Page 1

C

C

M

M

Y

Y

CM

MC

MY

YM

CY

YC

CMY

YMC

K

K

zodia(Space).pdf

9/9/10

2:57:24 PM

zodia(Space).pdf

9/9/10

2:57:24 PM

00-cover_r1.indd 1

10/12/10 1:23:12 PM


2 space

空 間

space 

2

series

designzens


introduction This issue of Space focuses on all kinds of restaurants from different parts of the world. The restaurants are a visual treat so that we enjoy a riot of colours; an exciting balance of light and dark or pools of glowing soft lights; and sleek or tactile finishes. We can just imagine the excited crowds, or intimate patrons, that these restaurants attract, and the heady aromas that waft! After going through these designs, you will notice a common thread. Designers the world over are showing a greater concern for the environment. The modern ethic is to salvage and re-use. Discarded (and sometimes even lowly) objects such as Y sockets find a new lease of life as chandeliers. It’s not the collection of designer objects that ensures success but rather how the designer carefully brings diverse elements together. Designers are forever asked what inspires them. The answer to that is just about everything - movies, books, painting, periods of time in history, location! What is unusual this year is that in Hong Kong/ China, at least three projects were inspired by the humble egg. Also in this issue, we have low-budget eateries with a very dedicated clientele – the school canteen. These are simple but challenging for requiring good space planning and multiple usage. We have a number of award-winning restaurants but occasionally, at the other end of the scale, designers just want to have fun. How else can you explain the statue of a pig that revolves every hour in the middle of a restaurant? Patrons love it! So, go ahead and enjoy! Bon appetit!!

2

2 Restaurant  

3


contents... introduction 

3

Bates Smart 

8

maze by gordon ramsay  Crown Metropol, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Jordan Mozer and Associates, Ltd. 

alice in mirror land  Umeda, Osaka, Japan

26

Fantastic Design Works co. 

alice in picture book  Shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan

32

Fantastic Design Works co. 

le porc de versailles  Kinshicyo, Tokyo, Japan

40

livingston  Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.

CCS Architecture 

r2l  Philadelphia,

CCS Architecture 

the plant: café organic  San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

Allen+Philp Architects/Interiors  CCS Architecture 

Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

trader vic’s  Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.A.

mid-atlantic  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

44 52 62 68 76

Allen+Philp Architects/Interiors 

prado  Paradise Valley, Arizona, U.S.A.

84

Allen+Philp Architects/Interiors 

canal  Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.A.

92

Fantastic Design Works co.  CRÈME 

so  Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

macondo  New York, U.S.A.

acarquitectos  JHP Design 

2 Restaurant  

20

Fantastic Design Works co. 

Puccini Group 

4

bob san  Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

cenario  Lisbon, Portugal

paris baguette  Seoul, South Korea

100 106 110 114


...contents Fantastic Design Works co.  JOI-Design 

redox  Unterschleissheim, Bavaria, Germany

Sunaqua Concepts Ltd.  SHAUN CLARKSON 

prince grill  Xian, China

odette’s  London, U.K.

Westar Architects 

hannah’s family bistro  Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A.

Wilsdon Design Associates 

park terrace   London, U.K.

MoHen Design International  Buckley Gray Yeoman  CCS Architecture  4N ARCHITECTS 

barbacco eno trattoria  San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

aok  Hong Kong, China

Mut-architecture 

bangalore express city  London, U.K.

Planet 3 Studios 

liquid  New Jersey, U.S.A.

mochamojo  Bandra, Mumbai, India

STUDIO GAIA, INC.  2 Restaurant  

cargo pizza & bar  Tasmania, Australia

teaspoon  St Petersburg, Russia

Westar Architects 

6

susuru  Berlin, Germany

restaurant 51  Paris, France

Paul Kelly Design  SHH 

danbo fun  Shanghai, China

nando’s  Spinningfields, Manchester, U.K.

Ester Bruzkus Architects 

Outline 

scottish glamour  Ginza, Tokyo, Japan

sakea  Busan, South Korea

118 122 126 130 134 138 142 146 152 156 160 166 170 174 178 184

MoHen Design International 

danbo fun fast food  Shanghai, China

WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design  Maurice Mentjens Design  Vonsung 

202

kaffeine  Fitzrovia, London, U.K.

208

frans hals museumcafé  Haarlem, The Netherlands

212

viet hoa cafe  London, U.K.

224

SHH 

applemore college canteen  Southampton, U.K.

228

SHH 

cherbourg primary school dining room  Southampton, U.K.

234

Evoke International Design inc. 

commune cafe  Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design  Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. 

lantana  Fitzrovia, London, U.K.

242

clink  Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

244

Jordan Mozer and Associates, Ltd.  Smolenicky & Partner Architektur  Fantastic Design Works co.  SJB Interiors 

copper bleu  Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.

248

maruha shokudo  Nagoya, Aichi, Japan

250

parkside  Shanghai, China

Hirschberg Design Group Inc.  Marcel Wanders Studio 

246

strozzi “piu”  Zurich, Switzerland

sepia  Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

MoHen Design International 

240

252 254

empire  Ontario, Canada

256

blits  Rotterdam, The Netherlands

258

188

index by designer 

268

194

index by location 

270 7


Bates Smart

maze by gordon ramsay Crown Metropol, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

1 345m2

maze occupies a sculptural, architectural space outside the main tower where its inside/outside quality is amplified in the interior.

As the name evokes, maze’s interior is crafted as a journey of intrigue and discovery. It is an evocative landscape where a variety of dining experiences are revealed and unfolded to the visitor. Bates Smart set about to create an active and captivating sequence of spaces that constantly morph thereby offering patrons diverse experiences within one venue. On entry, there is a choice of spaces.

The coffee/pastry station has a communal high table and an adjacent long bar with crafted charcoal, turquoise and platinum mosaic tiles and marble top. The adjacent Cocktail Bar is an intimate box-like folly overlooking the main lobby. A series of shuttered panels enable guests to view the lobby below or close these down for privacy. The a la carte restaurant is defined by a glassed, soaring volume and banquette that enclose this softer furnished space. Working in collaboration with New York / Miamibased textile designers NIBA, Bates Smart created a boldly patterned, vibrant, contemporary carpet that, like a flower bed, provides a strong accent colour to an otherwise neutral palette of taupes and charcoals.

Italy, hover above the dining room and act as beacons when viewed from the street below. David Band of Mahon & Band was commissioned to create a wall relief sculpture modeled and created from found birch trees. This contemporary installation evokes the imagery of an ivy-clad wall and travels 60 metres, further reinforcing the ambience of an outside/inside landscape.

rough cut slate and rustic, thickly glazed tiles in a deep emerald provide a bold and robust backdrop to the dynamic workings of the active kitchen. Finally, the journey ends in an elevated private dining space where the timber floor moulds dramatically to become both wall, and then ceiling.

Two dramatic basket-like pavilions are fashioned from hand-woven wicker to create both a Private Dining Room seating 12 and a unique ‘Sommelier Experience’ enclosure also seating 12. The plaited material provides discrete transparency as well as textural forms that give sculptural definition to the greater restaurant space. In maze Grill, a vibrant combination of raw steel,

Over-scaled light fittings, custom-made by Foscarini in 8

2 Restaurant  

9


10

2 Restaurant  

11


12

2 Restaurant  

13


14

2 Restaurant  

15


16

2 Restaurant  

17


Crown Limited & Gordon Ramsay Bates Smart Design Team Jeffery Copolov (Interior Design Director), Grant Filipoff (Associate Director), Kendra Pinkus (Associate Main Contractor Baulderstone Pty Ltd Fitout Contractor Schiavello Graphic designer Fabio Ongarato Design Photography Shannon McGrath Client/Owner design firm

Director)

suppliers:

Custom design by Bates Smart Ceramic tile artist Brian Keyte Cavit & Co Chair “Bonacina Chylium1” Hub Furniture Pendant Lights “Foscarini Allegro” Space Furniture Woven Screens Design Sense (Custom design by Bates Smart) Heat Lamps Design Sense (Custom design by Bates Smart) Artwork David Band & Anita Bell Table top

Table Base

18

2 Restaurant  

19


Jordan Mozer and Associates, Ltd.

bob san Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

646m2

Bucktown and Wicker Park are two of the most vibrant and creative neighborhoods in Chicago, filled with artists and young professionals. They meet at West Division Street, a high street populated with a collage of boutiques, galleries and night-life destinations, including Bob San, a JapaneseAmerican restaurant, bar and lounge. Bob San’s pony-tailed owner, Bob Bee, was born and raised in Korea and cooked in Japan for several years before coming to Chicago where he has founded three freestyle American-Japanese restaurants. Bob San, his third venture, originally opened in 2000. In 2008, he purchased the former Leo’s Lunch Room and adjoining vacant land to expand and improve his thriving business by adding a lounge, a private dining room, and expanding the bar.

The project, completed in early 2010, uses a new circulation system to link the Dining Room, Bar, Leo’s Lounge and the Private Room, four separate public spaces with individual personalities and moods that may be operated separately or together, as business requires.

The original kitchen, offices and dining room were extensively rebuilt and refined. The bar was expanded, pushing out onto vacant land between Bob San and Leo’s Lunch Room. The interior construction of the former Lunch Room was entirely gutted to create a dramatic two-storeyed, brick-walled lounge with views through a new glass façade to pedestrian traffic on Division Street. A deep steel beam was placed in the back wall of Leo’s to create an enormous arch leading to a new building. A private room was constructed on a second patch of vacant land. The designs for Bob San were created by Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited (JMA), a Chicago-based architecture and design firm led by artist/ designer Jordan Mozer, who has degrees in both architecture and product design, and his business partner, architect Jeff Carloss. They created the architectural solutions as well as many of the original, hand-made components in the space,

20

2 Restaurant  

including sculptures, furniture and lighting, which contribute to the Bob San story. The designs are inspired by Bob Bee’s very popular American interpretation of Japanese dining culture, as interpreted by Mozer, whose lifelong obsession with Japan began when he was 14. Jordan Mozer said that his father was a doctor who encouraged his fascination with zoology while his mother, who was an artist, praised his creative side. “When I wasn’t looking for creatures in ravines or along the beach, I drew and modeled them compulsively. My interest in design was triggered when I began to invent new hybrid animals composed from parts of what I’d collected.

“My favorites were cephalopods, a group of invertebrates which includes octopus, squid and the amazing chambered nautilus. On my twelfth birthday I received from my father a book by my hero, Jacques Cousteau, on the subject of cephalopods. On my thirteenth birthday I was ecstatic to be treated to dinner at what was then the only Japanese restaurant in Chicago, where I was served octopus and squid, creatures I had never actually seen in person, much less tasted. At 15, my family traveled to Japan, where everything was different, the first of 20 trips there.” Mozer feels that Japan is one of the most culturally exclusive and refined cultures in the world and in many ways, the antithesis of America. Bob Bee has created a stylized American portrait of Japanese food culture in Chicago. “Our designs for him draw inspiration from the confluence of these two very different cultures.”

21


22

2 Restaurant  

23


suppliers

Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited has distinguished their practice for 25 years by designing and manufacturing proprietary elements used in their projects. Dozens of artists, craftspeople and manufacturers in Chicago assisted Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited in realizing designs for custommade hardware, seating, lamps, tables, cabinets and table top elements. Some of the components manufactured for Bob San by Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited include the following: 3-D Flag The partition between the lounge and bar is a sandwich red marbles in a field of neutral marbles held between two layers of glass: this is a three-dimensional interpretation of the Japanese flag, a red dot in a white field. Glowing Octopus Some cephalopods are bio-luminescent, glowing at night to attract mates. The chandelier in the bar is inspired by arms of the the octopus used to make Tako sushi. It is composed of steel and hand-carved, red solid-resin castings. Tentacles Squid and cuttlefish have specialized elongated arms called tentacles. The lamps over the high sofa in the Bar were hand carved in wood and then cast in re-cycled aluminum-magnesium alloy, and then hand polished. Lounge Seating Hand-sculpted seating composed of cast resin creates flexible seating in the center of the room. Coral forms inspired the two–seat lounge chairs with built-in tables that were created exclusively for Bob San’s Lounge. They are inspired by coral. Lounge Lighting Sculpture The raw brick was sandblasted and then Jordan Mozer created a subtle abstract mural by amplifying the colors in the brick with paint and chalk and oil pastels. A sculpture of cast resin The lighting in the lounge is indirect, hidden in the steel compression ring used to restructure the walls after the second floor was removed; inside this ring are lights directed at the sculptures on the upper walls of the lounge, which act as reflectors. The sculptures are composed of lacquered cast resin. Private Dining Room Chandeliers Inspired by the forms of ceremonial Japanese bells and bivalve mollusks (cousins to the cephalopods also featured on Japanese menus) and composed of spun steel and hand-polished recycled aluminum-magnesium castings of wood carvings and finished in cute pastel colors from Japanese manga and designer toys mixed with rich warm colors of ebony floors, chocolate velvet and milky taupe glass tile. Surfboard Table Composed of hand-polished, recycled aluminum-magnesium castings of wood hand-carvings, with a solid Midwestern walnut top in the form of a surfboard. Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited Design Team Jordan Mozer(Principal/Designer); Jeff Carloss(Principal/Architect); Beverlee Mozer(General Manager); Siamak Mostoufi and Peter Ogbac(Project Architects); Courtney Suess(Project Interior Designer); Matt Winter & Manuel Hernandez(Project Product Designers); Reggie Trimble(Project Coordinator) Structural Engineer Lindau Companies, Inc. MeP Engineer Khatib and Associates, Inc General Contractor Crown Construction Photography Doug Snower Photography PAINTINGS AND SKETCHES Jordan Mozer FLOOR PLANS Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited design firm

24

2 Restaurant  

Dining Room Sculpture Inspired by images of bioluminescent squid photographed by Jacuqes Cousteau, it is composed of hand carved wood cast in recycled aluminum magnesium alloy. Milk and Honey Chandelier in the Dining Room Composed of steel, computer milled glass and locally hand blown, sand etched glass. Dining Room Candle Sticks, Hand carved, cast in recycled bronze, hand polished and acid washed. Dining Room Bowl Hand carved, cast in recycled bronze, hand polished and acid washed.

25


fantastic design works co.

alice in mirror land UMEDA, OSAKA, JAPAN

100m2

This restaurant concept is derived from Lewis Carroll’s famous work Alice in Wonderland. Here, the fantasy is played out in a dark atmosphere with waitresses dressed in Alice costumes. A book represents the entrance door and patrons literally walk into the story. To create a continuous movement from the dining hall, a seethrough fabric was chosen for the private dining room thus maintaining its privacy. The layout was designed as an open space so that all guests can share in the excitement. The layout functions as an Izakaya where drinks and food are served. Many mirrors have been used in the restaurant so

that it appears more spacious but when guests sit down, they will not see themselves or others in the mirror, since pictures or prints were strategically placed to prevent reflection. The waitresses wear Alice costumes which are like traditional maids’ outfits with a blue ribbon as in Disney movies. The skirts were shortened to create a cute sexy look. Most of the guests here are girls who enjoy Harajyuku style Gothic Lolita fashion. This restaurant has become popular and it now has branches in Shinjuku and Ginza.

26

2 Restaurant  

27


28

2 Restaurant  

29


Diamond dining co. fantastic design works co. Main Contractor Katsunori suzuki Photography HIROKAZU MATSUOKA Client/Owner design firm

30

2 Restaurant  

31


fantastic design works co.

alice in picture book shinjyuku, tokyo, Japan

181m2

The newest restaurant in the Alice in Wonderland Series originates from a pop-up picture book concept. The base color

is dark black with a gigantic chandelier in the middle. New colorful images were added as a new design feature.

In the private rooms, chandeliers were made with 10 types of dolls most of which were acquired from Game Center attractions. Given its location in Shinjyuku Kabuki Cho, the restaurant is open till early morning. To enhance this night image, colored, exotic Lewis Carroll pictures in vibrant colors

32

2 Restaurant  

were placed on the walls and screens in private rooms. The flooring consists of a carpet matching the Alice in Wonderland concept. This is also economical since you can change the carpet one square at a time.

33


34

2 Restaurant  

35


36

2 Restaurant  

37


Diamond dining co. fantastic design works co. Main Contractor Katsunori suzuki Photography Masaya yoshimura Client/Owner design firm

38

2 Restaurant  

39


fantastic design works co.

le porc de versailles KINSHICYO, tokyo, Japan

In Japan, there is a famous comic book called the Rose of Versailles in which MarieAntoinette is introduced. This restaurant’s name originates from this parody as does its design concept. The interior is not gorgeous as the palace of Versailles. Instead, it is casual like the menu. The menu focuses on pork cuisines from around the world. At the entrance, guests can see a painting of Marie Antoinette hugging a pig to create a laugh, in the main dining room, there is a big round table with a pig sculpture (FRP modeling) that rotates every hour. Along the window, there are strings of ping-pong balls which functions as a

40

2 Restaurant  

182m2

curtain as well as a logo. The inspiration for this came from the back stage of a popular American hard rock band called Kiss.

Kiss’ music, black tone style, and eyecatching flashy colors created a striking image. The interior designer credited artists, comics, movies and fashion for inspiring him rather than the work of famous architects or designers. The seating in this restaurant is very tight but highly efficient. The round table with the pig sculpture is most popular but the private rooms are also very popular for holding big group events.

41


Diamond dining co. fantastic design works co. Main Contractor Katsunori suzuki Photography Masaya yoshimura Client/Owner

design firm

42

2 Restaurant  

43


Puccini Group

livingston Atlanta, Georgia, U.s.a.

530m2

Designed by the Puccini Group, the dramatic glass and steel entrance of Livingston welcomes guests into a stunning two-storey dining room. Dark mahogany tables encircled by chocolate leather and platinum seating are beautifully contrasted with iconic white marble columns.

Gold and silver accents are illuminated by a grandiose chandelier encased in an iridescent screen, adding dramatic architectural detail to the space. The bar includes sleek, low tables made of Carrera marble surrounded by custom seating ranging from muted silver snakeskin club chairs, to deep chocolate crocodile stools and plush burgundy chairs. Oversized Palladian windows allow guests on the terrace to peek into the bustling Livingston bar. The bar itself, with modern polished chrome bar back, is a perfect juxtaposition to the classic Glowing lanterns reflect off dining tables onto the mirrored interiors. The grand twenty foot ceiling is punctuated by bar which offers a window stately columns intermixed between the two rooms. with a glowing ghost column filled with mercury-like silver pendants hanging within. Banquettes around the columns and discrete seating arrangements allow for intimate conversations near the dazzling chandelier that drips from the ceiling like a natural work of art.   Flanking the dining room are two unique works of art, each featuring dynamic black and white ghosted images of some of the city’s original socialites on the red carpet. Recognizing the historical significance of the space, these photographs were selected from those taken at the premiere party for Gone With the Wind, held in the same grand room in 1939.

44

2 Restaurant  

As a historical landmark, Puccini Group had to maintain the original architecture and shell of the building, while updating it with modernized furniture and lighting. Details such as original handrails were preserved giving the space a stage for the old to meet the new. The glowing ghost column was created to complete the colonnade layout in the bar and create social seating arrangements. The custom-made champagne display is housed in the shell of a previous entrance. The bar and restaurant entrance was moved back to the historical location and the stairs were rebuilt to the original specifications of the night of the wrap party for the Gone With the Wind cast. There was limited space in the existing kitchen which let to the kitchen being moved closer to the dining area and being turned into an exhibition kitchen.  

The historically elegant architectural details of the space are integrated with elements of warmth and texture that evoke modern sophistication and style. The namesake of the restaurant & café, Livingston Mims, was the former mayor of Atlanta and lived on this very plot of land in his mansion before the Georgian Terrace was built. He was known throughout Atlanta for his love of food and wine. A bust of Livingston rests upon the marble-topped bar overlooking the action and his beloved guests.

This was an opportunity to update the lobby in ways to pay homage to the namesake, Livingston, for his love of Atlanta and his lifelong efforts to ‘green’ the city. The city’s extensive parks were an inspiration for the polished, laser-cut metal trees created behind the front desk. The map behind the new concierge stand was a collaboration between the in-house design team and the gentleman who has been directing guests as the Georgian Terrace concierge for years. It highlights the parks and local attractions in a graphically gorgeous way. The ballrooms maintained their original architectural grandeur but were updated with custom carpets and fresh color palettes.

45


46

2 Restaurant  

47


48

2 Restaurant  

49


Client/Owner Design firm Photography

50

2 Restaurant  

Fremont Realty Puccini Group Michael Kleinberg

51


CCS Architecture

r2l

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

930m2

R2L is an elegant, modern restaurant and lounge that reinterprets the glamour and exoticism of the 1930s.

Perched high above the heart of Philadelphia, the intimate, convivial space recalls the elegance of the extravagant Art Deco era while celebrating the clean simplicity and spatial balance of modern architecture. A mix of texture, color and pattern bring the long space together in a combination of plush lounge furnishing and cozy booth seats contrasting with moments of glimmering light and exposed steel structure. The space is accented with a distinctive palette of materials including handpolished zinc, stacked strips of glass, ebonized mahogany, woven leather and zebra-

52

2 Restaurant  

print upholstery. A metallic ceiling grill undulates across the bar, dining room and lounge leading towards the spectacular city views. Upon entering the restaurant, a glass slot invites an upclose look at Daniel Stern’s custom kitchen. A floating handcrafted sculpture of polished silverware made by a local artist encloses a unique dining area that provides guests with unobstructed views across the city. While in one of the private dining rooms, one can dine aside the statue of William Penn atop Philadelphia’s City Hall. As a backdrop to the city skyline, a wall of wine marches along reminding us to raise a glass to an unforgettable experience.

53


54

2 Restaurant  

55


56

2 Restaurant  

57


main dining exhibition kitchen back of house house back of back of house ELEVATOR LOBBY bar/lounge bar/lounge bar/lounge EXHIBITION KITCHEN BAR circulation circulation WINEcirculation WALL main dining dining main

exhibition kitchen kitchen exhibition

main dining exhibition kitchen back of house bar/lounge circulation

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 10 10 11 11

MAIN DINING LOUNGE PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG ROOM A PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG ROOM B PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG ROOM C PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG ROOM D RESTROOMS

10 10

1 elevator lobby 2 exhibition kitchen 3 bar 4 wine wall 5 main dining 6 lounge 7 private/flex dining room a 8 private/flex dining room b 9 private/flex dining room c 10 private/flex dining room d 11 restrooms

ELEVATOR LOBBY LOBBY ELEVATOR EXHIBITION KITCHEN KITCHEN EXHIBITION BAR BAR WINE WINE WALL WALL MAIN DINING DINING MAIN LOUNGE LOUNGE PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG DINIG ROOM ROOM A A PRIVATE/FLEX PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG DINIG ROOM ROOM B B PRIVATE/FLEX PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG DINIG ROOM ROOM C C PRIVATE/FLEX PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG ROOM D PRIVATE/FLEX DINIG ROOM D RESTROOMS RESTROOMS

10 9 9

8 8

9

8 1 1 11 11

11 11 7 7 4 4

1 11

2 2

11

3 3

5 5

7 4

6 6

2 3 R2L. Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA PA R2L.

5

CCS ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURE CCS

6

58

2 Restaurant  

R2L. Philadelphia, PA

CCS ARCHITECTURE

59


client/owner design firm

Daniel Stern CCS Architecture

Design Team

Cass Calder Smith(Design Principal); Taylor Lawson(Project Director); Yvonne Choy(Project Architect) Structural Engineer King of Prussia MEP Alderson Engineering, Inc. Lighting TLP The Lighting Practice Food Service Advanced Foodservice Solutions Artwork Ali Ahmad/3-D Metal Arts General Contractor Domus, Inc. Photography Kris Tamburello

60

2 Restaurant  

61


CCS Architecture

the plant: café organic San Francisco, CAlifornia, U.S.A.

372m2

The Plant: Cafe Organic occupies two historic, waterfront buildings at Pier 3, straddling what was once a railroad passage, which has been modified to create a full-service, 112-seat restaurant and a separate, counter-service cafe.

The Plant has been named one of the “greenest” restaurants in San Francisco by San Francisco Waterfront Partners and is one of the few in the country with a rooftop solar PV system for on-site, electrical energy production which will be used to power much of the kitchen. The client’s program called for a sustainable design agenda which would be in sync with, yet showcase, the food they are serving. The Plant serves an almost purely organic and primarily locally sourced menu. The space they inhabit was to follow the same goals.

62

2 Restaurant  

The Architect inserted light, delicate interiors within the existing pier warehouses using reclaimed wood, recycled-content tiles and an eclectic mix of zinc, coldrolled steel, and stainless steel to finish out the spaces. The Plant, like many new projects within converted pier buildings along San Francisco’s Embarcadero, is helping revitalize this edge of the city where the land meets the Bay.

63


64

2 Restaurant  

65


©Kelly Barrie

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

SAN FRANCISCO BAY

ENTRY MAIN DINING ROOM COMMUNITY DINING TABLE BAR BAYSIDE DINING CAFE KITCHEN SUPPORT RESTROOMS RESTAURANT CAFE / KITCHEN / SUPPORT PATIO SEATING

client/owner

(M) RESTROOMS

design firm

(W) RESTROOMS

PROMENDAE

Design Team

9

5

1 1 2 1 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 5 4 5 6 5 6 7 6 7 8 7 8 9 8 9 9

HISTORIC WALK SAN FRANCISCO BAY SAN FRANCISCO BAY SAN FRANCISCO BAY

2

8

7 3

1

6 4

(W) (W) RESTROOMS (W) RESTROOMS RESTROOMS

PROMENDAE PROMENDAE PROMENDAE

5 5 5 BAR + RESTAURANT

The Plant: Cafe Organic. Pier 3, San Francisco, CA

66

2 Restaurant  

2 2 2 THE EMBARCADERO ROADWAY 3 3 3

7 7 7

CCS ARCHITECTURE

1 1 1 6 6 6

4 4 4

ENTRY ENTRY MAIN DINING ROOM ENTRY MAIN DINING DINING ROOM COMMUNITY MAIN DINING ROOM TABLE COMMUNITY DINING TABLE BAR COMMUNITY DINING TABLE BAR BAYSIDE DINING BAR BAYSIDE DINING CAFE BAYSIDE DINING CAFE KITCHEN CAFE KITCHEN SUPPORT KITCHEN SUPPORT RESTROOMS SUPPORT RESTROOMS RESTROOMS RESTAURANT RESTAURANT RESTAURANT CAFE / KITCHEN / SUPPORT CAFE / KITCHEN / SUPPORT CAFE KITCHEN / SUPPORT PATIO /SEATING PATIO SEATING PATIO SEATING

restaurant cafe /kitchen / support patio seating

1 entry 2 main dining room (M) (M) RESTROOMS 3 RESTROOMS community dining table (M) 4 RESTROOMS bar 5 bayside dining 6 9cafe 7 99kitchen 8 support 9 restrooms

HISTORIC WALK HISTORIC WALK HISTORIC WALK

CAFE, KITCHEN, SUPPORT

BREEZEWAY

MNMCO LLC CCS Architecture

8 8 8

©Melissa Werner

Cass Calder Smith(Design Principal); Barbara Turpin-Vickroy(Interior Design Director); Sean Kennedy(Project Architect); Historic Architect Page & Turnbull Lighting Luminesce Design MEP Engineer ACIES Engineering Structural Engineer John Yadegar & Associates Food Service Robert Yick Company, Inc. Table Tops Pacassa Studios Hickory Arnold and Egan Graphics EwingCraft Main Contractor Fineline Group Photography Kris Tamburello

67


Allen+Philp Architects/Interiors

trader vic’s Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.A.

710m2

The design challenge was to create an iconic freestanding restaurant on the grounds of a recently renovated mid-century modern hotel set in the urban fabric of Scottsdale, Arizona.

The structure was to house a restaurant whose concept has its historical roots in the 1940s-50s, steeped in the Polynesian pop culture of postwar America. The architecture and interior design reinterprets and reinvents the restaurant in modernist terms while paying homage to its history, the Trader Vic’s image and direct design inspiration from the adjacent hotel. The building occupies a corner of the hotel property and is sited diagonally ensuring a strong presence on two streets. This diagonal orientation also organizes the entry axis from

68

2 Restaurant  

“tikis” that punctuate the edge of the axis and further define dining and circulation space. The “tikis” are sky-lit in the daytime and top-lit at night to draw the eye up and show The entry axis, in turn, informs the plan bisecting the building’s the relationship between the curving soffits and the steel mass and defining its two distinct uses. The first is a non- roof structure. A glass enclosed wood-fired Chinese oven is also fenestrated “box,” housing the kitchen, service, restrooms and showcased along the axis. back-of-house functions. In contrast, the other is a naturally- Inside, the lava cone hub acts as an enclosure for arriving lit, transparent dining pavilion guests and maitre’d while and includes a “lava cone” hub allowing access to the dining featuring reception area, bar and lounge and logo sales area. spaces and bar. The bar is The axis is expressed internally spatially defined by a red steel tube trellis that “floats” through immense authentic beneath the roof structure and hand-carved monumental continues through the exterior glass where it covers the bar’s lanai. The trellis and the use of fully operable sliding glass walls work together to blur the line between outside and inside spaces. the street corner into the hotel proper allowing easy access for the hotel guest as well as the off-site patron.

The transparency between inside and out is enhanced by the use of a similar color palette on finishes and furnishings throughout the project. The exposed grey concrete block along with the stained concrete extends from the entry into the dining spaces and contrasts with the bright greens, oranges and soft golds on the seating. The main dining space is creatively sub-divided into smaller, more intimate spaces on the periphery by massive battered masonry walls. Sliding glass doors allow these spaces to open directly onto exterior dining lanais. Masonry walls, corrugated translucent panels and lush landscaping give the lanais privacy and act as a view backdrop for the interior spaces.

An elegant mix of honed masonry, exposed steel, sliding and fixed glass and integralcolored concrete make up the majority of the material palette, while natural lava, bamboo, channel glass, tapas cloth and glass tile used in conjunction with mica-chip stucco finishes add richness. Authentic art and artifacts from the South Pacific complete the composition and help “take the guest away”.

69


70

2 Restaurant  

71


72

2 Restaurant  

73


Client/Owner

Westroc Hospitality / MSR Properties design firm

Allen+Philp Architects – Interiors Design Team

Mark Philp, Elizabeth Damore, Thompson Ward Other Consultants

AME Engineering, Habermann Electrical Engineering, TLCP Structural Main Contractor

Kitchell Photography

74

2 Restaurant  

Bill Timmerman

75


CCS Architecture

mid-atlantic Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

510m2

Urban and Rustic. Past and Present. Tradition and Renewal. This is the essence of MidAtlantic, Chef Daniel Stern’s latest culinary surprise. CCS Architecture designed a warm, urban restaurant space to

support Stern’s vibrant and approachable Pennsylvania Dutch food concept. The 2,500 square foot space is creatively crafted from simple and reclaimed materials, taking on a casual, roadhouse feel. An angled wall of reclaimed Western Pennsylvania barnwood runs the length of the restaurant, anchoring the bar, open kitchen and counter seating. Custom lighting fixtures made from Behind the galvanized metal recycled fluorescent tubes bar, a window invites views hang from a long, wooden to the keg room stocked with drop ceiling. A central local microbrews. Locally farmhouse table offers social fabricated, sliding doors opportunities between clad in tin clad enclose a the bar and dining area. flexible private dining area. Outdoors, a linear firepit provides warmth and a visual focus for the large dining terrace. MidAtlantic’s design encourages frequent visits; it’s easy to drop in for dinner or beers and a ball game.

©Brendan McRae ©Brendan McRae

©Brendan McRae

76

2 Restaurant  

77


78

2 Restaurant  

79


11

10 6 11 3

main dining

4

7

exhibition kitchen

5

back of house 11 11 11

bar/lounge

2

patio dining

10 10 10 6 6 6 3 3 3

8

9

11 11 1 VESTIBULE 11

2 ENTRY 3 BAR 4 COMMUNITY TABLE 5 MAIN DINING main dining dining KITCHEN 6main EXHIBITION main dining main dining 7exhibition FLEXkitchen DINING exhibition exhibition kitchen exhibition kitchenkitchen 8 TERRACE DINING back of house house back of ofPIT house back of house 9back FIRE bar/lounge 10 KEG ROOM bar/lounge bar/lounge bar/lounge 11 RESTROOMS patio dining patio dining

1 7 7 7

5 5 5

4 4 4

2 2 2

8 8 8

80

2 Restaurant  

9 9 9

1 1 1

patio dining

patio dining

1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 9 9 9 10 10 10 11 11 11

VESTIBULE VESTIBULE VESTIBULE ENTRY ENTRY ENTRY BAR BAR BAR COMMUNITY TABLE TABLE COMMUNITY COMMUNITY TABLE MAIN DINING DINING MAIN MAIN DINING EXHIBITION KITCHEN KITCHEN EXHIBITION EXHIBITION KITCHEN FLEX DINING DINING FLEX FLEX DINING TERRACE DINING TERRACE DINING DINING TERRACE FIRE FIRE PIT PIT FIRE PIT KEG KEG ROOM ROOM KEG ROOM RESTROOMS RESTROOMS RESTROOMS

1 2 3 4 5 6

vestibule entry bar community table main dining exhibition kitchen

7 flex dining 8 terrace dining 9 fire pit 10 keg room 11 restrooms

81


client/owner design firm

Daniel Stern CCS ARCHITECTURE

Design Team

Cass Calder Smith(Design Principal); Taylor Lawson(Project Director); Erick Gregory(Project Architect) Lighting Lighting Design Collaborative Food Service Advanced Foodservice Solutions General Contractor Gardner Fox Photography Kris Tamburello, unless stated

82

2 Restaurant  

83


Allen+Philp Architects/Interiors

prado

Paradise Valley, Arizona, U.S.A.

Prado is situated on a 30 acre parcel in the heart of Paradise Valley at the base of the iconic Camelback Mountain, within the Montelucia Resort. The progression of arrival sets the tone for drinking and dining within this award-winning restaurant and lounge. The transition experience from the modern city of Phoenix to the inner heart of this resort begins by way of the vividly landscaped, stone-lined front drive, through a shaded colonnade and past a bubbling fountain into the Cortijo Plaza or town square. At night, the Cortijo is filled with twinkling lights in the trees, guests milling around the outdoor patio with drinks and music spilling into the courtyard. Accented with stone and tiled fountains, the square feels like the center of a small village providing a social gathering space as it connects Prado, the front lobby, a café, the wedding chapel and administrative offices along with select guest rooms.

84

2 Restaurant  

1 060m2

One can enter Prado between the massive terra cotta overscaled vessels and past the uniquely jeweled entry lights flanking the antique wood doors. Indoor and outdoor boundaries disappear as the patio spills onto the Cortijo from the lounge and bar within. This lively social space at the front entry allows lounge guests to sit back, unwind and watch the action arrive through the courtyard and into the dining areas. Arrival isn’t complete until guests go through the restaurant and onto the back dining patio where the stunning backdrop opens up to reveal the waters of the Alhambra walk, the relaxing pools of the resort and Camelback Mountain beyond. Within a setting that was designed to reflect an Andalusian village built over time, Prado’s character is unique in that it reflects but does not mimic the cluster of buildings surrounding it within

the resort. Materiality and composition tie the buildings together to support the concept while allowing for eclectic features created from historical and regional themes. Eclectic and moody, open yet nurturing, the space reflects the food and creates an atmosphere of glamorous leisure. The Spanish and Moroccan overtones of the interior begin at the copper and leather accented bar and lounge and is backed up by the open stone fireplace of the exhibition kitchen. Heavy use of dark woods contrast with light colored plaster walls and ceilings. Spanish influenced patterns on the heavy tapestries within the booths subtly play with those on cool concrete tile floors enhanced with the rich dark colors of the plush lounge seating. Dining zones and thoughtful attention to the acoustics within the restaurant allow for an open plan with a balance of quiet elegant dining and vibrant lounge areas. Extensive use of Spanish and Moroccan art and artifacts inside and out blend with plastered walls, textured hand-hewn woods, hand-cut stones and glazed decorative tiles. The liveliness of the action within this space is predicted by the modern imagery painted on the pieces commissioned specifically for Prado portraying the unique atmosphere and the mood of a dark, sexy, glamorous speak easy.

85


86

2 Restaurant  

87


88

2 Restaurant  

89


Crown Development Allen+Philp Architects – Interiors Design Team Mark Philp, Elizabeth Damore, Rachel Wuellner Other Consultants Glumac Engineering, TLCP Inc Main Contractor Rowlands Construction Services Photography James Christy Studios, Zaruba Photography Client/Owner design firm

90

2 Restaurant  

91


Allen+Philp Architects/Interiors

canal

Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.A.

593m2

Located on a once abandoned back alley irrigation canal, The Canal Restaurant is located within a new mixed use urban development on a revitalized site that is a thoroughfare of shopping, dining, interactive pedestrian activity and a popular venue for public and private cultural events. The canal is now the centerpiece for pedestrian traffic and conveniently situated in the heart of Old Town Scottsdale. This neighborhood in transition includes an operating blacksmith shop and is a thriving hotspot for upscale resorts, nightclubs and restaurants.

Surrounded by upscale retail areas, creating a physical connection from the luxury shopping boutiques on one side to the waterway on the other, the restaurant is a physical and conceptual link to the building as a whole. Customers typically enter through a side entrance through the bustling bar, but one can also find the Canal

Canal Restaurant juxtaposes two conceptual ideas: the highly polished urban chic of high fashion and an old industrial warehouse; references to Scottsdale’s reincarnation as a budding Mecca for fashionistas and its recent more utilitarian past. Both concepts come from the context of the restaurant’s location and integration within the site.

through an interconnected spiral stair from the adjacent retail. Models parade through the restaurant periodically demonstrating their wares off the glass runway. Back bar becomes patio bar when weather permits (most of the year) as an industrial garage door allows customers a full view of the canal activity outside and brings in the energy of the patio for a truly indoor/outdoor lounge experience. Playful contrasts energize the interior. The fashion world becomes the focal point day or night with a boldly displayed over-scaled glass projection screen radiating with images of models, fashions, color and

92

2 Restaurant  

energy adding edginess to the sumptuous patterns and textures on the seating beyond. While the primary design challenge was to attract the sophisticated youthful crowd in “old town” Scottsdale at night, the restaurant and lounge serve a business-oriented downtown lunch crowd. The mix matched bohemian colors and patterns appear youthful and contemporary in the bright natural daylight of the bar and restaurant when the bold modern shapes are the focus while the screen images become background. Referencing the materiality of the warehouse with rough

steel and old brick, the exposed concrete and mechanical / plumbing systems play off of the highly finished back-lit glass runway and translucent netting of the drapery sheers dividing the restaurant. Continuing the story of contrasts between highly polished and exposed industrial; the concrete and steel bar is set off with adjacent polished woods and frosted glass. At night, the chic images of models reflects off the crowd within, while the changing colors of the backlit forms give the space a sexy theatrical energy, alluding to spaces that aren’t seen and providing an ideal backdrop to the fashionable nighttime crowd.

93


94

2 Restaurant  

95


96

2 Restaurant  

97


Spring Creek Development Allen+Philp Architects – Interiors Design Team Jon Heilman, Elizabeth Damore, Zachary Shirk MPE Energy Systems Design Kitchen Consultant Collier Consulting Group Lighting Consultant LITEFX Main Contractor Hardison/Downey Construction Photography Fanny Allié Client/Owner design firm

98

2 Restaurant  

99


fantastic design works co.

so

YOKOHAMA, kanagawa, JAPAN

132m2

A dark colour palette was combined with subdued lighting in this restaurant. The lighting creates pockets of warmth within the restaurant and draws patrons inside.

100

2 Restaurant  

101


102

2 Restaurant  

103


Soushin fantastic design works co. Main Contractor Katsunori suzuki Photography Masaya yoshimura Client/Owner design firm

104

2 Restaurant  

105


CRÈME

macondo New York, U.S.A.

170m2

Named after the fictional Colombian village in Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s 1967 novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, Macondo serves up Latin American street food. The room was divided into three distinct sections. At the front, a storefront window reveals suspended baskets filled with fresh coconuts and pineapples as well as a screen of rope netting. The middle section features retro styled chairs with adjustable armrests and bar stools with

106

2 Restaurant  

gel cushions. In the back, a dining area with modular booth seating is enclosed by an ivy-coloured trellis and a barrisol ceiling with colourchangeable LCD. Unconventional uses of material evoke a bustling Latin streetscape. The ceiling is covered with wood chipboard that is typically seen at a construction site. Tables and banquettes are made out of salvaged wood as well as

wood chipboard. Inspired by the natural landscape, salvaged wood is used on the bar front in a random stripe pattern. The floor and bar countertops are custom coloured and textured to match the restaurant look.

107


CRÈME, JUN AIZAKI GINA SEUNG OH, MAY KORRANUN PAKARNSEREE, MAURO SOLMI, PATRICK MCGOVERN Photography Fanny Allié design firm Design Team

108

2 Restaurant  

109


joão tiago aguiar – acarquitectos

cenario Lisbon, Portugal

80m2

The programme initially required the creation of a cosmopolitan restaurant inside a 5 star hotel, contemporary and innovative, using the same materials as the rest of the hotel. It had to be located exactly beside the main public entrance and by the sidewalk so that people could immediately see it from the outside and desire to go in.

Subsequently, the project aimed to somehow create a new space within another space, to conjure up a distinctive area from the rest of the hotel using the same materials where people would feel comfortable and cosy even with one of the main hotel entrances and the street nearby. In that sense, the space was organized in a clear way, and to make people feel they are in a different environment immediately after entering, there is a change in colour from white to black of the stone on the floor marks the restaurant area. The space is entirely coated in black: black

110

2 Restaurant  

granite stone on the floor and columns and black textile ceiling. This gesture is reinforced by the orange glass on the walls that signs the perimeter. The space is mainly divided in two areas: one that includes the waiting area for people to sit and have a drink while waiting for their turn and the show-cooking counter in black granite stone with another one along the façade; and the orange glass façade where

you sit and enjoy the food. The ceiling was powdered by various pendant lights (Dear Ingo by Ron Gilad for Moooi), allowing light to come in from various points. White velvet curtains were put all along the façade in order to give it a more comfortable feeling and a not-so-exposed ambience.

111


GRUPO-VIP joão tiago aguiar – acarquitectos Design Team joão Tiago Aguiar & Renata Vieira Main Contractor EDIFER Photography Fernando Guerra / FG+SG Client/Owner design firm

suppliers:

VIRCLAR PLÁCIDO JOSÉ SIMÕES, LDA. OFFICE/A LINHA DA VIZINHA

Painted glass Black stone Furniture

112

2 Restaurant  

113


JHP Design

paris baguette Seoul, South Korea

255m2

Distilling the very essence of the best Parisienne patisserie, and transporting it east to the hippest district in Seoul, South Korea, a country with no great ‘bread culture’ created a distinct challenge for JHP.

114

2 Restaurant  

The client is Paris Baguette, a strong chain of 1,600 bakeries in South Korea that tasked JHP with “creating everything”. Every possible aspect of a new concept’s creation fell in JHP’s remit. Create the brand identity, store architecture, interior environment, communication strategy, packaging, photographic suite, uniforms, and developing in-store movies and music play-lists. After trips to the best bakeries in France, as well as benchmarking local competition in Seoul which proffers some of the finest food offers in the world, JHP set about conceiving a space that was incredibly modern, with subtle references to our Gallic neighbours’ royal legacy - the Louis XIV font, patisserie ponderings and palatial chandeliers.

It was deemed the ‘Provencal Eclectic Kitchen’. This ‘thematic platform’ would give the client an immediate point of difference in the marketplace and attract a younger audience. Underpinning the concept would be the duality of being ‘born of the Product’ (Provençal Kitchen) and being ‘born of Paris’ (eclectic) and celebrating the theatre of food with an open kitchen. The tone of voice would be lighthearted and witty whilst the essence of the brand would exploit the philosophy behind the purity of ingredients, expertise and authority. Even the staff’s uniforms impart confidence and authenticity.

The products on offer range from baguettes, croissants, pastries, sandwiches, coffee, wine, chocolate to a boulangerie and gift area. The fascia displays a blue awning with the prominent Paris Baguette blue and white logo. Warm and natural tones dominate the interior with limed oak display tables, glass cake showcases and screens striped with transparent blue, a stainless steel bulkhead and subtle blue lights. The new concept is currently being rolled out across the Paris Baguette chain. JHP also worked with famed film and commercial production company Ridley Scott Associates on the production of a set of TV advertisements for Paris Baguette to be aired on Korean TV.

This represented an extension to the brand strategy and communication work that JHP established at the outset of the project. JHP art directed the original in-store movies and photography for the chain. Every customer touch-point with the brand has been carefully considered by JHP. The final piece of the mix was the creation of a new packaging suite for the store’s products. Paris Baguette bakery products are housed in beautifully constructed packaging that make the transportation of the goods home or to work as special as the experience found in-store. Ultimately JHP achieved the goal of creating a “little taste of Paris” in one of the worlds most modern and advanced cities.

115


SPC Korea JHP Design Lighting Consultant YoungJun Lighting Art Consultant JHP Design Main Contractor CM Construction Photography JHP Design Client/Owner design firm

suppliers:

Sung Chang Wood EuroCeramic for floor tiles production SungShin

Wood Flooring Floor tiles Graphic

116

2 Restaurant  

117


fantastic design works co.

scottish glamour ginza, tokyo, JAPAN

165m2

The design theme is based on a whisky brewery.

A dynamic space was made with a mirror. Big barrels were made from FRP so that one can enjoy oneself over Scottish food and whisky.

118

2 Restaurant  

119


DIAMOND DINING fantastic design works co. Main Contractor Katsunori suzuki Photography MASAYA YOSHIMURA Client/Owner design firm

120

2 Restaurant  

121


JOI-Design

redox

Unterschleissheim, Bavaria, Germany

For the restaurant “redox” in the Dolce Munich Unterschleissheim, JOI-Design was briefed to conceive a fine dining establishment that would tell a story through its individuality and reflect the flag’s updated brand standards. The designers’ solution was to construct a tale of Bavarian culture that balances modern and traditional elements while celebrating the region’s culinary inheritance.

86m2

directly corresponds to a tenet of Dolce’s redefined corporate philosophy of “nourishment”, or nurturing the spirit, mind and body of its guests. JOIDesign interpreted this concept through the gourmet restaurant’s contemporary focal point, a backlit “wine wall” which showcases the bountiful – and antioxidantrich - varietals vinified in the region. Gracing either side of the access gallery between the wine displays, “sculptures” of traditional male and female “trachts”, the embroidered national costume of Germany, are a light-hearted homage to the locale’s provenance.

Redox’s understated entry suggests a place of respite from the hubbub of the neighbouring conference areas. The name “redox” refers to the chemical process Evidence of this intimate, 40seat dining area’s Bavarian that naturally occurs in antioxidant foods and, as such, inspiration can be found through the roughly textured antler chandeliers that provide a distinct counterpoint to the smoothness of the crisp white tablecloths and rich dark stained oak; together

122

2 Restaurant  

they evoke the spirit of a fine, time-honoured German dining hall. Tailored leather handles on the bespoke chairs upholstered in wool tweed add a both handsome and functional touch, while the horizontal orientation of the unstained oak panelling behind the banquettes relaxes the room’s tone so diners can unwind from the frenetic pace outside the restaurant. Dramatic contrasts and adjustable mood levels have been achieved through the strategic placement of “ecofriendly” LEDs and energysaving lamps.

JOI-Design’s attractive yet practical scheme reflects the location’s unique cultural heritage as well as Dolce’s new brand identity.

123


Hotel am BallhausForum GmbH,Augsburg JOI-Design GmbH Architect WSSA Architekten GmbH Photography JOI-Design GmbH client/owner design firm

124

2 Restaurant  

125


Sunaqua Concepts Ltd.

prince grill XIAN, CHINA

500m2

The brief was to design a western style grill in a restaurant complex located in a business tower. It was important in this design to project the quality of food into the space and atmosphere.

The designer wanted to create a fairytale dining experience with a “Black Forest” theme. The space is dark with an experimental mix of black finishings and simple, straightforward space planning.

The entrance has a large dramatic window display of wine. At the reception and bar, a huge stone display table occasionally serves as a buffet counter. The grill room is comprised of group seating divided with “horse lamps”. The texture of the wall and ceiling timber are rough and unfinished adding a vintage feel to the space.

126

2 Restaurant  

There are two private rooms. The first is clad in a white wood patterned wallpaper with a more open atmosphere, while the other is in black wood patterned wallpaper making it more cosy with a view into the kitchen. The materials and decoration help create the virtual feeling of entering a storybook world of food and wine.

127


MGF CATERING GROUP Sunaqua Concepts Limited Main Contractor 中山縱橫裝飾公司 Photography Ken Choi Client/Owner design firm

suppliers:

SUNNY TRADING CO. cole & son Artwork SUNAQUA+ Upholstery SUNNY TRADING CO. Curtains/Blinds SUNNY TRADING CO. SPECIAL GLASS 中山創美玻璃公司 Furniture

Wall Covering

128

2 Restaurant  

129


Shaun Clarkson

odette’s London, U.K.

This re-interpretation of the famous restaurant in London’s Primrose Hill is a riot of refreshing colour, but still retains the romance it has become famous for. The rambling white rose floral silhouette

wallpaper printed especially for this project gives the space a fresh and extravagant feel. The romantic and intimate space also includes a romantic, light and airy conservatory with white wire furniture, in which diners feel almost as though they are eating al-fresco.

130

2 Restaurant  

131


client/owner design firm Design Team Photography

132

2 Restaurant  

PAK LOH CHIU CHOW RESTAURANT SHAUN CLARKSON Mr. Sinner Sin & Mr. Danny Ng Mr. Pine Yip & Ms. Hyedy Tsui

133


WESTAR Architects

hannah’s family bistro Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A.

The restaurant’s interior and exterior design was inspired by the An family’s tropical, Asian summer home in Vietnam. Diners enjoy a fusion menu of Vietnamese dishes with French and Pacific Rim influences. The project required the remodel of both the interior and exterior of a non-descript existing building and the addition of two patios, to create a 245-seat restaurant. The exterior façade was redesigned, an exterior BBQ bar was added, lush landscaping installed, and a welcoming entrance was incorporated.

134

2 Restaurant  

669m2

In the interior, water is an essential element of the An family brand, lending to a tranquil dining experience with afaint, background of tropical streams flowing through the space; water also speaks to the freshness of the food. In order to create this experience, the space was designed to include three water features. The first, upon entering the restaurant guests “Walk on Water” over a meandering Koi fish pond which has been recessed into the floor, giving the guests a sense of flow. The feature is fed by two sources: the first being a waterfall gently cascading down a wall next to the entry door, and the second from a glass-topped twelve-seat communal dining table where the water flows under the diner’s tabletop,

then down into the “Walk on Water” feature. The third water feature is a 30-foot-long waterfall gently cascading over a glass wall above the Sushi bar giving visual appeal to guests dining at the bar. The restaurant is separated into various experiences. The marble Sushi bar with its water feature is the focal point upon entry into Hannah’s. The lounge is anchored by a circular reflective glasstopped bar with embedded metallic sheers. The dining room is divided in half by booths that are shrouded with sheer draperies hanging from wooden trusses above; gentlymoving wicker ceiling fans and brown Venetian plaster are all features designed to create a sense of tropical home for the diners. The rear dining room is flanked by large scale Asian influenced artwork and noodle artifacts.

There are two exterior patios: one serves as a dessert and cigar lounge at the rear of the building, and the other, located on the opposite side of

the restaurant, serves grilled appetizers from an outdoor grille behind the exterior bar. The furnishings in these areas are of the lounge type. Bottle service and live entertainment top off the experience. The base color palette complements the rich colors of autumn. Deep reds, browns, greens and beige create the framework for the restaurant. Accent purples, violets and blue can be found on pillows and artwork.

135


Client/Owner Design firm Photography

136

2 Restaurant  

Robert Eng WESTAR Architects Darius Kuzmickas

137


Wilsdon Design Associates

park terrace London, U.K.

335m2

WDA were appointed to work on the complete re-design of the renowned Park Terrace Restaurant, the muchfavoured restaurant at the heart of the hotel’s food and beverage operation. The brief required a complete overhaul of the existing interiors to form a new restaurant-bar-lounge as the key public area of the hotel, integrating operational flexibility within the space and creating a contemporaryclassic look to suit the hotel’s clientele.  A myriad of floor and ceiling levels were removed together with existing services and FF+E, taking the space back to the original concrete structure. 

138

2 Restaurant  

Central to the new design was the desire to provide an almost seamless flow through the restaurant, its private dining space and adjacent bar and lounge to allow guests to use the spaces in a variety of new ways with the greatest comfort and ease. This was achieved through elevating this elongated space to one level, subtly differentiating areas with the inclusion of large glass-laminated sheer fabric screens and the use of a natural material palette that evokes Kensington Gardens beyond the full-height windows. Each window module was framed with a layered effect of sliding sheer screens to either side with fixed fabric pelmet above.

A discreet host desk and free-standing leather-clad wardrobe are situated at the point of entry to the restaurant with adjacent access to the new restrooms. The restaurant’s bar was positioned as a visual anchor to the centre of the main space, just beyond the entrance, establishing important direct visual contact with the lobby, whilst supporting the natural division of spaces to either side.  The bar was designed as a single block of flamed granite, with services recessed to the rear and subtle uplighting to the front face, whilst the rear bar was kept as lightweight and transparent as possible to allow daylight to pass through it from the windows behind, allowing foliage to form the ultimate backdrop to the bar elevation. The sheer glass screens at either side of the bar provide a subtle containment to the area without interfering with

guests’ views across the entire space; achieved in part by the semi-transparency of the screens - themselves up-lit and by their varying heights according to their locations. The visual flow through the spaces was partially maintained at the private dining room (far end of the restaurant), where bespoke geometric glass and satinlacquered shelving form the wall between the two spaces, providing a sense of enclosure for those using the private dining room without entirely removing it and its end feature wall from the overall form of the restaurant. Likewise from the restaurant, the view to the specially commissioned artwork wall within the lounge is only interrupted by the sheer fabric screens providing a layering effect through the length of the entire space.

As a highly used, all-day dining environment, it was essential to build in numerous operational requirements from the start of the design process and to ensure that pantries and service stations were properly located, allowing for maximum capacity when required. This, and the multifunctional aspect of the space, meant for precision space planning and coordination of services. Materials used throughout were selected on the basis of their durability and appropriateness for use within the context of the brief and multi-phased task and decorative lighting was incorporated to effect mood changes throughout the day and create drama at night.

139


Royal Garden Hotel Wilsdon Design Associates Lighting Consultant Elektra Lighting Art Consultant Artefact Main Contractor EE Smith Other Consultants Child Graddon Lewis / Ostell Associates Photography Courtesy of Royal Garden Hotel Client/Owner Design firm

suppliers:

Mega Marble Couristan Fabrics Pollack / DesignTex / Brentano Laminated decorative glass Daedalian Glass Furniture RHA Decorative lighting Porta Romana Blind system Silent Gliss Stone flooring Carpet

140

2 Restaurant  

141


MoHen Design International

danbo fun Shanghai, China

180m2

Danbo Fun means a special kind of omelette in Putonghua where rice is covered with eggs and other ingredients. It is regarded as a mix of western and oriental food. The design concept of Danbo Fun comes from the original Putonghua meaning, which is the vivid and energetic power of eggs. The site is located at the basement atrium of a department store close to the Zhong Shan Park, one of the major city parks in Shanghai. The department store itself is about 10 stories in height with two-escalator access at the sides on all levels.

The designer opted for a dramatic visual impact from the top view of each floor. The floor plan resembles a cracked egg where the yolk has

spilled out. The main access to the restaurant is from the bottom looking towards the free form egg shape. Vinyl floor tiles in an optical artistic pattern reinforce the visual impact of the yolk by including further loose freestanding furniture.

142

2 Restaurant  

143


Zoe International MoHen Design International design Team Hank M. Chao(Architect), Mike Fang, Yu Long Luo, Jun Zeng Chen, Tiffany Wei Photography Maoder Chou(MoHen Design International) client/owner design firm

144

2 Restaurant  

145


Buckley Gray Yeoman

nando’s

Spinningfields , Manchester, U.K.

307m2

Located off the main thoroughfare to the Spinningfields development, the design needed to have a strong external presence to attract the attention of passing trade. Buckley Gray Yeoman were to continue to work with a palette of natural materials and evolve design concepts from the Beckenham scheme. A new build shell unit presented BGY with a blank canvas but no discernable design direction from the surrounding urban realm. The

stated aim of drawing attention to the restaurant had to be achieved without altering or projecting out from the existing shopfront. BGY were to capitalise on the volume of the unit, maximising covers, whilst maintaining a sense of intimacy to dining areas.

A silvered oak box sits within the shell unit. Lights to the front edge give external presence. Backlit perforated panels by Jonathan Coles define the entrance and highlight a servery kitchen. In-situ concrete walls, seating booths and rope screens divide the unit without creating isolated zones. Murals hang to perimeter walls, glimpsed through a timber wrap, and oversized text emphasises the Nando’s brand.

146

2 Restaurant  

147


148

2 Restaurant  

149


Client/Owner

Nando’s Chickenland design firm

Buckley Gray Yeoman Design Team

Matt Yeoman, Peter Thomas, Zsofia Kovacs Main Contractor

GF Contracts lighting Consultant

Jonathan Coles Lighting Design Photography

Hufton & Crow

150

2 Restaurant  

151


CCS Architecture

barbacco eno trattoria San Francisco, CAlifornia, U.S.A.

Barbacco, just opened in San Francisco’s Financial District, is the “sexy little sister” of Perbacco, the acclaimed 2006 Italian restaurant on California Street. Owners Umberto Gibin and chef Staffan Terje saw the need for a more casual option to serve the neighborhood, and when a space next door became available, they engaged CCS Architecture to develop a trattoria that would convert to an enoteca or wine bar at night. The result is Barbacco Eno Trattoria.

246m2

Barbacco, with 66 seats, occupies a long, narrow room within the 1912 Hind Building. Inspired

by traditional wine bars in Milan and Rome, the space is sleek, urbane and welcoming. A dramatic shaped ceiling, evoking the lines of

a sports car, links the higher ceiling at the front of the restaurant with the lower ceiling toward the rear. Forms, detailing, colors and art celebrate Italian culture, cinema, and design. Blurred images of Vespa scooters, wine barrels, sexy Italian screen Vibrant yellow combines The wine bar and eating stars, and motorcycles with more subdued colors counter extend the length of create a sense of sport and to complement the wall the space and sumptuously speed. of exposed brick. Negro curve. An extended row of counter-height tables provides Marquina stone and stainless steel create an urbane, flexibility, accommodating almost industrial feel that the change from daytime is moderated by the warm, to evening. Community textural, dark wood bar face. tables cultivate a bustling Walnut and chrome details on atmosphere toward the front the tables and chairs recall of the space. “Ferrari Yellow” the dashboard of a luxury elements - a beverage case car. Bias-patterned gray and on one wall, with framed yellow floor tiles reinforce the mirror and blurred images feeling of movement. opposite - horizontally line the room. A frameless glass Barbacco is filled with the storefront provides views flavors of Northern Italy, of the warm interior and emanating from the food, but opens the restaurant to the also from the restaurant’s urban landscape beyond. San Francisco’s famous cable cars colors, materials and urban rattle by adding an extra sense attitude. Incorporating some of Perbacco’s DNA, CCS of romance. Architecture has created a chic and approachable new gathering spot that is already a destination in its own right.

© Lawrence Lauterborn

152

2 Restaurant  

153


Client/Owner

Umberto Gibin & Staffan Terje design firm

CCS ARCHITECTURE Design Team

Cass Calder Smith(Design Principal) Barbara Turpin-Vickroy(Interior Design Bryan Southwick(Project Architect)

Director)

Structural Engineer

John Yadegar Associates Kitchen

Frank Muller Lighting 4

4

3

5

5

7 1

2

main dining and front of house

2 Restaurant  

kitchen/back of house bar

main dining and front of house kitchen/back of house bar bar restrooms restrooms main dining and front of house kitchen/back of house

6

154

5 1 entry 2 bar 3 community table dining 4 banquette dining 5 wc 6 kitchen 7 sidewalk

1 2 3 4 5

ENTRY BAR COMMUNITY TABLE DINING BANQUETTE DINING WC

3

City Lights

5

6

7 1

2

MEP

Acies General Contractor

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ENTRY BAR COMMUNITY TABLE DINING BANQUETTE DINING WC KITCHEN SIDEWALK

JME Construction Photographer

Eric Rorer, unless stated

155


4N ARCHITECTS

aok

HONG KONG, CHINA

149m2

Fusion cuisine in Hong Kong has always been marketed as a luxury experience by corporate monoliths. However, the owner of AOK, a well-established local restaurant group, intended to bring fusion cuisine into people’s everyday life. Working with 4N Architects, AOK set out to combine high quality service and reasonably priced During design concept fusion cuisine with Sandwiched between some of Hong Kong oldest development, 4N found that a chic and inviting public housing sectors, the “eggs” have always been interior. fully opened entrance of an important ingredient in AOK intended to invite a wide spectrum of the local population. The facade and details conjure up a feeling of natural beauty within. Spatial experience has always been a key criteria in 4N’s design approach. The interior is sliced into different sections intended to give customers a distinctive experience each time they visit, an approach specially set out for a restaurant in the heart of a residential suburb. On weekdays, one can share the long dining table with neighbors or sit at a round table with family and friends. In contrast one can spend a relaxing Sunday afternoon with the family in a cozy booth seating offering greater privacy.

most Asian cuisine and is thus used as a main feature in this restaurant. An eggshaped structure and circular elements become major elements in the design approach. The egg shellcladded VIP booth, the curved ceiling profile and tectonic concrete floor overlay with circular timber-patterned floor tiles remind customers of Asia’s favourite ingredient. The colour scheme features green, white, and monochrome colors like brown and grey. The earth tone flooring is a special touch by 4N to make people aware of the natural environment. While the green bowl-shapeed ceiling matches the hand-crafted chairs, specially designed by 4N for AOK, it gives the feeling of sitting under a tree. An elongated mirror on one major side of the restaurant is another highlight that

156

2 Restaurant  

provides patrons with reflections of various views. This experiences varies depending on where the customer sits and dines. A special feature of the lighting design is that hidden lights from above the mirror shine onto the bottom of the slanted ceiling panels. This light is reflected back into the interior as comfortable diffused lighting. The branding experience was enhanced by inserting several crafted, patterned panels featuring the restaurant’s floral logo. Light fixtures were carefully chosen to enhance the chic interior with imported pendant and fan lights becoming part of the design feature.

zoned lighting, energysaving LED lamps, adding ceiling fans to enhance air circulation and reduce demand of air-conditioning units, and designing fittings that consume less energy. 4N’s design approach is in harmony within the environment and customer needs. While meeting the owner’s commercial requirements, customers’ desires and needs were not neglected.

As part of 4N’s environmentally friendly objectives, 4N applied various strategies to lower carbon emission from the design aspect as well as in daily operations such as using

157


AOK RESTAURANT Group 4N ARCHITECTS Design Team Sinner Sin & Danny Ng Main Contractor Kee Wah Contracting Company Photography Mr. Pine Yip & Ms. Hyedy Tsui client/owner design firm

supplier: Pendant Light

158

2 Restaurant  

Artemide

159


Ester Bruzkus Architekten

susuru Berlin, Germany

175m2

The udon noodle bar Susuru is located in the centre of Berlin. Susuru means ‘slurping‘ in Japanese whereas in Europe, this is frowned upon. The interior was inspired by the cult Japanese film Tampopo directed by Juzo Itami.

The interior design connects an ideal midday stop-off with a familial atmosphere. The design combines Japanese ornamental, highclass white furniture and minimalist accents. Gently curved seating creates an elegant contrast to sophisticated dark wall tiles. The tiles are a major design element along the main axis. LIghting illuminates every single table. Frank Gehry’s Cloud Suspension Lamp adds more depth to the space.

160

2 Restaurant  

161


162

2 Restaurant  

163


Client/Owner design firm Design Team Photography

164

2 Restaurant  

Dr. Romann Fehrentz Ester Bruzkus Architekten Ester Bruzkus, Sabrina Cegla Ludger paffrath

165


Mut-architecture

restaurant 51 Paris, France

200m2

The newly built Restaurant 51 sits within the Cinémathèque Francaise which is housed in a Frank Gehry structure completed in 1994 - situated at 51 rue de Bercy, in Paris’ 12th arrondissement. The client initiated the project after winning an appel d’offres one month before the project was to be completed - a completion date set to coincide with the restrospective’s Jacques Tati openning. Working from the South Bronx in NY, Eléonore Morand and John Mascaro, i.e., ‘Mut-Architecture’, in competition with another architect, quickly set out to conceive a solution for the 200 sq meter space with a budget

166

2 Restaurant  

of only sixty thousand EU. Mut then began collaborating with Le Potager in Paris to begin implementing the design and manage the project on site. All the team members came together just one week before completion, working straight through to actualize the project.

The space opens to face Parc de Bercy so that unifying the interior space with the Parc became a crucial element of the concept. Spilling from the

building is a forty meter long twisting, turning picnic table constructed of Swiss Pine. The table enters and exits the building in a virtually seemless line, creating a sense of social dining, inviting people from the parc and adjoining neighbourhood.

Fabrication of the table ended in the hands of Kunstbetrieb of Münchenstein SW. Together with the Swiss team, Mut devised a method for bending the elements of the table without the use of steam. Moulds were made, glue was purchased by the bucketload, clamps were applied. The table flows through the space like a stream broken in points to allow the flow of foot traffic.

certain legs, then crunched the remaining parts together to fit the space allotted for the epicerie. The piece was sanded and coated with the same black paint used for the walls of the larger of the restaurant’s two rooms. Atop the epicerie, in nooks and within dresser drawers, sit cans of pâté or bottles of wine.

the entirety of the space, from a formally white room to the rugged, solid black room. The whole space is illuminated by ad hoc chandeliers constructed of ‘Y’ sockets purchased in New York’s Chinatown for less than 200 EUs and a varying assortment of bulbs found in hardware shops around Paris.

Hanging from old hutch legs you find saucisson to be accompanied this summer Inside the restaurant, the by lounge chairs and picnic Epicerie is an amalgamation baskets one can rent from of discarded furniture pieces purchased for 250 EU. Working the restaurant to relax with products from the epicerie. on site, Mut and Le Potager Rather than settling for regular dismantled the furniture, structural legs, seven pairs cut away shelves, smashed of filled fishing boots serve through drawers, chopped off as the structural support for a bank which houses the cash register and electronic equipment for ‘Restaurant 51’. A large protruding mezzanine, in which a library is housed, was painted a rich red. The giant object passes through

167


)

Hughes PIketty Mut-architecture design team John Mascaro, Eléonore Morand, Brigitte Bouillot, Benoit Millot Table fabrication Jürg Bader(kunstbetrieb) Photography Brigitte Bouillot client/owner design firm

168

2 Restaurant  

169


OUTLINE

bangalore express city London, U.K.

480m2

Bangalore Express is a restaurant serving creative Indian food. The client wanted to maintain a visual relationship with Outline’s first Bangalore restaurant in Waterloo. However, it was also important that the City site should have its own character,

responding to its location within the square mile. The designers conceived of the City restaurant as the older sibling of the Waterloo branch. Coffered ceilings were created over the two floors as a modern allusion to the banking halls in the vicinity. The ceiling is a negative landscape, allowing the side

170

2 Restaurant  

lighting to have darker and brighter spots to heighten the volume of the spaces. Around the Ground floor Bar, tiffin bowls are set into the wall, a reference to Indian take away meals, used by workers to carry their lunch. Many of the bar’s surfaces reflect at strange angles, allowing views over to the informal seating arrangement behind. An overhead mirrored glass rack, running the full length of the bar, adds to the abstraction of the space and reflects the linear lights set under the bar top. A large, feature staircase, purposefully sited opposite the entrance, leads customers directly down to the dining rooms. Here a series of covered booths runs the entire length of the Basement, splitting the room to make three separate areas: A main dining room, an Indian seating area with raised platform and a private dining room, all lead from the booths. The intention is to make three distinctive dining experiences

while making sure they are interlinked and allow views through to the other spaces. The booths themselves have a lowered ceiling and are designed to make a rhythm through the restaurant’s main axis, based on two tables per wraparound enclosure. The grooved walls around the bar and restaurant are as the Waterloo restaurant, a 6mm line cut into the wallboard. This idea came from seeing the waste sheet contractors place under a board they are cutting. After several cuts, this underboard has a series of shallow grooves forming an abstract pattern. This method was replicated on the walls painting the grooves in the basement bright red. Overall,

the City restaurant has a more refined colour palate than the Waterloo restaurant, again reflecting the surroundings and clientele. Outline offers a design-led service to clients looking for a creative team who can respond to their individual requirements. Through collaboration with a network of specialist contractors, consultants, craftsmen, artists and suppliers they deliver innovative, userspecific spaces. Through use of materials, understanding of light and exploration of the project’s brief, Outline makes spaces that are not only visually beautiful, but functional and practical. According to them, design is only part of the process.

171


Waterloo Leisure OUTLINE Main Contractor TBA Contractors Electrical Contractor Griffin Electrical Engineers Packman Lucas M&E Consultant Pearce and Associates Photography Courtesy of outline client/owner design firm

172

2 Restaurant  

173


PAUL KELLY DESIGN

cargo pizza & bar Tasmania, Australia

275m2

Paul Kelly Design was contacted by the client David Hales in early 2008, after the finalization of another project completed for the client ‘ Observatory Hotel’, to create a small scale pizza and wine bar in the historic Salamanca Precinct.

The brief from the client was to create a bar that could trade from lunch to late night, by keeping a low and small profile and not being too definite in the direction/markets that were being attracted. The space was to offer an internal offer of high volume pizza and wine / bar and an external retail face offering pizza, coffee and gelato.

The space previous to the renovation was two tenancies, one with a Fish and Chip shop and the other a historic walkway with cobble stone floors housing an ATM. A protracted battle was undertaken to obtain the local government clearance to open the two tenancies to each other, due to the history of

the space, but this was finally obtained and works began. The concept was based around a classic heritage style interior with a raw/stripped concept balancing out the charm. The internal bar space features a large bar area, high bar standing area, side and rear lounges (which are raised) and wide outdoor tables to the street. The Pizza kitchen can be viewed from the raised lounge area, and a lot of natural light spills through the space from the wide openings to the street. The interior of the space, prior to the renovation, consisted of painted stone walls that were constructed of a mixture of plaster and rubble. This was an early method of securing the sandstone/bluestone walls, but is not always the most appealing of surfaces. To cover this to the rear of

174

2 Restaurant  

the bar, hand-made convict bricks were sourced from a demolished turn of the century building and placed in the space to make it feel more original. The ceiling in the space was the original timber joists for the floor over. These were adapted and acoustic lining placed between the joists to increase noise absorption. All existing timber columns and ceiling were painted white for continuity. The fitout looks like it was existing but all the original elements were imported to give it that lived in feel, the idea being that the bar has always been here just as it was discovered. The space uses a lot of raw steel mixed. The back of bar shelving unit is a continual piece of steel section, bolted into the wall (with secret LED lighting). The bar is

made up of steel profiles, all distressed with antique mirror in between to maximize the depth. The main feature of the room is the dividing spine wall between the two original tenancies. This was covered in white tiles, with every tile laid in a different direction. It has the appearance of the original wall which may have been used 30 years ago. The tile pattern, combined with lighting, has a great effect as night increases because the tiles reflect different shapes in the shadowing.

The renovations have brought the quantity of pizzas to 1,200 per week and has become the destination bar for the states capital. The space is a simple concept located in a prime location with heavy competition, but pushes through the competition due to its quality service, product and fit-out.

The raised lounge area, which is hidden between the recesses in the white tiled wall, is a great place for customers to get into the space early and hide in the background enjoying a few wines, on the leather banquettes with the customdesigned acrylic pendants overhead.

175


Client/Owner

SOUTHBANC GROUP – David Hales Design firm PAUL KELLY DESIGN Design TEAM PAUL KELLY, STUART FORMOSA, HANNAR DAR BUILDER CORDWELL LANE STRUCURAL ENGINEER BURBURY CONSULTING AV SERVICES KWMC Photography Sean Fennessy

176

2 Restaurant  

177


SHH

teaspoon St Petersburg, Russia 305m2

A bold and striking new design concept was conceived for Russian tearoom operator Teaspoon. Teaspoon is a

6 year-old and 70-strong Russian chain of tea and pancake houses, based mainly in the St Petersburg and Moscow

regions in high street and hypermarket locations. The Teaspoon offer is based around a range of speciality teas, along with savoury and sweet pancakes. Each pancake is made to order and so the client brief asked to underline the theatricality of the preparation process, whilst customers await their order. The new design also had to encapsulate a broader offer including coffee, cakes and also draught beer, created

178

2 Restaurant  

as a separated offer with a dedicated till and aimed at different customer time slots in the day and evening. The new 300 sq m space had a natural sense of theatre with an exceptionally high 6m void below the beams (and a further 2m above) and existing industrial-feel exposed ceilings, with enough volume to allow for an interior

treatment of strong colours and dramatic design features. SHH wanted to achieve a clean, light and dramatic feel for the interior, building on the existing orange brand identity. The designers were also briefed to create a highly contemporary concept, but one that was specifically Russian and non-generic. The strongest new design feature – a 6m-high wraparound ceramic wall took the existing orange of the

Teaspoon brand and added two further tones of orange, along with black and white for contrast. Taking inspiration from traditional Russian folkloric art, the colours were combined to create a locationspecific, huge scale ceramic wall, which dominates the space. The main space customer seating area takes the form of large, communal, picnic-style tables; some with benches and some higher up with loose seating, whilst some tables are single and others double-sided, so that all types

of users, from single users to groups, feel comfortable. Above the main seating area and balancing out the impact of the tiled ceramic wall is a series of ten giant-scale, bespoke hanging pendant lights in black with an orange interior. A more intimate area down one side of the new space features booth seating, with bespoke-designed highbacked orange seats and orange perspex low-pendant lights above each table. A lounge area, with a different design treatment, houses 8 smaller round tables and loose furniture.

179


180

2 Restaurant  

181


Teaspoon SHH Design Team Neil Hogan, Helen Hughes, Ashley Thompson project location St Petersburg, Russia Photography Courtesy of SHH client/owner design firm

182

2 Restaurant  

183


WESTAR Architects

liquid New Jersey, U.S.A.

557m2

The concept behind the Liquid Bar and Café was to create a multipurpose entertainment and dining experience. The bar and café are colocated, each open 24 hours a day and they both change functions throughout the day. The bar serves quick to-go pastries and coffee in the morning and salads and sandwiches throughout the day. The back wall of windows and doors open to the famous boardwalk that overlooks the Atlantic Ocean while the front is open to the hotel and the café. At night, it turns into a live entertainment venue with V.I.P. seating and bottle service and music that can be heard on the beach. Frozen vodka lockers and a curved-glass wine display conspire to create private seating areas in the

184

2 Restaurant  

Bar. The backlit serpentine bar meanders throughout the space. Faux ostrich skin wall panels, wood ceilings and red terrazzo floors define the bar. A double-sided second bar opens to the Boardwalk and the Atlantic Ocean. The patio seating is defined by hand-bent railings. The color palette of the Bar furniture is deep reds, oranges and browns while the fabrics are mostly solids with interesting textures of terrycloth and velvet.

The upscale Café serves a sophisticated menu of Asian, Italian, Americana, and vegetarian fares. Half of the dining room is open to the lounge for an exciting dining and dancing experience, while the other half is intimate and quiet for a romantic evening. The Café softens to a palette of pastels of yellows, oranges, reds, and browns in interesting patterns. Twenty-foot tall metal piping encloses the booths and defines the boundaries of the Café. Banquettes create freestanding scrolls to divide the Café into small, quaint zones.

185


Client/Owner Design firm Photography

186

2 Restaurant  

Trump entertainment WESTAR Architects Darius Kuzmickas

187


Planet 3 Studios

mochamojo Bandra, Mumbai, India

237m2

A well known chain of coffee shops distinguished by a distinct, eclectic kind of interiors wanted to up-end the experience for its patrons at one of the outlets. A brand and space quality perception study was conducted by the designers involving patrons, management and employees provided interesting pointers to the way forward. Chor bazaar chic seemed to work well only up to a point and beyond that the cognitive dissonance of reconciling second hand furniture with quality experience was testing customer approval. The designers understood that at its essence, the experience hinged on period evocation. By reorienting the entire concept towards the exuberant, visually exciting and easily recognizable 70s, they drew from retro references and interpreted them in a contemporary context. By researching art, graphics, colour palettes, finishes, furniture, wall treatments, tiles, window dressings, interior styles, lighting and more, they created a library of sorts to be mined for inspiration.

access to a faux fur lined alcove that exuded excess and decadence of the age. Sofas, seats and even a floor rug took the crimson hue. A high recognition pattern was specially recreated and printed on plain wallpaper to create a striking backdrop for an iconic object of the age…. an Ambassador car. A trunk accommodated a seat and ensured the tail lights worked. Plastic moulded seats, the iconic lip sofa, chrome edged

and Formica-topped diner tables, flower power ottomans, white couches with quilted covers, neo-retro table with a lamp for a leg, high gloss jigsaw puzzle tables, a Rubik’s cube for a corner table, a large table shaped as a telephone dial, a multi-colour sofa, a whole seating that spelt ‘Make Love Not War’ and colourful garden benches that hugged a live tree…all were created and assembled to achieve the intended vibe. An authentic

cement floor from the time and an exciting 3D tile patterned floor outside were polished and left basically intact. Shag pile carpets added colour in intense patches. Accessoried with LOVE laser cut in mirror, lava lamps and up to door handles fashioned out of telephone parts, this space was crafted with attention to detail. From retro washroom tiles to cladding laminate on the outdoor fascia, the

intensity of the design quality is maintained consistently. This project is unabashedly over the top and revels in sheer excess. The designers helped create a unique spatial experience for patrons who will hopefully take in multiple cultural references and a design vibe to be transported to another age and time. Forever retro!

Except for an interesting ceiling in one section of the existing restaurant, everything else was stripped bare. Within this empty shell, a retro inspired bar and backdrop in signal red with frosted acrylic cutouts and faint backlighting was added. A collage of Roy Lichtenstein pop art clad on adjacent walls defined the

188

2 Restaurant  

189


190

2 Restaurant  

191


Client/Owner

Impresario Entertainment & Hospitality Pvt. Ltd Design firm Planet 3 Studios Design Team Kalhan Mattoo, Santha Gour Mattoo, Dimple Toraskar, Mansee Jain. Photography Mrigank Sharma, India Sutra

192

2 Restaurant  

193


STUDIO GAIA, INC.

sakea Busan, South Korea

740m2

SAKAE is a modern interpretation of a traditional Japanese restaurant, elegant and warm, a bit formal, wrapped in a traditional “wrapping paper�. The restaurant is monolithic and architectural, designed with basic shapes and with a sense of surprise and discovery. Lighting plays an integral part in the design without being overwhelming. It is a play of the old and new, traditional and modern, wrapped in red and flowers. The main challenge was creating this balance.

194

2 Restaurant  

Upon entering the re-opened Japanese restaurant Sakae, one is greeted by cherry blossoms on a red wall. Sakae encompasses three unique spaces including an independent space in a modernistic, simple design and a hall that embraces sunshine in summer. During the summer vacations in July and August, Sakae introduces two special menus for lunch, a bowl of boiled eel and rice set and an Eenaniwa udon set. In Sakae, one can enjoy the feeling of hot and cold in the interior design and menu, which reflects the blazing sun and a cool breeze.

195


196

2 Restaurant  

197


198

2 Restaurant  

199


PARADISE GROUP STUDIO GAIA, INC. Design Team Ilan Waisbrod, Heaohn Lee, Ronald Deschamps, Patricia Walker Photography Courtesy of STUDIO GAIA client/owner design firm

200

2 Restaurant  

201


MoHen Design International

danbo fun fast food Shanghai, China

250m2

The design consideration about ambience and function in fast food chains and restaurants are vastly different, not only in the general atmosphere but also in their overall operation. In addition to the necessary functions such as an easy usage and sanitization, the design focus for this particular fast food chain was to emphasize its unique market segment, as well as enhance the company’s corporate identity. The owner of Danbo Fun has an accurate understanding of the image and concept they hope to achieve, as well as

202

2 Restaurant  

determining their position in the market. The target was to create a joyful and modern gathering for people in the 18 to 35 year age group place to dine comfortably.

To accomplish this, the designers decided to analyze and draw their inspiration from the root of the concept.

After consideration, the designers were inspired to present the energy and power How could this be conveyed intrinsically without resorting of an egg with flourish and to conventional methods? How energy, symbolizing the bloom could a stronger visual impact of youth. Following the basis be marketed? How could this of this design concept, they be achieved to allow people to created and interpreted all the create a buzz about a distinct design lines and decorative image? Or to be more specific, language accordingly. Lines how could ‘Danbo Fun’ be are relatively mild, though made unforgettable in the it is not an exaggerated free minds of consumers? circumstance of space as expected; decorative language

is also appropriated with playful patterns, emphasizing cuteness rather than naughtiness. The lava lamp wall symbolizes the flow of an egg yolk while the entire LED comes together to make the whole space appear livelier. The floating curves from the bar shapes are also attempts at slightly increasing the comparable line tensions. However, using an intense stimulus, the color hues veered from traditional tones, but approximations of the yellow tone was still the main base which was controlled to achieve a modest contrast.

According to the designer, “It is both interesting and fun to help the younger generation to design space evoking a youthful revival. I think I’m

naughty at heart just like in my school days.”

203


204

2 Restaurant  

205


Zoe International MoHen Design International design Team Hank M. Chao(Architect), Mike Fang, Yu Long Luo, Jun Zeng Chen Photography Maoder Chou(MoHen Design International) client/owner design firm

206

2 Restaurant  

207


WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design

kaffeine laneway

Fitzrovia, London, U.K.

80m2

The scheme consists of a full refurbishment to an existing restaurant in Fitzrovia, London. The new cafe, Kaffeine was shortlisted for Best Cafe in the 2010 Restaurant & Bar Design Awards Timber decking and bluestone tiles respectively reference Australia generally and Melbourne in particular, where this type of stone was used extensively in the Victorian era. Boxes of timber decking function as seating and tables, alluding to the ubiquitous reuse of milk crates in contemporary Melbournian cafĂŠs. High-level mirror to

208

2 Restaurant  

the rear similarly creates an illusion of infinite space, recalling the flat Australian horizon. The compression of a Melbourne laneway is evoked by the longitudinal arrangement of the service counter and seating through the middle of the space, while the expansive area to the rear mimics the openness of the street to the front.

A number of previously latent elements of the London site are brought to the foreground, including Victorian floorboards, brickwork, and a traditional shop-front. An active tension is established between these found-object components of the existing building, and the transplanted spatial and formal devices that have been introduced.

209


Private WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design Design Team William Tozer, Chris Beer, Tom Shelswell & Bonnie Rogers Main Contractor Metropolitan Construction Photography Courtesy of WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design Client/Owner

Design firm

210

2 Restaurant  

211


Maurice Mentjens Design

frans hals museumcafé Haarlem, The Netherlands

200m2

The museum café in the Frans Hals Museum has gone back to its original tripartite layout: a row of three small houses. Interior designer Maurice Mentjens gave each house its own colour palette in shades of grey. As an accent, he used the

The Frans Hals Museum is housed in the Oudemannenhuis (Old Men’s Alms House), a tranquil group of 17th-century homes surrounding a courtyard. In order to add a museum café to the building, three adjoining houses dating from the early 20th century were bought and broken through. Twenty years later, the interior had become very dated because of its lowered ceilings, obscured passageways and

fragmented space. Johan Jacobs, architectural historian for the municipality of Haarlem, proposed restoring the former layout and making the structure recognisable as three distinct houses, while respecting the existing floor plan. In his search for inspiration, Maurice Mentjens looked first at the paintings of Frans Hals, one of the Old Dutch Masters, who experienced his greatest

colours of the historic Dutch flag - orange, white and blue. The design is intended to honour the sober yet sophisticated schutterstukken (group portraits of civilian guards) by the Dutch master Frans Hals.

success in the Dutch Golden Age of the 17th century. “To my surprise, I realised that the interiors in his paintings are all decorated very soberly, almost minimalistically. This is true of both his individual portraits and his large schutterstukken. The underlit, purposely vague decors in which the characters are placed are actually always composed of the same basic tones: antique white, grey, tan, dark grey, and black.” This characteristic sobriety was carried over into the interior design. Each former house received its own corresponding palette of grey shades. The first space with its alcoves has been painted in three shades of grey, the second in the historical shade “horn white” (a pale off-white) with light grey, and the third, the lecture room, has been done completely in black. The wall decorations, also in black and white, consist of halftone prints of Frans Hals

212

2 Restaurant  

paintings, large enough to fill an entire wall. The print on the wall by the kitchenette is dominated by shades of white, while the version in the lecture room shows a preponderance of black. The colour concept also uses three particular colours for contrast. Mentjens chose them with great care after examining five famous schutterstukken, including the Banquet of the Officers of the Cavaliermen Civic Guard (1627). In this Hals work, the officers of the Cavaliermen Civic Guard stand out against a grey background, decorated with sashes in orange, white and blue. These are the colours of the various companies of the Civic Guard, and also the colours of the flag of the States of Holland, the governing body of the County of Holland until 1795. This combination of symbolic colours is present in the new museum café in the fabrics used for the benches along the walls.

An existing bottleneck was put to good use in planning the new layout of the museum café. The housing for the transformer juts halfway into the first two houses. Instead of trying to disguise it, Mentjens decided to take advantage of this bulky structure by using it as a bar. The addition of beams to the walls surrounding the unit makes it resemble an old half-timbered house. The beams themselves serve as bottle-racks. In order to combine all the individual details into a coherent whole, pale oak floors have been used throughout, complemented by oak doors, as well as oak shutters in the lecture room. Teardrop lamps add a playful touch to this relatively sober, almost calculated interior. The result is a three-dimensional deconstruction and transmutation of a sumptuous schutterstuk from that glorious period of Dutch history that is the Golden Age.

213


214

2 Restaurant Restaura  

215


216

2 Restaurant  

217


218

2 Restaurant  

219


220

2 Restaurant  

221


Frans Hals Museum Haarlem Maurice Mentjens Design General contractor Bouwbedrijf Henselmans Constructor Constructiebureau Tentij BV Electric installations Somers Elektro Techniek Soundsystem Techno Desk Climatecontrol Spaarnelanden n.v. Lighting Grease Lighting Floor Brederode Parket Painting Rijs Schilderwerken Interior Curfs Interieurbouw Wall prints Jean-Pierre Zoetbrood Photography Arjen Schmitz client/owner design firm

222

2 Restaurant  

223


VONSUNG

viet hoa cafe LONDON, U.K.

128m2

Situated in the heart of a conservation area, Viet Hoa Cafe is the first Vietnamese restaurant established (1995) on Kingsland Road, London, E1. When the designers sat down with the client in August 2009, they wanted to resist the endless march for efficiency in a place of dining and basically, human interaction.  But people are wonderfully chaotic, messy, unorganized, and complicated creatures.   The designers felt that the restaurants’ or shopping centers’ customers are

224

2 Restaurant  

constantly being shunted into a carefully shaped box which isn’t fitted perfectly. When they researched Vietnam and its culture, they were pleasantly surprised to see less chaotic stock and more people in their atmospheric surrounding.  Thus the

planks. There is oak wood scent in every corner of the restaurant and the floors and walls are smooth and inviting to the touch.   The floors and walls are made of 4 meter long pieces that stop one-inch short of the purpose-built acoustic brief became ‘less ceilings to create lateral is more’. They openings across the top of the west side of the restaurant craved simplicity made of lacquered black and added wood strips.  The gap is to individuality to the show how the restaurant breathes - the heating and air restaurant’s main conditioning are channelled focus. through the strips and it   makes the restaurant feel Discovering that the building’s longer and higher.   structure was strong enough   to support heavy materials, the To maintain the infinity of the entire restaurant’s floors, walls space using the strips, Joseph and ceilings were constructed Sung (Creative Director of with solid, thick European oak VONSUNG) avoided revealing the surfaces whenever possible.  Storage area, and

even the toilets, disappear into the walls only to be opened by a hidden door handle. The entrance to the restaurant has been positioned out of view, eliminating the need for an additional second entrance door.   The main task was to unify the space in terms of color and materials - as furniture was acquired that would have such an impact.  The palette was earthy and neutral yet structured with distinct lines, like sculptures, are references to Vietnam’s surrounding water and sky.  The furniture finishes amplify the straight lines of the restaurant’s wood and strip panelling. The main

feature of the restaurant is the 9 meter-long center table which houses the King & Queen chair underneath the David Chipperfield chandelier. Intimacy was achieved by focusing on the smallest details and by trying to surprise and delight guests by way of branding designs by Michiko Ito.  We developed the new identity by creating the HOA - ‘blossoming flower’ in Vietnamese - these intimate Hoa logo mark can be found in all way-finding, branding collateral, packaging and uniforms.

225


VIET HOA CAFE VONSUNG Design Team Joseph Sung, Jing Chen Lighting Consultant Delta Lights Main Contractor VONSUNG Photography Yu-Kuang Client/Owner Design firm

226

2 Restaurant  

227


SHH

applemore college canteen Southampton, U.K. 450m2

SHH redesigned the dining area of Applemore College, a Southampton secondary school, in close consultation with both The Sorrell Foundation and UK government body The School Food Trust, which seeks to improve the quality of school food, promote the health of children and young people and increase school meal take up by targeting problem areas. The dining area had a series of complex issues. It was essentially a set of knocked-together spaces within a separated singlestorey building, it lacked cohesiveness and atmosphere and was very unpopular

with the pupils. The brief for the low-budget project was to create a sense of indoor greenery and some sheltered outdoor space, blurring the indoor/outdoor barriers. Dividing walls were to be translucent, increasing the sense of space and visibility; queue times were to come down and there should be better provision for litter and the use of sound-absorbing materials.

SHH’s design concept for this space was to make a virtue of the spareness of the space and create a semi-industrial graphic-led environment with a certain tough and streetwise atmosphere, softened by an ‘outside in’ policy with three of the new façades facing out onto the green grass. The 4,000 sq ft interior has a relaxed cafeteria feel with zoned areas, some formal and some with looser low seating. Overhead hanging graphic panels help to absorb noise. Materials throughout are inspired by nature, with a yellow and green colourway.

228

2 Restaurant  

A rationalised seating plan with value-engineered furniture is offset by a striking striped floor in 2m-wide stripes (in a nonslip durable vinyl), with an industrial look inspired by Manchester’s groundbreaking Haçienda club. An external shipping

container provides cover for some extra external seating (sprayed green to add a visual link to the interior). Also outside, screeded-off concrete stools (formed from Milton concrete tubes filled with concrete and aggregate) feature an iconic belisha beacon at their centre.

229


230

2 Restaurant  

231


client/owner

Applemore College / The School Food Trust design firm SHH Design Team

Neil Hogan, Helen Hughes, Ashley Thompson, Adam Woodward Photography Gareth Gardner

232

2 Restaurant  

233


SHH

cherbourg primary school dining room Southampton, U.K. 200m2

SHH redesigned the dining area of Cherbourg Primary School in close consultation with both The Sorrell Foundation and UK government body The School Food Trust. Like many schools, Cherbourg’s dining area was also the school hall and served as a multi-purpose space, used variously for assemblies, sport, after-school club, storage and AV presentations. It was inevitably full of clutter, as it held equipment associated with all these functions, preventing it from serving any individual function as

234

2 Restaurant  

well as it should. The brief for the very tight budget scheme (£45k in total) was to create a way to make all those activities smoother and less invasive by creating imaginative storage solutions and reworking the dining space counter area. The brief was to allow a separate feel for each activity, with improved lighting and storage, nicer furniture, better queuing at lunchtimes and quicker service - and to allow a sense of nature, colour and pattern into the space.

Simple redecoration in white created a pure backdrop for a number of creative solutions to lighting, storage and highimpact graphic designs. Furniture was chosen that could be stored in trolleys, so that the whole hall space could be cleared, when needed, for other purposes. The trolleys also sit in the space during lunchtimes and feature coat hooks on the side for the children’s coats to hang on before going out to play.

The far side of the hall has classrooms beyond a corridor area. The windows for these have been dressed with ‘stained glass’ vinyl applications, tying in with the decoration of all existing storage containers to create a highly graphic environment, with great projected reflections when the sunlight shines through. New pinboards can be used for notices, teaching or to display the children’s work. The new graphics were developed in close consultation with the children, who wanted to

use images suggesting the outdoors, trees (tying in with the school’s proximity to the New Forest), freshness and fresh food - especially fruit and vegetables. To help keep noise down, lighting is set within 8 foam, sound-absorbing chandeliers (or ‘sound hoovers’ as the children have christened them), each measuring 1500 x 1200mm.

235


236

2 Restaurant  

237


client/owner

Cherbourg Primary School / The School Food Trust design firm SHH Design Team

Neil Hogan, Helen Hughes, Ashley Thompson, Adam Woodward Photography Gareth Gardner

238

2 Restaurant  

239


Evoke International Design inc.

commune cafe Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

125m2

Commune Café is a modern space utilizing light woods, recycled felt upholstery, cork pendants, custom wood tables and bright red chairs, creating a contemporary and inclusive room. The space is organized around the service kitchen, with large custom food display units and dark stone countertops. The menu boards are written with magnetic letters, easy to change and viewable from any location in the room. The dining area has a capacity of 26 seats, and comprises a long white oak communal table with 18 red lacquer chairs and custom built booths at the perimeter. The four 2-person booths are also built in white oak, with seat cushions made from recycled wool industrial felt. Above the communal table hang three cork pendant

lamps by Benjamin Hubert. At the back of the dining room there is a large scale, vibrant mural that depicts a time when the cafe was the hub of social life and the inspiration for the exchange of ideas and creativity. The exterior of the corner site space is wrapped by a dining patio constructed entirely of western red cedar. The patio has space for an additional 24 seats, and is useable year round. Jasper Morrison Air Arm Chairs by Magis provide a clean compliment to the sleek patio details and glass

curtainwall frontage. Branding for the café was also used extensively on the exterior. Bright red vinyl window coverings provide a dramatic punch of colour and graphics framing the patio, while the central message of “those who eat together stay together” greets the guests upon entering the room. The client requested a holistic sustainable approach, and this is manifest in the use of FSC certified wood flooring, recycled felt, low flow plumbing fixtures, energy

efficient lighting, durable stone and stainless work surfaces and exposed concrete ceilings. This complements the recycling and food composting programme the kitchen strictly adheres to. There is a common design language used throughout Commune with Evoke being responsible for: interior design, custom-designed furniture, wall mural design and illustration, menus and all branding (including name development, logo identity, collateral graphics, signage).

Samei Holdings Evoke International Design inc Design Team David Nicolay, Robert Edmonds, Dean Collingridge Lighting Consultants Lightform Main Contractor Action Projects Photography Janis Nicolay Client/Owner

design firm

Suppliers:

Benjamin Hubert (Cork) Magis (Magis) Chairs Andreu World (Andreu World)

Pendant Lamps Patio Chairs Dining

240

2 Restaurant  

241


WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design

lantana

striated space Fitzrovia, London, U.K.

75m2

The scheme consists of a full refurbishment to an existing restaurant in Fitzrovia, London. Lantana was voted Best New Cafe in the Timeout London awards.Â

A distinction is drawn between the modern insertion of sculptural timber volumes and associated white planes that enclose various functional elements, and the existing building into which they have been placed. Through the addition of a white paint finish, the existing ceilings and walls have been curated and brought into a new relationship with the modern insertions, but are otherwise preserved in their raw and partially finished state.

The scheme consists of an internal and external refurbishment to an existing restaurant in Fitzrovia, London. The new joinery and existing walls are white painted. The existing ceiling and walls have been left in their original state and painted white, creating a new relationship with the modern insertions. The floor has been finished in oak floorboards, mirrored in the slats of the service counter and high

bar area, which conceals an existing vent to an electrical sub-station in the basement. The external fixed glazing has been replaced with a hinged window to encourage interaction with the outside area. The washrooms are white painted with white tiles.

Private WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design Design Team William Tozer, Chris Beer, Tom Shelswell & Bonnie Rogers Main Contractor Metropolitan Construction Photography Courtesy of WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design Client/Owner Design firm

242

2 Restaurant  

243


Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc.

Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Clink Restaurant is the full service, three-meal restaurant in the new Liberty Hotel in Boston. The Liberty, located in the former 1851 historic Charles Street Jail Building has become one of Boston’s newest and most popular hotel and restaurant destinations.

307m 2

Clink is a casual restaurant that is located adjacent to the hotel’s lobby. Its name is of course derived from “jailhouse slang” which seems appropriate given that the décor surrounding this restaurant is indeed complete with original and authentic cell doors, steel bars, and brick walls.

©Kwesi Arthur

clink

Unlike the space in its former life however, the restaurant now is a high-energy environment with polished wood floors, contemporary artwork and comfortable furnishings. The menu is broad and eclectic and the chef can be seen at work in the open kitchen. The restaurant also has a bar that serves the hotel lobby and has in itself become a Boston institution, offering classic drinks in its most unusual setting of a repurposed jail! Clink is a unique restaurant in a very unique setting.

©Kwesi Arthur

Client/Owner

The Liberty Hotel design firm

Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. Design Team

Cambridge Seven Assoc./Alexandra Champalimuad & Assoc. Lighting Consultant

Candace Kling Lighting Design

244

2 Restaurant  

Anja Kohler Main Contractor

Suffolk Construction Photography

Kwesi Arthur, Peter Vanderwarker

©Peter Vanderwarker

©Peter Vanderwarker

©Peter Vanderwarker

Art Consultant

245


Jordan Mozer and Associates, Ltd.

copper bleu Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.

Copper Bleu is a Modern American Bistro in Dakota County, Minnesota, fifteen minutes south of Minneapolis. It is an independent restaurant featuring handcrafted American supper-club dishes composed with seasonal ingredients and pronounced culinary inflections from Asia and Europe, reflecting the increasingly diverse suburban population united by popular culture. Similarly, the design for the building is an abstraction of the prairie landscape and the idyllic archetypical midcentury vernacular lodges and roadhouses of Minnesota.    The design team for Copper Bleu was led by Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited Jordan Mozer is an artist / designer with degrees in architecture and product design. He and his partner, architect Jeff Carloss, created designs for the building, the landscape, and most of the handmade furnishings, employing many regional

246

2 Restaurant  

650m2

materials such as fieldstone, copper, bronze, Douglas fir lumber, quartz, Minnesota limestone and walnut.   The site features rolling farmland and slices of deciduous forest and prairie. The form of the building emerged from a series of drawings, paintings and sculptures Jordan Mozer used to study and abstract the landscape forms. Two undulating copper-clad buildings (nicknamed Josh and Jake, after the owner’s sons) wrap around a terraced patio surrounded by evergreens, evoking a public exterior space suggestive of the north-woods weekend homes of Minnesota. Copper, mined nearby, was used to clad the roof and walls. The base of the building is local fieldstone. 

The sculptural forms of the building give the restaurant drive-by street presence. The building forms are like the landscape forms and as copper has developed a healthy patina, the natural color has become even more integrated with the landscape. The design of the restaurant began with an efficient kitchen and seating plan that minimized waiter travel distance and maximized the number of seats and flexibility.

The plan is terraced, rolling like the landscape, allowing guests inside and outside to see one another. The interior of Copper Bleu is inspired by the archetypical lodges and roadhouses throughout rural Minnesota. The interior is entirely surfaced in warm wood, softened with textiles and highlighted by glass. The ceiling is a twisting rhythm of glue-laminated Douglas fir beams and decking. Between the beams are chandeliers composed of

perforated metal and 25,000 glowing test tubes, inspired by the famous Minnesota Mayo Medical Clinic. The walls, like the ceiling decking, are composed of Douglas fir tongue and groove decking. Sunlight from the long garden window illuminates velvet seating in the terraced dining room. Finish materials are natural and designed to improve with age and patina. Seating, lights and hardware were designed and manufactured for Copper Bleu by Jordan Mozer and Associates Limited.  

Restaurant Tour LLC Jordan Mozer and Associates, Limited Design Team Jordan Mozer(Principal/Designer); Jeff Carloss(Principal/Architect); Beverlee Mozer(General Manager); Siamak Mostoufi(Project Designer / Project Manager); Matt Winter (Project Product Designer); Tim Schwarz, Brad Schenkel & Courtney Suess (Designers); Reggie Trimble (Coordinator) Architect of Record Cuningham Group Architecture, P.A. Structural Engineer Lindau Companies, Inc. Real Estate Services Hempel Properties Mechanical Engineer Harris Companies Electrical Engineer Parsons Civil Engineer Pierce Pini & Associates, LLC Main Contractors Kraus-Anderson Construction Co (General Contractor); Jordan Mozer Studios, LLC (Interior elements) Photography Doug Snower Photography client/owner design firm

247


Smolenicky & Partner Architektur

strozzi “piu” Zurich, Switzerland

Smolenicky & Partner Architektur won the contract to design a new restaurant within the former Credit Suisse headquarters building on Paradeplatz, Zurich. The conversion of the bank building into a covered shopping arcade created a new urban focus point with unique spatial qualities in the heart of the city. The Più Restaurant aims to introduce a fresher, more youthful edge to the traditional idea of exclusivity. It adds a new dimension to the public life of Bahnhofstrasse (the adjacent main shopping street) and creates a contemporary interpretation of the Zurich urban tradition of sophisticated cafes, such as “Confisserie Sprüngli”, situated opposite.

As an open room of glass, the concept plays with the fascination and complexity of multiple transparencies and spatial transitions. A new connection with the surrounding city is created by seamless transitions between the internal and external areas. The entire space becomes unified through a continuous flow across different layers of transparency from the Paradeplatz main entrance through to the Baerengasse patio. The grand curtain wall, the continuous perimeter sofa, and the sweeping lines of the bar counter and kitchen front mediate between the rectangular geometries of the existing structure and the new courtyard enclosure.

client/owner design firm Photography

248

2 Restaurant  

The intensity of views through the glass cube is controlled by floor to ceiling curtains. Multiple layers of fabrics with varying degrees of transparency from sheer to opaque allow - depending on the chosen layering - just enough glimpses of the interior to entice passers by while protecting the privacy of guests inside. The project will prove itself as a beautiful canvas for the colourful urban social life. It tries to not merely understand aesthetics as an architectural dimension - it emphasises the celebration of “beauty in use”.

Strozzi’s AG Smolenicky & Partner Walter Mair

249


fantastic design works co.

maruha shokudo NAGOYA, AICHI, JAPAN

300m2

This restaurant features teakwood and it is designed with a resort feel. It is famous for its lobster dishes.

maruha CO. fantastic design works co. Main Contractor Katsunori suzuki Photography KEISUKE MIYAMOTO Client/Owner design firm

250

2 Restaurant  

251


SJB Interiors

sepia

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

300m2

Sepia was designed with art deco overtones to inspire a sense of timelessness in the interior. An entry vestibule with gloss black timber frames forms a gentle transition from the busy, noisy street into bar area, which works not only as a transitional space for predinner drinks, but also as a more casual dining location. The dining spaces have been broken in to main rooms which are located either side of the bar area. This allows like minded diners and functions to be comfortably grouped to minimize any compromise to each group’s dining experience.

Every area has been given its own personality while maintaining a consistency to the colour tones and textures throughout. The bar space is enclosed with circular banquette seating upholstered in snakeskin embossed velvet. High darkstained timber paneling surrounds the banquette providing a subtle separation from the quieter dining spaces beyond. The curved bar itself has been formed from Liguria marble bar reminiscent of

Paris or Rome in the early 20th century while the floor has been laid in semi circles of black, white and grey marble to create the drama of a grand European entry foyer. Continuous timber panelling has been studded with brass studs to form interlocking circular patterns, which add sparkle to the serene mood of the dining rooms. The paneling wraps around the kitchen areas to conceal the frenetic back of house activity. The dining rooms are flanked with banquettes which not only screen the outside street, but also provide graphic decoration with their Art Deco inspired fabric.

Vicki Wild, Martin Benn, Andrea and George Costi design firm SJB Interiors Design Team Kirsten Stanisich, Dave Sweatman Other Consultants Austmont Catering Main Contractor ICMG Projects Photography Louise Lister, unless stated client/owner

252

2 Restaurant  

©Vicki Wild

253


MoHen Design International

parkside Shanghai, China

150m2

Shanghai got its own colonial history which can be traced back a hundred years. This historic background gives the metropolitan a multi-cultural basis under a mysterious Eastern veil. Hundreds of NeoBaroque buildings along the Bund have a special identity. Nowadays, Shanghainese people enjoy art and culture from different parts of the world and are creating their own blend of eastern-western taste. Occupying a150 sq. m. space next to the small “Fu-Xing” Park in the heart of downtown

Hui-Hai Road area, the designers decided to inject the historical background of Shanghai into their design concept for Parkside Bistro and Bar. The restaurant is located on the first floor of a 70-year-old, three storeyed Beaux-Arts Condo. Instead of traditional mouldings and trompe l’oeil, brass pipes are used to decorate the ceiling and become another interesting asymmetrical pattern of 3D effect. Faux-finishes are used to give a touch of historic feeling on the gilt painting. Old bricks are used in the backdrop and are lit by continuous wall washers. A geometric pattern is made on the floor by vinyl tiles.

The luxury of the Baroque Style was used in a mild, contemporary way with a low budget. The solution was to design a “a

palace in a contemporary way” and add a touch of oriental taste.

Mr Lee MoHen Design International Architect Hank M. Chao(MoHen Design International) Photography Maoder Chou(MoHen Design International) client/owner design firm

254

2 Restaurant  

255


Hirschberg Design Group inc.

empire Ontario, Canada

515m2

Located on the fringes of the trendy Yorkville district in downtown Toronto, Empire Restaurant & Lounge is designed as a place where “royalty comes to play”. This has a bold design that is arresting in its very simplicity. The owners envisioned Empire as a venue to fill a major gap in the area’s night scene where Mr. and Mrs. Famous could go to the “scene with the cuisine”. The entire venue is a sleek blend of highly polished surfaces, where white bar tops, dark zebrawood furniture, and dramatic draperies come together to create a theatrical and cool club-like atmosphere. Upstairs is the luxe new supper club that accommodates 110 for lunch, dinner, and “look-atme” lounging on adjacent street-level patio. It can best

be described as spacious and minimalist. The layout was designed for maximum space usage by having only perimeter furniture fixed. A long bar occupies the rear wall, creating a dramatic stage for those passing by on the street. The three “Jewel Booths” dressed in ostrich leather introduce some very private seating to the main level, while sparkling sheers that can be moved to separate the loose tables adds a very unique element that allows guests inside the booth to view the entire restaurant, and guests outside to look back at them.

Downstairs is “Chazz” nightclub, where the sense of privilege is enhanced by VIP bottle service and a deliberately understated back alley entrance that allows VIPs to be smuggled in. Downstairs, the feeling is more communal with an intimate dance floor and curvy banquettes. The white ostrich leather seats stand out in contrast to the dark wood and subdued lighting. Empire Restaurant & Lounge adds vibrancy and style to the Yorkville strip, reaching into the areas of seclusion and voyeurism. David Laxton Hirschberg Design Group Design Team Martin Hirschberg, George Foussias Main Contractor Kevin Ferry Sound Engineering Bang and Olufsen Photography Joy von Tiedemann Client/Owner design firm

suppliers:

Stone Tile, Floorworks Stone Tile, Saltillo Imports, Arc Com, Metro Wallcoverings, General Contractor Glass General Contractor Window Rodgers Surfaces Dessco Solid Surface Counters Upholstery Valley Forge Fabrics Curtains/Blinds Arc Com Flooring

Wall Covering

256

2 Restaurant  

257


Marcel Wanders Studio

blits

rotterdam, The Netherlands

The latest culinary hotspot from Rotterdam-based Hotel New York Group was designed by Marcel Wanders. The restaurant is beautifully located on the banks of the river Maas. Head chef Glyn Stoker is responsible for the culinary creations. The building is a design by the Dutch architect Francine Houben that dates from 1989. Marcel redesigned the interior and made Blits ‘a restaurant like a theatre’.

It’s even got Amsterdam talking! “It” combines typical Rotterdam brawn with the charm of Amsterdam. “A restaurant like a theatre.” As evening falls, it’s time for the audience to take the stage. Spectators and theatre merge, and it becomes impossible to tell the actors from the onlookers.The Rotterdam audience is the star of the evening; bottles are poured with charisma and bravado, bread and fish miraculously multiplies all around. The stage is scattered with props, and the formalities of the performance make way for chance encounters and unwritten romances. Young couples with no interest in the view flock to the red lodge, where they can safely drown in each other’s eyes. With the day’s work done, it’s time to loosen up and get down on the flashy Blits stage. Laughter fills the room, and the pressures of the day make way for the sensuality of night. The tired players peer into the darkened hall; floodlit ships float past on the murmuring water, the moon glistens, and the actors’ costumes get a critical going over.

258

2 Restaurant  

©Jonas de Witte

Heavenly light fills the waterside stage, but not all that glitters is gold here. Tomorrow will be another day, the waters will flow; the Maas, it seems, is no longer alone.

259


2 Restaurant  

©Jonas de Witte

260

261


262

2 Restaurant  

263


264

2 Restaurant  

265


©Jonas de Witte

©Jonas de Witte

??? Marcel Wanders Main Contractor ??? Photography Inga Powilleit, styling Tatjana Quax (unless stated) client/owner design firm

266

2 Restaurant  

267


index by designer 4N ARCHITECTS  www.4N.com.hk

aok 

156

Jordan Mozer and Associates, Ltd.  www.mozer.com

copper bleu

246

cenario

110

Marcel Wanders Studio  www.marcelwanders.com

blits

258

Allen+Philp Architects/Interiors  www.allenphilp.com

canal

92

Maurice Mentjens Design  www.mauricementjens.com

frans hals museumcafé

212

prado

84

MoHen Design International  www.mohen-design.com

danbo fun

142

trader vic’s

68

danbo fun fast food

202

maze by gordon ramsay

8

parkside

254

nando’s

146

Mut-architecture  www.mut-architecture.com

restaurant 51

166

clink

244

Outline  www.outline-projects.co.uk

bangalore express city

170

CCS Architecture  www.ccs-architecture.com  

barbacco eno trattoria

152

Paul Kelly Design  www.paulkellydesign.com.au

cargo pizza & bar

174

  

mid-atlantic

76

Planet 3 Studios  www.planet3studios.com

mochamojo

188

r2l

52

Puccini Group  www.puccinigroup.com

livingston

44

the plant: café organic

62

SHAUN CLARKSON  www.shaunclarksonid.com

odette’s

130

macondo

106

SHH  www.shh.co.uk 

applemore college canteen

228

susuru

160

cherbourg primary school dining room

234

commune cafe

240

teaspoon

178

alice in mirror land

26

SJB Interiors  www.sjb.com.au

sepia 

252

alice in picture book

32

Smolenicky & Partner Architektur  www.smolenicky-architektur.com

strozzi “piu”

248

le porc de versailles

40

STUDIO GAIA, INC.  www.studiogaia.com

sakea

194

maruha shokudo

250

Sunaqua Concepts Ltd.  www.sunaquahk.com

prince grill

126

scottish glamour

118

Vonsung  vonsung.com

viet hoa cafe

224

so

100

Westar Architects  www.wagnarchitects.com

hannah’s family bistro

134

empire

256

liquid

184

JHP Design  www.jhp-design.com

paris baguette

114

kaffeine

208

JOI-Design  www.JOI-Design.com

redox

122

lantana

242

bob san

20

park terrace

138

acarquitectos  www.acarquitectos.pt

Bates Smart  www.batessmart.com Buckley Gray Yeoman  www.buckleygrayyeoman.com Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc.  www.c7a.com

CRÈME  www.cremedesign.com Ester Bruzkus Architects  www.esterbruzkus.com Evoke International Design inc.  www.evoke.ca Fantastic Design Works co.  www.f-fantastic.com

Hirschberg Design Group Inc.  www.hirschbergdesign.com

Jordan Mozer and Associates, Ltd.  www.mozer.com

268

2 Restaurant  

WILLIAM TOZER architecture & design  www.wtad.co.uk   Wilsdon Design Associates  www.wilsdon-da.com

269


index by location frans hals museumcafé

212

blits

258

U.K. > London

bangalore express city

170

240

U.K. > London

odette’s

130

empire

256

U.K. > London

park terrace

138

aok 

156

U.K. > London

viet hoa cafe

224

China > Shanghai

danbo fun

142

U.K. > London > Fitzrovia

kaffeine

208

China > Shanghai

danbo fun fast food

202

U.K. > London > Fitzrovia

lantana

242

China > Shanghai

parkside

254

U.K. > Manchester > Spinningfields

nando’s

146

prince grill

126

U.K. > Southampton

applemore college canteen

228

restaurant 51

166

U.K. > Southampton

cherbourg primary school dining room

234

redox

122

U.S.A. > Arizona > Paradise Valley

prado

84

susuru

160

U.S.A. > Arizona > Scottsdale

canal

92

mochamojo

188

U.S.A. > Arizona > Scottsdale

trader vic’s

68

maruha shokudo

250

U.S.A. > California > San Francisco

barbacco eno trattoria

152

so

100

U.S.A. > California > San Francisco

the plant: café organic

62

alice in mirror land

26

U.S.A. > Georgia > Atlanta

livingston

44

scottish glamour

118

U.S.A. > Illinois > Chicago

bob san

20

Japan > Tokyo > Kinshicyo

le porc de versailles

40

U.S.A. > Massachusetts > Boston

clink

244

Japan > Tokyo > Shinjyuku

alice in picture book

32

U.S.A. > Minnesota > Minneapolis

copper bleu

246

cenario

110

U.S.A. > Nevada > Las Vegas

hannah’s family bistro

134

South Korea > Busan

sakea

194

U.S.A. > New Jersey

liquid

184

South Korea > Seoul

paris baguette

114

U.S.A. > New York

macondo

106

teaspoon

178

U.S.A. > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia

r2l

52

strozzi “piu”

248

U.S.A. > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia

mid-atlantic

76

Australia > New South Wales > Sydney Australia > Tasmania Australia > Victoria > Melbourne > Crown Metropol Canada > British Columbia > Vancouver Canada > Ontario China > Hong Kong

China > Xian France > Paris Germany > Bavaria > Unterschleissheim Germany > Berlin India > Mumbai > Bandra Japan > Aichi > Nagoya Japan > Kanagawa > Yokohama Japan > Osaka > Umeda Japan > Tokyo > Ginza

Portugal > Lisbon

Russia > St Petersburg Switzerland > Zurich

270

2 Restaurant  

sepia 

252

The Netherlands > Haarlem

cargo pizza & bar

174

The Netherlands > Rotterdam

maze by gordon ramsay

8

commune cafe

271


© 2010 by designzens designzens is an imprint of pace publishing ltd isbn: 978-988-1887-39-9 cover photo ©Kris Tamburello pace publishing ltd 2101-2102, 21/f., north point asia-pac commercial centre, 10 north point road, north point, hong kong t: +852 28971688 f: +852 28972888 www.beisistudio.com booknews@beisistudio.com publisher: george lam / george.lam@beisistudio.com proofreader: raka dewan design / layout: polly leung

While all reasonable efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, Pace Publishing Limited and the publishers do not, under any circumstances, accept responsibility for errors, omissions and representations expressed or implied. All rights reserved. No portion of “SPACE series 2-Restaurant” may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from Pace Publishing Limited.

designzens

Space 2 Restaurant  

Restaurant Design

Space 2 Restaurant  

Restaurant Design

Advertisement