Page 140

276~277

1

3 1. The compact six-storey rectangular volume dramatically embedded in the steep slope 2. Fritted, clear and red glass and a lattice of mullions animating the north-facing window on the campus 3. A bridge to adjacent buildings and a lower-level garden entrance supporting connections from the upper levels of McMicken Commons to the lower ravine area of the campus

building proved to be an effective solution. On east, west and south sides, a rose-coloured Alabama limestone veneer encloses the dense and compact form and relates to the masonry ensemble of nearby buildings. On the south faรงade, sunscreen/light shelves introduce reflected light deep into the interior workspaces while shielding ribbon windows from direct sunlight. By contrast, the north faรงade, which overlooks the commons, takes advantage of its orientation and the generous exterior space to provide maximum daylight in a continuous glazed wall, returning at both corners. Trellis-like framing gives alternating clear, fritted, and translucent glass panels an overall texture and continuity. The only elements to punctuate the taut volume are the entry vestibules at each of three lower levels, marked by red metal canopies, panels, or fritted glass. Interior materials reflect the enclosure strategy. The rear wall of the atrium is a red aniline-dyed plywood, providing a solid backdrop for the light wood railings and conference room screen that curves into the atrium. Flooring in the atrium and for stair is a Rosa Verona marble corresponding to the Carnelian granite on the exterior site steps. Seen across the commons at night, the building glows with light, colour and activity.

2

Awards: Boston Society of Architects, Honour Award, 2007 AIA New England Merit Award, 2006

University Architecture  

U N IV E R S IT Y A R C H IT E C T U R E DESIGN MEDIA PUBLISHING LIMITED DESIGN MEDIA PUBLISHING LIMITED UNIVERSITY ARCHITECTURE DESIGN MEDI...

Advertisement