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Architecture Department Studio Building Woodbury University Architect: Mark W. Rios, Robert G. Hale, Frank Clementi & Jennifer Charles / Rios Clementi Hale Studios Location: Burbank, California, USA Completion: 2007 GFA: 1,800 m2 Photography: Tom Bonner

South elevation

Woodbury University required a new studio building to complete the existing architecture department, comprising five one-storey buildings. Rios Clementi Hale Studios designed the new two-storey studio building to house architectural studios, critique spaces, support spaces and a double-height multi-purpose room.

North elevation

East elevation

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While the south façade creates a buffer zone, the north façade opens the studio building to the existing department complex and provides a porous edge to a courtyard formed by the existing studio building to the north. To connect the new structure to the existing complex, the north façade employs smallerscale layering of vertical elements. The block pattern consists of vertical stripes with alternating neutral colours. The guardrails at the balcony and open stairs mimic the pattern with vertical wood polymer pickets fastened to steel supports. These exterior circulation balconies and open stairs also animate the space.

West elevation

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As the most visible building on the campus perimeter, the studio building mediates between the public view and private use of the campus. The south façade is a horizontal, large-scale gesture to passing motorists that curves and wraps around the building. Varying patterns of concrete masonry units (CMU) compose this prominent wall. The stacked blocks created a large-scale, changing pattern of subtle shadings as the sunlight moves across the south façade during the daytime. Rios Clementi Hale Studios maintains continuity with the campus by using block colors and horizontal banding sympathetic to brick colors and patterning on existing buildings. Functionally, the south façade filters sunlight and traffic sounds fromed the adjacent city streets and freeways.

1. Existing studios & classroom 2. Existing gallery, classrooms, computer lab & lavatory 3. Existing shop & classrooms 4. Existing lavatory 5. Existing studios 6. Studios 7. Electrical 8. Storage 9. Exhibit space

Exposed construction and mechanical components of the building serve as teaching tools for the architecture students and include structural steel beams that extend from the studios to hold the cantilevered balcony and roof, metal decking that forms the structural floor and roof, hanging wire management ladders for electrical and data cable routing, roof drain pipes metal ducting and DuctSox for the HVAC system, sprinkler pipes, and pendant lighting. Lighting and mechanical systems adhere to the California Energy Code’s Title 24 standards for energy efficiency, as required by the code.

Site plan & Ground floor plan

Where possible, sustainable interior materials are specified, including ceramic tile made of recycled clay, glass and grinding paste; pressed paper and resin countertops and backsplashes; and recycled cotton acoustical insulation. In the restrooms, partitions were made from recycled materials and organic wood fibers, and dual-flushing toilets are located in each stall. The KONE EcoSpace elevator, with its hoisting machine attached to the guide rail, consumes approximately half the energy of conventional traction machines and approximately one-third of the energy of hydraulic machines. It requires no oil,

1. University entrance with signage, where the studio building is the most visible building on the campus perimeter. 2. Façade detail, with varying patterns of concrete masonry units (CMU) 3. The south façade as a horizontal, large-scale gesture to passing motorists

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University Architecture  
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