela Orvin Upper right: Multipurpose surfaces for parking and events © Adi Branda Lower right: The hybrid ipen space that combines the qualities of the informal beach environment with the city fabric © Daniela Orvin


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Upper left: Paving pattern defining the traffic areas © Adi Branda Lowe left: The GRC elements designed for a variety of sitting positions © Galia Kronfeld Upper right: The port as a vibrant public sphere © Albi Serfaty Lower right: Paving pattern defining the traffic areas © Daniela Orvin


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Waterfront Toronto Location: Toronto, Canada Designer: West 8 and DTAH Photographer: West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture Completion date: 2009 Site area: 650 sqm + 630 sqm

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1. Portland Wavedeck 2. Spadina Wavedeck 3. Rees Wavedeck 4. Simcoe Wavedeck 5. York Wavedeck 6. Yonge Wavedeck 7. Jarvis Wavedeck 8. Spadina Bridge 9. Peter Bridge 10. Rees Bridge 11. Simcoe Bridge

Award description: 2010 Royal Architectural Institute of Canada National Urban Design Awards – Spadina WaveDeck 2009 Canadian Society of Landscape Architecture National Merit Award for Spadina WaveDeck 2009 American Society of Landscape Architects Honour Award for General Design, Spadina WaveDeck

The Toronto Central Water front, a 3.5 kilometres length of Lake Ontario in direct proximity to the downtown business district, is one of Toronto's most valuable assets. Yet despite decades of planning and patchwork development projects, there is no coherent vision for linking the pieces into a greater whole – visually or physically. In this context, the fundamental objective of the project is to address this deficiency by creating a consistent and legible image for the Central Waterfront, in both architectural and functional terms. West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture, in joint venture with DTAH, prepared a comprehensive vision for the Central Waterfront that produced a powerful design language with the strength and simplicity to overcome the existing visual noise and create a sense of interconnectedness and identity. Connectivity between the vitality of the city and the lake and a continuous, publicly accessible waterfront are the plan’s priorities. The plan expresses a vision for the Central Waterfront that brings a sustainable, ecologically productive “green foot” to the rich culture of the metropolis. West 8 + DTAH are currently implementing the first phase of the strategic masterplan. Spadina WaveDeck and recently Simcoe Wavedeck and Rees Wavedeck have been completed. A series of timber pedestrian bridges, new streetscapes, public realm and water’s edge promenades will follow or construction already started.

Right: Spadina WaveDeck


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Left: The design of the WaveDeck is inspired by the shorelines of Ontario’s great lakes and the Canadian cottage experience Upper right: The WaveDeck is an urban dock that is both a piece of art and a functional gathering space Lower right: The large swell features slender stainless steel railings that follow the undulations of the waves in the deck


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Upper left: The backless bench acts as an elegant barrier to the water while also providing seating for users of the space Lower left: The four WaveDecks explore variations of a simple articulation in the change in level between Queens Quay Boulevard and Lake Ontario Upper right: In-water LED lights have been installed to create a surreal experience by night Lower right: A curving 57-metre-long bench along the edge highlights the experience at Spadina


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Southeast False Creek Location: Vancouver, Canada Designer: PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc Photographer: PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc Completion date: 2008 Size: 320,000 sqm

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4 1. Community Gardens 2. West Pedestrian Promenade 3. Timber Boardwalk 4. Wetland Bridge

Award description: 2010 United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) – Lovable Communities Awards 2010 Canadian Institute of Planners – Award of Excellence in Neighbourhood Planning 2010 Canadian Urban Institute Brownie Award 2009 The Waterfront Centre – Honour Award 2009 CSLA Professional Awards – National Merit 2008 Design Exchange Awards – Award of Merit 2006 Royal Architecture Institute of Canada Urban Design Award – Honour Award

Waterfront Park Phase 1 represents the first phase of Southeast False Creek’s primary park and open space system and a 650-metre extension of Vancouver’s iconic seawall. Through walkways, bicycle paths, diverse seating and gathering areas the park provides a variety of vital green spaces that will reconnect people with the heritage-rich waterfront and offer unique experiences unlike any other in Vancouver. Social opportunities and cultural heritage were carefully integrated with the project’s ecological design features. The site’s past life as a shipyard, rail yard, and industrial centre are reflected in the design narrative, material selection, and construction detailing. People have been reintroduced to False Creek through a series of stone terraces and a tidal amphitheatre that lead to the water; all were constructed with locally-sourced granite. Naturally, an important part of this public space’s ecology is its ability to engage people and impart a sense of discovery and fun. Distinctive lounge chairs inspired by the wings of a seagull are enjoyed by people of all ages and have become one of the most recognisable features of the new Waterfront Park. Metal swivel chairs allow 360º views of the neighbourhood, downtown peninsula, and mountains. To complement the industrial materials in the park, native plantings punctuated by strips of ornamental grasses provide movement and texture to the landscape while reintroducing longabsent living materials to the site. Water front Park – Phase 1 completes the existing water front promenade and bike lanes found throughout the False Creek and Downtown Vancouver areas. This innovative project demonstrates that environmentally sensitive design is completely at home in a dense residential and commercial neighbourhood and shines even brighter when layered with historical references, social spaces, and recreational opportunities.

Right: Bridge to science world


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Left: Aerial view Upper right: Boardwalk Lower right: Swivel chair detail


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Left: Rainwater runnel Upper right: Boardwalk with bikes Lower right: Bench and paving detail


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Ballast Point Park Location: Sydney, Australia Designer: Mcgregor Coxall Photographer: Christian Borchert, Landscape Solutions Completion date: 2009 Site area: 25,000 sqm

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1. Wharf Road Amenities 2. Yeend Street Amenities 3. Belvedere 4. Tank 101 5. Menevia 6. Amphi Theatre 7. Grass Rings 8. Grass Ring Bund Wall Stair 9. Walkway below Grass Rings 10. Grasslands on Ridge 11. Ridge Terraces 12. The Point 13. Lower Grass Terraces 14. Grasslands Bund Wall Stair

Award description: 2010 International Waterfront Design Honour Award 2010 NSW National Trust Heritage Awards 2009 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects NSW Award 2009 BPN National Sustainability Award – Landscape Design 2009 Landscape Contractors Association Awards of Excellence

The design uses world leading sustainability principles to minimise the project’s carbon footprint and ecologically rehabilitate the site. The design reconciles the layers of history with forward looking new technologies to create a regionally significant urban park. The environmental approach is further underpinned by site-wide stormwater biofiltration, recycled materials, and wind turbines for onsite energy production. This design brings to life the principles established in the original master plan where there is a fine balance between what is removed and what is retained. The end product is a park that proudly communicates all the site’s past layers and human interventions in both, an innovative and informative manner. The design challenges our perception of materials and their use. Dominant new terrace walls sit atop the sandstone cliffs but these walls are not made of precious sandstone excavated from another site, rather from the rubble of our past. What once was called rubbish is now called beautiful. It is the new ballast. But it is more than this at play: it is the total composition of these recycled rubber filled cages, off set with concrete coping panels topped with fine grain railing, that allow these walls to sit confidently at the portal to the inner harbour. 8 vertical axis wind turbines and an extract from a Les Murray poem, carved into recycled tank panels, forms a sculptural re-interpretation of the site’s former largest storage tank. The wind turbines symbolise the future, a step away from our fossil fuelled past towards more sustainable renewable energy forms.

Right: The Point


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Left: Grass rings bund wall stair Upper right: Aerial view Lower right: Rubble filled wall detail


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Upper left: The lube ring-wind turbines Lower left: Boules play area and seating Upper right: Grasslands bund wall stair Lower right: The entry gate at Wharf Road


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Erie Basin Park Location: New York, USA Designer: Lee Weintraub Landscape Architecture LLC Photographer: Collin Cooke Studio Completion date: 2008 Site area: 26,305 sqm

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Lee Weintraub first came to Red Hook in 1987, and led a community design process that resulted in the design of the Coffey Street Pier and the development of Valentino Park. In 2003 they returned to Red Hook; an incredibly compelling place, filled with the memory of the waterfront as a place of commerce and production. Invited by the Ikea Corporation to design a new waterfront park, Erie Basin Park comprises approximately a mile of green park, esplanade and plaza spaces. Incorporated into the fabric of the park are remains of the site's former occupancy - the New York Ship Yard. Four inactive cranes will be stabilised and will serve as heroic markers and powerful reminders; remains of a dry dock are expressed in planting and in pavement. The park language interprets the industrial archeology of the ship yard into a series of linked moments that use landscape to tell a powerful story. The Client of Erie Basin Park was the Ikea Corporation. LWLA's responsibility was to help Ikea overcome the contentious relationships that they had encountered in attempting to build in the New York/ Westchester Region. With the client's counsel, the open space improvements including a 26,305-square-metre park and streetscape improvements were proposed. As the process developed, these were the lynchpin for the project's approval by the City and the adjacent community. LWLA used both it's design skills and it's community design skills to help facilitate the review and approvals process.

1. Entry Pergola 2. West Facing Lawn 3. The Mound 4. Picnic Lawn 5. Blue Light Bridge/Columbia Street Allee 6. Pier 4 7. South Esplanade 8. Bosque 9. Ferry Arrival Plaza 10. Salvage Gardens 11. Chock Garden 12. Dwight Street Allee 13. Graving Dock Ghost 14. West Esplanade

Award description: 2010 The Waterfront Centre: Annual Honour Award

Right: Sculptural kiosk and crane


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Left: Night shot of sculptural kiosk. Upper right: Bird’s eye view of bosque with honey locust trees. Lower right: View from esplanade looking toward Pier 4


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Upper left: Night view of ferry plaza Lower left: Winch and wave bench at Pier 2 Right: Seating cove along south esplanade


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Mangfallpark Rosenheim Location: Rosenheim, Germany Designer: A24 Landschaft Robel Swillus und Partner Photographer: Hanns Joosten Completion date: 2009 Site area: 130,000 sqm

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The new Mangfallpark connects Rosenheim with its rivers. The landscape boardwalk concept reinforces the unique character of the existing river landscapes and makes nature come alive for the visitors in a variety of ways. The 500 metres long system is made up of landscape boardwalks and eight bridges that connect the city with the Inn, Mangfall, Hammerbach and Mühlbach waterways. The boardwalk for ms the backbone of the new park and is multifunctional as an architecture – hybrid – it’s a ramp, bridge, promenade, viewpoint, seat and lounger all in one. Along the landscape boardwalk, broad steps can be sat on and luscious stream-side gardens invite you closer – to play in and linger by the water. The northernmost part of the boardwalk ends in an eight-metre-long protruding platform, which offers a wide view from the waterways all the way to the Chiemgau Alps. The Mühlbach Creek, which was previously built-over, has been uncovered and devised as an attractive green corridor from the city centre to the Inn. Between the future residential area and an existing power station, embankments confine the stream, whereby inlets create space for urban gardens along the waterside. In the form of a graceful bridge, the Nicklwiesen boardwalk crosses the Hammerbach, which has been transformed into a kayak route. The large Kiesinseln (gravel islands) affect the river flow while at the same time offering the visitors a place to sit and lie down. The recreational offerings are complemented by extensive playgrounds and sports areas.

1. Nicklwiesen Boardwalk 2. Mangfall Boardwalk 3. Promenade Board 4. Mühlbach Creek 5. Old Town Rosenheim

Right: Lookout point


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Left: Top view of the Mangfall Bridge Upper right: Terraced lawn elements at the lookout point Lower right: Entry area to the kayaking route at the Hammerbach creek


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Upper left: The uncovered M端hlbach designed as a city creek Lower left: Silhouette of the Mangfallbridge Upper right: Giant garden at the Hammerbach Creek Lower right: Gravel island at the Hammerbach Creek


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Sydney Pirrama Park Location: Sydney, Australia Designer: ASPECT Studios in collaboration with Hill Thalis Architecture+Urban Projects and CAB Consulting Photographer: Florian Groehn, Adrian Boddy Completion date: 2009 Site area: 18,000 sqm

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1. The Community Square 2. The Pole Garden 3. The Green and the Point 4. The Shoreline Promenade 5. The Grove

Award description: 2010 AILA NSW Awards – The Medal 2010 Walter Burley Griffin Award for Urban Design (Australian National Architecture Awards) 2010 Kidsafe National Public Playspaces Winner 2009 The Best Overall Project National Award, CCAA Bi-annual Public Domain Awards 2009 The Winner of the Precincts Category, CCAA Bi-annual Public Domain Awards 2007 AILA NSW Award for Excellence in Planning

ASPECT Studios was commissioned by the City of Sydney to design a new waterfront park on the former water police site in Pyrmont. The brief was to develop a master plan for an 18,000 square metres parcel of land on the Pyrmont peninsula into public parkland incorporating a significant children’s play environment. The New Park on the Former Water Police site required significant marine engineering at the harbour edge to create a sheltered bay and interpret the former shoreline. The public realm includes wharfs, promenades, squares, laneways, rain gardens and a cycle way which forms significant public fabric, linking the City to the Docklands. The bay creates passive recreation opportunities at the water’s edge and strengthens the site’s historic relationship to Sydney Harbour. A range of other “park rooms” are created which celebrate this unique location. World’s best practice initiatives were embedded into the master plan and rain gardens and bio-filtration trenches in the park capture and clean the water from the surrounding park storm water catchment. Street tree pits along Pirrama Road collect street runoff and 200,000 kilolitre water tanks have been proposed to ensure irrigation is maintained sustainably throughout the year. Add to that, the proposal of solar panels on the shade canopies to power park lighting and the master plan is an exemplar of best practice ESD. Social sustainability is promoted through the creation of a significant public space at the end of Harris Street which provides an opportunity for social interaction and public gathering.

Right: The playground shade canopy provides shelter to parents and children. Low walls andplanting form informal buffers and help contain the playground space


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Left: The central spine contains a boardwalk and existing concrete wall which formed part of the existing site. A planted swale captures and filters rain water for reuse Upper right: An aerial view showing the park’s context within Pyrmont and the city Lower right: A suite of custom furniture using concrete and recycled timber is featured throughout the site


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Left: The pole garden and existing concrete wharf structures have been retained which reflect upon the site’s post industrial history Upper right: An existing “whale bone” structure has been recited and reworked into an existing and playful entry element Lower right: Crossing points have been designed to allow access across the central swale


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Upper left: The Sheltered Bay changes the existing Harbour shoreline and allows unimpeded access to the water Lower left: The shoreline promenade reflects the pre-development shore edge and creates a strong foreshore link between Harris Street and Pirrama Park Upper right: An elegant kiosk structure and canopy/belvedere provide opportunities for gathering and reflection Lower right: Precast concrete steps from transitions through the planted swale from the shoreline promenade


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East Side Park Location: Berlin, Germany Designer: HÄFNER / JIMENEZ Büro für Landschaftsarchitektur Photographer: Hanns Joosten, HÄFNER / JIMENEZ Büro für Landschaftsarchitektur Completion date: 2009 Site area: 39,720 sqm

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1. Park along Spree 2. Brommy Bridge 3. East Side Park 4. Plaza 5. Spree River 6. Oberbaum Bridge 7. Mühlen Street

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The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 ushered in one of the busiest moments in the history of modern, urban architecture as innumerable buildings and open spaces became available for development throughout the former Communist East. One of the most famous of these spaces in Berlin is the East Side Gallery, a strip of the original wall that has been left as a monument to the division of the city where artists began painting a mural in the 1990s. As a meaningful and multilayered historical document, along with its impressive constructed appearance and artistic design, the East Side Gallery follows the entire length of open space along the Spree from the Mühlenspeicher at the Oberbaum Bridge to Stralau Square. It makes this strip of the Spree’s bank unique and momentous for both tourists and Berliners. The promenade on the south bank of the Spree creates an attractive open space for residents of the two boroughs bordering the site and visitors to the wall monument. The park is conceived in two parts with the East Side Gallery and the patrol path forming the historical monument while the new park opens toward the water. The expanse of the Spree, the liveliness of the water and the traffic of the ships offer important potential for a rich and multi-faceted downtown Berlin experience. The prominence of the water in the area surrounding the East Side Gallery is an important measure in creating quality city development.

Right: Park an der Spree – Promenade


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Upper: Park an der Spree – Panorama Lower left: View to the Oberbaum Bridge Lower right: Ramp


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Left: Overall view at dusk Upper right: Retaining wall as reating area Lower right: Sand playground


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General Maister Memorial Park Location: Ljubno ob Savinji, Slovenia Designer: Bruto Landscape Architecture & Design Photographer: Miran Kambic Completion date: 2007 Site area: 1,500 sqm

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1. Benches 2. Event Area 3. Sculptures 4. Grass Terrains 5. Rack Embankment 6. Access to the Water

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The memorial park is designed as abstract three-dimensional space, where the paths lead around geometrically cut grass ridges. It is a very abstract illustration of the mountain ridges of the northern border, for which Maister's soldiers fought in the year 1918. The main elements of the space articulation are the reinforced prefabricates of concrete, which are separating single triangular sur faces and framing the terrain like retaining walls. The multifunctional elevated retaining walls are also resting places view points, which include benches, litter bins and light elements. The whole embankment is secured against inundation and erosion with solid stone blocks, which protect the park like a stone shield. AB prefabricates divide rigid surfaces of the rock embankments. The grass terrain along the road ends in the retaining wall, which from the side view presents the abstract form of a mountain ridge and functions as part of the memorial place, as near by stands a sculpture which is composed of several stylised soldiers, and the statue of general Maister with a horse. The sculptures are made from welded metal rods. The abstract wire frame sculpture has the appearance of a sketch, at the same time it forms with the subtle accentuation of key lines of the torso real volume and fullness of the soldiers’ bodies The abstract design suggests strength of the existing value and sense of place in a highly artistic mode. The design makes use of art and sculpture to tell the story of the past. The materials and scale of the design gives a harmonious linkage to the landscape.

Right: The park is designed as abstract three-dimensional space


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Upper left: Panoramic view Lower left: Illuminated sculpture by night Upper right: Night view from the bank Lower right: Elevated retaining walls as resting places


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Sam Fiszman Park Location: Sydney, Australia Designer: 360° Landscape Architects, McGregor Westlake Architecture Photographer: Dianna Snape, Kyal Sheehan Completion date: 2007 Site area: 1,100 sqm

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The programme required that an existing above ground carpark be replaced with a pedestrian space that also linked to the beach and the coastal cliff walk. Focussing on edges and views, the design strategy was to work as much as possible with the topography and the layout of the existing rock shelves and floaters. The level changes were to be met by a series of terraces, steps, seats and walls to afford passage down the site and to create a range of interlocking spaces from which to enjoy the panoramic views. Each of the terraces contains planting beds that are designed as bio-retention basins, capturing diverted stormwater that would otherwise cascade off the cliffs into the ocean. The terraces are planted with endemic plants that create a soft compliment to the hardscape of concrete and sandstone. At the top of the site, 2 room-like lookouts crown the rock floaters, like concrete tiaras, one orientated towards the horizon, the other to the southern headland of Bondi Beach and the coastline beyond. Each is richly lined with glazed bricks, which capture and condense the blue of the view. The two lookouts, accompanied by a circular, raised lawn are little monuments to the view recalling the military architectures scattered along Sydney’s ocean edges. The entry to the park is marked by a long walled element, containing the park title. On the lee side is a long seat that provides a pointer back to Bondi Beach and the city. Together, the lookouts and seat are organised as a triptych of tighter spaces, providing shelter from the ocean winds.

1. Raised Lawn and Seating Edge 2. Look-out Point/Standstone Wall 3. Look-out Point 4. Native Ground Cover

Award description: 2010 The AILA NSW Award for Excellence in Landscape Architecture 2008 Civil Contractors NSW Earth Award

Right: South coast view showing balconies and lower site


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Upper: View across Sam Fiszman Park at dusk Lower left: Outlook to Southern Headland Lower right: Terraced planters in simple material palette


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Upper left: Concrete to sandstone outcrop Lower left: Seating Wall and lookout point Upper right: Outlook to Pacific Ocean Lower right: Park name imprinted in concrete wall


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Rhine Park, Duisburg Location: Duisburg, Germany Designer: Atelier Loidl Photographer: Phillipp Obkircher Completion date: 2009 Site area: 400,000 sqm

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The subsequent use of the Thyssen-Krupp steel mill in DuisburgHochfeld created the opportunity to turn the property into a lively leisure park on the river, thus strengthening Duisburg’s profile as a city on the Rhine. The “Rhine Park” leads the city to the river and also closes an important gap in the city planning concept of a “Green Ring”. The topography of the park landscape supports the orientation of the main paths to the future site of the promenade along the Rhine. The meadows of the park are designed as an open, lightly contoured landscape. The meadows rise from the level of the park as "floes" that ascend gently up to the station and that continue beyond the tracks. As a result, the tracks dive into the new terrain model. If the topographic relationships (incisions, prominences) between the park and the Rhine are examined, a type of folded landscape can be seen in which the tracks (which were intrusive until now) can be viewed as the comforting link in the search for the horizontal line. The folds, i.e. the interplay of varying high and low places, let a number of different spaces and utilisations develop. All the design approaches serve to strengthen the perceptibility and experience of the river landscape.

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1. New District 2. River Meadows 3. Bird Pine Groves 4. Former Sintering Walls 5. Skate Park 6. Old Water Tower 7. Conference Centre 8. Beach Balcony 9. River Café 10. River Rhine 11. Marina 12. Hotel

Right: Meadows ascending from the ground level of the park


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Upper left: Topography as means of orientation Lower left: Fragments of the old steel mill are integrated as play – and sports areas into the new park Upper right: Orienting the city towards the waterfront of the Rhine Lower right: The Rhine park is part of the "green ring" of Duisburg


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Upper left: "Floes" ascending from the ground level of the park creating various spaces and connecting to the Rhine river Lower left: Integrating playgrounds into the park Upper right: Synthesis of old and new Lower right: Visual relationships are created through axes


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Barcelos Fluvial Park Location: Barcelos, Portugal Designer: PROAP Landscape Architecture Photographer: Diogo Bento Completion date: 2009 Site area: 73,380 sqm

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1. Amphitheatre 2. Grassed Platforms 3. River 4. Water Canal

The proposal is characterised by the redefinition of the main connection routes with the city, through the integration of adjacent buildings and the definition of a cycle/pedestrian path along the River. Due to the land’s major level variation, the proposal design is based on the definition of platforms and stairs that adjoin, in a smooth and natural, the land’s slope while defining visual directions and paths of gradual approach to the water level. The limited range of materials used, concrete that defines benches and paths edges, highlights the green element and unifies the entire space while enabling the continuity of the design system and of a low maintenance regime. The intervention area is a nuclear area, very important for the implementation of a new and desired relation between the city and the river. The construction of a boardwalk along the river will generate extensions upstream and downstream and enunciates the resumption of the connection to the opposite shore and to the fluvial beach on the south. The proposal sets a number of essential goals, in search of a complete answer to the questions posed by the intervention objectives: to establish the necessary formal and function unification of the space, and its unity with the city and the river, to recover the pre-existent valuable elements by dignifying them, to implement the correct management of the vegetative cover through the clarification of the covering typologies related to certain situations-type and precise objectives, simplifying the maintenance processes, thus enabling the continuity of the projected system.

Right: General view of the park


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Upper left: Access to the amphitheatre Lower left: Overview of the topographical elements Upper right: Overview of the amphitheatre Lower right: Topographical elements as an amphitheatre


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Appel Park Location: Queensland, Australia Designer: PLACE Design Group Photographer: Aperture Photography Completion date: 2007 Site area: 5,750 sqm

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Just across the road from Circle on Cavill apartment, one will find the Appel Park overlooking the Nerang River. This park is frequented by tour boats taking people onto the Gold Coast waterways for the day or venturing out into open waters in winter/spring for the annual whale migration. It is also the perfect place to relax and soak up the sun's warm rays. A key objective in the design was to provide a strong visual and pedestrian link from the Nerang River through to Surfers Paradise Boulevard. To support this connection to Circle on Cavill, the designers have re-designed and landscaped Appel Park on the riverfront. As part of the Circle on Cavill development, our client rejuvenated Appel Park creating a strong physical and visual connection between the river and the city centre. The resulting urban space incorporates giant public artwork that represents the timber logs that were floated down the river from Nerang and upstream areas in the early days of settlement.

1. River Link Access Path 2. Toilet Block 3. River Lookouts 4. Bus Shelter 5. Lawn 6. Cedar Cutter Memorial

Right: Giant public artwork represents the timber logs


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Left: Featured lighting continues the public space lighting from Circle on Cavill and highlights the public art elements Upper right: Elevated seating decks reinforce the park geometry Lower right: Public artwork detail


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Left: Lighting has been incorporated as a key design consideration in this 24 hour public space Upper right: A pavement and lawn channel aligns with the Broadwater boating channel Lower right: Custom designed public space lighting links Appel Park to Circle on Cavill


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Sandgrund Park Location: Karlstad, Sweden Designer: Thorbjörn Andersson Landscape Architect Photographer: Åke E:son Lindman, Kasper Dudzik, Johan Krikström Completion date: 2010 Site area: 40,000 sqm

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The Sandgrund Park in Karlstad, Sweden, has undergone a major change from being an unused peninsula of sand, transforming into an attractive park in the middle of the city. The aim of the project has been to create a certain place from which to enjoy the grandeur of the surrounding landscape. The new park now offers lush valleys, viewpoints and extensive boardwalks by the river. At the point where the Klar river splits, a 400-metre long peninsula forms what from the air looks like a bird’s pointed beak. The presence of water, the dramatic end point and the urban setting were the most obvious features here. The designers’ concept became to amplify those same qualities for the future park. Along the river's edge, the proximity to the water was further stressed through a system of boardwalks on the western shore, facing the sunset. The very end was given a sharper profile by adding a 40-metre long viewing platform. The grounds were shaped as undulating terrain with five parallel ridges, about 100 metres long. The ridges were designed to offer green viewpoints along their crests, and contained valleys in between. Each other valley was designed to be a distinct plant habitat, a beech forest, a magnolia grove, a fern valley. The others were made into activity areas for rest and play, formed by grass and low granite steps marking the contour lines.

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1. Viewing Platform 2. Jetties with Boat Mooring 3. Riverside Walk, East 4. Riverside Walk, West 5. The Ridges with Granite Steps 6. Reedbed Park 7. Event Location 8. Activity Space 9. Sandy Beach 10. Sunset Boardwalk

Award description: Best Park of 2010 by Associates of Architects of Sweden

Right: On the west side, a series of boardwalks form a sunset promenade at the parks edge


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Left: High attention has been put on details in planting and construction design Upper right: The park is designed as a series of five valleys. The so-called activity valley has seating of granite curbs Lower right: The park is centrally located in the city of Karlstad, Sweden


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Upper left: The valleys lead the visitor to the edges of the peninsula with their wooden decks Lower left: The sun decks create terraces stepping down to the water Upper right: Trees of Silver Willow planted in one of the decks to give shade and character Lower right: Three of the valleys are plant habitats, as for instance this Firn valley


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Volmepark Hagen Location: Hagen, Germany Designer: Büro Drecker, Architect E.Stückemann Photographer: Peter Drecker Completion date: 2008 Site area: 11,000 sqm

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The River Volme is the main body of flowing water that crosses the City of Hagen. The development of a continuous green corridor along the River Volme is essential to the town-planning. The associated park “Volmepark” is part of this green corridor and is located between two existing bridge constructions in north-south alignment. Concerning the green corridor structure, the final project design aims at a longitudinal alignment according to the river’s form. A so-called “sur-terrain” gives the opportunity to linger above the surface of the river Volme. The construction almost levitates and corresponds to the planned perron placed on the opposite bank. The archaic character of the structures in combination with the invisibility of the supporting constructions transforms the ordinary waterfront into a poetic stage over water. The esplanades and the removal of groves close to the wall allow the visitor a direct contact to the brink of the river. The “sur-terrain” as well as the perron in combination with the esplanades unite different elements of the area and give people opportunities to interact with the river. In the southern sunbathing area steps are formed in the grass in a longitudinal alignment to sustain the topography of the river ashore and even the difference in altitude between the river and the street. The playing area north of the River Volme will be rearranged. Several elements and amply sandpit areas will offer playing opportunities to children of different stages of life.

1. Skate Park 2. Playing Field 3. Esplanade 4. Perron 5. Playground with Rope Garden 6. Volme River 7. Sur-terrain 8. Playground 9. Sunbathing Area with Concrete Steps 10. Floristic Plant Association

Right: Sur-terrain


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Left: Esplanade Upper right: Aerial view Lower right: Rope garden


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Left: Statue Upper right: Top view of the sur-terrain Lower right: Band of perennials


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Upper left: Sunbathing area with concrete stairs Lower left: Sur-terrain details Upper right: Long esplanade Lower right: Playground in rope garden


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Location: New York, USA Designer: Dattner Architects, MKW + Associates, LLC. Photographer: Bruce Katz, Jonnu Singleton, Luca Vignelli, MKW + Associates, LLC. Completion date: 2005 Site area: 10,522 sqm

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Clinton Cove Park, Segment 7, Hudson River Park

Clinton Cove Park represents the first constructed phase of Hudson River Park Segment 7 and is the northern terminus of the overall park. The "cove" between existing Piers 94 and 97 provides fairly calm water, so the incorporation of a public boathouse and launching ramp was ideally sited at the former Pier 96 location. It has been designed to incorporate kayak storage and launching and its east and west facades feature roll-up doors that provide open views to the Hudson along the view corridor of the 56th Street. The large lawn bowl was created by building a planted berm along Route 9A, shielding the park from the sights and sounds of the road and orienting the view towards the Hudson. This raised earthwork also allowed plantings to easily occur over the concrete remains of a former concrete manufacturing facility, without those remnants having to be removed. Historic granite bulkhead coping stones salvaged from other areas of the park provide informal seating elements within the lawn. Broad, sweeping steps connect the raised berm pathway to the esplanade and the Pier 96 Boathouse Plaza, the setting for the public art piece developed for this park, Private Passage by Malcolm Cochran. Canopy trees provide shade and ornamental trees provide seasonal colours and scale as shrubs and perennials. Mounds of ornamental grasses retain steeper portions of the berm and add movement to the park experience as breezes blow along the Hudson.

1 1. South Entry 2. Sloped Lawn Bowl 3. Pier 95 Get-Down & Shade Structures 4. Shaded Seating Areas 5. Esplanade 6. Public Art 7. Pier 96 Boat House 8. Kayak Launching Platform 9. Bow Notch

Right: A public art piece occupies the broadened esplanade near the Pier 96 boathouse Š MKW Associates


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Left: The pier and “get-down” at Pier 95 allow the park visitor to shift from the esplanade to a vantage point above and closer to the river. Both steps and a serpentine ramp provide access © Bruce Katz 2007 Upper right: Aerial view of the park and esplanade and public art piece © Luca Vignelli Lower right: The esplanade repeats the park-wide material of granite and bluestone pavement and stainless steel bulkhead railings © Jonnu Singleton


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Upper left: Aerial view of Pier 95, looking southwest © Luca Vignelli Lower left: Pier 95 engages park visitors on multiple levels © Luca Vignelli Upper right: Aerial view of the park looking southwest, just after completion © Luca Vignelli Lower right: The open lawn bowl provides numerous opportunities for relaxing and enjoying views to the water © Jonnu Singleton


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Riverside Park South Location: New York, USA Designer: Thomas Balsley Associates Photographer: Thomas Balsley Associates, David Quinones, Betsy Pinover Schiff Completion date: 2010 Site area: 93,078 sqm

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1. Pedestrian Entry Plaza 2. Pedestrian Path 3. Bicycle Path 4. Existing Transfer Bridge 5. Amphitheatre 6. Terraced Park Overlooks and Promenades 7. Earth Promontory and Hudson River Prospect 8. NYCDPR Maintenance & Storage Facility 9. Natural Landscape Area 10. Boardwalk Through Natural Landscape Area 11. Gardens 12. Northern Children’s Play Area 13. Southern Children’s Play Area 14. Restaurant Concession

Award description: NYASLA – Honour Award

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The master plan called for the relocation of an overhead highway into a tunnel beneath the new park and extended from the 59 th Street to the 73rd Street at the Olmsted Riverside Park. The process involved working with local and state government agencies, community groups, stakeholders and the client to create a vibrant new public space that reintroduced the community to the water’ s edge and responded to the unique industrial history and riparian ecology of the site. The new park, called Riverside Park South, features a series of special architectural park structures and landscape spaces that vary in scale and highlight the experiential qualities of the park. Terraces, expansive lawns, architectural shade structures, recreation areas, lawn mounds, and intimate tree groves create viewing areas, spaces for play, that draw one to the river’s edge. A circulation system of esplanades, boardwalks, footpaths, and bike paths tie the individual places together. Overlooks at each historic pier piling field, terraced walls and a two hundred and fifty metre long pier take visitors out to and across the water. A new serpentine pedestrian bridge sweeps out across the water and encircles a reconstructed wetland planted with native grasses. The design is guided by site remediation and social and environmental sustainability principles.

Right: Grasslands, cove, and the southern lawn plaza are punctuated with interpretive overlooks at the historic pier landings


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Upper left: Terrace with "train shed" shelters that overlook the historic pier pilings Lower left: A train shed inspired structure shelters and custom lounge chairs on the grassland terrace Upper right: Removed from the main esplanade, a row of shade shelters provide comfortable and intimate moments of river views Lower right: Off the beaten path, timber seats offer extraordinary intimacy with the river and its environment


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Upper left: Pedestrian walkway crosses cove heading south Lower left: Custom deck chairs overlook the river just past the tot play lawn Upper right: Double-width high-backed timber lounge chairs designed to capture the breathtaking views in a comfortable incline Lower right: Distinctive seating defines spaces


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Sugar Beach L o c a t i o n : To ro n t o , C a n a d a D e s i g n e r : C l a u d e C o r m i e r A s s o c i a t e s Photographer: Waterfront Toronto & Claude Cormier Associates Completion date: 2010 Site area: 8,500 sqm

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1. Urban Beach 2. Promenade 3. Plaza Concert Space 4. Chorus Concert Stage 5. Interactive Fountain 6. Candy-Striped Bedrock 7. Temporary Berm over Future Development Parcel 8. North Plaza (Proposed)

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Sugar Beach takes its queue from adjacent Redpath Sugar Factory, source of the noteworthy sugar spray frequently carried by westerly breezes onto the site. Sweetness is here manifested through candy-coloured umbrellas across a sandy wedge of beach, and bedrock outcrops patterned after rock candy. Intergrating the future Waterfront Promenade and a plaza for programmed and unprogrammed events, the design for Sugar Beach playfully adopts some of the most enduring elements from Toronto's emerging landscape identity - its beaches, tree and water - embedding them into the urban horizon with a trace mood of the city's industrial past. Canada’s Sugar Beach, whose design includes a plaza, urban beach and tree-lined promenade, is like three parks in one. The park’s engaging plaza space offers a dynamic space for public events. A large candy-striped granite rock outcropping and three grass mounds create a colourful amphitheatre-style space with unique vantage points for larger events. The spaces between the mounds result in a natural performance space for smaller events. At the beach, white Muskoka-style chairs under playful pink umbrellas line the water’s edge giving people a place to while away the afternoon. A dynamic water feature embedded in a granite maple leaf beside the beach makes cooling off fun for adults and children. Between the plaza and the beach, people will stroll through the park along a promenade with granite and tumbled concrete cobblestones in a maple leaf mosaic pattern. Lined with mature maple trees, the promenade offers a shaded route to the water's edge giving the public ample opportunity along the way to sit and enjoy views to the lake, beach or plaza. At the lake, the park's promenade connects seamlessly to East Bayfront’s continuous kilometre-long water’s edge promenade and boardwalk.

Right: Panoramic view of Sugar Beach


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Left: Tree-lined promenade Upper right: Interactive water features Lower right: Candy-coloured umbrellas


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Upper left: White Muskoka-style chairs under playful pink umbrellas line the water’s edge giving people a place to while away the afternoon Lower left: A dynamic water feature embedded in a granite maple leaf Upper right: A large candy-striped granite rock outcropping and three grass mounds create a colourful amphitheatre-style space Lower right: white Muskoka-style chairs under playful pink umbrellas


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HtO Location: Toronto, Canada Designer: Janet Rosenberg + Associates, Claude Cormier Associates, Hariri Pontarini Architects Photographer: Jan Becker, Neil Fox Completion date: 2007 Site area: 24,281 sqm

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1. Metropolitan Toronto Condominium 2. HtO Park West 3. Queens Quay West 4. HtO Park East 5. Lake Ontario 6. Fire Station 7. Urban Beach 8. Urban Dunes

Award description: 2009 ASLA Honour Award 2008 CSLA Regional Honour Award 2007 Gold Award, Design Exchange

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HtO, an urban beach along Toronto’s waterfront, is not only an adored, seasonally adaptive public space where people of all ages can spend extended time by the water away from downtown commotion, but it is also a catalyst for the city’s future waterfront development, having set high design standards. Transformed from an abandoned industrial site, the park is a welcoming, branded destination that effectively draws visitors to the waterfront and animates it with colour and activity. As a flexible public space that allows for passive and active uses and as a one-of-a-kind, iconic destination, HtO, as soon as it opened, became highly popular. Nearby residents spend the day sun tanning on the beach; strolling tourists admire the site, which offers majestic views of the Toronto skyline and the lake. The topography of HtO allows visitors to go uphill through a series of green berms as they enter the park and then they descend down towards the beach and the lake, feeling as though the city and the elevated expressway are left behind. But the design of the park had many challenges, the biggest of all being environmental concerns. HtO sits on a site with history and a legacy of environmental damage. The design had to address issues of soil contamination and other remnants of industrial progress. Contaminated soils were capped and on-site storm water management systems were put in place such as pervious surfaces that infiltrate water and gradually dispersing infiltration pits. In addition, all the water that is used for irrigation is lake water. To revive some of the natural ecologies in the lake, fish habitats were built along the edge of the park and in the slip using recycled concrete from the site and rip-rap.

Right: A boardwalk extends along the edge of the park


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Upper left: HtO is dramatically lit up at night Lower left: Aerial view of HtO Upper right: The name HtO is a branding tactic, created to give identity to the park Lower right: HtO offers panoramic views of Lake Ontario


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Upper: Panoramic view of HtO Lower left: Night view of the entrance Lower right: Families spend time together at HtO, picnicking


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Location: Queensland, Australia Designer: Mark Fuller, Aecom Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones Completion date: 2009 Site area: 3,486 sqm

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Southport Broadwater Parklands

The Southport Broadwater Parklands has realised its vision of becoming an iconic gateway for the Gold Coast and a popular destination, where events, history and water combine to create an active green waterfront. The design draws on natural and urban cues, creating a place that is both legible and functional, while being layered in the sculptural and poetic. Bold geometric forms frame up major gathering spaces and circulation routes, while dunal landforms and planting enclose more intimate spaces. The re-introduction of long forgotten historical functions and structured community activity spaces, including pier, memorial, stage and bathing boxes now provide an adaptable framework to encourage new uses. A strong desire to reflect the distinct "Gold Coast Lifestyle" and emotive experience of the beach is referenced through striped beach towel paving patterns, fun, colourful beachstyle furniture, and "the Rockpools" children’s water play precinct. However, the key underlying initiative that binds together these social, cultural, historical and physical aspects of the site is clearly the projects’ bold and visionary response to the natural environment and the preservation of the Broadwater. By layering green technologies such as water cleansing and harvesting, solar energy production, recycled materials, use of non-potable water sources and preservation of sand dunes, AECOM has created a truly integrated open space that has set a new benchmark for the design of public open spaces and will be a legacy for generations to come.

1. Southern Park Entry 2. BBQ Shelter and Play Equipment 3. Central Events Lawn 4. Secondary Central Event Lawn 5. Event Deck 6. Outdoor Cinema Structure 7. Water Garden 8. Solar Array 9. Nerang Street Pier 10. Water Play Area

Award description: 2010 Australian Institute of Architects, State Commendation, Urban Design 2010 Australian Institute of Architects, Regional Commendation, Urban Design 2009 Planning Award in Landscape Architecture, Australian Institute of Landscape Architecture (AILA) Queensland

Right: The parklands provide opportunities for shaded seating with open water views


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Upper left: Water sensitive urban design – wetlands design to capture and filter storm water runoff from roads and urban surfaces before it enters the Broadwater Lower left: Natural materials has been used where possible such as timber for the cross wetland boardwalk Upper right: Expansive parkland paths have been designed to accommodate a mix of uses Lower right: The use of solar panels reflect the parklands’ commitment to sustainability


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Upper left: Bio-filtration garden beds have been integrated into the main entrance path making sustainable processes visible to all parkland users Lower left: Water play provides opportunity for passive and active recreation for age groups Upper right: Public access water play is a key element to the parkland design Lower right: Water invigorates children’s play


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Los Angeles Waterfront Location: San Pedro, USA Designer: AECOM Photographer: AECOM Completion date: Ongoing Site area: 1,618,743 sqm

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1. Cruise Ship Promenade 2. Gateway Fountain 3. Harbour Boulevard 4. Cabrillo Beach

Award description: 2010 Honor Award, American Society of Landscape Architects, Northern California Chapter 2010 Los Angeles Architectural Award, Los Angeles Business Council 2009 Honor Award, Waterfront Centre

The Los Angeles Waterfront project is a long-term plan to transform the industrial Port of Los Angeles property along a 7-mile stretch of waterfront to include promenades, parks, retail and commercial spaces. Designed to reconnect the community with its waterfront, improve environmental quality, create new economic opportunities, and triple the amount of San Pedro’s existing open space, the development has already dramatically changed the appearance of the Port’s working waterfront and spawned new development. Built portions of the San Pedro Waterfront Gateway Project include the Cruise Ship Promenade, Gateway Plaza, the Harbour Boulevard Parkway and the Fanfare Fountain. The one-mile promenade is dotted with plazas, event spaces, fountains and art, and represents the first phase of realisation of a long-awaited community vision to recapture an industrial waterfront for public access and use. It has been a catalyst for urban revitalisation and created momentum for on-going phases of redevelopment. Connecting the promenade with the Gateway Plaza, the 21-metre-wide Harbour Boulevard Parkway is designed to accommodate pedestrians and bike riders, and includes seating and gathering spaces with historic interpretive elements. The Gateway Plaza is located at the entrance of the Los Angeles World Cruise Centre and the welcoming station of the Waterfront Red Car Line. The Fanfare Fountain, located in the heart of the Plaza, is a choreographed exhibit of water and lights. The Plaza creates a civic gathering place, surrounded by significant icons such as the Vincent Thomas Bridge and the visual attractions of Cruise Ships and cranes.

Right: The promenade creates a shady link to downtown San Pedro. A coloured asphalt Class 1 bike trail, custom lighting and furniture were designed in collaboration with the community


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Upper left: This catalyst project will remake seven miles of industrial Port of Los Angeles property, photographed here prior to development. Acres of asphalt will be replaced with public amenities, tripling the amount of open space on the site Lower left: An iconic arc of Canary Island Palms frames a new gateway to San Pedro’s waterfront Upper right: A granite band Story Rope extends the length of the promenade. Thirteen stories of San Pedro’s history are engraved in gold granite medallions with illuminated blue terrazzo compass-rose medallions that serve as trail markers and give directional reference Lower right: The promenade provides a venue for new community attractions and events, creating a spectacular new context for experiencing the working harbour


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Upper left: LED lighting effect is meant to create a festive contrast with the industrial background Lower left: The outward focus of the design accentuates the richness of experience without competing with the majesty of scale of the surrounding port, and provides the community’s number one preferred activity on the promenade: “viewing the working harbour” Upper right: A major water feature anchors the Gateway Plaza, celebrating the revitalisation of San Pedro Lower right: Wooden deck overlooks have moveable “deck chairs” to create a new context for viewing the working harbour through ornamental grasses that allude to the site’s natural history as a tidal marshland


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Ipswich River Heart Parklands Location: Queensland, Australia Designer: Mark Fuller, Aecom Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones Completion date: 2007 Site area: 18,000 sqm

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1. Park Entry Signage 2. Reconfigured Carpark 3. Vehicle Drop Off and Toilets 4. Informal Grassed Terraces 5. Ramp to Water Edge 6. Water Plaza 7. Jetty 8. Interactive Cascading Water Feature 9. Wetland Water Feature 10. Boardwalk along River Edge

Award description: 2008 AILA National Landscape Architecture Awards, Award for Design 2008 Illuminating Engineering Society of Australia and New Zealand National Awards, Award of Excellence 2007 AILA Queensland State Awards Commendation Award for Design in Landscape Architecture

Sensitivity and understanding of the Bremer River’s significance to Ipswich and its residents enabled the design team to transform a once neglected river edge into the heart of the city. As lead design consultants for the project, Aecom recognised and harnessed the social and geographic importance of the Bremer River to revitalise it from an underutilised and unsightly urban river precinct into a vibrant, multi-use public space. Key features of the parklands include: • Terraces, boardwalks, jetties and walkways through a replanted and rejuvenated river’s edge; • Collapsible and removable handrails for sections of boardwalk to reduce damage to structures caused in the event of flooding; • New shelters, picnic facilities, toilets and seating; • A 180 square metres water feature, which operates on recycled water; • A small-scale wetland to encourage localised opportunities, such as fauna access to freshwater; • Simple, robust and cost effective historical interpretative panels and directional signage; and • Open and legible landscape design, thoughtful design lighting and the inclusion of video surveillance to improve access and safety. The true test of public domain is the public’s enjoyment of a space, and since its opening in 2007, the Parkland has been enthusiastically embraced by all sections of the community for its richness, quality and sense of place. The resurrection of this portion of the river has reinvigorated people’s use and expectations of their public domain as a place where they can feel safe, comfortable, accessible to everyone and therefore highly valued.

Right: Site contours are the inspiration to the design of the waterfall


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Upper left: Creative interpretive and wayfinding signage is a key design element of the parkland Lower left: Elevated boardwalks provide greater site wide usage and views of surrounding landscapes Upper right: Filtered river water feeds the waterfall as a sustainable element of the parklands design Lower right: Shade structure provide rest and gathering areas of a more intimate scale within the parkland


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Upper left: Entry signage for parkland was designed to activate creative play and investigation throughout the park Lower left: Strong creative design has led to many successful outcomes for structures throughout the parkland Upper right: Local artist were engaged to install site specific artworks throughout the parkland Lower right: A strong focus of the design was to bring people closer to the waters of the Bremer River


INDEX

DAOUST LESTAGE Inc.

OKRA

PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc.

Thomas Balsley Associates

Email: info@daoustlestage.com

Email: mail@okra.nl

Email: bchan@pwlpartnership.com

Email: info@tbany.com

Tonkin Liu

Arkitekt Kristine Jensens Tegnestue

McGregor Coxall

Claude Cormier Associates

Email: mail@tonkinliu.co.uk

Email: kj@kristinejensen.dk

Email: christian.borchert@mcgregorcoxall.com

Email: info@claudecormier.com

PLACE Design Group

Stoss Landscape Urbanism

Lee Weintraub Landscape Architecture LLC

Janet Rosenberg + Associates

Email: brisbane@placedesigngroup.com

Email: admin@stoss.net

Email: l.weintraub@lwlallc.com

Email: office@jrala.ca

Guallart Architects

Thorbjörn Andersson

A24 Landschaft Robel Swillus und Partner

Aecom

Email: infoguallart@gmail.com

Email: thorbjorn.andersson@sweco.se

Email: post@a24-landschaft.de

Email: info@aecom.com

HÄFNER / JIMENEZ Büro für Landschaftsarchitektur

GFSL Clausen+Scheil, Landscape Architects

Bruto Landscape Architecture

Email: info@gfsl.de

Email: info@bruto.si

Katerina Tsigarida Architects

360° Landscape Architects

Email: contact@tsigarida.gr

Email: Kajsa@360.net.au

C. F. Møller Architects

McGregor Westlake Architecture

Email: cfmoller@cfmoller.com

Email: peter@mwarchitects.com.au

Henningsen Landschaftsarchitekten BDLA Berlin

Atelier Loidl

Email: info@henningsen-berlin.de

Email: office@atelier-loidl.de

BHF-LandscapeArchitects

PROAP Landscape Architecture

Email: Bendfeldt@bhf-ki.de

Email: proap@proap.pt

Mayslits Kassif Architects

Büro Drecker

Email: mk@mkarchitects.com

Email: markus.schmidt@drecker.de

West 8

MKW + Associates, LLC.

Email: pr@west8.com

Email: info@mkwla.com

Email: info@haefner-jimenez.de

Sasaki Associates Email: info@sasaki.com

Bjørbekk & Lindheim Email: post@blark.no

EARTHSCAPE Email: info@earthscape.co.jp

Latz + Partner Email: post@latzundpartner.de

3LHD Email: info@3lhd.com

ASPECT Studios Email: aspectsydney@aspect.net.au


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