Page 1

acarquitectos Agence Patrick Jouin Akar Studios Andrea Langhi Architect Architects EAT Blacksheep BOX Interior Design Inc. Buckley Gray Yeoman Buero Berge Strugar Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. Concrete Architectural Associates Conran & Partners CRÈME Denis Kosutic Design Research Studio/Tom Dixon Design Spirits Co., Ltd. DesignARC DPWT Design Ltd Elliott + Associates Architects Entasis Estudi Arola

1901 560 58 Tour Eiffel Américas Anne-Sophie Pic au Beau-Rivage Palace Ara Pizza Arata Bar Pleiades Barbie Café Beijing Noodle No. 9 Biko BOA Steakhouse Breslin Calla Can.teen Chifa Circus Citrus Coast Conduit Crescent Heights DBL(double) Departure Dim T Dion

Ezequiel Farca Design Studio Gilles et Boissier Design GLAMOROUS Inarc Design Hong Kong Ltd. JOI-Design Interior Architects Jump Studios Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture AB Ladakh Design Associates MoreySmith Mr Important Design Munge Leung Nigel Coates On Office Ong & Ong Pablo Tellez Page Southerland Page Panorama Paul Kelly Design Planet 3 Studios Architecture Pvt. Ltd. Project Orange richard mccormack design

Distrito Doctor Coffee El Merca’o Elements ELLA Food Louver Fuel Café Gitane Hakkasan Hard Rock Café Himeji Monolith I-Talia Inamo JohnnySmalls Katsuya Kitayama Monolith Made in Kitchen Made in Kitchen II Maedaya Bar Market by Jean-Georges Matrix Pizza Mirage Motif Mumon Nando’s Nautilus

RestauRant Design

Roman and Williams Buildings and Interiors Rottet Studio S. Russell Groves SHH Skylab Architecture Slade Architecture Something from Us Stanley Saitowitz I Natoma Architects Inc. Studio GAIA SWEET Tag Front UXUS

George Lam

Vaillo + Irigaray Architects Westar Architects Wilsdon Design Associates Yasui Hideo Atelier

Nevy Nu Asia Oca Orlando di Castello Oth Sombath Owners Box Poncho No.8 POPS Pure Red Prime Steak Reflections Rigoletto Bar and Grill Rigoletto Short Hills RockSugar Scarpetta Segundo Muelle Seoul Bros. Skylon Society Steak 954 Sushi-Teq T-Crossover Takasaki Monolith Tanzore Tazmania Ballroom Teeq

The CBS Scene The Dock Kitchen The Grove The Mira The Modern Pantry The Piper’s The Standard Grill Toast Tomo Izakaya Tongue and Groove Transit Trattoria Tube Ultra Ville Chaumiere Vinoteca Torres Vizeum Vlet Wallop Whitechapel Zen Zizzi Zizzi II Zizzi III

isbn 978-988-1887-49-8

designzens

designzens


Restaurant Design George Lam

designzens


© 2011 by designzens & co ltd isbn: 978-988-1887-49-8 publisher george lam / george.lam@beisistudio.com proofread raka dewan design / layout polly leung rm704, 7/f., hong kong arts centre, 2 harbour road, wan chai, hong kong t: +852 28971688 f: +852 28972888 www.beisistudio.com booknews@beisistudio.com While all reasonable efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, designzens and the publisher do not, under any circumstances, accept responsibility for errors, omissions and representations expressed or implied. All rights reserved. No portion of Restaurant Design 101 may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher.

Special photographic credits : - cover©“Scott McDonald©Hedrich Blessing” from Fuel Café(p532-535); - back cover©Jeff Dow from Johnny Smalls (p94-103); - p2-3©Morley von Sternberg / Francesca Yorke from Dion (p170-177); - p4-5, courtesy of JOI-Design Interior Architects from Calla (p274-277); - p6-7©Mr. Important Design from Motif (p86-93); - p8-9©Munge Leung / Device222 from Ultra (p178-185); - p10-11, courtesy of Jump Studios from The Modern Pantry (p448-451); - p620-621©Francesca Yorke from Inamo (p586-591); - p622-623©Eric Laignel from Hakkasan (p542-551); - p624©Morley von Sternberg from Nu Asia (p564-571) 3


Contents Introduction 

10

12 Departure  Portland, Oregon, USA  18 Teeq  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia  26 Tube  Indranagar, Bangalore, India  30 Bar Pleiades  New York, New York, USA  34 Takasaki Monolith  Takasaki City, Gunma, Japan  40 Himeji Monolith  Himeji City, Hyogo, Japan  52 Kitayama Monolith  Kyoto, Japan  66 Hard Rock Café  Las Vegas, Nevada, USA  74 The CBS Scene  Foxborough, Massachusetts, USA  80 Motif  San Jose, California, USA  86 JohnnySmalls  Las Vegas, Nevada, USA  94 Gitane  San Francisco, California, USA  104 BOA Steakhouse  West Hollywood, California, USA  112 Tongue and Groove  Canberra, ACT, Australia  122 Conduit  San Francisco, California, USA  130 Tazmania Ballroom 

Hong Kong, China 

Circus 

Covent Garden, London, UK 

Market by Jean-Georges 

Vancouver, BC, Canada 

Society 

Vancouver, BC, Canada 

Citrus 

Barcelona, Spain 

Steak 954  Red Prime Steak 

Florida, USA 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA 

Dion  Ultra 

Toronto, Ontario, Canada 

Made in Kitchen 

Xuzhou, China 

Made in Kitchen II  Pure  Rigoletto Bar and Grill 

London, UK 

Wuhu, China 

Naples, Florida, USA 

Minatoku, Tokyo, Japan 

The Piper’s 

Milan, Italy 

Nautilus 

Singapore 

Oca 

Polanco, Mexico City,Mexico 

Biko 

Polanco, Mexico City, Mexico 

136 142 148 152 156 164 170 178 186 192 198 206 214 222 230 238

  5


...contents

Skylon Coast

London, UK

Vancouver, BC, Canada

1901 Anne-Sophie Pic au Beau-Rivage Palace

London, UK

Lausanne, Switzerland

Vlet

Hamburg, Germany

Calla

Hamburg, Germany

Trattoria

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Rigoletto Short Hills

Minatoku, Tokyo, Japan

ELLA Crescent Heights

Sacramento, California, USA San Diego, California, USA

Wallop

Lewes, East Sussex, UK

Orlando di Castello DBL(double)

Vienna, Austria Osaka, Japan

Américas

Taxas, USA

Oth Sombath

Paris, France

58 Tour Eiffel

Paris, France

246 252 258 264 268 274 278 282 288 296 302 306 310 316 322 328

Tomo Izakaya Ville Chaumiere

Clarke Quay, Singapore

Indranagar, Bangalore, India

Whitechapel I-Talia Scarpetta

Distrito

Novato, California, USA

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Segundo Muelle Zizzi

Mexico City, Mexico

Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, UK

Zizzi II Zizzi III

New Delhi, India

New York, New York, USA

Toast Nevy

London, UK

St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK

High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, UK

Nando’s  Reflections

Spinngfields, Manchester, UK  Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA

Owners Box T-Crossover

Hong Kong, China

Indranagar, Bangalore, India

334 340 344 348 354 358 364 372 376 380 384 388 394 400 406 412

El Merca’o

Pamplona, Navarre, Spain

Mirage

Falsterbo, Scania, Sweden

The Grove The Standard Grill The Dock Kitchen

Houston, Texas, USA

New York, New York, USA

Portobello Dock, London, UK

The Modern Pantry 560 Ara Pizza

London, UK

Lisbon, Portugal

Sant quirze del Valles, Barcelona, Spain

Transit Sushi-Teq

Berlin, Germany

Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Seoul Bros.

Pasadena, California, USA

Matrix Pizza Poncho No.8 

Spitalfields, London, UK 

Beijing Noodle No. 9 Maedaya Bar

Syracuse, Italy

Nevada, USA

Richmond, Victoria, Australia

Vinoteca Torres

Barcelona, Spain

418 428 432 438 444 448 452 456 460 464 468 472 476 480 486 494

7


...contents a touch of asia

Breslin Elements

New York, New York, USA

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA

Vizeum

London, UK

Food Louver

Jakarta, Indonesia

Can.teen

Hong Kong, China

The Mira

Hong Kong, China

Barbie Café

Shanghai, China

Doctor Coffee

Barcelona, Spain

Fuel Café

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA

POPS

Arcadia, Oklahoma, USA

498 504 508 512 516 520 524 528 532 536

Hakkasan RockSugar

Miami, Florida, USA

Century City, California, USA

Nu Asia Tanzore

Manama, Bahrain

Beverly Hills, California, USA

Zen

Kolkata, India

Inamo Dim T Arata Katsuya

Victoria, London, UK

Minatoku, Tokyo, Japan

Hollywood, California, USA

Mumon Chifa

London, UK

New York, USA

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

540 542 552 564 572 580 586 592 598 604 610 614

Index by designer Index by location acknowledgements

620 622 624

9


Introduction

Welcome to the Restaurant Design 101! We hope you enjoy going this book and the many projects featured worldwide. A number of Asian projects are featured here. Interestingly though, the projects may not be located in Asia but draw heavily on Asian culture such as in Hakkasan and Rock Sugar. It’s the designers’ treatment of objects and space which commands our attention. Sometimes, we are in for a surprise. It is second nature for designers to turn to all that is around them for inspiration. The design brief is a response to a number of factors including the client’s needs, site constraints, response to a legacy, or reflecting the owners’ cultural heritage. At times, the heritage may be acquired with the purpose of making a fashion statement or to stand out. Take the 58 Tour Eiffel sited in the heart of Paris’ celebrated landmark, the Eiffel Tower. The restaurant celebrates its presence with a newly worked spaciousness that encourages diners to look out and drink in views of Paris. Jouin Manku has clearly done his homework and paid meticulous attention to detail. A ‘wood-tiled’ carpet directs the eye upwards toward the staircase, and then on to cloud lamps above tables. Not for a moment can you forget where you are. Another restaurant, this time Departure in Oregon, celebrates travel. It is infused with travel-inspired nostalgia of a by-gone era when travel by ocean liners was imbued with romance and adventure. This is a place where you do not just dine; people are there to see and be seen. At the other end of the spectrum is the futuristic Tube. The designers here envisioned an elliptical lounge akin to the crosssection of an aircraft. You can dance the night away to flashing lasers while enjoying views of the terrace through laminated glass flooring. And where would this hot spot be? London? New York? No, this is in Bangalore, India’s very own Silicon Valley. The nature of some projects makes for easy understanding and brand recall. A giant guitar mounted on the exterior says a thousand words.

The Hard Rock Café is a global brand showcasing Rock and Roll memorabilia and merchandising. The designers created ‘Memo Walls’ in the Las Vegas Café which are freestanding or function as partitions. So too then, you only need one look at ‘the eye’ to be reminded of the US TV broadcaster, the CBS Television Network. The iconic ‘eye’ looks down upon a spiral staircase connecting three levels, making it the heart of the design. ‘The eye’ also serves as the centre stage for the restaurant and bar. On another note, and for a highly tactile design, check out Motif. Vintage and futuristic materials jointly inject a healthy dose of Asian style glamour. Hundreds of feet of black and silver chains were turned into an eye-catching floral tapestry by hand. As night deepens, the restaurant turns into a club. This necessitated a monochrome interior where lighting was key to realizing thus change. Whereas Edison bulbs are used earlier in the day, later, an LED system floods the place with vivid colours. Equally flexible is Circus in London where the boundaries between fine dining and entertainment blur. One of the highlights of Circus is a kinetic 3D wall custom-designed in collaboration with an artist. The wall has 40 rotating metal ‘gems’ which reflect LED lights shining onto them to bounce off a myriad shadows and reflections. Performers such as contortionists, snake charmers and acrobats have performed here and customers too have taken the plunge to strut their stuff. If you enjoy mystery, check out the Tazmania Ballroom in Hong Kong. The interiors appear dark, mysterious and deep like Aladdin’s Cave. There is not a single plain wall in sight. Instead, one encounters black, many-faceted rock walls with integrated lighting. Sharp geometric lines abound so that it exudes a masculine, eye-catching appeal which is just about right as this functions as a pool bar. Designers often integrate a structural necessity into their design intent so that it becomes the missing piece in the bits they put together to seamlessly craft their overall plan. Tongue and Groove, a contemporary pizza bar in the Australian capital territory, Canberra, is a case in point. Existing concrete Y frames were turned into a central feature in the main dining and lounge space. A communal table between the Y frames divides the lounge and main dining zone. A massive piece of artwork ties in the space. A moving pendant lighting rig with custom pendant lights

above the bar can be raised during the day to maximize light and lowered at night to enhance the atmosphere. The Grove in Houston is fortunate to be sited in lush 12 acres. Various levels of glass enclosures were used here so that the building blends in with the surrounding trees and diners enjoy unparalleled vistas. The restaurant is broken into a series of small spaces depending on usage but one factor remains constant. Warm, tactile materials have been used throughout. On the upper floor, one can enjoy drinks or a bite on the same level as tree branches, making it a truly memorable place. Some projects, like the Mirage Dance Hall, have a story to tell. A pair of designers went on to win an international design competition for a dance hall in Sweden. This was no ordinary dance hall but one that had been pulling in visitors from far and near since the 1930s. The dance hall had burnt down thus prompting the building of a replacement. True to their calling, the architects went one step further and built a dance hall that pays tribute to the surrounding pine wood grove. Also, it now has a bar and two restaurants. In Himeji Monolith, the designers used light as a design motif so that light pours into a chapel, wrapping it up like warm light under the gentle sunlight. This becomes a symbol of rebirth for the building, and perhaps the town. Colour can unite or accentuate a certain part of the room depending on its usage. In Made In Kitchen, the designers explore spatial hierarchy by moving from bright yellow on the ground floor to dark red on the floor. And then again, a wall was painted in anthracite stained red light for a very good reason. Its location is La Vinotecca Torres, a concept store and restaurant for wine cellars. As it name suggests, Fuel showcases high octane colours. What used to be a nondescript space now looks very eye-catching with the addition of colour. The architects used a large reflector to which were added T8 fluorescents with colour gels, LED lamps and laminated glass panels with polyester film. Trust a designer to see beauty in industrial items. Segundo Muelle in Mexico City features floors made from board-formed concrete similar to that of a well worn pier. In the VLET restaurant of Hamburg, driftwood “sculptures” are lit from below so that they cast shadows against the irregular wall surface. Sometimes, clients and designers exhibit a tongue in cheek streak. Johnny Smalls in Las Vegas is an off-beat place where large portraits of the owners look on as diners sit back in quirky pieces of furniture, ensconced in an intensely purple glass room. You are left wondering whether this is for real. Clearly, this is unchartered territory full of surprises. Happy reading!

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D esig n Re se arc h St u d io /To m D ixo n

Tazmania Ballroom Hong Kong, China

180m2

Design Research Studio was invited to create a slick new interior for Tazmania Ballroom, an exclusive pool bar in Central district, Hong Kong. Integrating the rough concrete of the building with sharply designed accents lends the interior a raw geometric quality. Inspiration was drawn from a traditional British game room or gentleman’s club. The colours and finishes reflect luxury, masculinity and glamour. Integrated lighting, a hi-tech DJ booth and a bespoke, glazed pool cue case contribute to the quality of the space and are reminiscent of early James Bond sets in their aesthetic. Upon entering Tazmania Ballroom, patrons step into a highly reflective hall decorated in bronze mirror and brass. The mirrored wall to the right reflects the discrete, warmly lit staircase ahead creating an illusion of wide space. At the entrance to the main space, there is a complex, black, faceted ‘rock’ wall with integrated lighting. The space features brass tables with black marble table tops and a large inbuilt upholstered banquette in turquoise wool. Beside this area is a brass control tower-inspired DJ booth. These custom-designed pieces make a strong impact on the dance floor which features hard-wearing dark resin. Overhead is a huge chandelier that is a bronze version of the Tom Dixon classic‘Copper shade’pendant light. Crazy paving made from Chinese slate forms the flooring. This unites the dance floor with an external terrace through large glazed sliding doors. Seating is maximized on the small terrace with a built-in brown leather banquette, with detailing inspired by a classic Jaguar car seat. Black Artek Rocket stools and classic Warren Platner side chairs are scattered around the terrace to create dense yet flexible, additional seating. The custom-designed bar features spun brass with a curved top echoing the form of pool tables. Above the bar counter hang three chandeliers made from turquoise cast glass lights (the Tom Dixon Bead and Top). Behind the bar, back-lit brass shelves illuminate bottles from the counter to ceiling. The pool table area consists of three custom-designed brass clad pool tables, with Tom Dixon Cone lights suspended above. These pool tables can be suspended from the ceiling to create a larger dance floor on major club nights. The pool cues are kept in a custom-designed glass cabinet which is wall mounted beside an innovative and quirky, blue cue-chalk greeting stand. The lounge area acts as a viewing gallery facing the pool tables and is low and comfortable, inspired by a traditional British library. The main wall is clad in a plaster bookcase inspired by the art of Rachel Whiteread, whilst the floor and adjacent wall are decked in oversized chevrons. Above the lounge is a chandelier of Tom Dixon pipe lights. This leads into the lift lobby which is clad in three dimensional, anodized metal harlequin tiles.

13


Tazm a n ia Ba llro o m     D e s ig n R e search St u dio /To m D ixo n

  15


Client/Owner Another Department    Design Design Research Studio(Tom Dixon)    Design Team Tom Dixon, Helene Bangsbo Anderson, Helen Arvanitakis, Jacu Strauss, Philippe Isometrics Lighting    Photography Olaf Mueller and Helene Bangsbo Anderson    Malouin    Consultant Main Contractor RAN contractor SUPPLIERS: Tom Dixon    Furniture Lighting

Tazm a n ia Ba llro o m     D e s ig n R e search St u dio /To m D ixo n

twentytwentyone

  17


Sk y lab Arc h i te c t u re

Departure Portland, Oregon, USA

836m2

(Below) The entrance off the elevator creates an experience of a travel-infused fantasy, and (above) a barnacle host stand greets customers as they enter the space.

Departure is a rooftop restaurant and lounge. It is situated on the top floor of the historic Meier & Frank building – originally built in 1908 and on the National Register of Historic Places in Portland, Oregon. Once a cultural icon in its time, the building has been renovated as a luxury hotel, restaurant and department store with Departure on the rooftop. The design concept for Departure is grounded in the history of the site. It references a time when Meier & Frank featured a Santaland with overhead monorail and when ocean liners were about voyages, not transportation. Responding to the time when a department store or an ocean liner could serve as a cultural outpost, Departure is an escape. It is a place to experience the unfamiliar, to observe as much as to be seen. The entrance offers a sense of arrival. From a barnacle host stand, customers are greeted and taken into one of four connecting spaces inside. The octagonal walls of upholstery tiles serve as a portal to the dining room, lounge, stateroom and deck. The main dining room is a cockpit-like space. A teak-clad smokestack bar penetrates a windshield skylight. The skylight cuts 19.8 metres along the ceiling continuing down a main wall. A chartwork mural of fantasy islands spans 15 metres encircling the dining room. The smokestack bar is situated in the centre and dining booths face inward. Seating a hundred people, the dining room is defined by marine teak decking, sailcloth panels and helm bar seating. Taking advantage of expansive horizontal views, a stateroom and lounge adjoin decks on the east and west end. From banquette seating facing out, sliding glass doors reveal a floor to ceiling view of downtown. Maximum capacity including decks is 500. An engine room is the inspiration for the bathrooms. In a horizontal mirage, a series of steel sinks, stalls and mirrors line up in crank case fashion that ends at the vanishing point at both the left and right. A galley of portholes leads to the bathrooms, with views into the kitchen. The experience is a travel-infused fantasy of a getaway. The Asian menu, nautical design references and futuristic undertones show a lack of singularity of place or theme, but instead a not to an unfamiliar frontier.

19


The main dining room is a cockpit-like space defined by teak wood flooring and sailcloth panels.

D e p a r t u r e     Sk y la b Arc hite c tu re

Teak-clad smokestack bar penetrates a 19 metre skylight.

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(Above) The smokestack hovers over a semi-circular bar with helm seating, and (below) The stateroom provides space between the dining room and an outdoor deck; (opposite page) an upholstered wall and sheer curtain hallway leads to the east deck and more private bar area.

D e p a r t u r e     Sk y la b Arc hite c tu re

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Client/Owner Luma    MEP

Sage Hospitality Group    Design Skylab Architecture    Design Team Jeff Kovel, Dannon Canterbury, Kim Kovel, Cecily Ryan, Kent Heli    Lighting Consultant PAE    Structural KPFF    Photography Boone Speed and Jeremy Bittermann

Hoffman Construction (shell) / Walsh Construction (TI) Main Contractor SUPPLIERS: KORN    Carpet Van Dijk walkoff    Interior Walls Maharam Entry Barnacle:    Signage Happy Lucky    Furniture Sandler, Magis    Custom Teak Table Tops Main bar and dining room:    Chartwork Mural Wise Company Recardo Style Plush Bucket Seat on West Coast Industry bases    Bar Top Silestone Main bar:    Helm Seating Allermuir, Maharam    Upholstery Kvardrat Hallindale State room:    Furniture

Ghilarducci Studio

(Below) Steel sinks, stalls and mirrors form a mirage resembling a crank case in an engine room; (above) porthole views and mirror play with fantasy in a corridor, and (above right) a view through corridor porthole gives views of an active kitchen.

(Above) The restaurant and lounge was created on the rooftop of a historic building circa 1908; (below) the skylight folds into a wall of windows for extensive dining views, and (below right) the view from the deck off the stateroom.

D e p a r t u r e     Sk y la b Arc hite c tu re

  25


D esig n Sp i ri ts Co. , L td.

Teeq Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

555m2

The restaurant Teeq is located on the eighth floor of a parking lot in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The project took almost one and a half years from concept to completion. Teeq functions as a restaurant at noon and as a dance lounge at nights and on weekends. As the restaurant does not have outstanding views, the design focussed inwards on the ceiling.

27


Cient Contractor

YTL Land Sdn.Bhd.

Design

Design Spirits Co., Ltd., Yuhkichi Kawai

Lighting Design

Muse d Co., Ltd., Kazuhiko Suzuki

Photography

Zainudin

Syarikat Pembenaan Yeoh Tiong Lay Sdn. Bhd.

GARDEN

ENT.

CORRIDOR

D-A

MOBILE BAR

RECEPTION CASHIER

WINE COOLER

SHOW KITCHEN

WINE DISPLAY

OUTSIDE SEATING

FOR DISH DOWN (WASH)

BAR

D-H

GARDEN

Tee q

D e s ig n Sp irit s Co. , Ltd.

29


Pla ne t 3 Stu d io s Arc hite c t u re P vt. Ltd.

Tube Indranagar, Bangalore, India

172m2?

Tube is part of a bigger program brief which required four different dining experiences and offerings in a single hospitality destination. These were to be accommodated on two levels - a floor and terrace - each having a 372 sq. m. footprint. Tube is a lounge bar located on the upper level. The designers understood the need for creating a lounge that allowed patrons to truly relax, soak in the environment and immerse in music. In an attempt to create that perfect posture which allows comfort and a choice of conventional sitting and lying back as though in a bed lounge, they hit upon the idea of an elliptical lounge space with a cross-section like an aircraft. This was to straddle the terrace and shout its presence on the street, much like an architectural billboard. Constructed out of tubular steel hollow sections with a galvanized sheet roofing skin, it was clad on the inside with soft faux leather quilting. A dance floor was inserted in the centre, along the spine, with laminated glass flooring providing views of the terrace 3 feet below. The structural system was deliberately left exposed to add drama to the space and intensify the sense of a temporary construct. Inside, the DJ console was located above the bar. From the entrance, the elevated DJ console. accompanied by flashing lasers, offers a quick introduction to the energy of the place. The elliptical tabletops and stainless steel supports evoke the neo-retro feel of sci-fi pop culture icons like Flash Gordon comics and Starship Enterprise! The space has been designed to disconnect patrons from outside. Effect lights create psychedelic patterns on the ceiling/walls, and lasers stream across the underside of the dance floor filled with artificial smoke. For the 20- to 30-year-olds who fill up this space every evening, it is the place to rock!

31


Client/Owner Consultants

Tub e

Pl a n e t 3 St u d io s Architec t u re Pvt. Ltd.

UV hospitality Jagdish Menda

Design Planet 3 Studios Architecture Pvt. Ltd. Kitchen Consultants Mr Srinivas Contractors

Design Team Kalhan Mattoo, Santha Gour Mattoo, Jainish Jani, Jyoti Gujaran Various Consultant Photography Sanjay Ramchandran

Hospitality

33


Ro ttet Stu d i o

Bar Pleiades New York, New York, USA

13 935m2

Rottet Studio was commissioned to create a new look for this popular, upscale hotel located in New York’s Upper East Side. The $60 million gut renovation of the property has had amazing results, including boosting the hotel to the number one slot on TripAdvisor.com’s Popularity Index with 100 per cent positive reviews. The Surrey Hotel is subtle and sophisticated yet rich with intrigue and style. Like a vintage black and white photograph, it has turned history into a timeless romantic memory where guests are enveloped in the charm and nostalgia of an era of formality and glamour. The 40-seat lobby bar, Bar Pleiades, was intentionally designed to belong to a hotel in the 1930s, true to the Beaux Arts style of the hotel. The bar is elegant yet warm and engaging, with seating areas inside the black box. These large black lacquer boxes with inlaid white Corian lines were inspired by the simplicity and beauty of Coco Chanel and are intended to emulate the beauty and romanticism of a black and white photograph. When viewed from the front, the box shape emulates a stage where the curtains have been pulled back to reveal the excitement onstage represented by the warm beige suede tufted walls, white shark skin seating and custom sconces by Lukas Custom lighting. The banquettes are open and inviting from the outside yet private and personal within while capturing the beauty and excitement of the surroundings all at the same time. Large Venetian crystal chandeliers hang over the seating area where breakfast and afternoon tea are served. Underfoot, the sumptuous carpet reveals a graphically stenciled poem by Dean Blehert entitled Central Park, 1974. Rottet created playfully drawn numerals atop cocktail tables and UK-based artist and furniture designer, Jimmie Martin, painted Rottet’s numbers on the backs of stools lining the black shark’s skin bar. French doors and mirrors outline the lounge with walls adorned by de Gournay’s Views of India wall coverings.

35


B a r Ple ia d e s     R o t te t St u d io

  37


Client/Owner Denihan Hospitality Group    Design Rottet Studio    Design Team Lauren Rottet, FAIA, IIDA; David Davis, AIA; Richard Riveire, AIA; Kelie Mayfield; Christopher Ann Kale Associates, Ltd.    Art Consultant Rottet Studio    Consultants Leslie E. Robertson Associates (LERA)    Main Olexy; Chris Evans; Laurence Cartledge    Lighting Hunter Roberts Interiors    Photography Eric Laignel Contractor SUPPLIERS: (Corian, Black Laquer, Glacier White) Artifax Millwork    Padded Walls (Suede) Designtex    Banquette NY Contract Seating, Designtex    Custom Tables Bar Wall Impressions Architectural Millwork    Custom Carpet Couristan    Custom Wall Sconces Lukas Lighting    Bar Lights (Mini Round Downlight) Spectrum 3    Artwork (Smoke Rings) Donald Sultan    Bar Stools Interior Crafts Chicago

B a r Ple ia d e s     R o t te t St u d io

  39


L adak h D e si g n As s o c iate s

Takasaki Monolith Takasaki-city, Gunma, Japan

1 124m2

TAKASAKI MONOLITH is sixth in a series of guesthouse-type restaurants in Takasaki-city, Gunma. Run by NOVARESE Inc, a bridal production company, MONOLITH restaurants leverage on the Japanese obsession with having a perfect wedding. While they function first and foremost as dining venues, they all come with spaces designed specially for wedding ceremonies. TAKASAKI MONOLITH contains a main dining, lounge,two bars and a wedding chapel. It functions as a French restaurant during weekdays and only at weekends, it becomes a venue for wedding ceremonies. The designer finished this in a simple and symbolic appearance without a theme, story or character on purpose. This building serves as a landmark at the station square, attracting the interest of passers by. A beautiful green garden and dramatic space spread out as one crosses the entrance. A corridor formed around the garden gives continuity to the space. As a result, visitors are drawn into the story woven by the building which climaxes when one enters the main dining. The dynamic main dining room has a 7 metre high ceiling from which light overflows, spreading through the very front when one enters the room. Hundreds of acrylic rings hung from the ceiling reflect the shiny light of LED downlights that are arranged in a grid on the ceiling. The whole ceiling shines like a sea of clouds in the daytime and resembles a never-ending starlit night sky. The illumination programmed by every scene offers a unique experience. It is an expression of hospitality extended to guests from Takasaki Monolith. The Monolith series will go on to evolve with new ideas.

41


Tak a s a k i M o n o l i t h     L a d a k h D e sign Asso ciates

  43


Tak a s a k i M o n o l i t h     L a d a k h D e sign Asso ciates

  45


Tak a s a k i M o n o l i t h     L a d a k h D e sign Asso ciates

  47


Tak a s a k i M o n o l i t h     L a d a k h D e sign Asso ciates

  49


Client/Owner Novarese inc.    Design Ladakh Design Associates    Design Team Yoshinobu Kubo(Kubo Zoen)    Art Work Mika Machida    Main Contractor Design

Kazuhiko Tarumi, Shigeki Kawashima    Lighting Masanobu Takeishi (ICE)    Garden Daiwa House Industry & Hakusen sha    Photography Nacasa & Partners

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Tak a s a k i M o n o l i t h     L a d a k h D e sign Asso ciates

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L adak h D e si g n As s o c iate s

Himeji Monolith Himeji-city Hyogo, Japan

1 241m2

A Georgian architectural structure stands majestically in the centre of the historic area of Himeji city from where one can view the beautiful Himeji castle. The old building of the Ministry of Communications was constructed in the early Showa period and, at the end of 80 years, it saw the end of the telegraphic communication business. ‘Renovationrebirth’ was an important keyword for this project which infuses new breath into the old building, reviving it as a guesthouse restaurant with reception banquet facilities. The designers tried to add impressions of modern refined sharpness while keeping the solid presence and dynamism of the past era. The moment you step inside, you will find the atmosphere juxtaposed with its outside appearance, a modern and dynamic world. The challenge was to create something modern and beautiful yet classical. The designers focused on light as a design motif. New light pours into the building, wraps it up and makes the luminosity brilliant. Traditional techniques such as Rohto iron or woodwork inlay, coupled with modern technology such as LED lighting, showcase this design motif in various elements and materials. The pattern of light becomes an important element of the Himeji Monolith. The chapel built in the courtyard is literally a symbol of the dazzling light emitting brightness. Translucent white porcelain tiles were used for the chapel’s interior wall as well as the exterior structure to produce a luminosity within itself giving the chapel the effect of being wrapped with a warm light under the gentle sunlight. At night, this lantern-like building gives off a delicate light as if floating in the darkness. The chapel was designed as an illuminator, thus expressing the dazzling light symbolizing the rebirth of Himeji Monolith. The building has become a bridge to the future and will hopefully become a symbol of the newly revitalized town.

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H im e ji M o n o lit h    L a d a k h D e s ign Asso ciates

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H im e ji M o n o lit h    L a d a k h D e s ign Asso ciates

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H im e ji M o n o lit h    L a d a k h D e s ign Asso ciates

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H im e ji M o n o lit h    L a d a k h D e s ign Asso ciates

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H im e ji M o n o lit h    L a d a k h D e s ign Asso ciates

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Client/Owner Art Work

Novarese inc.    Design Ladakh Design Associates    Design Team Kazuhiko Tarumi, Shigeki Kawashima, Iku Shoji    Lighting Mika Machida    Main Contractor NTT Facility & Hakusen sha    Photography Nacasa & Partners

SUPPLIERS:    Porcelain tile

Range    Wood Inlay & Veneer

Masanobu Takeishi (ICE)   

Yasuta Veneered Surfaces & Design

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H im e ji M o n o lit h    L a d a k h D e s ign Asso ciates

  65


Ya sui H i d e o Ate lie r

Kitayama Monolith Kyoto, Japan

1,125m2

The site is located close to Kitayama in Sakyo district of Kyoto. In the traditional Japanese garden near the site, people can hear the Takano River nearby murmuring and enjoy a wonderful view of the mountains. It was only natural for the designers to take advantage of these lovely surroundings. Part of the original garden was retained and the building and landscape so organised that the neighbouring mountains are visible. A concept of Modern Sukiya House was requested by the client in view of the original Kyoto environment, and to unite the traditional with the modern. This was achieved by using stainless steel and aluminium in the ceiling. and having the faรงade in a lattice of aluminium. This allowed control of the height and width of the windows facing the garden in the tradition of Japanese gardens. Visitors experience the space through variations in ceiling height, width and depth of room, connection to the exterior, choice of surfaces, and objects/furniture used.

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K it a y a m a - M o n o l i t h     Ya s u i H id e o Atelier

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K it a y a m a - M o n o l i t h     Ya s u i H id e o Atelier

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Cient Novarese    Design Structure Planning    Photography

K it a y a m a - M o n o l i t h     Ya s u i H id e o Atelier

Yasui Hideo Atelier    Lighting Consultant Nacasa & Partners, Inc.

Daiko Electric    Landscape Consultant

Kubo Landscape    Structure Consultant

CRS

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Ca mbri d g e S eve n As s o c iate s, Inc.

Hard Rock Café Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

3 900m2

The overeaching concept for HRC Las Vegas (HRCLV) is the creation of a dynamic, energized dining and club experience that redefines the Hard Rock Café brand in a city that sets the bar for unique restaurant designs. HRCLV will join the ranks of the hippest, fun and most unusual venues on the strip to date. The design approach of Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. (C7A) began with the idea that this Café needed to respond to the scale and magnitude of the Las Vegas strip. To start, C7A focused on the key interior design feature and core element of every café - the presentation of authentic memorabilia. To transition the scale of the large space, C7A developed a modern system of display that creates a series of “metal” tile architectural walls with large openings designed to uniquely display the Rock and Roll memorabilia. These “Memo Walls” are sometimes freestanding and serve to separate zones in the Café. Other times, they are coplanar with the walls of the dining room and create a wonderful over-scaled framework of rock history. Entering The Rock Shop at ground level is your first experience of the Café. Using a palette of natural materials - wood, tile, metal and glass - the shop is an energized environment with dynamic floor patterns and articulated ceiling planes drawing visitors into the shop, focusing on the merchandise and ultimately drawing you upwards to the Café on Level Two. As patrons arrive at the Level Two Main Dining area, C7A’s design works with the notion of “rhythm and sound”. The idea of music sound waves becomes the driving idea for the interior design. Wood wainscoting with modulated dimension reflects this idea of rhythm and curvilinear bands of metal and light sweep dramatically overhead to reflect the idea of sound waves. The Bar itself is a tour de force. Sweeping curves define each bar side. Banks of monitors sweep over the bottle display and from the centre, emanate waves of LED-lit mesh bands dramatically growing upward and outward to embrace the space. The idea of a “tornado of sound” becomes clear. Patrons can then move outside onto a terrace that offers eye-popping views of the strip. Moving to Level Three, patrons discover the live venue of the Café. Here, C7A embraces the concept of a live rock production. The Bar has a wild display of speakers, lights and monitors that simulate an oversized bank of speakers typically found on the stage of a live rock concert. The speaker truss work at the Bar is curved on both sides allowing a DJ booth to be suspended in between over the back bar. Banks of speakers and lights offer a dramatic backdrop to the stage itself. The Hard Rock Las Vegas promises to redefine the Café experience and establish itself as the most unique club experience in Las Vegas.

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H a r d Ro c k Ca f é     Ca m b rid g e S even Asso ciates, Inc.

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Client/Owner International

Hard Rock International Design Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. Main Contractor Gamma Construction Photography HRC

Second level plan

Ha r d Ro c k Ca f ĂŠ

Ca m b rid g e S even Asso ciates, Inc.

Lighting Consultant

CDM Lighting Design Group

Art Consultant

Hard Rock

Third level plan

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Ca mbri d g e S eve n As s o c iate s, Inc.

The CBS Scene Foxborough, Massachusetts, USA

1 675m2

The Kraft Group and CBS Television Network commissioned Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. (C7A) to design a unique concept restaurant showcasing the vast heritage of the CBS Television Network. C7A captured that spirit by designing a unique dining experience which recreates what it feels like to be “behind the scenes” in CBS studios. The dramatic interior features a state-of-the-art audio system and LED lighting in addition to multi-layered video projections which can be easily adjusted to accommodate special events, including championship sports, television show screenings, theme nights, private parties and corporate events. Patrons also have interactive touch screens at their tables where they can select from a menu of their favorite classic TV shows, sporting events, and entertainment. The project consists of 1,675 sq. m. of space on three levels. At the top level is the main bar with a 36-foot wraparound high definition screen, modular production stage for live broadcasts, and an outdoor terrace with outstanding views of Gillette Stadium. Level Two is the main dining area seating over 300 patrons. The Plaza Level houses a flexible function room and The CBS Store which will offer the latest in CBS merchandise. Connecting all three levels at the heart of CBS Scene is a 60-foot spiral staircase structure in the shape of CBS’s trademark eye. The “Eye” is the focal point for the entire restaurant and bar. The centre of the eye, or pupil, is a floating stage at each level hovering within the cylindrical volume of the stair. It serves not only to connect the three levels in dramatic fashion, but is also as an event unto itself. Video projections, high definition monitors and classic CBS graphics create an experience of energy and fun, a place to see and be seen.

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The CBS Sc e n e    Ca m b rid g e S even Asso ciates, Inc.

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Client/Owner Contractor

First level plan

T h e CBS Sc e n e     Ca m b rid g e S even Asso ciates, Inc.

The Kraft Group / CBS Network    Design Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc.    Lighting Consultant Suffolk Construction    Photography Kwesi Arthur

Second level plan

Boston Light Source    Art Consultant

CBS    Main

Third level plan

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Mr. Imp or ta nt D e s ig n

Motif San Jose, California, USA

743m2

The mix of vintage and new, the desire to push the use of materials, the need to transform the interior from restaurant to club ambience and evoking a somewhat Asian feel of dark glamour - these were the objectives in the design of Motif. The designers jazzed things up by using futuristic materials such as stretched glossy polymer film to provide an undulating ceiling of reflected colour and pattern in the DJ area. They used cutting edge Asian furnishings with traditional materials from Kenneth Cobonpue coupled with the modernism of Konstantin Grcic all mixed, with the 60s and 70s glam of Tommi Parzinger style pendants and sleek black linear silk shades. The use of materials was pushed. Working again with Eva Menz, the designers suspended seven thousand pieces of black glass forming two huge leaf shapes hovering above the downstairs restaurant and lounge (Eva Menz). Hundreds of feet of black and silver chains were hand-worked into a bold floral tapestry (art provided courtesy of Amy Butler) that envelopes the space without suffocating it. Yards and yards of thick black silk rope soften and provide pattern to the institutional cinder block construction of the building’s interior. Lighting was also used to help transform the interior. Extensive and saturated use of colour-changing LED lighting transforms the intentionally monochrome palette of Motif’s interior into a heady polychromatic club experience later in the evening. One of the main challenges was to make the switch from restaurant to club with just ambient lighting. An entirely monochrome interior was created that would be appropriate for daytime and evening functions i.e. light drinking at dining. Early on, the restaurant’s monochrome furnishings were bathed in warm amber glow from Edison bulbs in black silk shades. Later in the evening, the full effect of the extensive LED system floods the monochrome interior with polychromatic lighting and slow-changing effects herald the beginning of serious nightlife.

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Mo t if     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e s ign

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Mo t if     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e s ign

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Client/Owner Design

Mo t if     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e s ign

Teresa Ngyuen    Design

Mr. Important Design    Design Team

Charles Doell, Principal; Gui Bez, Project Team    Photography

Courtesy of Mr. Important

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Mr. Imp or ta nt D e s ig n

Johnny Smalls Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

393m2

Vegas can take you around the world in a single day - from Paris, to New York, and then to Venice, to the wonderful land where people thought Slots-a-Fun was a great pun, and were right. Now, it gives you a world tour of tapas, Johnny Smalls. Johnny Smalls is a trip inside the slightly off-kilter world of Johnny and Ms. Smalls. The restaurant is set up as a living room, dining room and bar within their house of purple glass. The space is anchored by large portraits of both Johnny and Ms. Smalls and contains multiple references to their menagerie of pets - a cigar-smoking bulldog, some frisky squirrels and portraits of their thoroughbred horses. On display and for your enjoyment is their eccentric collection of furniture, lighting and art. It’s an adventure down a different sort of rabbit hole, but with similarities to Alice in Wonderland. Large mushroom tables sprout up around the main bar which is adorned with padded medallions and mismatched stools. The bar, and in fact the entire space, is viewed through a lens of purple glass that descends from the ceiling and rises up from the floor, providing a shifting duality of deep coloured and non-coloured views, just like putting on or taking off Johnny’s rose coloured glasses. Named after the marijuana/tobacco cigarette, Smalls makes you feel like you’ve smoked a few with wild “Daliesque” decor: psychedelic murals on the walls featuring men, mushrooms, monkeys, and wooden chairs that look like hands; and stained glass lighting. The menu boasts Spanish tapas, Asian dim sum, Italian antipasti, Mediterranean mezze, Indian thali, Mexican antojitos, and classic American starters which is the best way to build a rotation. The gorging commences with “Stuff on Sticks” like Meaty Balls (ground Kobe, veal, and pork, with Tuscany gravy), “Slider Duos” like the Cuban Reuben (pretzel roll, corned beef, ham, pancetta), and “Special Stuff” like crispy pork belly with Wild Blossom Honey, smoked sea salt, and potato chips, plus fried alligator bites with a Fat Tire batter and “Smack Ya’ Mamma” remoulade (note: use sparingly if you want good Christmas presents). Further fattening accomplished via “Pizza & Flatbreads” like the flat iron steak/Tuscan sauce/goat cheese/crispy onion Meat Lovers, Lobster Taquitos with spicy mango & sweet guava Sriracha, the “Avocado Bliss” (tempura avocado, ponzu and blood orange, Thai chili dipping sauce and wasabi aioli), and the soft bread/kafta/ cucumber/tomato Mad Pita, which unlike the It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Pita, doesn’t exclusively star people whose names only your dad knows. In lieu of the place’s namesake, get buzzed off 20+ beers or cocktails like the Uno Mas (Patron, Triple Sec, OJ, splash of grenadine) and the creme de banana/Malibu/coconut nectar/pineapple juice/shaved Ghirardelli chocolate “Arrested Development”, from the awful land where people think they made great music, and were not right.

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J o h n n y Sm a lls     M r. Im p o r t a nt D esign

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J o h n n y Sm a lls     M r. Im p o r t a nt D esign

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J o h n n y Sm a lls     M r. Im p o r t a nt D esign

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Client/Owner Dolce Group and The Nightlife Group    Design Mr. Important Design    Design Team Ken Murphy - KMA, John Devries, Klai Juba Architects    Main Contractor MJ Dean    Photography SUPPLIERS: Custom Booths

J o h n n y Sm a lls     M r. Im p o r t a nt D esign

West Coast Industries    Custom Murals

Charles Doell, Principal; Miriam Marchevsky, Project Team    Consultants Jeff Dow

Mural Arts, SF

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Mr. Imp or ta nt D e s ig n

Gitane San Francisco, California, USA

140m2

Named after the freewheeling gypsy, Gitane is a modern, funky, and artistically bold restaurant located in downtown San Francisco between the financial district and Union Square. Chef Lisa Eyherabide creates simple, approachable bistro fare emblematic of the Basque region, and drawing inspiration from neighbouring Spain, France, and Portugal. An elevated bar program pairs exotic tastes and sensations with unique Sherries, Cavas, Madeiras, Spanish brandies, innovative hand-crafted cocktails and small-estate wines. The interior decor from Mr. Important Design unabashedly integrates vibes from three separate decades — the Euro-themed 50s, Hippie-Driven 60s and Big Bling 70s, giving the space a traditional yet modern, eclectic feel. Artwork from Turkey and the UK flank the walls, highlighted by Nazif Topçuoglus’ Goya-esque tapestries. The interior mixes freely. Vintage art assemblage of Deborah Bowness’ hand printed wallpapers, riffs on French midcentury design by way of two huge “pearl choker” chandeliers, antique lighting that has been collected from various sources throughout Europe, lux fabrics that speak of a more genteel and romantic era; all shimmering under a glossy polymer canopy that reflects the spectacle below like a soft crimson mirror. Specialty upholstery fabrics designed by Nina Campbell, paired with furnishings from Anthropolgie and Tom Dixon, round out the rooms. Described as a design “high wire act” and “the sexiest restaurant in San Francisco” by the jaded masses at Yelp.com, this warm, eclectic and glam interior has blithely stumbled its way (sherry glass in hand!) into numerous publication features over the past year.

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G it a n e     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e sign

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G it a n e     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e sign

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Client/Owner Photography

G it a n e     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e sign

Franck Le Clerc    Design Jeff Dow

Mr. Important Design    Design Team

Charles Doell, Principal; Gui Bez, project team    Main Contractor

Mills General   

  111


Tag Front

BOA Steakhouse West Hollywood, California, USA

994m2

In the fourth iteration of BOA Steakhouse, Tag Front expanded on the themes evident in the design of the original restaurant located nearby. The design team used elements prominent in the original design as accents to maintain a continuity of design vision, however, the newest space has its own feel and provides the ambiance necessary as the flagship location. Located on the street level of a recently renovated high-rise, the challenges facing Tag Front included creating a unique restaurant that maintained its own identity while complementing the existing building. The interleaving of unique textures, colours and themes – coupled with a stimulating use of space – resonates throughout the restaurant. The main areas of the space include a dining room, private dining room, an extensive patio dining area, and a bar and lounge area. The 994m2 space is located on Sunset Boulevard and can be easily spotted from the street due to a critically-designed exterior space featuring two asymmetrical, 6m high cantilevering sculptural canopies. The canopies define and cover most of the patio dining area and help to differentiate the restaurant from the existing building. The patio dining area beneath the canopies, one of which features a circular opening, allows diners unobstructed views of the sky above. In order to reinforce the indoor/outdoor relationship of the space, Tag Front included three, interior-lit, 5m high glass volumes wrapped with translucent tree imagery. The addition of several fire elements creates a warm atmosphere for year-round dining. The main dining room features a cantilevering L-shaped element made of leather panels that hover below an array of acoustic panels. The back-lit leather panels define the centre of the room featuring circular leather banquettes separated by two largescale custom light fixtures used in all the iterations of the restaurant. The north side of the room takes advantage of the views of Sunset Boulevard while the south side features a hyper textural felt tulip wall. The L-shaped element separates the main dining area from the private dining area, and is open to the wine room. An amber-glowing sculptural element, the wine room is clad in undulating anodized aluminium fins. As a prominent sculpture in the space, the large wine room serves as the focal point of the entry area and it also separates the main dining room from the bar and lounge area. The private dining room features custom resin pendants that play on the custom wall and ceiling floral walnut element. The floral element grows on the wall and ceilings over honey onyx wall panels with the pendants extending and scattering out. Reflective ceramic wall tiles and steel rods add texture and depth and separate the area from the main dining room. Custom walnut with red leather interior light fixtures, along with hanging resin pendants, define the bar area. Rising up from the floor and wrapping to create the bar top, a Xango-Brazilian red quartzite bar anchors one side of the bar area. The north and east sides of the bar are open to Sunset Boulevard and the patio respectively while the back leads to the lounge area. The floor features areas defined by faux wood ceramic tiles and round, coloured glass mosaic tiles. The use of multiple divisions of backlit coco bolo in a herringbone pattern creates a more intimate space in the lounge area. Aluminium boxes with a red leather fill are used as displays to showcase various alcohol bottles. A cupped ceramic-tiled wall further adds texture to the space and, along with hanging steel rods, provides separation from the bar.

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B OA St e a k h o u s e     Ta g Fro nt

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B OA St e a k h o u s e     Ta g Fro nt

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B OA St e a k h o u s e     Ta g Fro nt

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Client/Owner Innovative Dining Group    Design Tag Front    Design Team Mandi Rafaty, Mehdi Rafaty, Meghan Kelly, Gary Hunt, Niloo Aryanpanah, Viro S    Main Contractor Alfredo Annino Construction    Photography Farhad Samari, Jessica Boone --SITE PHOTO INSTALLATION PHOTO (trees) by Viro S

BOA St e a k h o u s e     Ta g Fro nt

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Paul Ke l l y D e s ig n

Tongue and Groove Century City, California, Australia

400m2

Tongue and Groove is a contemporary, vibrant pizza bar located in Civic, Canberra. The space is centrally located with various areas and facilities for all types of customers irrespective of the time at day or night. The interior shell is a newly built 6 metre high retail space under the ATO building in the centre of Canberra on two highly recognizable streets. Existing concrete Y frames were used as a central feature in the main dining and lounge space with a custom sculpture running over the two frames, and uplighters enhancing the extended concrete arms. The area has three major features. There is a moving pendant lighting rig with 42 custom pendants on a staging truss that raises and lowers the lights from 5000mm to 2000mm for day and night. A 60 metre square handpainted, post-cold war industrial artwork was painted on the rear wall over a period of four weeks. Feature custom stainless steel and LED paper pendants, extended with 80 individual support frames across the entire length of the space, hold 2000 A4 sheets of the rear artwork pulling them from the rear wall through the space. Between these are suspended LED tubes for illumination at night. The project has several different areas which are all connected and have mixed usage. The kitchen area to the rear of the space houses the bar area facing Bunda Street and has three sides allowing customers to be served, as well as a two storey display cabinet for products. The interior of the space is bounded by a large amount of outdoor casual beverage/dining that access the bar via complete width bi-folds (plus two doors for inclement weather), and also on the side adjacent to the lounge area, with fully operable windows that allow connection between the Chesterfields and the customers outside. The bar area has two zones for high table drinking, one with a large sports screen and the otherdirectly feeding the outdoor area on Bunda Street. The bar front is clad in Nero Marquina Marble with solid laminated timber American oak used for the bar top. The bar display is a 6 metre high recessed mirror light box with LED to edges and adjustable glass shelves. Above the bar are 42 custom black aluminium pendants with gold interior and custom three head spindle. The pendants are attached to a motorised staging truss that allows the lights to be at a high level during the day for maximum natural lighting, and to drop by night for atmosphere creation. The corner zone is low leather and timber lounging with full view to the corner street outside, also allowing for standing room and live music performances. The main central dining area between the two concrete Y frames is a mid-height communal table which divides the lounge and main dining zone. The lounge zone bounds the glazing to Genge street and consists of Chesterfield lounges with cocktail tables between. The rear of the space features a raised platform with dining to banquette below a 60 metre square mural. The dining area extends across to the kitchen pass through area. The floor is a burnished polished concrete featuring distributed blue basalt stone to the centre of walkways to age the floor. The whole concept is bounded by a black 6 metre high ribbed acoustic wall with track lighting by Inlite positioned on each extrusion.The furniture was custom designed and uses solid timbers and classic leathers. Custom, Persian-influenced carpets by Tascot Templeton are used.

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Ton g u e a n d Gro o v e     Pa u l Ke lly D esign

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Ton g u e a n d Gro o v e     Pa u l Ke lly D esign

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Client/Owner Photography

Ton g u e a n d Gro o v e     Pa u l Ke lly D esign

Tomi Cavic    Design Tongue and Groove    Design Team Tristan Maddigan(The Mark Agency)

Paul Kelly, Priscilla Williams , Elizabeth Wong, Matthew Fatches   

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Stanley S a i tow it z I Nato m a Arc hitec t s Inc.

Conduit San Francisco, California, USA

340m2

Conduit Restaurant is located in a ground floor commercial space in a new residential building. It had a low ceiling and tangled maze of plumbing, sprinkler and electrical conduits serving the residences above. To cover these pipes would have further reduced the space. Instead, even more conduits were layered over the existing to counteract and remediate the situation. The design inspired the name. At the entry is a long fireplace. Behind, table seating fills the room. A series of conduit screens in galvanized or copper colour divide the tables. On the right is an open bar made of stacked bars of conduit. Glass shelves support the bottles. The other end is banquette seating on a bench, hovering in light, divided into a series of conduit alcoves. At the end of the room, another bar frames the open kitchen, a well-lit stage for the cooks. Seating at this bar allows patrons to watch the performance close up. The floor has black granite paths with a large mat that locates the black wood laminate tables. Behind the kitchen is a glass and conduit-enclosed cellar and private dining room. Wine is stored in a perforated black wood wall. Beyond are the bathroom enclosures of entirely etched glass, with a continuous trough sink and long mirror above. The atmosphere is sleek and hip, as well as rich and warm. Conduit disproves the old adage by making a silk purse from a sow’s ear.

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C o n d u it     St a n ley S a itow it z I Nato ma Architec t s Inc.

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Client/Owner Brian Spiers    Design Stanley Saitowitz I Natoma Architects Inc.    Design Team Spiers Construction    Photography Rien Van Rijthoven Associates    Main Contractor

Stanley Saitowitz, Alan Tse, John Winder    Acoustics

SUPPLIERS: Blu Dot    Furniture - Cabinetry Zelco Commercial Cabinetry    Lighiting Fixtures Furniture – Chairs WestBay Plastics – Corian    Laminate Wilson Art    Fireplace Montigo

C o n d u it     St a n ley S a itow it z I Nato ma Architec t s Inc.

Spectrum Lighting, Inc.    Faucets

Colin Gordon &

Kohler    Bath Sink

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D esig n Re se arc h St u d io /To m D ixo n

Circus Covent Garden, London, U.K.

320m2

Design Research Studio was asked to create a dynamic venue for a new concept in dining. The premise was to create a spectacular atmosphere which combines fine dining with an informal atmosphere where the customers feel inclined to dance and participate in surprise performances. The interior was to reflect the ‘circus’ concept within a flexible and glamorous design. The main challenge was transforming the drinking-dining experience into a stimulating entertainment space. This includes a series of flexible design features which allow for a variety of entertainment opportunities. In order to create integrity with the performance aspect of the brief, Design Research Studio referenced the history of the building as the Royal Opera House menagerie (the building housed the elephant for Covent Garden performances). The surrealist-inspired design incorporates a landscaped ceiling of mirrored globes, stepped bar area, a kaleidoscopic reception area and a kinetic 3D wall. The bespoke furniture engages and entertains: animal inspired tables, a stage dining table (which moves to allow for the dance floor), a platform with a dance pole, and a mirrored WC lobby houses a hidden water fountain. The stage dining table has proven to be a successful focal point for all diners as contortionists, snake charmers and acrobats all perform sporadically throughout the evening. The table is made of quartz, mainly white in colour with fragments of mirror incorporated to capture the light. Steps form part of the structure at either end of the table and are an integral part of the performers’ routine. The kinetic 3D wall to the lounge was designed by Johan Llewellyn King, an artist who worked alongside the Design Research team to produce a bespoke art piece that fits with the overall design concept, materials and colours. The wall consists of 40 rotating, anodized metal ‘gems’. The gems relate to the kaleidoscopic theme and reflect individual LED lights that shine onto them to create fascinating shadows and reflections. The finishes also respond to the entertainment brief with a wall of brass and blue steel harlequin tiles, sparkling shimmer signs to the Barbarella inspired bar, faceted brass DJ booth and grey smoked mirror. The furniture incorporates custom designed pieces from the Tom Dixon range alongside completely bespoke designs solely for Circus and some design classics. The Saarinen tulip table and chairs are used in the bar area, Paulin’s mushroom stool and chairs are used in the lounge and an eclectic mix of vintage Eames, Jacobsen and Panton chairs are used in the VIP area.

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C ir c u s     D es ig n R e s e a rc h St u dio /To m D ixo n

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Client/Owner Market Café Ltd (Adam and Trevor Davies)    Design Design Research Studio(Tom Dixon)    Design Team Tom Dixon, Helene Bangsbo Anderson, Helen Arvanitakis, Emulsion Architecture, Measur, Mach Acoustics, Peter Deer Associates    Photography Leon Chew    Charlotte Griffiths, Philippe Malouin    Consultants Main Contractor Cameron Black SUPPLIERS: Diespeker    Metal Quartz Lighting Modular; Erco

C ir c u s     D es ig n R e s e a rc h St u dio /To m D ixo n

Rimex    Leather

Ben Whistler    Mohair Velvet

Kvadrat    Shimmer Signs

Keelgrove Ltd    Furniture

twentytwentyone   

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Market by Jean-Georges B OX I nte ri or D e s ig n Inc.

Vancouver, BC, Canada

557m2

MARKET by Jean-Georges is a new 557 sq. m. restaurant for internationally renowned chef Jean-Georges Vongericthen, situated on the second floor of the new Shangri-la hotel in downtown Vancouver, BC, Canada. Both the chef and hotel are making their Canadian debut. MARKET is a contemporary restaurant exemplifying restrained luxury and glamour. Divided into a series of distinct areas and experiences: entry foyer, bar-bistro, fine and private dining areas, the design is a complementary counterpoint to the hotel’s traditional Asian design aesthetic. The space also adheres to the principles of feng shui as directed by the client’s feng shui master. Contrast and colour are used to differentiate the various areas: light and glamorous for the entry and dining, rich and intimate for the bar-bistro and washrooms. The circular entry foyer is the bridge from the Asian hotel to the restaurant, with hand-plastered walls incised in a subtle geometric Asian motif. Bar/bistro areas are dark, strong, and sexy; while the dining room has a soft lightness, a perfect foil to the typical grey Vancouver weather. The main dining room features two private dining rooms that anchor the North and South ends. The North room enfolds you in dark wood with velvet upholstered walls and heavy lined silk drapery; while the airy South room suspends you in a glass box hung over the urban heart of the city.

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Ma r k e t b y Je an -G e o r g e s     B OX I nterio r D esign Inc.

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Client/Owner Shangri-la Hotel, Vancouver & Culinary Concepts for Jean-Georges Vongerichten    Design BOX Interior Design Inc.    Design Team Ledcor Construction    Photography Ed White Photography Tara Lingle, Monica Jeffers    Main Contractor

Ma r k e t b y Je an -G e o r g e s     B OX I nterio r D esign Inc.

H. Jay Brooks, Cynthia Penner,

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B OX I nte ri or D e s ig n Inc.

Society Vancouver, BC, Canada

325m2

The goal was to renovate the client’s existing staid restaurant into a dynamic and sexy new dining concept with a glamorous upper level mezzanine lounge. Within the existing double height space, a new two level interlocking circle screen has been inserted. This screen changes the spatial experience. It provides intimacy in the double height space while separating the upper lounge from the dining area below. This separation also helps create a sense of allure and mystery to the room. Pink chandeliers add a sense of wit and playfulness. In the upper lounge, illuminated bronze acrylic panels line the back wall. An eclectic mix of seating options are offered.

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Client/Owner Emad Yacoub & Shannon Bosa – Glowbal Restaurant Group    Design BOX Interior Design Inc.    Design Team Action Projects    Photography Larry Goldstein Photography Jeffers    Main Contractor

S o c ie t y     B OX Inte rio r D e s ign Inc.

H. Jay Brooks, Cynthia Penner, Tara Lingle, Monica

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E stud i Arol a

Citrus Barcelona, Spain

408m2

The restaurant Citrus is in a historic part of the city. The client asked for the restaurant to be renovated and expanded with a brand new, modern image but with a warm and comfortable atmosphere. The renovated reception changes the perception of the restaurant from the street. A core element of the design is a lamp that creates the ‘backup’ of the premises, and opens it up to the outside. Quality materials were used throughout the project. The number of seats was increased without altering the atmosphere or destroying the privacy of each table behind the low walls and fabric separator. There are more opportunities for groups and events now. The kitchen is also used for storing wine. The roof stands out because of its use of a sequence of wooden boxes along the length and breadth of the place.

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Client/Owner

An Grup    Design

Main Contractor Arteco SUPPLIERS: Ramon Solé M    Glass furniture

C it r u s     E s t u d i Aro la

Estudi Arola    Graphic

CRICURSA    Fabric

Josep Maria Guinart    Photography

Gaston y Daniela    upholsterer(Wine Rack)

Jordi Tamayo / Eugeni Pons   

Lacernou   

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G illes e t B oi s s ie r D e s ig n

Steak 954 Florida, USA

475m2

The idea for Steak was to create a beach house, fresh, elegant, and simple; a sort of “surfer” cabana disconnected from the W building and very open to the ocean; a peaceful atmosphere, easy and accessible for all guests. The space is dressed in a mix of white painted pine wood panels with wenge verticals, black Zimbabwe stone and teak floor mix. Within the whole volume are different rhythms or colour schemes. The hotel lobby is in black and white, amplified by a mural painting by Cyprien. ‘Corridors’ made from wenge partitions lead to the bar and lounge “salle a manger” having turquoise blue seats. The main dining rooms have a jellyfish tank as a metaphor for the ocean with seats in acid green leather. In the VIP room, which is slightly apart from the main area, coral and a Christian Astuguveille collection orchid fabric wall keep the colour palette calm. The patio area serves as a “sensitive” garden that welcomes the space to the ocean.

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S t e a k 954    G ille s e t B o is s ier D esign

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S t e a k 954    G ille s e t B o is s ier D esign

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Design

S t e a k 954    G ille s e t B o is s ier D esign

Gilles et Boissier Design    Photography

Eric Laignel

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E llio tt + As s o c iate s Arc h ite c t s

Red Prime Steak Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S.A.

560m2

RED Prime Steak is located in the Buick Building, a part of the historic downtown district known as ‘Automobile Alley’. The concept of RED Prime Steak was to create an experience that awakens the senses of vision, smell, taste, and personal interaction. The main idea was to create a comfortable, yet dramatic space, that draws attention while in and out, and is a memorable experience on every level. A second idea, alongside this concept, was the intent to reinvent the steakhouse and push it into the future. The architectural design sought to take full advantage of the 5.5m ceilings, skylights, and sheer volume to create a spectacular urban beauty and drama. The spectacular Wine Wall, some 55 bottles tall by 130 bottles wide for a total of 7,150 bottles, separates the RED bar from the main dining room where each table offers an exciting vantage point for a memorable dining experience. Sweeping the room’s grand dimension with a warm glow are suspended “rays” of red neon. These create energy and light that refract off the building’s rustic walls in a created concept called ‘Red Wind’. The rays frame a dramatic procession for diners entering the main dining room. Its focal point is the exhibition kitchen where a red portal highlights activity and a glowing grill. This frames “food as art” and allows customers “in” to the kitchen, the heart, life, and energy of the restaurant. In the Red Room, slip behind the translucent red fabric panels that separate this private venue from the main dining room. The space is secluded with a view to the mezzanine that adds an exciting dimension to the dining experience. RED offers private dining venues – each is a one-of-a-kind setting. Suspended above the historic Buick’s original turntable is a sleek, red lacquer, super-private retreat seating nine for memorable events.

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Left: south dining area looking east with wine wall detail; above: wine wall detail, north dining area with toilet form and Mez on left, and steel room view looking south; below: bar looking south from the entry.

R e d Pr im e St e a k     E llio t t + Asso ciates Architec t s

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Red Prime Steakhouse L.P.    Architect Elliott + Associates Architects    Project Team Rand Elliott, FAIA; Brian Fitzsimmons, AIA; Kenneth Fitzsimmons, AIA: Joseph Williams, Client Mark Eudaley Engineers, Inc.    Photography Scott McDonald © Hedrich Blessing Assoc. AIA    Structural

This page: views along procession

Above: stair to Mezzanine and partial procession; above right: View from Mezzanine looking Southeast toward Exhibition Kitchen; below: view looking south through red acrylic at stair.

2nd floor

1st floor

Basement

Re d Pr im e St e a k     E llio t t + Asso ciates Architec t s

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SHH

Dion London, UK

380m2

SHH created a sleek and sexy new bar and restaurant for premier champagne and wine bar brand dion, set within a historic building on West India Quay in London’s Canary Wharf. The Canary Wharf bar, the third to open under the dion brand, is the first to feature the new interiors concept, which marks a departure from the design concepts of the initial two outlets. The new bar, with capacity for up to 360 people, occupies the ground and lower ground of the space, as well as an external entrance area (The Veuve Clicquot Terrace), bordered by bamboo planting and lined with tented pavilions. As well as being responsible for the interior architecture and design of the space, SHH also applied the brand to new menus, matchboxes and signage. The West India Quay building in which dion is housed has a fascinating past. Built at the apogée of the slave trade in 1802, it formed part of the single largest and most technically-advanced building of its era; one of a series of nine linked buildings, which covered almost a mile in combined frontage and which could service four clipper ships at any one time. Only two of the buildings, built to store sugar, rum, and coffee from the Caribbean, now survive. These are Number Two Warehouse (in which dion is located) and Number One Warehouse, now home to the Museum of Docklands. The other seven buildings were destroyed during bombing raids during WWII in 1940. Number Two Warehouse is home to a series of popular mid-market bars and restaurants at ground floor level and also houses two storeys of retail with residential units above. Certain key features of the original warehouse are listed and untouchable from a design point of view. The listed features included two original walls (at ground floor and lower-ground floor levels) and one front wall; original cobbles in the outside Terrace area and flagstones on the lower-ground floor and stunning original timber columns (10 on the ground floor and 6 on the lower-ground). The design concept was to develop and accentuate dion’s status as a luxury brand, creating 3D and 2D brand associations in terms of pattern, colour and materiality. Previously, the space had been used as a restaurant with two thirds of the space used for back of house. For dion, the configuration was inverted so that two thirds of the new space is now front of house, with ample kitchen facilities now condensed at the rear of the ground floor area. Structurally, SHH exposed all the existing timber columns, scrapping the plasterboard that contained them. The space on both levels was long and thin with no natural light apart from two tiny sources and was therefore very challenging to design around. SHH’s response was to use lighting creatively and maximise reflective surfaces throughout the scheme. The client’s brief for the space included a request for a glitzy, gold staircase and a feature display area to showcase dion’s champagne offer.

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D io n     SH H

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D io n

SH H

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Cient Jo Chalker    Design SHH    Design Team Photography Morley von Sternberg / Francesca Yorke

D io n     SH H

Neil Hogan, Steven Southall, Addy Walcott, Adam Woodward, Ashley Thompson   

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M ung e Le u n g

Ultra Toronto, Ontario, Canada

325m2

Munge Leung had a unique opportunity to revisit a project they completed five years ago and re-imagine the elegant and luxurious design that established Ultra as the place to be seen in Toronto. In doing so, the designers’ goal was to pare back the seriousness and extravagance of the original design and inject a healthy dose of humour and approachability into the space. The client decided to invest in the renovation understanding that doing so would help to continue attracting the desired clientele. By changing the venue’s attitude to accommodate new spending trends, the client also gave rise to a fresh social dining experience. Many of the original design elements of the former venue can be seen throughout the new space but with a clever, unexpected twist. Never to be satisfied with a little re-upholstery here and a coat of paint there, the designers commissioned custom finishes, furniture and lighting by some of Toronto’s hottest innovators to bring their unique talents to the project. The new space features an avant-garde 25 foot table made of solid oak by avant-garde design studio Castor. The table, which seats twenty four people and will be the hub of the social dining experience, was created to double as a fashion runway. Each leg, modeled in clay and cast in aluminium, has a different bird-inspired design. Flirtatious chicken feather art installations by Applied Art Studio emphasize a casual dining experience that teases the senses and alludes to fun-loving frivolity. Another prominent design feature comes from the collaboration between Munge Leung’s sister graphic studio Device222 and photographer Stephen Green-Armytage whose stunning iconic bird portraits bringing a playful curiosity to the dining room.

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U lt r a     M u ng e Le u n g

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U lt r a     M u ng e Le u n g

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Cient

INK Entertainment (Charles Khabouth, CEO)    Design

Munge Leung    Photography

Munge Leung / Device222

PT General Contractor Inc. Main Contractor Suppliers:    Lighting Fixtures & Fittings Camilla House Imports, Commute Home, VISO Inc. / Device222, European House    Furniture Camilla House Imports, Castor, Sitconf, European House, Design Crown Wallpaper    Upholstery Designer Fabrics Outlet, Fabricut    Curtains/Blinds Fabricut, Device222, Nella Drapery    Within Reach, Dominion Rug    Wall Covering Custom Graphics Device222    Chicken Feather special finish Applied Art Studio

U lt r a     M u ng e Le u n g

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Pano ra m a

Made in Kitchen Xuzhou, China

1,115m2

Located in a downtown area of Xuzhou, China, Made In Kitchen is a newly opened restaurant serving contemporary Chinese cuisine. It has a total floor area of 1,115 sq. m. spread over two floors. The site imposed constraints of missing vertical linkage and unpleasant views of busy streets. The design solution was aimed at turning the constraints into a unique spatial language and creating a brand identity for the newly set up dining space. This was done by creating a totally inward-focused scheme with the help of a man-made landscape. The context and language of traditional Chinese landscape painting were re-interpreted to complete the dining experience. The resulting environment incorporates the narrative elements of scenes, flow, and hierarchy. Scenes like cloud, flying birds, rock, mountain, moonlight, and waterfall were adopted to give cultural identity to the whole space. Flow is seen in the full-height, white metal screens with random square patterns that create a screening effect and sense of continuity, as well as the minimal “cage like” stairwell providing a vertical link between the two levels. The full-height dark timber structure suggests a virtual experience of ascending a mountain from a traditional Chinese painting. The Chinese definition of spatial hierarchy was established by the tonal change from bright yellow on the ground floor, to dark red on the first floor, and with the level of privacy from the open ground floor bar and first floor open dining, to semi-open (circular booths) to private (VIP rooms). A unique dining experience is key for any successful restaurant’s business strategy, and Made In Kitchen aims to move that dining experience to another cultural level.

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Ma d e in Kit c h en     Pa n o ra m a

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Cient

Ma d e in Kit c h en     Pa n o ra m a

Seaport Catering Management Co., Ltd.    Design

Panorama    Design Team

Horace Pan, Alan Tse, Vivian Chan    Photography

Ng Siu Fung

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Pano ra m a

Made in Kitchen II Wuhu, China

4,000m2

Located within a downtown area in the city of Wuhu, China, Made In Kitchen II is the newest roll-out of this high-end F&B brand serving contemporary Chinese cuisine. The site faces a beautiful lake in the city centre with a total floor area of 4,000 sq.m. The design strategy aimed at creating a unique dining experience by reinterpreting various beautiful scenes of a “lake�. The resulting environment incorporates narrative elements in different zones. In the entrance lobby and corridor, motifs of a pool, ripples, butterflies, rocks, falling water and the lotus were created to impart a unique sense of arrival at the restaurant. On the mezzanine floor, booth seating and a central floating stage were introduced in the 10 metre high multifunctional atrium dining space to provide different types of cosy seating arrangements. The color-changing moon on the full-height feature wall provides different moods at different times. Projected images of fish swimming multiply the visual excitement of the whole space. Low-height glazed partitions define various seating patterns and provide privacy to the open seating in the dining area. Images projected on to the ceiling above the central square table act as a focus and provide subtle visual interest to the area. The tonal changes of the lake in the four seasons were represented in the private dining rooms. Images and colours of flowers representing spring, summer, autumn and winter provide different moods in the enclosed dining spaces.

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Ma d e in Kit c h en     Pa n o ra m a

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Cient

Ma d e in Kit c h en     Pa n o ra m a

Seaport Catering Management Co., Ltd.    Design

Panorama    Design Team

Horace Pan, Alan Tse, Nick Wong    Photography

Ng Siu Fung

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Mr. Imp or ta nt D e s ig n

Pure Naples, Florida, USA

484m2

The interior concept for Pure was based largely on the funky and glamorous jewelry created by Erika Pena. Her combination of vagabond world beach looks with a healthy dose of bling led the designers to an interior that is approachable, textured and sexy, funky but chic. Similarly Chef and PURE Founder Peter Schmid, wanted to create a total lifestyle brand – encompassing this concept into a modern dining experience….elevated dining without pretention. PURE Urban Oasis serves reasonably priced American style food with a global attitude; a freewheeling approach to mixing familiar ingredients with the unexpected. The journey from midday to midnight and beyond is conducted via the house DJ spinning tracks that enhance the Pure approach to mixing food and nightlife. Down-tempo, “acid jazz” and groovy house mix together throughout the evening and far into the late hours. The total package is a finely crafted restaurant/nightlife experience. It’s a unique concept in dining and lifestyle that promises to be a feast for the senses, and rejuvenation for both body and soul.

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P u r e     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e s ign

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P u r e     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e s ign

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Client/Owner Peter Schmid    Design Jeff Dow Construction    Photography

P u r e     M r. I m p o r t a nt D e s ign

Mr. Important Design    Design Team

Charles Doell, Principal; Miriam Marchevsky, Project Team    Main Contractor

Idyll

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Rigoletto Bar and Grill SWe e T co. , L td.

Minatoku, Tokyo, Japan

552m2

Rigoletto Bar and Grill is the fifth restaurant of the Rigoletto brand. The theme is contemporary American co-existing with the avant-garde and classic. The 13 metre long avant-garde bar counters are made in metal, mirror and glass. Light was installed inside the counter so that the counter appears to float. There are seats from the wall and images were projected on the TV monitor. A classic feeling was emphasized in the wine cellar and dining space. The space appears luxurious through the use of antique wood for the flooring and doors. A marble lamp shade and 930 pieces of mirror were installed between the bar and hall in the theme color gold and purple.

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R ig o le t t o Ba r a n d G r i l l     S We e T co. , Ltd.

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R ig o le t t o Ba r a n d G r i l l     S We e T co. , Ltd.

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Client/Owner

R ig o le t t o Ba r a n d G r i l l     S We e T co. , Ltd.

Huge Co.,Ltd.    Design

SWeeT co.,ltd.    Main Contractor

Ten-nen-sha Co., Ltd    Photography

Nacasa & Partners

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Andre a L a n g h i Arc hite c t

The Piper’s Milan, Italy

400m2

Inspired by hotel lobbies of the 1950s, this restaurant uses a mix of traditional materials like wood, brass, marble and leather; and modern features such as Venetian glass chandeliers or a large glass and marble counter showcasing the preparation of seafood. The ceiling is made from Extenzo, the stretch ceiling, with backlighting to simulate a skylight. The wood flooring is in natural color. On the wall, some parts feature Emperador Brown marble for a luxurious atmosphere. There are two separate entrances. One leads to the restaurant and the other to the lounge bar. The lounge bar is fully covered in rosewood paneling alternating with bronze mirrors. One room has a wall unit fitted with refrigerators where selected guests are given a private key. A second room is a lounge area with a big sofa and armchairs in velvet and tables from India. A divider featuring carved wood creates a separation within the restaurant. Different types of chairs in leather and wood are spread around tables in the room. In the central hall, under a large skylight, a big counter becomes a stage where the kitchen is in sight and chefs prepare fish. All around, the bar and kitchen are visible from some rooms. In one room, a modern iron sculptural fireplace dominates the space. The space appears more intimate by reducing the ceiling height. Upstairs, there is a smoking area with a large window.

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The Pip e r ’s     And re a L a ng h i Architec t

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The Pip e r ’s     And re a L a ng h i Architec t

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Client/Owner SUPPLIERS: Custom Furniture

The Pip e r ’s     And re a L a ng h i Architec t

Piper srl    Design

Andrea Langhi Architect    Main Contractor

www.cierreesse.it    Stretch Ceiling

Extenzo    Lamps

Cierreesse Arredamenti    Photography Diamante    Lamps

Courtesy of Andrea Langhi Architect

Muranodue Ether (customized)    Chairs

www.bulfoni.it

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D esig n Sp i ri ts Co. , L td.

The Nautilus Singapore

503m2

The Nautilus Project is located on the fourth floor of the newly opened ION shopping center on Orchard Road, Singapore. This floor has not only restaurants but shops as well. The owner is the president of a cargo company and a beautiful woman so the designer decided to reflect her sophistication and elegance in the restaurant project. The chef was recruited from New Zealand by the owner herself. Entry to the restaurant is through a common passage. The skeleton of the restaurant features many curves. The owner requested wood which was treated in a manner that does not look futuristic.

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The N a u t ilu s P r o j e c t     D e s ig n Spirit s Co. , Ltd.

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The N a u t ilu s P r o j e c t     D e s ig n Spirit s Co. , Ltd.

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Cient AC2 International Pte. Ltd.    Producer Focus Hospitality Inc., Carl Kjellqvist    Design Molotov Creative Pte. Ltd., Alistair Christie    Photography Kazuhiko Suzuki    Graphic Design Fitout Contractor

The N a u t ilu s P r o j e c t     D e s ig n Spirit s Co. , Ltd.

Design Spirits Co., Ltd., Yuhkichi Kawai    Lighting Design Courtesy of Design Spirits Co., Ltd.   

Muse d Co., Ltd.,

KNK Construction Pte. Ltd., Edwin Fong

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E ntas i s

Oca Polanco, Mexico City, Mexico

538m2

The project is located in a set of houses built in the 1950s in a block of the Polanco neighbourhood in Mexico City. Over the years, the block has been subjected to repeated alterations, not only in its architecture but also in its purpose (from residential to commercial). Nowadays, very little remains of what was originally a well-structured block with a formal and well defined clarity. Eventually, the house was subdivided into many small rooms and, deprived of natural light and ventilation, this became an obscure labyrinth. The project was solved by two premises that transformed the multiplicity of spaces into a single open dining room area from the front to back and from the top to bottom. The original facade was substituted by green walls formed of steel cables and plants allowing light and air to penetrate the building, and thus integrating the exterior and interior. Liberating the central space generated a lung in the middle of the house that makes natural lighting and ventilation possible. From being a centrifugal building that expelled you, it has become a centripetal space that greets and invites you. The materials used were a combination of black slate, ash wood, black steel plates and glass, which defined walls, floors and ceilings to give unity to the entire building. The black steel plates were moulded to communicate vertically and horizontally across different levels. The steel plates in the walls were placed at a five degree angle in order to give them volume and a point of fugue. All these materials contrast sharply with the plain brick wall that was rescued from the original building. The entrance is shaped by black slate that provides base and strength to the ground floor, contrasting with the transparency of the green walls of the upper floors. A pierced ash wood wall on the ground floor creates a lattice that generates the access corridor forming the patio, bar and a private dining room. The kitchen and toilets are also placed on this level. The first floor turns into an open space formed by the dining room, patio and the wine cellar. The second floor is a terrace formed by the patio that also looks onto the street. The booths that limit the patio on the first and second floors were designed with steel plates placed in the same angle as the walls, bent to form benches to receive diners. The wine cellars are made of solid ash wood into which steel plates are inserted to house bottles and glasses. The stairs and other spaces are formed by black slate and steel cables that form these green walls of plants that limit the views depending where one is seated. The glass facade can be completely open or closed. The same level of visibility can be achieved in the patio by using a retracting canvas. The rest of the furniture (chairs, tables and coat hangers) were designed in a blend of solid ash wood and black steel plates. Finally, scrap slate was used to fill the top part of the window boxes and chimneys, both formed by steel plates.

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O c a     E nta s is

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O c a     E nta s is

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Design Entasis    Design Team Alejandro De la Vega Zulueta; Ricardo Warman    Lighting Jorge Zinser; Marco Gongora; Pedro Garza    Colaborators Oscar Lopez; Enrique Bernal; Antonio Mukul; Juan Carlos del Val; Juan Garcia; Antonio Hernandez; Juan Planas; Guy Tixidor; Fernando Ortiz Monasterio    Main Contractor Jaime Navarro Construcciones Condesa sa De cv    Photography

O c a     E nta s is

Guillermo Lopez; Proyectos y

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E ntas i s

Biko Polanco, Mexico City, Mexico

512m2

The architectural design is partly inspired by the approach of chefs Mikel Alonso and Bruno Oteiza (disciples of Jean Marie Arzak) through the tasting of dishes and wines where the traditional flavours of Basque cuisine and its evolution create a new concept of duality. Based on this duality, the architectural concept uses contrasting tones (light/dark) that can be appreciated in the texture and hardness of materials; this, combined with an oblique geometry inspired by pre-Hispanic forms, generated the base for the design. The colour is inspired by the dishes. The dark tones are represented by black slate on floors which forms a solid base. Dark steel plates on walls and ceiling envelope the wine cellars and bathrooms thereby generating more hidden and solemn spaces. Clear tones are conveyed by a sand-coloured skin (Sande plywood) that envelops the space in horizontal scaled sections starting from the floor, increasing in size and ends with a structure of vertical wooden lattices whose transparency allows a view of Mazaryk Avenue and controls the afternoon sunlight Within this space, two elements break its equilibrium. The first is a wooden walnut box forming the bar which also limits the entrance. The second one are two Ÿ� steel plates which wrap the chocolate-coloured leather booths and also contain waiters’ stations. These become a point of reference in the restaurant. Access to the wine cellars is through an oblique tunnel made of glass. This is wrapped in steel plates and wooden oak racks for storing wine at a 5 degree angle to the walls and ceiling. A solid oak table in one of the cellars serves as a private dining room for special requests, enhancing the lightness of the walls and black steel ceiling.

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Design Entasis    Design Team Alejandro De la Vega Zulueta; Ricardo Warman    Lighting Jorge Zinser; Marco Gongora; Pedro Garza    Colaborators Oscar Mandujano; Francisco Fernandez; Juan Lopez; Nicolas Arellano; Oscar Lopez; Enrique Bernal; Antonio Mukul; Marcial Rivas; Juan Garcia; Antonio Hernandez; Guillermo Lopez; Guy Tixidor    Main Contractor Proyectos y Construcciones Condesa sa De cv    Photography Jaime Navarro

CORTE TRANSVERAL A-A'

ACCESO SERVICIO

MONTACARGAS

COMEDOR PRIVADO

BLANCOS

CAJA

CAVA BAR

IMPRESORAS

MESA CHEF

ACCESO RESTAURANTE BARRA

PLANTA ARQUITECTÓNICA

B ik o     E nt a s is

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Conra n & Pa r t ne r s

Skylon London, UK

885m2

With the restoration of the Royal Festival Hall on London’s Southbank in 2007, Conran & Partners were responsible for the redesign of the new restaurant Skylon, housed in what was “The People’s Palace Restaurant”. Now a Grade 1 Listed Building, Conran & Partners design for the restaurant space was informed by the original building design and heritage materials. The restaurant enjoys 6m ceiling height with floor to ceiling glazing along a 36m aspect to the Thames. Conran & Partners’ scheme brings a feeling of intimacy to this vast space through a careful choice of colours and fittings. Five bespoke chandeliers break up the enormous ceiling height whilst making a striking statement when viewed from the exterior of the building and Hungerford Bridge. The chandelier references details found in the hall. A ring of fins take their shape from the “Net and Ball” carpet design found throughout the building and dating back to the hall’s original construction. The slots into which the fins are lodged, an elongated lozenge shape, echo those cut into the boxes in the main auditorium. This slot motif is repeated through the restaurant design and can also be found on the waiter stations. The restaurant bar sits on a raised platform in the centre of the room and serves to divide the restaurant in two. On one side, the atmosphere is relaxed with warm dark brown tables and golden olive chairs complementing the restaurant’s walnut timber flooring and joinery. The opposite side of the room has a more formal ambiance. Leather banquettes and dining sofas complement an olive green carpet, and the tables are dressed in cloths. The glamorous bar forms the centrepiece of the room. Here, chairs based on an original 1950s design are placed alongside modern sofas. The floor and bar counter are a grey-green limestone. The material echoes the existing panels of the same stone, which line the back wall of the restaurant. The bar front is clad in bronze. Again, this material finds its precedent in features of the rest of the building and is used in details throughout the restaurant space, including skirting at the base of the columns, on doors to a feature wine display and in the magnificent chandeliers. Throughout the design, the colour palette is chosen from the array of heritage colours found through the Royal Festival Hall building. The architects responsible for renovations to the rest of the hall used paint scrapings from the 1951 colour scheme to produce new paint colours for the building. Conran & Partners have carried these colours in Skylon’s paint scheme, choosing deep warm red for accent walls at the back of the room and a pale green for the walls to the entrance staircase.

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Sk y lo n     Co nra n & Pa r t n e r s

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Client/Owner D&D London    Design Conran & Partners    Lighting Consultant Speirs and Major Associates    Art Consultant Max Fordham/Summit Design    Photography Robin Hayes Photography Collection    M+E Consultant Vivid    Main Contractor Suppliers:    Bespoke Chandeliers/Bespoke Fixed Standard Lamps Mike Stoane Lighting    Table Lamps Davison Highley    Bespoke tables Target    Bespoke fitted carpet armchairs/sofas

Sk y lo n     Co nra n & Pa r t n e r s

Artwork on loan from Arts Council

Jonathan Adler    Knoll Saarinen Executive Chair Conran Contracts    Bespoke Wilton    Aluminium blinds(sourced to match original) Aspraes

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B OX I nte ri or D e s ig n Inc.

Coast Vancouver, BC, Canada

762m2

Coast was designed as a modern seafood restaurant with a sense of tradition. Adjacent to the restaurant is O Lounge, a separate but connected lounge with its own identity and later operating hours. Deep turquoise tones, custom mosaic-tile floors and lush leather banquettes define a new Vancouver aesthetic and extends a respectful nod to classic San Francisco seafood eateries. While the main level experiences a higher energy level with its central bar, open kitchen, and harder surfaces, the upper level is more calming with darker tones and carpeted flooring. The top of the stairs is anchored by the highly coveted VIP room, clad in teak and draped with capiz shells. A glass balustrade on the mezzanine level reinforces the visual connection between the upper and main floor of the restaurant. The O Lounge with its glowing abalone-patterned drink tables and suspended shades, coral-toned velvet sofas, custom gold mirror mobile, and dark indigo articulated walls, makes for a sultry lounge vibe.

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C o a s t     BOX Inte rio r D e s ign Inc.

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Client/Owner Emad Yacoub & Shannon Bosa – Glowbal Restaurant Group    Design BOX Interior Design Inc.    Design Team Action Projects    Photography Larry Goldstein Photography Jeffers    Main Contractor

Co a s t     BOX Inte rio r D e s ign Inc.

H. Jay Brooks, Cynthia Penner, Tara Lingle, Monica

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Wilsdon D e si g n As s o c iate s

1901 London, UK

425m2

1901 is at the heart of the Grade ll listed ANdAZ Liverpool Street, London, built between 1884-1887 to the designs of Charles Barry. In generating the concept, one salient principle remained central to the thought process; namely that this excellent example of high Victorian architecture should be shown to its full glory whilst introducing a new contemporary concept that challenges yet compliments. The backdrop to the new design is in pure chalk-whites. The appearance of the decorative panelling is ethereal. New FF+E contrasts by its modernity and as if to mark this distinction, all that is new is set away from the existing architecture and seen to be floating. On entering, to the left, spanning the length of the lobby, is a cantilevered table that floats through the architecture. In its centre is housed discreet refrigeration for wine and champagne and, to the top, a tapas station caters to guests. The table also acts as a host desk where reservations can be taken for the restaurant. Area rugs define the far end of the space and break the elongated architecture. Full height back-lit sheers form a wall of light within a natural alcove where low seating groups are anchored by a large artwork that floats away from the sheers. Within the restaurant, the arrangement creates a powerful centre, focusing on a beautiful one-level bar table with intermediate height tables, seating and bar/lounge chairs to either side. Dining arrangements act to frame and embrace the central space. The space is defined in several ways and importantly, all elements sit away from the ornate architecture allowing it to breathe in its own right. The perimeter is punctuated by a series of four tall semi-opaque glass screens, laminated with soft textural fabric. These form discreet screens embracing the tables in front of them. Their appearance is architectural but translucent. The glass wine wall to the far side allows vision of individual wine bottles and partly reflects the core of the central bar area. Echoing the form of the glass wine wall, at either side, are cheese cabinets that act in unison with the operation of the front table, which is formed from a substantial trunk of hand finished walnut, and elevated to act as a high table for guests. Central to the space is a communal table made of a heavily veined dark grey marble, with a series of glass shelves stacked beneath the top, apparently supporting its weight. The bar table can be operated from either side; both ends having a small inset sink and herb garden, and to the left of the barman, refrigerated drawers beneath the top. The lighting has the ability to form a wash of bright even light over the walls during the day whilst at night, the lighting softens to focus on the inner space of the restaurant, allowing for more mood-enhancing dramatic lighting of tables and major features. The use of colour lighting enhances the warm ambiance and creates more dramatic effects and intimacy when the occasion suits.

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Opposite page: listed glass dome

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Client/Owner ANdAZ Liverpool Street    Design Wilsdon Design Associates    Lighting Consultant Oshe Link Limited    Photography Andaz Liverpool Street Associates    Consultant

Elektra Lighting    Art Consultant

Wilsdon Design

EE Smith Main Contractor SUPPLIERS: Stonell    Occasional seating Morosso    Stools B&B Italia / Brent Comber    Consoles Nusa Furniture    Area rugs Danskina    Furniture Stone flooring The Design Net / European Design Centre    Fabrics Zimmer + Rohde / Pollack / DesignTex / Sahco Hesslein    Curtain systems Silent Gliss pieces

1 901    Wils d o n D e s ig n As so ciates

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Anne-Sophie Pic au Beau-Rivage Palace Wilsdon D e si g n As s o c iate s

Lausanne, Switzerland

420m2

The aim was to create a 350 sq. m. high-end 50+ cover restaurant for the hotel to be operated by 3-star Michelin chef Anne-Sophie Pic, as part of a major refurbishment of key public areas at the heart of the c.1864 structure of the BeauRivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland. The refurbishment entailed total re-modeling/re-orientation of major outlets in order to create a new entrance, restaurant, adjoining bar (servicing both restaurant and refurbished lobby lounge) and restaurant terrace overlooking Lake Genève. All operational considerations were taken into account to ensure fluid circulation, ease of use and correct mode of restaurant service. Zones were formed within the space creating a sense of intimacy for guests whilst dining. Advantage was taken of long window elevation to enable views towards lake and mountains. There was careful crafting of plan to ensure compliance with local municipality requirements in all respects including those relating to listed building status. The designers were led by the brief which included critical operational requirements for adjacent areas working closely with the restaurant. The key was to create a restaurant as a sumptuous ‘cocoon’ with a strong sense of privacy, attained in part by the layering of spaces that access the restaurant proper, and interior architectural features such as sheer fabric laminated screens and softer elements like full-height window sheers. Colour is subdued, warm and embracing, designed to enhance incredible views during the day and create intimacy by night. Of paramount importance was guest comfort, achieved not only through careful prototyping of dining chairs and custom-designed sofas but in considering the effect of the restaurant environment on all five senses. Establishing a sense of place unique to the restaurant, without divorcing the spaces from the grandeur of the original palace interiors that were to remain, was considered throughout the design process. Individuality or ‘sense of place’ comes not only with the appropriate use of materials but with key features such as the Bellori marble fireplace and the custom-designed, leather-embossed wardrobe with its open glass back. In some instances, this is also evident in small details such as the seamless turn of the upper wall to the ceiling or the use of reflection. It is the sum of these parts that enhances the overall guest experience. The layering process is evident in the use of materials, one superimposed upon the other, such as the back-lit custom designed horsehair screens that float off the suede paneled walls, itself containing under-lit antique brass and grey mirror niches that act as wine cooler supports for individual tables. The layering effect was designed and selection of materials made to complement the ethos of Anne-Sophie Pic’s cuisine which focuses on the layering of taste, texture and lightness of touch. Materials were also selected to be practical and durable in their locations and, wherever possible, from local and sustainable sources.

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Client/Owner Beau-Rivage Palace, SA    Design Wilsdon Design Associates    Lighting Consultant Elektra Lighting    Art Consultant Richter et Dahl Rocha / R Monnet & Cie SA    Photography Beau-Rivage Palace Hotel / Wilsdon Design Associates Associates    Consultant

Wilsdon Design

Moraz SA / Wider SA Main Contractor SUPPLIERS: John Hutton Ensemble    Occasional furniture Laurameroni / The Design Net    Bespoke fire gate Planika    Glass screens Dining chairs Couristan    Fabrics Pollack / Jim Thompson    Pendant Lighting Ochre    Decorative wall lights Terzani    Decorative table lamp Serralunga

Fusion Glass    Carpeting Porta Romana    Floor Lamp

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A n n e - So p h ie Pi c a u B e a u -R i v a g e P a l a c e     Wilsdo n D esign Asso ciates

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J O I-D e s i g n I nte rio r Arc h ite c t s

Vlet Hamburg, Germany

390m2

When coming up with the concept for VLET Restaurant, it was abundantly clear to JOI-Design from the outset about the direction the interior design should take. The strongest aspect of the restaurant’s identity is its location in the old “Speicherstadt” of Hamburg or“Warehouse District” that is home to the city’s historic port. The neighbourhood brick construction, steel pedestrian bridges and prolific canals have an industrial charm that is being rediscovered as the area regains popularity. JOI-Design understood the need to preserve this personality when designing the restaurant. Their solution was to translate these architectural influences into a chic, Hanseatic urban loft that feels like settling into a friend’s comfortable downtown living room. Located in a building nearly a century old, JOI-Design saw the beauty in the original construction techniques and chose to expose these components rather than hide them. The graceful arches of the barrel-vaulted ceiling, steel beam supports and textured brick and plaster walls are enhanced by newer design elements such as the rustic timber plank floors, rich leather chairs and driftwood “sculptures” which are lit from below to define their shadows against the irregular wall surface. The heavy, rough-hewn natural finishes of these structural design features are offset by the smooth, shiny modern materials of the stainless steel dining table bases and barstool frames, clear crystal wine glasses and sparkling translucent pendant lights. The visually exciting contrast is further emphasised by the bold flash of fresh lime green behind the bar and on its counter surface. The emotional response of the guests to these “clashing” styles is one of excitement that creates a buzz in the restaurant’s atmosphere. In Old High German, the word “Vlet” meant a fleet, or a channel in coastal cities. One manner the restaurant’s name is introduced in the interior design is through a gigantic golden fish sculpture at entry. The space plan also capitalizes on the “stream-like” ripples created by curves in the barrel-vaulted ceiling to create a directional flow though the dining area. Additionally, a floor lamp constructed from soft fabric to resemble a floating sea urchin is placed alongside the timber dining table by the feature window. The predominantly natural tones of the restaurant’s décor allow the vibrant culinary creations to be true artistic masterpieces. Reminiscent of the richness of the traders’ treasures of coffee, carpets, spices and silks stored in the old warehouses, JOI-Design has created a canvas that allows the menu to shine.

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V le t     JO I -D e s ig n I nte rio r Architec t s

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Client/Owner Photography SUPPLIERS:    Upholstery(Chair)

V le t     JO I -D e s ig n I nte rio r Architec t s

Nord Event    Design JOI-Design Interior Architects    Consultant for Acoustic Ceiling & Curved Wall JOI-Design Interior Architects Accademia Srl    Pendulum Light(Bar area)

Alturo Alvarez    Pendulum Light(Dining area)

Knauf Gips KG    Main Contractor

Foscarini SRL    WC Fittings & Accessories

Rosink Gmbh   

Hansgrohe AG

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J O I-D e s i g n I nte rio r Arc h ite c t s

Calla Hamburg, Germany

520m2

At Steigenberger’s flagship hotel in Hamburg, JOI-Design was briefed to redesign a large restaurant into a multifunction space retaining a fine dining ambiance. In doing so, the designers harnessed the property’s spectacular location and created a stylish establishment where the interior design merges effortlessly with the external surroundings. Situated on an island in one of downtown Hamburg’s many picturesque canals, the Steinberger Hotel is surrounded with scenic water-level views of passing tour boats and yachts. Thus the restaurant’s inspiration became“the perfect wave” as expressed through the simple elegance of the Calla Lily, since the petals’shape emulates the smooth undulations of the surrounding tides. The pure cream-and-white colour palette creates a sublime sense of serenity while the textured stucco sculptures gracing the walls add a nuanced contrast. Gently backlit sculptures take on an ethereal glow and when inset, their ebbed patterns are drawn out by downlights. Wave shapes can also be found in the gold-plated banana leaves scattered at the base of these wall insets. Their metallic surface subtly casts sparkles of light which, along with the halogen wall-washers, are reminiscent of the glints of sunlight bouncing off the nearby water. The Calla Lily’s shape also provides an elegant solution for the space plan as the adoption of its lines creates a free-flowing traffic pattern through the restaurant’s centre to contribute an important see-and-be-seen theatrical element. The layout also provides for a variety of events by integrating translucent draw curtains that can be reconfigured to form a breakfast buffet room, a conference breakout area, or a pre-function space. The restaurant itself can be divided into two parts by a well-disguised curved wall, allowing for additional flexibility during private parties. With thoughtfully planned spaces and clean sculptural finishes, Restaurant Calla exemplifies modern sophistication.

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Client/Owner Union Investment Real Estate AG    Design JOI-Design Interior Architects    Consultant for Acoustic Ceiling & Curved Wall Theo Albert GmbH    Photography JOI-Design Interior Architects SUPPLIERS:    Custom Ceiling and Ceiling Lighting

Feature wall detail

C a lla     JO I -D e s ig n I nte rio r Architec t s

Knauf Gips KG    Custom Curved Wall

Knauf Gips KG    Main Contractor

Stuccoworker O.Werner & Söhne GmbH

View of logo at entrance

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B OX I nte ri or D e s ig n Inc.

Trattoria Vancouver, BC, Canada

325m2

The designers aimed to create a modern, sexy, and inviting neighbourhood restaurant with an Italian identity. By eschewing typical Tuscan design elements and using imagery that pays homage to the 1950s Italian artist/ designer Fornesetti, the restaurant is an updated version of the traditional trattoria. Large one metre diameter disks float off the wall with images of Michelangelo’s “David” and Botticelli’s “Birth of Venus”. The wall behind these images is heavily textured and lit from below to create a dramatic lighting effect. Rows of wood shelves line the walls to display wine in front of communal tables centred in the back dining area. Anchoring the end of the restaurant is the tomato red room with its mirrored acrylic panels and matching red banquettes.

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Client/Owner Emad Yacoub & Shannon Bosa – Glowbal Restaurant Group    Design BOX Interior Design Inc.    Design Team Heron Construction & Millwork    Photography Larry Goldstein Photography Jeffers    Main Contractor

Tra t t o r ia     B OX Inte rio r D e sign Inc.

H. Jay Brooks, Cynthia Penner, Tara Lingle, Monica

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Rigoletto Short Hills SWe e T co. , L td.

Minatoku, Tokyo, Japan

206m2

This is a secret restaurant located at the back of an alley. The interior theme was inspired by Morocco. The first floor reminds one of dining in the souk. The silhouettes of Arabic patterns are expressed in a modern style on the floor because of lighting inside a mirror. The second floor resembles a study room. There is a bookshelf and a fire place carved in delicate Arabic patterns. Modern art was used to express a modern Moroccan style. The simple space makes each item stand out.

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R ig o le t t o Sh o r t H i l l s     S We e T co. , Ltd.

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Client/Owner

R ig o le t t o Sh o r t H i l l s     S We e T co. , Ltd.

Huge Co.,Ltd.    Design

SWeeT co.,ltd.    Main Contractor

Wege Co., Ltd    Photography

Nacasa & Partners

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UXUS

Ella

Sacramento, California, USA

710m2

Ella Dining Room & Bar serves ‘Modern American Bistro’ cuisine. The owners wanted the restaurant to become ‘Sacramento’s living room’, an urban oasis where lawmakers and other diners can go and unwind after a long day’s work. The design objective for Ella’s was to create a brand that embodies the principles of ‘Rustic Luxury’ and that celebrates an elegant, relaxed, contemporary lifestyle. ‘Rustic luxury’ is a synonym for purity, the essential beauty and goodness contained in simple things. It is about the pleasure and sensuality of real materials, and about the inherent comfort of a natural, effortless style. ‘Rustic luxury’ is not a simplistic reduction. It is the magical crystallization of two apparent opposites, simplicity and complexity. Rustic Luxury, as defined by Ella’s, offers guests an experience that combines the simple and natural pleasures of dining at a dear friend’s home, at their table d’hôte or host’s table. The ‘Host’s Table’ is a French tradition of eating in the kitchen while the chef prepares dinner. It is a very welcoming and intimate experience, usually reserved for honored guests and close friends. The owners of Ella wanted to create that level of intimacy at their restaurant. UXUS cleverly opened the kitchen to the dining area with two large communal tables forming the table d’hôte area. Diners can experience the thrill of watching the chefs at work, and taste the results of their culinary efforts. All these elements come together at Ella Dining Room & Bar to form an intimate and convivial dining experience, the embodiment of “Rustic Luxury” right in the heart of California’s State Capital.

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El la     U X U S

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Client/Owner

The Selzim Restaurant Group    Design

UXUS    Lighting Consultant

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El la     U X U S

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Ak arStu d i os

Crescent Heights San Diego, California, USA     650m2

Occupying the ground level floor as an anchor tenant of a new modern high-rise office building in the heart of San Diego’s business district, Crescent Heights restaurant and bar projects a scale and drama in its interiors that befits the contemporary fine-dining culinary creations of its chef and owner, David McIntyre. It is the first truly modern restaurant venue to open in recent years in California’s coastal city of San Diego. The approximately 650 sq. m. space in contemporary design, encompassing a restaurant, lounge, bar, private dining and an outdoor patio, takes California cuisine experience to a whole new level. Despite being a large space with a seating capacity of over 170, the restaurant has been designed as a series of distinct yet interacting spaces to accommodate differently sized groups and private events. One of the defining aspects of the space happens to be the ceiling. A complex ceiling assembly, comprising a series of undulating ceiling planes, provides a rhythmic visual affect that takes attention away from the height and boxy shape of the space. The clean and sharp planes of the interior have been rendered in hues of brown and taupe colours that have been offset by the white polished marble tabletops and chocolate brown leather-upholstered chairs. Various types of flooring materials have been selectively utilized within the interior space. While walnut wood flooring is used in the main seating area, polished concrete has been used in the bar and circulation spaces. The carpeted lounge area, with a lower ceiling height, has a large glass window affording a view of the stainless steel exhibition and finishing kitchen. With an open kitchen, the chef and his staff are seen performing for the clientele visiting the restaurant. Within the lounge space, sofas and ottomans, upholstered in deep rust colored fabric have been grouped together to create an intimate seating arrangement. The open layout of Crescent Heights has a strong focal point — an island bar that occupies a central and pivotal location within the venue. Overlooking the lounge space on one side and the main dining area on the other, the bar brings a level of warm sophistication to the space. Made entirely of finely sanded and polished planks of zebrawood, the bar top and front give this place a look of sophistication. The elevated back-bar structure displays an extensive vodka collection in this venue. The upper structure of the back-bar has been left open to the dining space allowing filtered light to come through the vodka bottles to create an enticing glow at the front. Adjacent to this bar, arranged along the wall, a glass-clad wine storage displays an extensive collection of temperaturecontrolled wines that have been selected by the restaurant’s wine director. Long banquette seating and a combination of high-back, fabric upholstered booths define the spatial edge of the restaurant’s dining space. Natural light floods the large expanse of the tall glass panels at the front of the building’s storefront that separates the outdoor patio from the main dining space. Overall, Crescent Heights has successfully created a new contemporary destination in San Diego for visually stunning California cuisine prepared under the direction of its celebrity chef.

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Cr e s c e n t He ig ht s     Ak a r St u d io s

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Client/Owner

David and Mariah McIntyre    Design Team

AkarStudios    Photography

TSA, San Diegp Main Contractor Suppliers:    Lighting Liton Lighting    Chairs Adriano Contract Seating    Wood Flooring Curtains/Blinds Maharam    AV System(Monitors & Speakers) LG & JBL

Cr e s c e n t He ig ht s     Ak a r St u d io s

Ramona Dviola

Armstrong    Lavatory & Towels

Kohler    Upholstery(Chairs)

Maharam   

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Nig e l Coate s L td.

Wallop Lewes, East Sussex, UK

555m2

In 2008 Glyndebourne, an Opera House contacted Coates to help upgrade their Middle and over Wallop restaurant, an important part of the theatre complex and visited by a sizable proportion of their opera audience. Coates was to design everything on the inside of the recently enlarged space. Hopes were for a more stylish and comfortable environment within a very tight budget. The old restaurant was more a canteen than a gourmet experience. Vast spaces needed breaking up into distinct areas and the open expanses of ceiling needed an eye-catching feature. Its two levels were separated from one another by a steep central stair. No one wanted to dine on the upper level. Above all, it needed a sense of opulence and theatricality that could make it part of a night at the opera. Despite the more than 300 covers, the design reinforces a sense of place and identity for each of the diners. By using serpentine banquettes, towering waiter stations and interconnecting levels, Coates defines many distinct areas on three levels each with their own upholstery colour. All the furniture is designed by Coates and made by Fratelli Boffi, including the specially created banquettes and waiter station towers. Chairs, on the other hand, are part of his Scubist collection for the same company. The project also includes a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cloudâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of chandeliers realised with Swarovski Crystal Palace and the lighting company Slamp. Its 43 chandeliers are hung in the central area of the restaurant, visually connecting its three levels. A huge painting saved from a now defunct production of La Traviata hangs above one of the banquettes. In fact, the whole design is imbued with an appropriate sense of theatre, with props from many past productions animating the top shelves of the many waiter stations dotted through the space.

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Client/Owner

Entrance

Glyndebourne Opera House    Design

Nigel Coates Ltd    Design Team

Bramber Construction, Fratelli Boffi    Main Contractor SUPPLIERS: Fratelli Boffi    Lighting Construction of Cloudelier Furniture

Nigel Coates, Ace Morgan, Andrea Mancuso    Photography

Slamp    Crystals for Cloudeliers

Charlotte Boulton

Swarovski

Kitchen

Wine storage

Bar

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Mid d le a n d Ove r Wa l l o p     N ig e l Co ates Ltd.

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D enis Kosu ti c

Orlando di Castello Vienna, Austria

420m2

The interior designers thought of uniting the contradictory worlds of Queen Elizabeth II, the rapper 50 Cent and a girl from Tyrol all in one room and of forming associations which leads to a new kind of harmonic composition. Symbols, such as delicate, stylised little flowers and hard metallic nuts appear in the room in countless versions, thereby making for strong contrasts. The exciting sense of space appears through the examination of new proportions: baseboards are transformed into wall cladding, floor lamps become ceiling lights, and benches explode into small, kidney-shaped segments. The result is an ironic, surreal atmosphere full of surprises. White is the dominating colour - fresh, innocent and friendly - and it is used on various materials and surfaces. When white is used with metallic, silver and mirrored elements, the colour loses its innocence and appears hard. However, when a white background is immersed in warm light, it shines with a smooth, golden warmth. The use of different kinds of seating shapes in different areas of the room creates the intended space separation and zoning. The targeted use of illumination, as well as carefully planned and selected light colours supports the atmosphere in particular areas. The strong ODC branding appears to be dominant or reserved, characterised or printed on several custom-made objects and surfaces. High-quality handicrafts enhance the brand Orlando di Castello so that the architecture becomes a medium for brand development.

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Design Denis Kosutic    Design Team Christian Ploderer

Or la n d o d i Ca s t e l l o     D e n is Ko s u t ic

Mareike L. Kuchenbecker, Carina Haberl, Judith Wölkl, Matteo Trentini    Corporate Design

Thies Design    Lighting

Designbüro

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G lam orous Co. , L td.

DBL(double) Osaka, Japan

210m2

The two storey F&B outlet is a fantastic and elegant experience with outstanding three-dimensional arabesque artwork by noted Japanese artist Masataka Kurashina. The design implicitly continues the story from the leafy park opposite the establishment. The aluminium bunching arabesque art flies around the 6 metre high void like a lift-the-flap book and you may notice various animals hiding in the arabesque design. There is a slight sensation of having wandered off into Alice in Wonderland. At the bar lounge on the second floor, you can enjoy drinks on sofa seats or at the counter, and see arabesque-design shadows of the 18 glass lamp shades visually reflect on the white wall. The design creates an extraordinary yet relaxing environment.

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D BL ( d o u b le )     G la m o ro u s Co. , Ltd.

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Design

Glamorous Co., Ltd.(Yasumichi Morita)    Photography

Seiryo Studio

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Studio G a i a , I n c.

Américas Texas, USA

700m2

The new Américas Restaurant and 1492 Lounge in The Woodlands blends distinctive architecture with progressive Latin cuisine to create a captivating culinary experience. Michael Cordúa teamed up with Studio Gaia, a renowned New York City architectural firm, to create sleek interiors and bold, imaginative elements that complement the romantically provocative menu. The stairway leads to the dining room where vivid reds and oranges are woven together with natural accents of stone and wood, overlooking The Woodlands Waterway. From the hand-crafted wood tables to the slow tumble of water down three water walls to the oversized banana leaf murals overhead, guests are transported to the tranquility of a tropical rainforest.

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A m é r ic a s     St u d io G a ia , Inc.

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Cient

A m é r ic a s     St u d io G a ia , Inc.

Michael Cordúa    Design

Studio Gaia, Inc.    Design Team

Ilan Waisbrod, Elise Lee, Patricia Walker    Photography

Courtesy of Studio Gaia, Inc.

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Ag e n ce Joui n M a n ku

Oth Sombath Paris, France

400m2

A restaurant of 400 sq m showcases the talent of young Thai chef Oth Sombath for up to 80 diners. The designers searched for the right balance in the restaurant ambiance in order to respond to Oth’s cuisine and offer something exquisitely modern. They immersed themselves in Thailand and translated it into a Parisian context. They studied the traditions and culture of Thailand, its colors, rhythms, volumes, and light, while looking to create a fully contemporary gastronomic experience – smooth lines and sleek curves. There is something sensual and exotic, a delicate blend of rich influences in one place. The bar and each of the three dining rooms offers a unique atmosphere to enjoy Oth’s sumptuous flavors. One is in scintillating gold, another in bold orange, and the last in soft creams. The color palette is reminiscent of temple treasures, the bold colours of women’s dresses and rice paddies. Textures also play a reference in the restaurant – the curved wall of the bar looks like the hairstyles on Buddha sculptures while the warm wooden floor on the ground floor echoes the dark wooden artisans’ creations in Thailand. The arch of a dragon’s back (golden leaves in the entranceway) resonate with the sweeping curves of the stairway connecting the three dining rooms. Thailand is in the details of the restaurant – from the subtle flavors to the custom lamps, while Parisian refinement exudes as well.

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O t h So m b a t h     Ag e nce Jo u in M anku

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Client/Owner Société Very Oth (Jacques Konckier, Lisa Abrat Konckier, Eddie Mitchell)    Design Agence Jouin Manku    Design Team Claudia del Bubba (interior designer SLA Architecture    Architect’s Team Birgitte Trosby (project manager), Mélanie Lallemand-Fluche and Richard + project manager), Antoine Lesur (designer)    Architect of Record Claudia del Bubba, Ramy Fischler and Richard Perron    Photography Eric Laignel Perron    Product Design SUPPLIERS:    Plaster Sofrastyl    Woodwork Paul Champs    Electricity Fontelec    Painting Beaumatin    Flooring Sequoïa    Carpet Tai Ping Carpets    Gold leafing Atelier Martin Berger    Graphic design Philippe David    Lighting elements Designed by the Agence Patrick Jouin ID:Akonite    Bar and consoles Designed by the Cassina, Elegance    ”Dream” table Pedrali    ”Jiff” low bar tables Flexform    Bar stools Mater    ”Canasta” bar armchairs Agence Patrick Jouin ID    ”Hola” chair B&B    Back of bar BRX Italia    Bathroom mirror Murano Due    Bathrooms Boffi, Alessi, Alape, Catalano, Porta France

O t h So m b a t h     Ag e nce Jo u in M anku

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Ag e n ce Joui n M a n ku

745m2

In April 2009, a new restaurant was unveiled on the first floor of the Eiffel Tower. Agence Jouin Manku re-designed the sumptuous space, 58 Tour Eiffel, to embrace the extraordinary locale and Groupe Alain Ducasse’s enticing kitchen. Celebrating the energy and legacy of French cooking, brasseries in particular, Agence Jouin Manku conceived of 58 Tour Eiffel as a contemporary brasserie that is a continuation of the tower itself – elegant and airy, brimming with the liveliness of a traditional brasserie, and with the beautiful view of the capital below. The restaurant embodies the kitchen as well as the tower – transparent in form and function, and paying tribute to the functional ingenuity of the tower itself. “All the scents and sensations of entering a kitchen, the energy of cooking, the sounds and speed of a brasserie, this is what we wanted people to feel at 58 Tour Eiffel,” said designer Patrick Jouin. And indeed, the copper glow of the kitchen’s back wall evocative of the copper pots and heavy pans found in French brasserie cooking, resonates throughout the bi-level dining room – up like a chimney to the mezzanine. The copper sheen draws attention from all angles to the simmering stove within – the warmth and immediacy of Chef Alain Soulard’s cuisine. Transposing materials of the tower into the design itself, the restaurant structure – with its strong but delicate metallic emblems, iron beams and steel supports in plain sight – is perfectly integrated with Jouin Manku’s vision of opening up the restaurant for diners to truly enjoy their surroundings. Design motifs of openness and light that make the existing structure a jewel of the Art Nouveau style, are indeed kept in mind for the redesign of 58 Tour Eiffel. Removing bulky columns and supports that might obstruct the glorious view, those remaining are bare, simply but strikingly recalling the beams outside. A circular skylight enables diners to appreciate an intimate view as nowhere else in Paris. Jouin Manku celebrates a bird’s eye view of Trocadero, Quai Branly and the Champs de Mars seen through the windows of the restaurant. The materials of the tower, the palette in deep brown, filters all parts of the design – down to the exquisite mesh metal chairs custom-designed by Patrick Jouin and fabricated by EMU. These chairs, clearly a product of our times, admire and pay homage to the 19th century masterpiece they are in – at once subtle and structured, delicate and indestructible. At 58 Tour Eiffel, the energy and legacy of brasseries is present in each of the custom-designed details, each reinterpreted in cutting-edge materials and latest techniques, each holding a reference to the kitchen or the tower. While incorporating new technologies and techniques, Jouin Manku designers work in harmony with existing motifs – bringing together styles and epochs. For example, a wall of faiënce tiles chromatically-printed with bold images of vegetables and fruit of the sea (hand-selected by Jouin Manku from the Bibliothèque Nationale Française) or the wood-tiled ‘carpet’ welcoming and drawing attention vertically to the wood and metal staircase, leading up to the new ceiling skylight; or the textured golden-copper cloud lamps suspended above the tables on the mezzanine level - are all evocative of the diners’place above the city. The custom-designed carpet on the upper floor also recalls the view from above: beige, grey and grassy-green conjure up the blurring outlines of the world far below. The sculptural banquette on the mezzanine level creates a landscape in aluminium sheets, tucking diners in for their meal in alcoves formed by sloping metallic hills and valleys like the panorama beyond. Indeed, every visible and tactile element has been treated by Jouin Manku – fresh forms and texture combinations that create a unique balance between tradition and today.

©François Christophe

Paris, France

©Dominique Milherou

58 Tour Eiffel

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©Dominique Milherou

©Dominique Milherou 5 8 To u r E if f e l     Ag e n ce Jo u in M anku

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Millenia (Groupe Alain Ducasse and Sogeres) Architect of Record SLA Architecture

Design Agence Jouin Manku Design Team Claudia del Bubba (interior designer + project manager), Antoine Photography Dominique Milherou, François Christophe

©Dominique Milherou

©François Christophe

©Dominique Milherou

Client/Owner Lesur (designer)

5 8 To u r E if f e l

Ag e n ce Jo u in M anku

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Ong &O n g P te L td.

Tomo Izakaya Clarke Quay, Singapore

308m2

“Tomo” is the Japanese word for friend, and “Izakaya” means a drinking establishment which also serves food accompanying drinks, and is usually casual and affordable. True to the Izakaya’s down-to-earth tradition, the interior layout had to be designed to allow the smooth flow of people moving and also meet the project’s 200 headcount without compromising on the aesthetic and efficiency value. Inspiration was drawn from the traditional Japanese culture: sitting on mats for meals, the simple lattice-style window and sliding door, the soothing landscape, the environment of the fishing port, the structure of the “Torii” entrance and the ritual of the “Shinto Shrine”. These elements are key features leading to the design of Tomo Izakaya. Two key design concepts found throughout are the unconventional low light source and the direct approach layout. The low light source refers to the light beaming from within the table. It emphasizes the food and patrons rather than the design features of the premises. The direct approach layout is found with the long wooden table, introduced to encourage casual dining and shared sitting among patrons, to initiate conversations. Very few Japanese establishments offer outdoor dining but Tomo presents an al fresco dining experience to its patrons. Segregating functional spaces was the first step in the design process. The indoor space caters more to the diners whilst the outdoor space panders to drinking patrons. A huge, long, natural wood log specially imported from Indonesia was selected for the bar-top counter area, adding bulk and weight in the dining area. A variation of seating options are offered: a raised platform to achieve the traditional Japanese culture of sitting on the floor, aided by a modified seat cushion specially designed for Tomo; table and chair seating; and bar counter seating. There are two main feature walls in the indoor area, created with elements inspired by the old fishing port and the Shinto Shrine respectively. The fishing port feature is mainly clad with old used wood, similar to those used in old houses. Shelves made from crates with the Tomo logo printed on them were also used to mimic the elements employed for packing harvest for export. These crate shelves were specially created to make menu reading convenient for patrons. The Shinto Shrine feature wall is actually a partition for the private room. The idea was to try to recapture the scene of old shrines usually found in forests or mountains. With this in mind, a backdrop clad in raw stones was created with the shrine beside it. As the entire design concept was based on the Fishing Port, the highlight is on the Fishing Port and Shinto Shrine feature walls. These two pieces of artwork not only enhance the look but also contribute an authentic Japanese feel to the restaurant.

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Tom o I za k a y a     Ong & On g P te Ltd.

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Cient Tomo Izakaya Pte. Ltd.    Design Ong&Ong Pte Ltd.    Design Team Ong&Ong Pte Ltd. Subaneknan    Photography

Tom o I za k a y a     Ong & On g P te Ltd.

Lynn Ng (Team Director), Dickman Tan (Designer), Maung Thant Zin Oo, Myo Kalayar, Nithipong

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Pla ne t 3 Stu d io s Arc hite c t u re P vt. Ltd.

Ville Chaumiere Indranagar, Bangalore, India

200m2?

Ville Chaumiere is part of a bigger program brief which defined the requirement of different dining experiences and offerings in a single hospitality destination. These were to be accommodated on two levels, a floor and a terrace, each having a 372 sq. m. footprint. Ville Chaumiere, which offers fine dining with an open air grill, is located on the upper level. Catering to affluent customers, this space had to evoke subtle luxury and grandeur to be successful. In order to mitigate the effect of a small footprint, the designers decided to maximize the height. An undulating roof simulating the sinusoidal form of a wave reaches 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; at the apex. Again, a structural necessity was transformed into a design opportunity. Columns supporting the roof were created to spread in the form of the branches of a tree. Between the bases of these two trees in the centre of the hall, a bar was inserted with a rack to display wines. This became the organizing device for the floor plan. The undulating roof was punctured with lit cut-outs that evoke the spread of a leafy canopy. The wall separating the fine dining from the service areas became a sandwich double glass window holding an interesting arrangement of stem glasses stacked to 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; height. On another side, a full wall water screen over the window added the gentle sound of cascading water to the environment. The entire colour scheme was in muted earth tones, complemented by silk drapes and highly tactile upholstery. The space has been designed to dramatically change character from day to night. The flooring is laminated wood and carpet.

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Client/Owner Consultants

Vi lle Ch a u m ie re

Pla ne t 3 St udio s Architec t u re Pvt. Ltd.

UV hospitality Jagdish Menda

Design Planet 3 Studios Architecture Pvt. Ltd. Kitchen Consultants Mr Srinivas Contractors

Design Team Kalhan Mattoo, Santha Gour Mattoo, Jainish Jani, Jyoti Gujaran Various Consultant Photography Sanjay Ramchandran

Hospitality

343


Pro j e c t O ra n g e

Whitechapel London, UK

40m2

The Whitechapel Art Gallery is the hugely influential London gallery that debuted the likes of Picasso, Mark Rothko and Jackson Pollock in the UK. Project Orange was approached to design the new Dining Rooms as part of the galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ambitious expansion plans, doubling the size of the gallery by extending into the historic Victorian library building next door. The approach to the design of the Dining Rooms has been to try and forge a synthesis between the history and character of the original Arts and Crafts building, and the contemporary cutting edge of the exhibited works. In contrast to the expansive gallery spaces, these public areas are intimate and cosy characterised by timber panelling, pendant lighting and leather upholstery. Reclaimed library units contrast with modern detailing, fixtures and fittings. The effect is to create a timeless space that seems at once modern and traditional, and where materials will change and improve with age and use.

345


Client/Owner Photography

Whitechapel Art Gallery Design Matthew Burlem, unless stated

Project Orange

Design Team

James Soane, Rachel Coll, Michael Boyes

1.

Main Contractor

Woodcraft Joinery Ltd.

2.

1.

Wh it e c h a p e l

©Richard Bryant

©Richard Bryant

VOID OVER

2.

Pro je c t Ora n g e

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Pro j e c t O ra n g e

I-Talia New Delhi, India

180m2

The design of the new I-Talia restaurant and café is inspired by the collision of rustic simplicity and catwalk glamour. Within the very classical shopping centre environment at Vasant Kunj, New Delhi, the designers wanted to create two very different dining experiences that were true to the roots of their Italian cuisine. Patrons are reminded of the historic connections between India and Italy which saw Roman ships making use of the monsoon to cross the Indian Ocean in order to trade spices, gems and ivory for gold in the first century. This dialogue between aromatic and exotic spices with the allure of gold and silver created a narrative that ties these two countries together and generated the design brief for the restaurant. At the entrance is a gleaming polished brass totem that sits in front of the horizontally boarded, curved oak wall. To the left is the café; a relaxed and simple room clad in painted white brick work with timber beams and a natural terracotta tiled floor. There is a sense of being in a barn or farmhouse decked in understated luxury. Double doors lead into the busy kitchen and a tall display counter shows off the chef’s finest dishes and ingredients. At the back of the room, a huge yellow portal leads to glass doors and onto the terrace. To the right, is the restaurant with bar that floats in front of an iridescent curved screen of gold mosaic panels. The front of the bar features Italian Marron Imperial marble cut into scallops and set on the curve, behind which are a series of polished brass cabinets. The floor uses a rather reflective mercury coloured stone while the ceiling is scribed in a series of three tiered arcs which glow gently. According to Time Out Delhi, “The restaurant sticks with The Park’s bright, airy feel, while adding a big dollop of luxe: gold walls, black marble and lots of brass and glass. It feels like the inside of a Cartier watch.”

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I-Ta lia     Pro je c t Ora n g e

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Client/Owner

I-Ta lia     Pro je c t Ora n g e

Apeejay Surrendra Park Hotels, India    Design

Project Orange    Design Team

James Soane, Michael Veal, Alesia Jegorova    Photography

Ali Rangoonwala

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S. Rus s e l l G rove s

Scarpetta New York, New York, U.S.A.

214m2

The designers collaborated with New York-based chef, Scott Conant, in utilizing the combination of rich textural materials contrasted with retrained modernism, to realize the chef’s conceptual vision of “Urban Milan meets Tuscany.” Located on the edge of Manhattan’s über-trendy meatpacking district, the space reflects Conant’s honest and personal approach to Italian cuisine: equally grounded in tradition and modern interpretation. This theme of old versus new is echoed in the design through unique custom panels located in key areas. Thin slices of aged, tawny beech wood veneer are sandwiched between sleek sheets of clear glass. The contrast of the warm wood and cool glass is further highlighted by backlighting the materials to create a sparkling divider. The first of two distinct areas, the front café features a long mahogany bar and seating for twenty. The bar itself, a turn-of-the-century antique, was ebonized to give it a contemporary edge and topped with classic white Carrera marble. The sleek marble is repeated on the floor and is balanced by soft white-washed brick, reclaimed wood paneling, and mercury glass pendants, which add a silver glow. The main dining room features a retractable glass roof offset by warm rough hewn timber beams. White cork, used in a random grid pattern, is complemented by elongated ochre-hued banquettes and period inspired adjustable light sconces. Wall mirrors are hung by orange belted straps that add an industrial note and splash of colour. The space is at once warm, inviting and casual but also sleek and sophisticated – a perfect complement to the menu.

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Client/Owner Main Contractor

Sc a r p e t t a     S . Ru s s e ll G roves

Scott Conant    Design S. Russell Groves    Design Team Red One Construction    Photography Eric Piasecki

Russell Groves, Neal Beckstedt, Pamela Ledesma    Lighting Consultant

Mary Ann Hay, IALD   

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Stanley S a i tow it z I Nato m a Arc hitec t s Inc.

Toast Novato, California, USA

353m2

Toast Restaurant serves comfort food for breakfast, lunch and dinner.This is the second branch at the new Hamiltonplace shopping mall in Navato, north of San Francisco. The mall is one storey Mediterranean kitsch in a parking lot. The experience of entering Toast is like walking inside a loaf of bread or swimming in sparkling champagne. The yeast that creates this fizzy interior world is particle board, perforated with random shaped holes, and covers all surfaces. Walls, ceilings, furniture are all wrapped in this bubbling, bread-like material. The low canopied entry transitions to a 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; volumetric space with a hanging column suspended over the bar. This column has storage for glasses raised in the air. The bar mirrors this cubic cupola below with seating on three sides. Behind the bar, the ceiling drops to the main dining area. First are large communal tables, then smaller tables and booths. The open kitchen has bar seating and becomes a stage for the chefs and pizza makers. A fireplace with storage niches warms the space. Behind, the toilets are contained in a floating box entered from the rear. Niches in the toasty walls are for displays of ingredients and wares. The image is homey, warm as toast and sparkling like champagne.

359


Toa s t     Stanley S a itow it z I Nato ma Architec t s Inc.

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Client/Owner Shahram Bijan    Design Stanley Saitowitz I Natoma Architects Inc.    Design Team Stanley Saitowitz, Alan Tse, John Winder    Lighting Consultant Revolver Design    Acoustics Colin Gordon & Associates    Main Contractor Carolan Construction    Photography Rien Van Rijthoven SUPPLIERS: Furniture – Chairs Lacava    Fireplace

Toa s t     Stanley S a itow it z I Nato ma Architec t s Inc.

Blu Dot    Furniture - Cabinetry Heat N’ Glow

Lincoln Street Builders    Lighiting Fixtures

Spectrum Lighting, Inc.    Faucets

Kohler    Bath Sink

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Conc re te Arch ite c t u ra l As s o c iates

Nevy Amsterdam, The Netherlands

220m2

Concrete was asked to redesign the restaurant Nevy, formerly known as Onassis. Nevy is the third outlet; the first is the delicacy restaurant “Envy”, and the second being the wine bar “Vyne”. Nevy focusses on fish. Concrete created a tranquil environment by eliminating all unnecessary elements. The basis of the design concept was to create a space which has the appearance of an old market hall. Marble was therefore the material of choice. The restaurant is separated into two parts: the restaurant and raw bar. Black and white is used to create a visual separation between the two. In the white part, the ceiling and floor are black; and the opposite appears in the black area. At the entrance is a large visual of an x-rayed fish. This visual identity enables the fish to be seen in various variations. The wardrobe and stairs leading to the restrooms in the cellar are located at the entrance. From the entrance, you step into the white restaurant. A door to the left leads to the wine cabinet which also serves as private dining for about 20 and can be separated from the wine cabinet area with a velvet blue “yves klein” curtain. From the white restaurant, you have the best views of the “Ij” and Amsterdam North. All furniture was placed cross grained on the façade so guests can enjoy optimal views. To keep a connection with “Envy” and “Vyne”, some of the same furniture pieces were used in all three establishments; revolt chairs (Ahrend) and lighting by Tom Dixon, while the sofas and marble tables are custom made. The couches have a “deeper” seating so guests can relax after dinner. Between every row of couches there is a service station and table decorated with plants which also serves as fencing. Flooring in this area is the original smoked oak from the previous use, but treated with black oil. At the back of the restaurant is the raw bar where the focus is on the chef. The raw bar experience begins with walls covered in black marble, white marble flooring and white painted ceiling. This area also serves as distribution point for the kitchen, and can be seen from the entrance. Sofas in the seating niche here are upholstered in a gold fabric denoting a special place at the raw bar. The fresh bar is a part of the raw bar and is fully made of black marble, and displays fresh fish daily. The raw bar’s design allows customers to see the chef’s activities. Visitors sit at a U-shaped white marble table with a higher plateau as a drop-off location for dishes, and a cut away in the floor in the centre allows the chef to be on the same level as the customers for easy communication.

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N e v y     Con c re te Arc hite c t ural Asso ciates

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N e v y     Con c re te Arc hite c t ural Asso ciates

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Client/Owner IQ Creative    Design Concrete Architectural Associates    Design Team(Concrete Architectural Associates) laboratorium i.c.w. Cote d’azur    Photography Ewout Huibers Erik van Dillen    Graphic Design Roord binnenbouw i.s.m. Concrete    Contractor Management Painting Stipe schilderwerk,Amsterdam Suppliers:    Partition Heemskerk Bouwspecialiteiten, Nieuwkoop    Furniture

N e v y     Con c re te Arc hite c t ural Asso ciates

Roord binnenbouw, Amsterdam    BS Installation Roord binnenbouw, Amsterdam    Natural Stone

Rob Wagemans, Janpaul Scholtmeijer, Jari van lieshout,

KroonTecniek, Nieuw-Vennep    Cuperus natuursteen i.s.m. Biemans natuursteen

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Crè me

Distrito Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

735m2

Distrito is one of the country’s most interactive restaurants boasting spectacular design features such as a booth crafted from a green Volkswagen bug; seats that swivel, rock and swing; 600 colourful wrestling masks and a karaoke room hidden behind a bar shelf. Named for Mexico’s capital city, Distrito Federal, the restaurant is a celebration of that culture’s lively colours and textures. It was inspired by the playful, vibrant aesthetics of everyday objects during a research trip to Mexico City. Entering the dining space through swinging saloon doors, guests are greeted by flamingo pink walls and a bright yellow resin bar top with scorpions cast inside. Neon signs and marquee-style signs above the bar announce some drinks and menu items. A working jukebox provides the soundtrack for the restaurant’s first-floor lounge, and hot pink, sparkling gel bar stools offer ample seating. Distrito’s prime table is a booth crafted from a green Volkswagen bug, the common taxicab in Mexico City, with seating for up to four guests under a pink acrylic rod light fixture. Another prominent design feature is a wall constructed from more than 600 masks of the lucha libre or free-fight professional wrestlers. Take-away postcards were clipped along the wall for customers to take home. Comfortable banquettes covered in hand-woven water hyacinth fibres are shaped like enormous sombreros and provide additional lounge space. Throughout the restaurant, resin table tops inlaid with the bright prints of Mexican oilcloth and sparkling gold glitter contribute to the carnival atmosphere while flexible neon vinyl tubing comprises both chairs and illuminated hanging globes. Seats include swinging benches; cocoon-style booths that rotate to face away from the main floor; glider style boothing seats up to six people; and chairs upholstered in colourful, checked fabric that is used for shopping bags in Mexico City. Distrito features an open kitchen, two bars (one upstairs and the other downstairs), and a retractable movie screen and stage above the central grand staircase for live mariachi performances or screenings of films. A karaoke room is concealed behind the host stand, through a door disguised as a shelf for Mexican jarritos or fruit sodas. Inside, the dark purple room seats up to 24 guests and offers a flat screen monitor for singalong lyrics.

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Cient

D is t r it o     Cr è m e

Garces Restaurant Group    Design

CREME    Design Team

May Korranun Pakarnseree, Gina Seung Oh, Patrick McGovern    Photography

Fanny Allié

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E zequ i e l Fa rc a D e s ig n St u d io

Segundo Muelle Mexico City, Mexico

446m2

Segundo Muelle, Spanish for “Pier 2,” is a successful Peruvian restaurant with locations in Mexico, Panama and the United States. The company hired Ezequiel Farca to design the very first restaurant, its flagship location in Mexico City, to establish the look and feel of the chain’s interiors, and to help brand the restaurant for its entry into Mexico and subsequent additional locations. The design concept, flowing from award-winning Chef Daniel Manrique’s seafoodrich menu, emulates Ezequiel Farca’s interpretation of a modern coastal, upscale aesthetic. Upon entry, one steps on rough floors of board-formed concrete, emulating the patina of a well worn pier. A dramatic water-mirror hints of an ocean ambiance and alludes to the cuisine de la maison. Taking cues from traditional Peruvian piers, made out of concrete, wood and steel, Farca crafted thick, machiche wood tables over steel bases, lined the walls with wood paneling, and designed concrete tile floors in four different shades of gray. Divider walls constructed out of roughly-stacked timbers play with the light, absorb sound, and exude warmth. Complementing this rich palette of structural materials, Farca designed seating in light-colored fabrics and machiche bases, and to complete the transformative experience, selected flatware, dishes, linens, and crystal to harmonize with the surroundings. Special glasses were chosen for the traditional Peruvian tequila drink, Pisco. The design utilizes modular panel systems on the walls and ceilings so that the design can be easily replicated and scaled for the company’s other planned locations. Furnishings in the restaurant’s Mexico City location are intentionally targeted at the traditional three-hour Mexican business lunch client; comfortable, oversized chairs have arms, welcoming guests to eat and linger. From one side of the restaurant, downtown Santa Fe is visible, and Mexico City from the other. On a clear day, both of Mexico City’s volcanoes are in view, creating a dreamlike, otherworldly atmosphere where the old meets new, and guests linger in the warmth of Segundo Muelle’s inviting space.

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Design Ezequiel Farca Design Studio    Design Team Decomarc Constructions    Main Contractor

Se g u n d o M u e lle     E ze q u ie l Fa rc a D esign St u d io

Ezequiel Farca (Interior Designer), Juan Sánchez Aedo, Grupo Arquitech Architects.    Photography

Paul Czitrom

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B uck l ey G ray Ye o m a n

Zizzi

Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, U.K.

430m2

Situated within a major new development and fronting onto a public square, the restaurant had to project a strong presence to compete with neighbouring venues. The design was to incorporate key elements of the Zizzi brand â&#x20AC;&#x201C; log wall, exposed pizza oven, natural materials â&#x20AC;&#x201C; used in a fresh and imaginative way. With a generous ceiling height in the unit, Buckley Gray Yeoman were keen to capitalise on the space available and maintain this over as much of the plan as possible. It was necessary to formulate a design concept that would provide visual interest from the square outside. Having realised numerous restaurants for the client, BGY evolved the way they incorporated the brand design elements into their scheme. Floating timber lightboxes of varying size, depth and colour swarm across the ceiling of the restaurant whilst more timber boxes are featured along the wall at one end of the unit to meet the ceiling lights and form a log wall. A zinc clad wall wraps around the bar and front-of-house kitchen with an open pizza oven providing animation and spectacle to the dining experience.

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Client/Owner Photography

Z izzi – M ilt o n K e y n e s     B u c k ley G ray Yeo man

Gondola Group    Design Hufton & Crow

Buckley Gray Yeoman    Design Team

Matt Yeoman, Laura O’Hagan, Amrita Mahindroo    Main Contractor

Gary Bluff Projects   

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B uck l ey G ray Ye o m a n

Zizzi II St Albans, Hertfordshire, U.K.

450m2

Buckley Gray Yeoman were appointed by Gondola Group to develop a design vision for the future of the Zizzi restaurant brand. This was implemented in their flagship restaurant in St Albans ahead of a planned roll-out. BGY were responsible for all aspects of the design and project management including furniture, lighting and graphics. Ideas were developed from concept to realisation in a short timeframe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just 18 weeks from briefing to completion. A design was formulated that reflected the aspirations of the client and took the brand in a new and distinct direction without alienating the existing Zizzi customer base, creating detailing that was both classic and contemporary, and that could be replicated across the Zizzi portfolio. Timber wall paneling and oak joinery were teamed with dark furniture to evoke a sense of timeless elegance associated with a classic dining room, without being overly formal and which elevates the dining experience from that of a standard chain outlet. An exposed kitchen and glass coldroom provide visual signifiers of the clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emphasis on freshly prepared food made from quality produce with clear provenance.

385


Client/Owner Photography

Gondola Group    Design Hufton & Crow

Buckley Gray Yeoman    Design Team

Matt Yeoman, Laura O’Hagan    Main Contractor

Gary Bluff Projects   

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B uck l ey G ray Ye o m a n

Zizzi III High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, U.K.

420m2

Following on from the Zizzi St Albans restaurant, this was one of the first roll-out units to have the new design so Buckley Gray Yeoman were to incorporate the new brand elements and demonstrate how they would work in a distinctly different setting. As with many new build shell units, BGY had a high ceiling height to work with and a relatively narrow and deep floor plan. The restaurant would have to present a strong presence to compete with the neighbouring competitors. BGY adapted the key Zizzi brand elements to the site. A 4m high entrance door and opening shopfront create a point of difference to the front elevation, and a vivid green fin draws you into the plan. A light oak balustrade and joinery provide visual warmth whilst the open plan kitchen and servery to the rear of the unit adds vibrancy and movement. A mezzanine dining area capitalises on ceiling heights and offers a vantage point over fellow diners.

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Z izzi – Hig h W y c o m b e     B u c k ley G ray Yeo man

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Client/Owner Photography

Z izzi – Hig h W y c o m b e     B u c k ley G ray Yeo man

Gondola Group    Design Hufton & Crow

Buckley Gray Yeoman    Design Team

Matt Yeoman, Laura O’Hagan, Katharine Mccloat    Main Contractor

Key Electrical   

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B uck l ey G ray Ye o m a n

Nandoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beckenham, Kent, U.K.

230m2

The brief was to create a high impact/ strong presence in a suburban high street whilst providing a fresh design approach to evolve an established brand. The aim was to reflect the Nandoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ethos by working with a palette of natural materials in an innovative and fun way and incorporating pieces from their African Art Foundation. The Beckenham site presented many challenges often found in high street locations. Historically, two retail units had previously been knocked together and the resulting footprint was an awkward shape that did not lend itself easily to the accommodation required. A division of structural piers remained along its central axis and downstand beams resulted in low ceiling heights. A timber box wraps the floor, walls and ceiling to define the dining zone, projecting through a new shopfront to form a glazed aperture to the street. The design plays on the original building division mirroring the dining zone within the timber wrap. A glowing box of backlit perforated panels by Jonathan Coles Lighting houses a servery kitchen, reflecting the heat and energy of the functions within.

395


Na n d o ’s     B u c k ley G ray Ye oman

  397


Client/Owner Nando’s Chickenland    Design Buckley Gray Yeoman    Design Team French Joinery    Photography Hufton & Crow Lighting Design    Main Contractor

Na n d o ’s     B u c k ley G ray Ye oman

Matt Yeoman, Peter Thomas, Zsofia Kovacs    Lighting Consultant

Jonathan Coles

  399


West a r Arch i te c t s

Reflections Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA

1 300m2

The CafĂŠ is a 24-hour dining environment made up of seven seating zones. The 383-seat dining room is divided into quaint environments that create a unique dining experience for repeat clientele. Curvaceous banquettes sit within cozy rooms decorated with flowers and pearl shell pendants. Slate-clad walls with sensual Pullman booths create private pockets that overlook the room. Curved booths are awash with lighting from arc lights while two types of chairs are placed below fifty dancing glass pendants. The backlit undulating ceiling was inspired by the waves of the adjacent ocean. At times, the sensuality of the curved wood beam ceiling almost touches and cradles the guests while at other times it raises and invigorates with its unreachable height. It is as ever changing as the waves themselves. The alternating orange backlit panels change lighting intensity throughout the day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; brighter in the morning as the guests awake and more subdued as the day moves on in order to greet the romance of the evening. The room is dressed in reds, oranges, yellows and browns. Cowhide leathers and lush velvets continue the richness. Chinese-made furniture and hand-selected Italian marble round out the opulence of the room.

401


R e f le c t io n s     We s t a r Arc h ite c t s

  403


Client/Owner Harrah’s Entertainment Inc.    Design Darius Kuzmickas Construction    Photography

R e f le c t io n s     We s t a r Arc h ite c t s

Westar Architects    Design Team

Paul Heretakis, Lee Montaina, Kai Yang    Main Contractor

Weatherby

  405


Inarc D e si g n H o n g Ko n g L td.

Owners Box Hong Kong, China

1 000m2

For the M1 7/F Owners Box, a design solution was created for the young owner with the emphasis on betting, private rooms, and a unique yet casual dining experience. The floors for the reception, buffet and betting areas were clad in a brushed black granite while the main dining area features a custom-designed carpet. The walls are clad in both walnut and rosewood timber with stainless steel mosaic tiles to selected feature walls. Feature partitions are clad in coloured and patterned glass within black stainless steel frames. Sculptural light fittings are included in the ceiling design. The front-of-house catering fixtures were also clad in a patterned black stainless steel finish.

407


O w n e r s Bo x    I na rc D e s ig n H o ng Ko ng Ltd.

  409


Client/Owner The Hong Kong Jockey Club    Design Inarc Design Hong Kong Ltd.    Design Team Terry A. Spinolo, Fannie Bao, Marco Hung, Sandy Lam    Building Services Sunland International Ltd.    Lighting Duo Lighting Designs + Associate    Main Contractor Design Unlimited Limited    Photography AJL Photography

O w n e r s Bo x    I na rc D e s ig n H o ng Ko ng Ltd.

  411


Pla ne t 3 Stu d io s Arc hite c t u re P vt. Ltd.

T-Crossover Indranagar, Bangalore, India

372m2

The T-Crossover is part of a bigger program brief that defined the requirement of four different dining experiences and offerings in a single hospitality destination. These were to be accommodated on two levels, a floor and a terrace, each having a 372 sq. m. footprint. T-Crossover is located on the lower level, a multi-cuisine vegetarian eatery with open kitchens. The designers were grappling with the frustration of a design that did not quite come together when someone tore and crushed the paper with the initial sketches. Much later, when they wanted to go over the ideas again and dug it out of the bin, the design revealed itself, not in the content of the sketches but in the form of the paper! The crushed paper feel was evoked in a different material. Crossover is a multi-cuisine restaurant with many open kitchens that dish out a variety of offerings in a contemporary setting. The age demographic of the patrons necessitated a young, trendy, fashion forward solution. In keeping with impeccable hygiene requirements, the materials choice inclined towards hard, easy to maintain surfaces with steel being a natural choice. The designers called this polymorphic construct, the ‘Carapace’. It is an undulating wall that runs the entire diagonal length of the restaurant visually connecting the open kitchen and the front glass façade and providing a backdrop for the table setting. The wall turns and warps to become the canopy for the open kitchen in the plan. Constructed out of plywood clad in high quality brushed stainless steel skin laminate, it reflects and disperses light in a fascinating way. Patrons visiting this eatery for the first time are struck by the visual impact of the element. It surprises, intrigues, and fascinates…in this order! Designing and detailing was a challenge, so was the construction. Using standard construction techniques and by introducing some modularity, the project was managed on time and within budget. Having such an element in place restricted the use of other elements and materials to a subservient role. Complementing the Carapace is an open kitchen apron clad in white acrylic solid surface. The steel has been carried over in the table edge detailing, supports and chairs as well. The flooring and tabletops are in synthetic stone, the ceiling in milky polycarbonate that diffuses light evenly, and the window dressings in synthetic gauzelike material that carries the pristine feel of the place to the outside.

413


T-Cr o s s o v e r     Pla ne t 3 St u d io s Architec t u re Pvt. Ltd.

  415


Client/Owner Consultants

T-Cr o s s o v e r     Pla ne t 3 St u d io s Architec t u re Pvt. Ltd.

UV hospitality    Design Planet 3 Studios Architecture Pvt. Ltd.    Design Team Kalhan Mattoo, Santha Gour Mattoo, Jainish Jani, Jyoti Gujaran    Hospitality Jagdish Menda    Kitchen Consultants Mr Srinivas    Contractors Various Consultant    Photography Sanjay Ramchandran

  417


Va illo + I ri g a ray Arc hite c t s

El Mercaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;o Pamplona, Navarre, Spain

990m2

The designers aimed at creating an intimate, classic atmosphere where light accentuates day and night but does not bathe everything indiscriminately. The restaurant occupies two floors. The first is connected with the market while the other leads to the basement. There are two types of spaces. One is open and flexible, linked to the street and market, and organizes circulation and access through the bar. The second is deeper and austere and provides a serene receptacle. Spaces are defined by curtains. Some are made of velvet while others let in light and act like large veils. A connection is made with the outside world through the use of filters such as glass aquariums. The furniture consists of tables in different sizes and shapes: low, high, large and small; square and oblong. Similarly, there are chairs, benches and banquettes. Objects lying on wooden mats unify the place through color and texture. Massive slatted panels are also featured in the restaurant.

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Upper ground floor

El M e r c a ’ o     Va illo + Irig a ray Architec t s

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El M e r c a ’ o     Va illo + Irig a ray Architec t s

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El M e r c a ’ o     Va illo + Irig a ray Architec t s

  425


Basement

Client/Owner Nueva hostelería del mercado 2006 S.L.    Design Vaillo + Irigaray Architects    Design Team Daniel Galar Irurre    Facilities Consultant PyP Ingenieros - Luis Maeztu    Lighting Consultant Manager Conslau    Photography José Manuel Cutillas    Comunicacion    Builder

El M e r c a ’ o     Va illo + Irig a ray Architec t s

Antonio Vaillo Daniel, Juan L. Irigaray Huarte    Project ALS Lighting - Anton Amann    Design Consultant KEN

  427


K j e llg re n K a m ins k y Arc hite c t ure

Mirage Falsterbo, Scania, Sweden

10 000m2

In 2006, Fredrik Kjellgren and Joakim Kaminsky won the International Architecture Competition for a new dance hall in Falsterbo, Sweden, and started their studio, Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture. The designers’ manifesto is to focus on people’s needs and context. In special projects, they have come up with text describing what can take place in the building. In the Mirage project, it was important to connect the conservative and historical mindset of the community of Falsterbo to attract young people from all over Europe to visit the area in summer. On the 30th of May 2006, the old dance hall in Falsterbo, Sweden, was destroyed by fire. The dance hall was situated 200 meters from the beach in a small pine wood grove on the southernmost tip of Sweden. Having been a famous meeting place for both locals and tourists since the 1930s, the dance hall was greatly missed and it was soon decided to rebuild it. The municipality launched an international architecture competition that drew record-breaking interest from both the media and architects. After careful consideration, the jury decided upon Kjellgren Kaminsky’s proposal “Mirage”. The Mirage dance hall establishes a dialogue with the site, its history and future. It reflects the position and facades of the old dance hall while simultaneously reflecting its surroundings in every moment; the changing seasons, light and people passing by. Much emphasis was put on designing spaces with extraordinary acoustic qualities. A custom-made damping wall was designed in collaboration with an acoustic expert. This consists of black acoustic felt covered by white wooden boards of various dimensions which creates strong graphical elements in the whole building. The wall has proven no more expensive than standard solutions. The old dance hall consisted solely of a dance floor and bar but in the new building, the program was extended to also include two restaurants for 250 people, a kitchen, a room with a stage and a second floor with a roof terrace, adding up to a total of 1600 sq m to host 1,500 people. The plan of the new building has the same footprint as its predecessor. It is cut diagonally by a two storey high entrance room which connects all the public areas in the building. The building is divided so that the serving spaces are placed along the eastern facade and the served public spaces are located on the west side. The rooms towards the southern facade open up to terraces. The building is situated in a nature reserve. The pine tree grove surrounding the building is unaffected. The terraces and paths connected to the building are made of wooden boards taking inspiration from the jetties on the nearby beach. A small gravel road for deliveries is laid out on the east side of the site. The facades of the building are clad in boards of graphite gray fibercement and mirror glass. The mirrors are placed in a pattern inspired by the wooden facade and windows of the old dance hall. The building is constructed with prefabricated concrete elements. This has not only proven an economically feasible solution but also contains the noise of heavy construction inside, to the joy of worried neighbors living nearby.

429


Client/Owner Municipality of Vellinge    Design Kalle Sanner Tjäder    Photography

SECTION

FIRST FLOOR

Mir a g e     Kje llg re n K a m in s k y Architec t u re

SECOND FLOOR

Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture    Design Team

Joakim Kaminsky, Fredrik Kjellgren with Taito Lampinen, Oscar Arnklitt, Jonas

ROOF

  431


Page S outh e rl a nd Pa g e

The Grove Houston, Texas, USA

1,595m2

The Grove revels in being an extension of its memorable site, Discovery Green park, a lush, green 12-acre oasis in the heart of downtown Houston. The whole building is a series of long, thin bars that parallels the trees. The first bar, which contains the dining spaces, is made of a steel frame with various levels of glass enclosure. The second is made of a rich, ruddy Gulf Coast brick and houses two grand exterior stairs as well as a bathroom, elevator and interior circulation. The third, containing the kitchen, is made of sustainable ipe wood topped with a planted green roof. The final bar, which faces Lamar Street, is brick again and houses delivery and administration. By breaking the restaurant into a series of smaller parts defined by function and by using a range of warm, tactile materials, the building becomes a natural extension of the park and the trees, with a scale, texture, and colour palette that complements its surroundings. The architecture, much like Schiller Del Grande’s cuisine, is authentic and rooted in the American Southwest. The dining experience is about enjoying the simple, natural pleasures of a place – beautiful daylight, a cooling breeze, and inspiring vistas. Downstairs, the main bar is located at the west end of the building, affording a view of the downtown skyline as well as live oaks. A generous outdoor deck links the bar to the action on Walker Promenade, the primary pedestrian route through Discovery Green. More private decks on the building’s north side allow the main dining room to spill out under the trees in fine weather, giving a strong sense of connection to nature in all seasons. At the east end, two private dining spaces can be enclosed from the dining room or opened to it via massive sliding glass walls. Tall ceilings faced with wood match the rich, warm oak on the floors to create a natural sense of calm that is echoed in paint and fabric colours. The live oaks and the dappled light that comes through their canopies create all the pattern and complexity. The interior itself is simple and deferential. Upstairs, the outdoor dining experience is dominant with a skyline view to the west that is even more dramatic than below. The “tree house” shaded decks that nestle into the upper branches of the live oaks offer informal spaces for a drink or light meal. In inclement weather, these rooms can be fully enclosed by sliding glass panels. Wood and brick were integrated into the materials mix for their warmth and graciousness. They were used to sheathe functions that needed to be more solid – bathrooms, elevators, stairs, and kitchen. Wood ceilings were used to link the interior rooms to the space under the canopy of the live oak trees outside. Especially on the upper floor, the idea was to create a “tree house” dominated by wood surfaces. Wood floors were used for their continuity with wood decks outside. The whole ambiance, indoors and out, was meant to be tactile and natural. Another criterion for particular materials selected was sustainability. Discovery Green, including The Grove, is tracking LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. Steel was good for its recyclability. A regional brick was chosen for its economy of transportation. Woods were chosen that could be FSC certified as sustainably grown. All materials were vetted for their durability and ability to be maintained in a very high-use environment. As few duplicative layers of materials as possible were used. Structural materials become finish surfaces as well. This is an important resource conservation measure. The steel framing is exposed in most instances. The bottom flange of the spanning members is the shelf for attaching the wood ceiling inside. The brick “core” of the building utilizes glazed bricks when it touches the kitchen and requires less porous surfaces. Creating veneers was avoided wherever possible. Every aspect of the design – its relationship to its site, massing, orientation to sun and breezes, ecological consciousness, and use of local materials – rejects artifice in favour of an authentic sense of place.

433


The Gr o v e a t D i s c o v e r y G r e e n     PageS o u t herlandPage

  435


Cient Discovery Green Conservancy    Design PageSoutherlandPage    Interior Designer Candice Schiller, Schiller Del Grande Restaurant Group    Artists Margo Joe Milton, Milton Architects    Prime Consultant and Landscape Architect Hargreaves Sawyer (ext. color blocks) and Eduardo Ortiz (painting)    Restaurant Planner Lauren Griffith    Structural Engineer Henderson & Rogers    Photography Eric Laignel and Chris Cooper Associates    Landscape Architect Main Contractor

The Gr o v e a t D i s c o v e r y G r e e n     PageS o u t herlandPage

Miner-Dederick Construction, LLP

  437


Ro ma n a n d Willia m s B u ild ing s and Interio r s

The Standard Grill New York, New York, USA

372m2

By contrast to the Brutalist concrete form of the Standard Hotel building that rises 18 stories above the High Line, the new restaurant, which is set beneath the High Line’s trellis, was designed to respond to the context and history of its neighborhood. The scale, materiality and detailing all take into careful consideration the experience of pedestrians and people at street level. The primary goal was to create, both on the exterior and interior, a place that is respectful of the vernacular, recognizable, and comfortable while feeling new, fresh and unique. The project comprises an outdoor dining patio under the High Line and inside, a bar/cafe, restaurant, and private dining room. On the exterior, reclaimed brick, steel windows and industrial lighting create a dialogue with the restaurant’s surroundings. The highly detailed interior features a palette of familiar materials, furnishings and finishes that have been rediscovered and updated. The bar area has a milky palette while the restaurant is darker and has a more meaty look. In the front bar/café area, cream-coloured porcelainized-steel panels line the walls. This is a classic utilitarian material that historically was used to create a sanitary environment in dairies and butcher shops but one with great detail and ornament. The bar is made of solid oak inlaid with brass studs and topped by reclaimed marble. Custom-coloured and patterned concrete tiles line the floor. The lighting is also all custom – both the brass sconces and powder-coated metal pendant lights. Several styles of black Thonet chairs and benches surround the solid oak tables. Through an arched doorway is the main restaurant, which is distinctly darker and more glamorous. The vaulted and beamed ceiling, with vaults lined with handmade tiles in herringbone pattern, has the feel of an old Guastavino space and feels perfectly suited to the restaurant’s location under the High Line. Oiled pine light fixtures on custom steel armature emerge from ceiling beams. Desiring to create a floor of copper, Roman and Williams researched many options and ended up figuring out how to cover the floor in 480,000 copper pennies laid into wet epoxy grout. The walls are covered in shellacked Douglas fir horizontal planks and vertical wainscoting made of painted wood strips with stud attachments. Wood and glass partitions with brass studs separate banquettes on the perimeter and in the centre of the dining room. Seating is a combination of red slatted wood benches in the centre booths, custom-designed orange leather armchairs at tables, and red leather upholstered banquettes. At the back wall of the restaurant, a huge custom copper hood hangs over the opening to the kitchen. The overall effect is of a space that feels as if it has been renovated rather than designed from the ground up.

439


The St a n d a r d     R o m a n a nd Williams Bu ild ings and Interio r s

  441


Design Roman and Williams Buildings and Interiors    Lighting Consultant L’Observatoire International    AV Consultant Edwards and Zuch Consulting    Structural Engineer DeSimone    Main Contractor Pavarini/Mcgovern    Photography

Audio Unlimited    Mechanical Engineer Stephen Alesch/Roman and Williams

SUPPLIERS: Castaic, Glen-Gary, Old Mississippi Reclaimed Brick    Windows(Steel) Hope’s (Restaurant, Bar and Meeting Room Window system)    Metal Doors Exterior Cladding(Masonry) Hope’s    Hardware Dorma, PBB, Paul Associates, FSB, Rocky Mountain, D-Line, Onity    Fixed Seating(Custom) Roman and Williams    Tables(Custom) Roman and Lucifer, Erco, DAC, Circa, RSA    Bar Lighting(Custom) Roman and Williams Williams    Downlights

The St a n d a r d     R o m a n a nd Williams Bu ild ings and Interio r s

  443


D esig n Re se arc h St u d io /To m D ixo n

The Dock Kitchen Portobello Dock, London, U.K.

555m2

The Dock Kitchen opened as part of the Tom Dixon Shop during London Design Festival, September 2009. The informal dining room is run by young cook Stevie Parle, previously of the River Café, food writer for The Observer online, and contributor to Waitrose Food Illustrated. His new project is set to evolve and grow as Stevie aims to create a relaxed environment serving honest yet exotic food. The experimental, often international menu changes daily featuring a small selection of the best dishes discovered by Stevie during his extensive travels around the world which include working on a tea plantation in Sri Lanka, touring North and South India, North Africa, South East Asia and much of Europe. Recent dishes include spiced grilled French rabbit with Turkish walnut sauce, slowly boiled beef rib on sour dough with Colmans and pickles and home-made damson ice cream. His Indian influences are prevalent in the delicious Basundi drink, a cardamom and orange flower water infused milk. All ingredients are extremely carefully sourced, sometimes from Stevie’s own allotment, and everything is prepared fresh each day by Stevie himself. Stevie has selected three teas from specialists Post Card Teas that best reflect the food of The Dock Kitchen. These include green tea made from the tips of one hundred-year-old wild Vietnamese trees flavoured with fresh jasmine from Hanoi. Equally special is the coffee by Hackney-based roastery Square Mile which follows the harvests of South America to produce four distinct and seasonal blends a year. At the heart of Stevie’s kitchen is the enjoyment of cooking and love for eating. Guests eat food sitting side by side on long oak benches around big kitchen tables. The Dock Kitchen also hosts Pop Up nights as part of Stevie’s underground project The Moveable Kitchen. These are held weekly at The Dock Kitchen and other interesting spaces around London. Private dinner and lunch parties can also be arranged, choosing food to suit the diners. Found in a converted Victorian Wharf building as part of an urban regeneration project by Derwent London (also responsible for the Tea Building in Shoreditch), The Dock Kitchen overlooks the Grand Union Canal in Ladbroke Grove, West London. The original brick arches and beamed ceilings have been preserved and combined with an exclusive display of the full Tom Dixon collection of furniture and lighting to create an honest open space in keeping with Stevie’s food.

445


Client/Owner Furniture

The Do c k Kit c h e n     D e s ig n R e search St u d io /To m D ixo n

Stevie Parle    Design

Design Research Studio/Tom Dixon    Photography

Nina Morris   

Tom Dixon

  447


J ump Stu d i os

The Modern Pantry London, UK

1,025m2

The Modern Pantry, comprising upstairs and downstairs restaurant space as well as a shop/pantry, is neatly ensconced in two elegant Georgian properties on St. Johns Square in Clerkenwell, London. The Grade II-listed buildings were almost derelict when world-renowned chef Anna Hansen first came across them, spotting their potential as a home for The Modern Pantry. Extensive work was done to convert and link the properties – one was a townhouse while the other formed part of an adjacent steel foundry – into a light and airy restaurant. The style is contemporary with a homely, almost folksy, vibe, designed to complement Hansen’s culinary mission “to please the palate by using traditional and modern ingredients in new and exciting ways.” Working with a listed building provided a sense of tradition and heritage. The challenge was to introduce a contemporary feel to the Georgian palette. The designers wanted to create an environment that was more akin to a domestic space than a public one, with a comforting element to match the style of the food on offer. Situated on the ground floor, the glass-fronted cafe/restaurant is the most casual dining space featuring furniture designed by Jump Studios and made by Nicholas Alexander including one long rustic-style table with turned legs accompanied by Cherish chairs by Horm. Smaller tables have lathe-turned pedestal bases with smooth LG Hi-Macs tops engraved with Modern Pantry cooking utensil motifs, designed by London-based graphics studio Hyperkit. ‘We brought Hyperkit in to help us extend the concept through a broad graphic language that could be applied to various elements from the menus and branding to the engravings on the tables,’ said Jump director Shaun Fernandes. The white furniture matches the dove grey colour of the walls and pillars while brickwork was the deliberately exposed to reveal a bit of history. Brown leather banquette seating runs the length of the restaurant and light comes in the form of copper pendants – reminiscent of Victorian copper cooking pots and vessels but with a 21st century twist – by Piet Hien Eek. The pantry, meanwhile, is decked out like an old-fashioned traiteur but has contemporary touches like bespoke shelving. Situated in the old townhouse part of the building, it can be accessed via a separate doorway to the side of the restaurant. Upstairs there are two further dining rooms with beautiful views over St. Johns Square. Here the design is slightly more formal. The furniture is made of black stained ash – including tables designed by Jump Studios and Cherish chairs by Horm – set against light grey walls and original wood panelling, carefully brought back to life. Sky Garden lights by Marcel Wanders hang in the main dining space, which can also be used as a meeting room, while clusters of Caravaggio lamps feature in the North dining room. Combined, the two rooms seat 56 people. The artwork was sourced by Hansen herself along with a mixed array of crockery, candelabras and other antique objects that reinforce the character of the Modern Pantry aesthetic. The facade of The Modern Pantry was restored to show off Georgian architecture in all its glory, with long vertical glazing panels modelled on the old shop front to the side of the ground floor restaurant and a more traditional shop window for the pantry next door. In keeping with tradition, all the exterior signage was hand signed.

449


Cient

S t e a k 954    J u m p St u d io s

Anna Hansen     Design

Jump Studios    Design Team

Simon Jordan / Shaun Fernandes

  451


joão ti a g o a gu ia r – a c a rq u ite c to s

560 Bairro Alto, Lisbon, Portugal

80m2

The restaurant is located on the ground floor of an old building in Barrio Alto, Lisbon’s city centre. By hosting different commercial uses, it suffered some changes in order to respond to different functionalities throughout the 20th century. Its last known use was an internet café and tea house, both functioning at the same time. Since the program was to design a restaurant, a new interior reorganization was called for. The space is divided in two separate parts – the first corresponds to the two dining rooms and the second one is for services. Entrance is through two separate doors each of which is flanked by huge windows. The original façade was partially recovered but totally kept. Despite the separate entrances, there is a central volume with storage below. The space is united by using wood to clad the floor, walls and ceiling. The two rooms have a height of 2.85 metres. Some square holes were made in the wooden surface and a light placed behind it to illuminate the space. A separation was created between the eating area and services by creating a Portuguese black tile wall. The change in materials draws a line between the kitchen, bar and toilets. This wall does not touch the perimeter in both ends in order to be read as a volume and at the same time creates two entrances – to the bar on the left and to the toilets on the right. There is an extra re-entrance in the same material which leads to the kitchen.

453


Design joão tiago aguiar – acarquitectos    Design Team FG+SG (www.ultimasreportagens.com) SUPPLIERS: Molde    Oriented Strand Board(OSB) Tiles

5 60    j oã o t ia g o a g u ia r – ac arq u itec to s

joão tiago aguiar & renata vieira    Lighting Consultant

Sonae Industry    Sanitary and Sanitary Fittings

Espaço Energia    Photography

Fernando Guerra /

Padimat

  455


Pablo Te l l ez

Ara Pizza Sant quirze del Valles, Barcelona, Spain

137m2

Ara Pizza is a newly opened fast food restaurant in Sant Quirze del Valles, 30 minutes away from Barcelona city center. Located in the main commercial road of Sant Quirze, the challenge was to reconvert an almost rectangular old workshop with an outstanding high ceiling. The space is divided into two main areas: one is for take away or home deliveries, and the second is for serving customers on site. This second area is where most of the shop activity takes place and where different movements and people get together. Prism-shaped spaces having different heights were linked by creating various light effects on the walls. This led to the creation of different spaces in the same room and users can enjoy different views depending on where they sit. Colors play a big role in this project. The room has neutral tones but warmer colours were used in the staff working area along with the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s logo. A study of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disposition in such areas was crucial to designing a specially shaped table. These tables were built in Valchromat and cut with CNC. The tables can overlap each other like the segments of a silkworm. The set of tables can be adapted to suit the number of diners occupying the space. Likewise, Dr Yes chairs from Kartell (Eugeni Quitllet and Phillip Stark) were chosen for their lightness and resistance which allows a very flexible and easy-to-move set. Also, the decoration artwork images were designed and drawn by hand resulting in a set of cheerful, relaxed images of colourful animals interacting with different restaurant products.

457


Client/Owner General pizza 51.sl    Design Ventura, www.juanstudio.com

Ma t r ix Pizza     Ono f f ice

Pablo Tellez    Main Contractor

Ecollar Tecnics    Consultants

Mediodesign - Digital

Fabrication    Photography

Juan

  459


B e rge Stru g a r Arc hite k te n

Transit Berlin, Germany

160m2

The restaurant TRANSIT is the second of its kind and the first designed by Berge Strugar Architekten. The goal was to create a unique and modern place in the new Mitte of Berlin which supports the special dining experience that TRANSIT offers its customers: a wide range of authentic cuisine from South-east Asia served in small bowls as a kind of Indonesian Tapas bar so the urbanity of Berlin is combined with associations and memories of Asian culture. The idea was to mix all the influences: concrete tile walls with bamboo prints, lampion-like glass bowls sticking into each other in different colours and the furniture is reminiscent of the pagoda - built out of Asian â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kambalaâ&#x20AC;? wood glazed in black. The room was divided into two zones (guests and kitchen) separated by materials. The floor changes from wood to blue-and-white tiles and the wall from concrete tiles to anthracite latex. The kitchen bloc was designed as a room-in-a-room sculpture and is completely made of steel. An opening is cut out of the steel and releases the inside to the customers: a steamy, noisy and turbulent cooking performance which seems like a window into another world. All the furniture, lights and tiles were designed by the architects.

461


Client/Owner SUPPLIERS: Kitchen Equipment

Tra n s it     B e rg e St ru g a r Arc hitekten

Goodtime GbR    Design

Berge Strugar Architekten    Décor Lights

Rüfferhalo    Functional Lights

Erco    Décor Lights

Glasmanufaktur Harzkristall    Photography

Glasmanufaktur Harzkristall    Wooden Floor

Achim Hatzius

Sanssouci Parkett    Paints

Caparol

  463


Ca mbri d g e S eve n As s o c iate s, Inc.

Sushi-Teq Boston, Massachusetts, USA

56m2

Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. (C7A) has designed the dramatic new Sushi-Teq located in the Hotel Intercontinental Boston. The project represents a dramatic and vibrant dining and nightlife experience for Boston. With the task of creating a synergy between Margaritas and Maki, an unusual pairing indeed, C7A energizes the experience with LED illuminated Polycarbonate walls to fully embrace the space. The cool, modern, Asian-influenced interior is dynamically balanced with the sounds of hot Salsa music. C7A took advantage of the terrific location on the waterfront with views to Fort Point Channel by featuring the full window on one side of the restaurant. Other interior elements that augment the experience are star-like lighting, a sleek stainless steel sushi counter and an extensive display of unique and rare Tequilas. In a recent review it was noted: “The high-top tables and casual seating complement the chic décor, allowing for intimate conversation areas and an ideal balance of comfort and energy. If tequila and sushi were personified, they would hang out at a spot like Sushi-Teq.”

465


Client/Owner Hotel Intercontinental Boston    Design Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc.    Lighting Consultant Bovis Lend Lease    Photography Kwesi Arthur, C7A Associates, Inc.    Main Contractor

S u s h i- Te q     Ca m b rid g e S eve n Asso ciates, Inc.

Boston Light Source    Art Consultant

Cambridge Seven

  467


Ak arStu d i os

Seoul Bros. Pasadena, California, USA     160m2

Located in the heart of Pasadena’s financial district, the new quick service Korean restaurant’s modern appearance brings a fresh transformation to an area typified by office buildings and chain eateries. The space formerly housed a Japanese concept in an average looking space that was primarily geared for lunchtime crowds. The new venue has upped the ante by becoming a neighbourhood destination for the vast number of young professionals living in nearby condos and apartments. From the street, patrons are greeted through a pair of grand doors made of distressed steel and glass. Having set the tone of the venue from the outset, the interior looks like a modern art gallery and the setting for performances. The customers approach the counter through a large sumptuous space that has been designed in clean and simple lines, and has contemporary finishes running throughout. An oversized wall print depicting flower patterns over a subtle background of the Korean alphabet graces one side of the dining space while the parallel side has a long leather upholstered banquette. Above the seating is a recessed opening that displays a wall mural projecting a collage of images of modern Korean lifestyle. The wood-covered ceiling and dark brown ceramic flooring combine to add an air of relaxation to this dining area. Binding the visual and operational elements of this venue together is the ordering counter. The counter, where all orders are taken, has the open kitchen as its main backdrop. With white walls and ceilings, the colour scheme complements the textures and colours of the dining space. Being right in the centre of an upcoming neighbourhood, the idea from the start was to impart in this place a sense of design that gives a welcoming, relaxing and accessible environment.

  469


Client/Owner

Andrew Hong    Design Team

AkarStudios    Photography

Joe Lum Joe Main Contractor Suppliers:    Recessed Lights Europhase    Wall Covering(Mural Graphic) Upholstery(Banquette) Maharam    AV System(Speakers)

Se o u l Br o s .     Ak a r St u d io s

Derek Rath

AkarStudios    Flooring(Ceramic Tile)

Design Surface Solutions    Sanitary Ware

Toto   

JBL

  471


Onoff i ce

Matrix Pizza Syracuse, Italy

90m2

The design emphasizes the social aspects of dining. Usually, tables and chairs allow diners to sit in closed groups where interaction between groups is rare. By minimizing the volume occupied by a single module/table (a cube 70x70x70 cm) and the distance between modules, interaction between tables is facilitated. A low budget dictated innovative use of affordable materials, especially those found on the construction site. The ceiling and warehouse-wall were covered in corrugated fibreglass and the bar was assembled from metal boxes to hold a steel shelf. The graphics complement the simplicity of the space; they express and celebrate the variety and richness of taste in the food served. All the ingredients used are mapped out and symbolized by colors and codes. On the wall next to the entrance is a life-size zebra. The zebra is simple in appearance, mysterious and surreal. It inspires endless thoughts and discussion among customers waiting for a table or take-away food.

473


Client/Owner Vincenzo Perez    Design Alberto Moncada Pantazis    Photography

Ma t r ix Pizza     Ono f f ice

Onoffice    Design Team

Francesco Moncada, Marco Pizzo, Gianluca Conigliaro    Graphics

Marianna Rentzou and Konstantinos

  475


S ometh i n g f ro m Us

Poncho No.8 Spitalfields, London, UK

90m2

Something from Us have designed the first offering from Poncho No.8, a new Cali-Mex restaurant specialising in fresh, healthy burritos in London’s fashionable Spitalfields. SFU have used Poncho No.8’s distinctive brand identity to inspire the restaurant floor. A unique multicoloured herringbone pattern is the restaurant’s signature feature. The oversized parquet flooring is complemented by clean, white service and eating areas. Poncho No.8 serves hearty Cali-Mex style burritos made to order. This distinction from generic lunchtime eateries is reflected in the bespoke flooring and illustration. The restaurant’s vibrant, fresh atmosphere is synonymous with the healthy, colourful food on offer. Predominantly a lunchtime venue for London, it is important that both the interior and exterior stand out from the crowd. Attracting new customers with the inviting and vibrant look. SFU has developed an easily maintained, durable space with clean lines and straight edges ensuring Poncho No.8 will look just as fresh and exciting for years to come.

477


Client/Owner Photography

P o n c h o N o . 8    S o m e t hing f ro m Us

Poncho No.8    Design Something from Us   

Something from Us    Design Team

Tom Tobia and Mark Irlam    Consultant

Telegramme   

  479


D esig n Sp i ri ts Co. , L td.

Beijing Noodle No. 9 Nevada, USA

300m2

Entering Beijing Noodle No. 9 is like walking into a dream where the walls are illuminated with modern ornate Chinese patterns. You’re surrounded by thousands of goldfish welcoming you to dine in surreal surroundings. In the summer of 2007, the world was waiting in anticipation for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Inspired by iconic buildings like Bird’s Nest Stadium and National Swimming Centre, the designers sought to do something different even though the brief was for a casual, modern design. The designers felt a contemporary twist would push the design to another level and be remembered years later. The design of the space revolves mainly around the adoption of Chinese lace into an arabesque pattern. It spans from the ceiling down the wall, illuminated with LED lights, and gives the space a lucent “glowing flower shield” all around. The process however, was not so easily carried out. There were fire restrictions in terms of material selections so the designers experimented with various materials and ended up using metal plates with patterns laser cut onto them. In the end, what first seemed like an error revealed itself as the perfect solution. Coming from a cultural background where shoji paper is used as a window screen, the metal gave a similar lighting effect. In other words, it looks amazing. The idea to represent Chinese culture through a contemporary take on a traditional pattern had great appeal. This gave a modern feel to the experience while retaining an authentic atmosphere that is immediately recognisable by local people and foreigners. The dreamlike pathway leading to the restaurant was inspired by an incidental occurrence while on a trip to China. Hundreds of goldfish were swimming around vividly in tanks, giving it the illusion of a moving “red screen”. This Idea was taken on board and an abstract interpretation turned into reality by filling six aquariums with 350 red goldfish in each tank. When it comes to capturing the essence of Chinese cuisine, you should witness how a dish is prepared. This resulted in placing the ‘sifu’ or master noodle maker at the forefront of the restaurant which allows customers to enjoy the ambiance and appreciate the art of noodle making as well as Chinese culture. No detail was too small. Every part of the project was taken into consideration from the goldfish species to the restaurant signage. This was a delicate task and required collaboration with world-renowned graphic designer Alan Chan from Hong Kong. The resulting powerful signage completes the design vision. The final result met the client expectations while retaining the essence of traditional Chinese dining.

481


B e ijin g N o o d le N o . 9     D e s ig n Spirit s Co. , Ltd.

  483


Design

Design Spirits Co., Ltd.    Lighting Consultant

Suppliers: Lighting Fixtures and Fittings

B e ijin g N o o d le N o . 9     D e s ig n Spirit s Co. , Ltd.

Muse – D Inc.    Photography

Barry Johnson

The Lighting Design Alliance, Inc.   

  485


Archi te c ts E AT

Maedaya Bar Richmond, Victoria, Australia     200m2

The brief was to deliver a sake bar catering for Japanese ‘tapas-styled’ cuisine. The concept and preparation of food has a simplicity that is an intrinsic part of Japanese food and culture. The design is inspired by the traditional Japanese art of bottling sake. The design approach and meanings attached to it were not compromised throughout the entire design process. The outcome is a result of a stringent and uncompromising pursuit of “design honesty”. Sake is traditionally bottled in timber casks/barrels and sealed with rice paper and rope. The designers were less interested in the sake itself and more interested in the art of bounding. There was less borrowing of design ideas, and more of reinterpreting Japanese philosophy for a different context and a different purpose, hence being as abstract as possible. The food and sake are very Japanese which the space is purposely designed to house. Just as with cooking, the chef should always strike a balance with his dishes. The end result is a wonderful and inviting space. A tunnel made of rope elements is filled with a long timber bar and a grill section for the chef. The ‘Japanese’ factor is maintained without literally borrowing or replicating the current food and beverage trend. Telling the story was an important process and expressing the materiality gave an extra dimension to the design outcome. The repetition of the manila ropes establishes a consistent spatial quality. When you first walk into this space, you see the configuration of the ropes resembles an abstraction of a house – a tea/sake house. The simplicity of the construction and space is intended to reflect the humble culture of traditional Japanese while the ropes represent the art of binding the sake cask.

  487


Section b-b

First floor

B

A Ground floor

Ma e d a y a Ba r     Arc hite c t s E AT

  489


Ma e d a y a Ba r     Arc hite c t s E AT

  491


Client/Owner Photography Main Contractor Suppliers:    Led Lighting

Ma e d a y a Ba r     Arc hite c t s E AT

Daiwa Food Pty Ltd.    Design Derek Swalwell

Architects EAT    Design Team(Architects EAT)

Eid Goh, Albert Mo, Thomas Pai, Peter Fox    Consultant

Ab Air Industries   

Crown Shopfittings    Hafele    Toilet Suite / Basin

Caroma    Spotted Gum Timber

Timber by Stone    Timber Veneer

Laminex

  493


E stud i Arol a

Vinoteca Torres Barcelona, Spain

150m2

La Vinoteca Torres is a new concept store and restaurant for the world-famous Torres Wine Cellars. This new wine bar immerses visitors in the world of viniculture, combining a store with a tapas bar and restaurant serving typical dishes and offering the possibility of savouring Torres’wines. The space design is evocative of a wine cellar with a dark atmosphere in which light filters through strategic corners. The atmosphere was inspired by dark wine and has limited natural light. It also has raw materials that relate the world of wine to nature and original artwork. The space is divided into two areas – the shop and the bar. The bar is located at the entrance so this is the first point of attraction. During peak hours, a selection of cheese and ham is offered, and the tasting of wine and a tapas meal. The bar is famous for its length and consists of “flying” solid oak envelopes while the front is covered with large, black fragmented granite pieces similar to the soil. Screens hung from the ceiling of the bar show pictures of changing skies, referring to the importance of light for wine and also allowing light into the bar. The restaurant separates the bar and shop. The stone flooring here was replaced by oak to impart a feeling of warmth. The walls are painted in anthracite stained red light in a random way like red wine stains. A huge map printed in black gloss vinyl is painted on the wall and it marks the areas of cultivation in Vilafranca del Penedès. An eight metre long black fabric was hung from the ceiling to take advantage of the ceiling height and diffuse light.

495


Client/Owner

TAYUAN IBERIA, S.L.    Design

Estudi Arola    Lighting Consultant

Realización y Gestion de Obras, S.L. Main Contractor SUPPLIERS: PROYECTO DOS    Surface Granito Zimbabwe abujardado    Doormat Ceramic INDUSTRIAS BEC, S.A.   

Vi n o t e c a To r r e s     E s t u d i Aro la

Ca2l / Santa & Cole    Graphic

ALTERA T

    Sheet

Gandara Associados    Photography

CHAPA PERFORADA S.A.    Fabric

Eugeni Pons

AZUR SECENIC    Screen

  497


Ro ma n a n d Willia m s B u ild ing s and Interio r s

Breslin New York, New York, USA

214m2

Located in the lobby of the Ace Hotel, The Breslin is the new restaurant owned by Ken Friedman and Chef April Bloomfield and designed by Roman and Williams. Though the 1904 building that houses the hotel had wonderful bones and some beautiful architectural details, the space that was to become the restaurant was a series of decrepit drywall rooms when Roman and Williams began designing. The firm created an entirely new architectural interior – one whose sense of articulation, detail and texture makes it feel as if may have been discovered, rather than designed. The room is muscular and masculine – with wood, leather, and color palette of green, black and brown and an overall feeling that recalls the pub architecture of the British Isles. Roman and Williams exposed the century-old plaster ceiling and divided the space into a series of rooms within rooms to create a sense of intimacy. The walls of the entire space are covered in large-scale wood panels that function almost like a box within a box. The panels stop just a few inches below the original ceiling – so the keen observer can discern the existing architecture as it peeks out from behind the new. A post and beam system gives the space a literal and figurative sense of structure. Reclaimed wood flooring feels heavy and rustic and contrasts with the sheen of the glossy oil paint in deep browns, greens, and blacks that covers many of the wood surfaces. Within this structured architectural creation, the collection of salvaged, vintage and custom furnishings creates a studied sense of imperfection. Patrons enter into the bar area, which is dominated by a 40-seat salvaged bar, with vintage ice boxes fused together and elevated to create the back bar. Counter seating along the inside of the window – clad in copper – and two Roman and Williams-designed bar tables extend the seating of this space. The underside of the mezzanine, or “balcony,” –is covered in reflective brown tiles that give off a subtle glow – defines the beginning of the restaurant proper and begins to describe the various intimate spaces that make up the eating area. The mezzanine has its own bar and dining area that overlooks the rest of the dining room and kitchen below; the great sightlines down to the main bar and dining spaces will lend a sense of theatricality to the experience. Custom mahogany tables (supported by bases that are hefty turned columns painted in glossy celery green) are surrounded by chairs with orange-leather seats (with stud details) and banquettes upholstered in tufted green leather. There are three distinct and very private booths with leather paneled walls and curtains made of vintage plaid blankets, trimmed in corduroy, that snap to the posts (like in a train). Like a “snug” – where women would enjoy a private drink in times when it was frowned upon to be seen in a pub – these curtains can enclose the occupants in their own “room.” Patrons inside can ring a buzzer for service. Throughout the space is a variety of vintage lighting in brass and bronze – all with orange and green plaid shades. Glass dividers – made from individual Depression glass plates – between spaces and antique mirrors also lend a sense of sparkle. Ultimately, the food is the star and the kitchen opens onto the dining room energizes the entire space. A steeland-glass wall along the east side of the dining room provides views back into Roman and Williams’ lively and beautiful Ace lobby.

499


B r e s lin     R o m a n a nd Williams Bu ild ings and Interio r s

  501


Client/Owner Ace Hotel Group    Design Roman and Williams Buildings and Interiors    Lighting Consultant Edwards and Zuch Consulting    Main Contractor Quest Builders Group    Photography Controls    MEP

Johnson Light Studios    AV Consultant Stephen Alesch/Roman and Williams

Audio Visual and

SUPPLIERS: Argosy    Reclaimed Wood Flooring Terra Mai    Custom Millwork CKS- Architectural Millwork    Tile Ann Sacks, Urban Archaelogy    Reclaimed Custom Metalwork Olde Good Things    Paint Fine Paints of Europe    Main Bar Demolition Depot    Table Bases Andy Thorton    Fittings Watermark Designs Iron Work

B r e s lin     R o m a n a nd Williams Bu ild ings and Interio r s

  503


E llio tt + As s o c iate s Arc h ite c t s

Elements Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S.A.

1,026m2(including lobby)

The project had a number of goals. First, it should have table service with a waiter. Second, the “spa” menu should feature light, healthy food because the majority are female employees. Third, it encourages diners on the campus with good table service. Fourth, complementary or different foods will be served. It also has an exhibition kitchen where grand windows provide a good view for customers. Access to the dining room is through the elevator core and a down ramp. The main dining room seats 120 customers. The “Lunch Bar” dining and booth can sit 67. Outdoor tables are for 44 people. The building lobby became a part of the restaurant finishes. The key point was to co-ordinate the existing Chesapeake restaurants. ELEMENTS is the third restaurant the architects have designed for the corporation. The Wildcat features stone and rustic surfaces, home cooking and a warm atmosphere. The Conservatory space is bright and airy with large glass windows and garden rooms along the creek. FUEL Café is a colourful space with high energy believing in a “kitchen as an art” concept serving Mediterranean food. The second design point is for the next “move.” It should respond to potential customers. This concept introduces an organic, natural and inviting atmosphere using wood. It has a warm glow with a few surprises. The goal is to “shape the light” and fill the space with natural sunlight, shade and shadow. There is texture. It is also a casual, elegant and comfortable place serving “spa” food. Human scale is considered on the ground level and also details of the concrete box. Thus, the building is more inviting and interesting. The sun screens filter lights, giving the building a new character.

505


Client Chesapeake Energy Corporation    Architect Elliott + Associates Architects    Project Team Rand Elliott, FAIA; Bill Yen, AIA; Kenneth Fitzsimmons, AIA    Structural Mark Eudaley Engineers, Inc.    MEP Determan-Scheirman, Inc.    Civil Johnson & Associates, Inc.    Landscape Total Environment Nursery, Inc.    Lighting Smith Audio Video Design    Renderer Skyline Ink    General Contractor Smith & Pickel Construction, Inc.    Lighting Sales    Acoustical Photography Scott McDonald © Hedrich Blessing

El e m e n t s     E llio t t + As s o c iates Architec t s

  507


M oreySmi th

Vizeum London, UK

2,000m2

Vizeum wanted to create a central hub for their new office space - incorporating a reception, cafe, meeting and presentation spaces, with collaborative and team working facilities. This space needed to be both professional and informal, and suitable for working and relaxing. The concept of this cafe is different to the norm. Vizeum did not want a full service cafeteria - there are only 180 staff and this was not a viable solution. So instead of a kitchen, a self service preparation area enables staff to bring in food from home or local shops and prepare it themselves. No service would usually mean no restaurant but here, the area is packed at lunchtime. People come together to eat and socialise daily - some with plates of hot food brought from home, others with sandwiches from local delicatessens or salads they have prepared themselves. This allows staff to cater to their own tastes and budgets while eating together and benefiting from the improved communication and knowledge sharing this inevitably generates. There is a long coffee bar with a good quality coffee machine where people can prepare their own cappuccinos. The counter itself provides the perfect base for canapés and drinks for catered events. Clients and visitors are also encouraged to use the area as a ‘touchdown’ space when in the area. Even if not specifically visiting Vizeum, they often come in for a coffee and take advantage of the free WiFi, and relaxed atmosphere. The area provides seating for up to 110 and is divided into different zones. In the reception, there is soft seating where people can sit and chat over coffee. The main cafe area comprises padded bench seating at long refectory style tables, each seating up to 16 people, and smaller round tables for three or four people. In the quiet area, there are three booths with built-in banquette seating and low hanging pendant lights above. There is also a lean bar with high stools overlooking the bustling street below. This area is great if you are sitting on your own or want to work quietly on your laptop. All the different seating areas have power supplies for laptops and specified areas on the benches have a VGA link to the projection screen which drops from the ceiling. These allow a meeting to turn into a presentation at the touch of a button. A glossy white porcelain floor creates a bright, lively space. This complements the exposed ceiling which features large white Caravaggio pendant lights suspended above the circular tables. The bench seating is defined by plasterboard ceiling rafts with recessed light channels. Two drop-down projector screens facilitate presentations while glazing and reflective finishes maximise natural light throughout. Within the quiet area, oversized bespoke pendant lights designed by MoreySmith and manufactured by Iberian Lighting are suspended over each circular booth to create a feeling of privacy within the open space. White round tables complement the beige upholstery. The separation of the quieter, more intimate booths from the communal dining area is subtle and is accomplished through the use of lighting and a change in floor finishes. A glazed screen with bespoke graphic film divides the area from reception behind. The boardroom leads directly off the café. A large acoustic sliding timber door enables this room to open up to the café and accommodate events for up to 200 people. MoreySmith has created an exceptionally distinctive café which is bright, spacious and colourful. The ingenious use of unusual contemporary furnishings and finishes is in perfect harmony with the innovative and creative Vizeum.

509


Cient Aegis Media / Vizeum     Design MoreySmith Ltd    Design Team GDM Partnership    Photography Alistair Lever Consultants

Linda Morey Smith / Andrew McCann / Nicola Osborn     Art Consultant

ArtSource    M&E

Parkeray Main Contractor Suppliers:    Lighting Fixtures & Fittings Modular Lighting Instruments, Iberian Lighting, Box 3, Lightyears.    Furniture SCP, Inform Furniture, B&B Italia, HiddenInk joinery    Back painted glass, ADS joinery, Castle Flooring    Smoked Oak timber floor, white gloss tiles HARO, Strata tiles    Bespoke Graphics Design worked up with in house Vizeum timber panelling team and produced by ArtSource

Vi ze u m     M o rey Sm it h L td

  511


D esig n Sp i ri ts Co. , L td.

Food Louver Jakarta, Indonesia

2,800m2

In FOOD lOuVER, the designers wanted to focus on food displays and diners. That is why the Louvre, an internationally recognized architectural element, was introduced to blend the entire space. The food court is a place where food from various countries and cultures is served. Its highlights are self service and reasonable prices. Therefore, the interior should reflect these casual characteristics. The food court should feel comfortable, appeal to a wide range of customers, and not appear too luxurious. At the same time, to reflect its very exclusive location in a prominent shopping centre in Jakarta, FOOD LOuVER is contemporary in outlook. The Japanese designer constructed the space with attention to cleanliness and detail. Whilst the use of louvers erases the presence of floor, wall and ceiling, various natural textures were applied on its surface to give a sense of warmth to the space. Much attention was given to the expression of this texture, its size and interval between application because if applied wrongly, the louvers could end up appearing like a prison. The challenge was to make the entire kitchen see-through in order to display the food. The aim was to make the food court like something never seen before. In the food court, one can select food as well as walk around. To make this a memorable experience, various zones were differentiated through contrasting materials and colours. Throughout the space, various water features were introduced to bring the natural landscape into the interior.

513


Cient

Grand Indonesia    Design

Fitout Contractor

Foo d L o u v e r     D e s ig n Sp irit s Co. , Ltd.

Design Spirits Co., Ltd.    Lighting Consultant

Koizumi Sangyo Corp    Photography

Courtesy of Design Spirits Co., Ltd.   

IMP

  515


DPW T D e s i g n L td.

Can.teen Hong Kong, China

360m2

Fast food design conventionally tends toward the cheap and thematic, favouring low maintenance and low cost materials of the shiny, wipeable variety. Such spaces do not encourage people to linger. Can.teen aims to provide an alternative choice via better articulation of design and more food choices. Can.teen is part of Maxim’s group with a different outlook. It offers an opulent, relaxing European atmosphere through the interior design and fitting out. White wooden window frames, luxuriant greenery, and quaint fans direct visual attention from the ceiling to the floor. For seating, tables in different sizes are used. The restaurant’s starting point was the colour palette. Red, which is used in Maxim’s logo, became the theme colour along with warm tones such as orange and yellow. It gives harmony to the space and enhances the appetite. To integrate European and Chinese styles, DPWT strategically matched the lattice ceiling light fixture in the open area with lantern-style lamps to provide a bright contrast. Small suave table lamps adorn surrounding tables in the open area to give a sense of homey dining. To cater for different customers, seating groups are zoned in different corners with four sets of circular family sofa seats as a thematic visual feature. Different palettes of vinyl were chosen for different zones. Inlaid translucent glass was used in partitions and aluminium fans installed in the open area. In keeping with the trends of coffee culture in Hong Kong, a relaxing corner adjacent to the entrance was dedicated to the café area. Upholstered brown single seat sofas are scattered in the area. Textile floor tiles accentuate a warm, welcoming ambiance. The food counter features numerous spot lights. In order to offer more food choices, a South East Asian noodle bar was launched with bar seating. There is an open kitchen with the chef demonstrating the cooking process in front of customers. The food counter is divided into four zones: Chinese BBQ, set lunch/dinner, sandwiches, and drinks. Each area has a different fascia board and lighting.

517


C a n . t e e n     D P W T D e s ig n L td.

Client/Owner Photography

Maxim’s Caterers Ltd.    Design Diamond Chan

DPWT Design Ltd.    Design Team

SUPPLIERS:    Stucco Paint James Design

Lezard Design & Contracting Co., Ltd.    Plastic Laminate(Wall)

Arthur Chan, Summer Zheng, Jenny Bai, and Alice Ng    Main Contractor

Genesis Development Ltd.    Ceiling Fan

Ming Tat   

el:ar Limited    Lighting Fixtures & Fittings

Marc

  519


DPW T D e s i g n L td.

The Mira Hong Kong, China

355m2

The Mira staff restaurant, located in the basement level of The Mira Hotel, is the rebirth of a relocation project. The original restaurant, on the same level, was outdated and dilapidated. Together with the whole office and staff ancillary facilties area, a more comprehensive and thoughtful renovation was carried out to tie in with the new image, spa and hotel rooms. The new restaurant is much more memorable and welcoming. When The Mira decided on a makeover, they commissioned DPWT to work up a livelier and more contemporary look. DPWT designed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dancingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; graphics for the walls and partitions based on the theme of the restaurant. This has proved adaptable and is evident in diverse appearances. The creation of an attractive 12 metre environmental graphic panel provides visual interest and runs around the space a metre above ground. Red, together with orange and yellow, are core warm colours permeating the space which give a high-energy feel. Tying In with the ambiance, white furniture was selected throughout the restaurant, creating a chic and memorable impression. As the restaurant is in the basement and devoid of natural light, mirrors were introduced. These were installed at the far end of the wall so that the space appears larger. The lighting design was divided into two zones. The bar area has fluid shape ceiling planes with spherical lights echoing the flooring. A lighting panel above the dining area makes the area appear dynamic and vibrant. The open ceiling is spray painted in charcoal so that it is outstanding and forms a more airy atmosphere. The variety of seating can be used by individuals or groups and there is a mix of low and high tables. A VIP area was also provided at the far end with sliding translucent glass panels. Different material and colours were used here such as wooden parquet flooring. At the new Mira Canteen, staff are likely to linger longer to recharge their energy.

521


Client/Owner Photography

The M ir a     D P W T D e s ig n L td.

The Mira    Design DPWT Design Ltd.    Design Team Courtesy of DPWT Design Ltd.

Arthur Chan, Willie Wu, and Gigi Chung    Main Contractor

Or Keung Kee Engineering Co. Ltd.   

  523


Slade Arch i te c t u re

Barbie Café Shanghai, China

420m2

Slade Architecture designed the Barbie Café and B-Bar on the sixth floor of the Barbie Flagship store in Shanghai, China, as an immersive dining experience intended to expand on the overall Barbie Flagship store experience. Mattel worked with Shanghai-based celebrity chef-restaurateur David Laris to conceive a place where European glamour meets classic American diner - expressing Barbie’s international credentials and her American/ Californian heritage. The Barbie Café provides a perfect place for a tasty lunch or an enchanting dinner. The sexy B Bar, a sculptural black bar under a hanging mobile of Barbie icon cut-outs rocks until 2 a.m., serving an alluring menu of creative cocktails – BarbieTinis and Malibu Barbies – to real-life glamour girls and their attendant Kens. To accommodate different ages and the atmosphere, Slade chose a simple and striking palette: black lacquer, white accents, pink upholstery and curtains. Slade designed the custom herringbone tile pattern on the floors and walls to recall the herringbone swimsuit that Barbie first wore when she debuted at the New York Toy Fair in 1959. Furniture was also designed by Slade Architecture and includes acrylic chairs printed with whimsical silhouette prints of iconic chairs: one Chinese antique, another European antique, and the last international modern. These silhouette prints create a literal blend of café references. Table bases are flat cutout silhouettes of classic turned wood profiles continuing the play between two-dimensional flat silhouette and three-dimensional chair. This is a playful allusion to the Barbie Dreamhouse and other Barbie accessories which use flat graphics to represent realistic detail at toy scale. Continuing the reference to the number one Barbie, Slade conceived the signature plate as a circular array of the world famous doll in her timeless black and white dress.

525


Hayes Slade (Principal), James Slade (Principal), Emily Andersen (Project Architect)   

Courtesy of Slade Architecture

Cient Mattel    Design Slade Architecture    Design Team Photography Iwan Baan(unless stated)

B a r b ie Ca f é     Sla d e Arc hite c t u re

  527


E stud i Arol a

Doctor Coffee Barcelona, Spain

37m2

The first CafĂŠ Saula establishment, Doctor Coffee, was conceived as a modern coffee shop to enjoy the best coffee in town. As the space is small, mirror-clad walls were used to enhance the space and reflect the graphics and coloured lights. The monolithic white marble counter stands out and is illuminated by the suspension lamp Peled. The design concept was to focus on the materials and elements in the bar/cafĂŠ which are white marble, wood and mirrors. The existing high ceiling was kept in the bar area to give a feeling of spaciousness. The space is divided into two areas - an area behind the bar and the customer area. The customer area is defined by a low white ceiling. The wall is lined with bamboo which also serves as a shelf. Part of the wall is engraved with the world of coffee. The back of the room features a wall of full-length mirrors which constitutes the doors to the kitchen/storage and services. The flooring is made from black iron sheet.

529


Client/Owner

Café Saula    Design

Main Contractor LGA T SUPPLIERS: Marbres Marquès    Covering Marble

D o c t o r Co f f e e     E s t u d i Aro la

Estudi Arola    Lighting Consultant

Viabizzuno    Graphic

Pati Nuñez Associats    Photography

Jordi Tamayo   

Tuka Bamboo   

  531


E llio tt + As s o c iate s Arc h ite c t s

Fuel Café Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA

355m2

Hip and high energy are the key words here. The team started out with a bland 400 sq. m. space that used to house Chesapeake’s accounting department. It had natural light on three sides which was it for visual excitement. The ceilings were low, the floors gray, and the general atmosphere gloomy. The architects gutted it to create a clean white space, essentially a large reflector, to which they added T8 fluorescents with colour gels, LED lamps, and laminatedglass panels with polyester film. There are no computers, fancy fixtures or any sophisticated dimmers. Yet from this bare-bone technology comes a stunning range of intense colour that complements the food being served: banana yellow and chili-pepper red, the cool pink of watermelon, and the deep purple of eggplant. The cooking island in the centre of the restaurant is covered in red and green resin panels like a floating Italian salad. FUEL celebrates the interplay of colour and daylight with colour being a starting point and first principle for the architect instead of a decorative afterthought. The café has as many moods as the day: soft and welcoming in the morning, bright and upbeat at lunch, and subdued in the late afternoon. Light is multidirectional as it streams through laminated-glass panels, bounces off walls and floors, and zips across ceilings in vibrant fluorescent stripes. Even mechanical chases are light sources. The glowing rectangular boxes at opposite ends of the café, with their green and blue LED lights, hide the exhausts from the prep kitchen below. Everywhere, colours intersect and overlap, turning the interior into a Fauve painting. But FUEL is more than a hip design statement; it is part of a strategy to enrich the corporate culture. By providing fresh, healthy, cooked-to-order food, it is a way to boost productivity and promote in-house socializing without making employees feel that they’re settling for less.

533


Client Chesapeake Energy Corporation    Architect Elliott + Associates Architects    Project Team Rand Elliott, FAIA; Bill Yen, AIA; Miho Kolliopoulos, AIA    Structural Mark Eudaley Engineers    MEP Determan Scheirman    Audio/Video Sound AVD Design    Lighting Smith Lighting    Kitchen Equipment/Food service Oswalt Smith & Pickel Construction    Photography Scott McDonald © Hedrich Blessing Restaurant Supply    General Contractor

Fue l Ca f é     E llio t t + As s o c iates Architec t s

  535


E llio tt + As s o c iate s Arc h ite c t s

POPS Arcadia, Oklahoma, USA

511m2

The legend of Route 66 is alive in POPS, a roadside attraction, and much more than a gas station. POPS portrays the image of freedom on the open road, and pays homage to the living history of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mother Roadâ&#x20AC;? in its design. It is a building of our time, with respect to the past, and the technology of the 21st century. With land stretching far in all directions, POPS Is visible from afar, seemingly emerge up from earth, a part of the place and its surroundings. With the canopy as a representation of technology and the future with the ability to cantilever unsupported for 33.5 metres, it embraces stone walls as a link between the past and future. It is new architecture with tribute to the spirit of Route 66 in the historical photos of Route 66, old-fashioned pop machines, and 12,000 pop bottles in the window in every imaginable colour.

537


Client POPS, L.P.    Architect Elliott + Associates Architects    Project Team Rand Elliott, FAIA; David Poerio, Assoc. AIA; Sam Moore, NCARB    Structural PSA Engineers    Civil Grossman & Keith Engineering    Landscape Elliott + Associates Architects in conjunction with Total Environment Engineering    MEP General Contractor Smith & Pickel Construction, Inc.    Photography Scott McDonald © Hedrich Blessing

P OPS    E l l io t t + As s o c iate s Architec t s

Eudaley Nursery, Inc.   

  539


A Touch of Asia

  541


G illes e t B oi s s ie r D e s ig n

Hakkasan Miami, Florida, USA

1 000m2

This project is a replication, interpretation, and translation of a Chinese house sequenced by courtyards, corridors, and semi-opened rooms. There are no walls and no obstruction of views. Through the entrance, covered with black slate and blue retro luminescent glass, a huge cage-like form is visible. Located in the centre, this wooden box is a major element in the space. Given the play of light and shadow through the lattice work and marble pattern, the box is a composition of opposites between the dark wood and white marble, the void and plane of wood and marble panels, opacity and transparency. Following the themes and history of Chinese art where water, nature and heaven are invisible but major guidelines, so the space has been created. Water and heaven are omnipresent through the blue of the glass (kitchen wall, maitre d’ area, and back bar) and in the pattern projected on the back bar wall while nature-inspired patterns are carved into the marble pieces of ‘the cage’ and onto the Ling Ling panels. The general atmosphere is dark in order enhance the effect of the China blue colour of the glass. Focused lighting is provided by rectangular suspended lampshades, porcelain vases, and spotlights. The rhythm of the shadows and semi-transparency give a smooth and sexy feel. The choice of materials Is masculine such as the dark brown wood for the ‘cage’, grey stone floor, and arabescato marble for the bathrooms. The details are feminine such as floral patterns in the white marble of the cage, carved subjects in the Ling Ling boiseries, and gold thread embroidered patterns on the leather black seats. Chinese detail references are sprayed onto all elements. The Ling Ling room is totally unique and exquisite in remembrance of the Chinese Hutong. Full height doors envelope this room so that it can be an open lounge linked to the ‘cage’ or an intimate and mysterious room. The walls are covered in carved grey wooden panels inspired by episodes from the romance of the Qing Dynasty. Each panel tells a different story depicting flowers, birds, and people. The corridors are also an important part of the space as they lend mystery. You can have a thousand different views of the space depending on the shadows of customers. The bar and the back bar were designed as pieces of furniture, carved into a single piece of metal with insert of China blue retro luminescent glass. The back bar wall features a composition of slate panels softened by the projection of water waves. The bathrooms, sharp and impressive, are all in arabescato marble. The mirrors, doors, and handles are all inspired by Chinese artistic details.

543


H a k k a s a n     G ille s e t B o is s ier D esign

  545


H a k k a s a n     G ille s e t B o is s ier D esign

  547


H a k k a s a n     G ille s e t B o is s ier D esign

  549


Design

H a k k a s a n     G ille s e t B o is s ier D esign

Gilles et Boissier Design    Photography

Eric Laignel

  551


R icha rd M cCo rm a c k D e s ig n

RockSugar Century City, California, U.S.A.

700m2

Rocksugar Pan Asian Kitchen was designed to have a southeast Asian aesthetic yet cannot be identified with any one culture. Sitting atop a highly visible site at Westfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Century City Mall in Los Angeles, California, the restaurant maintains its own identity while harmoniously merging with the existing surrounding architecture. The exterior features a dramatic 10.6 metre highl modern glass façade bordered by limestone columns adorned with Thai phrases. The building is topped with a gentle sweeping roofline, the lines of which suggest the curvature of a pagoda. Upon approaching the restaurant, guests first encounter massive red doors framed by gold leaf-overlaid columns, over-sized Burmese Buddha statues and an ornate naga (dragon) carving. Once through these doors, guests are led through an open air courtyard lounge warmly illuminated with fire pits and hanging lanterns. Only after passing through this inviting space does one arrive at the formal restaurant entry. Entering the 700 sq. m. restaurant, one is struck by the warm glow emitted from floor-to-ceiling candle walls and an elaborate hostess counter that incorporates a beautiful stacked glass partition wall, handmade carvings and a gold leafed naga sculpture. Just beyond the reception area, the blend of old- and new-world elements continues with three distinctive Buddha heads along with other hand carved elements that comprise the backdrop to the bar, and a 3 metre long antique replica communal table for bar patrons. Though the restaurant features extremely high vaulted ceilings, Richard McCormack Design created intimate dining areas adorned with intricately carved wood, wenge wood, limestone, slate, Venetian plaster, gold leaf, ornate art, artefacts, murals and statuary â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sourced both locally and globally. The use of Buddha statuary along with an oversized Thangka mural adds a calm Zen feel to the space. A refined lighting programme provides layers of glowing illumination throughout the 210-seat restaurant and the 80-seat festoon-lit, trellis-covered patio. The patio functions as another distinct dining area, featuring two large water walls and custom made Chinese cabinets. The synergy of these elements, both indoor and outdoor, creates a truly unique atmosphere and dining experience.

553


R o c k Su g a r     R ic h a rd M c Co rm ack D esign

  555


R o c k Su g a r     R ic h a rd M c Co rm ack D esign

  557


R o c k Su g a r     R ic h a rd M c Co rm ack D esign

  559


R o c k Su g a r     R ic h a rd M c Co rm ack D esign

  561


Client/Owner The Cheesecake Factory Design Shawmut Design and Construction Photography

R o c k Su g a r

R ic h a rd M c Co rm ack D esign

Richard McCormack Design Rober Berger

Design Team

Rick McCormack; Amelie Hicks; Angie Allen; Ryan Gee

Main Contractor

563


SHH

Nu Asia Manama, Bahrain

1,425m2

Nu Asia is a stunning, newly built, three-storeyed, 300-seat restaurant in Bahrain. Aimed at both families and young adults, Nu Asia offers a selection of four leading Asian cuisines: Chinese, Indian, Japanese, and Thai. Situated adjacent to the Al A’ali Mall in Bahrain’s capital city in Manama, the restaurant is at the heart of a burgeoning new business area called the Seef district, to the west of the old city. SHH designed the new building as three elegant interlocking volumes, each one larger than the last and variously clad in timber, glass, and stone. The first 8.5 metre high ‘box’ is clad in dark timber slats, allowing light to shine through dramatically at night whilst protecting against the searing daytime sun. A grand stone entry staircase in Galala marble is located in front of/alongside this first timber slat elevation. The staircase is set beneath a high-impact cantilevered entrance canopy, inset on the underside with brightly-coloured mosaic-style tiling, linking in both to the shapes used on the third stone volume of the building and to a fabric two-storey wall created as part of the interior treatment. The second 9.7 metre high ‘Chinese lantern’ box is clad in dark glass and features applied aluminium mullions in a geometric pattern, whilst the third and final 12.2 metre high box is clad in stone, in the colour of sand to blend in with its environs, in seemingly random grain patterns. The striking geometric pattern was achieved by turning the basic stone module pieces either vertically or horizontally with filler pieces in between for tolerance. Internally, the building is arranged with a first kitchen on the lower-ground floor (which was only able to be set one metre down because of the water table), along with a staff area. A glazed reception/lobby area on the ground floor contains circulation with a service core located near the restaurant space. A second, open and more theatrical kitchen is located on the ground floor and is semi-open for diners to see in. A series of six columns break up the ground floor space. The first floor area is accessed via a lightweight stair with a central timber spine, which looks down on a reflecting light pool set at ground level. The upstairs dining area features several different zones linked by a floating opaque glass bridge. Three private dining rooms are situated at the far left of the floor plan, over the entrance lobby below, with a timber screen wall between two of them, which can be retracted to create a double-size private dining space when required. The Nu Asia brand, also designed by SHH to the name chosen by the client, was conceived as a two-stage design: both as a typographical marque and as a holding device, with an accompanying background. The essence of the brand is to sum up the essential warmth of Asian cuisine and was inspired by the vivid colours of spices.

565


Nu As ia

S HH

567


Nu As ia     S HH

  569


Cient Al-Hilal Enterprises Group    Design Photography Morley von Sternberg

Nu As ia     S HH

SHH    Design Team

David Spence, Neil Hogan, Guy Matheson, Addy Walcott, Ashley Thompson   

  571


Ak arStu d i os

Tanzore Beverly Hills, California, USA â&#x20AC;&#x192; â&#x20AC;&#x192; 700m2

Tanzore is the result of a major refit of a new 700 sq. m. Indian venue located on the famed Restaurant Row in Beverly Hills, named after a town in India known for its cultural treasures and temples. Tanzore is a modern interpretation of distinctly Indian aesthetics in its ambiance and arrangement, and contemporary culinary creations. Located in a large 70s modern black building on a busy commercial avenue, the box shaped space contains a series of interconnected areas integrating a bar, lounge, restaurant and private room, each with a distinct identity. From the very outset, colour and texture play an important part in the overall appearance of the interior spaces. The walls and ceilings have been swathed in bold and colourful Indian hues to create a befitting backdrop for the collection of Indian artefacts that have been selectively positioned within the venue. From the street entrance, a contemporary waterfall feature against a warm terracotta backdrop greets guests entering the venue through a custom-made wooden door. From the entrance portal, customers are drawn into an aqua blue lounge area with a modern and sophisticated bar that overlooks the sweeping polished granite clad walls and a fullheight glass box containing a large collection of temperature controlled wines. On one of the wall surfaces of the lounge area, moving images of Bollywood movies and dance sequences are projected from the ceiling to create a dramatic backdrop for patrons. Offsetting the bar and lounge areas are a series of dining spaces separated by an intervening water channel with floating candles and rose petals. This water element conjures the imagery of ancient Indian pavilions and water gardens, providing a level of grace to the establishment. Lighting has been integrated as a critical element of the overall design, both as a visual object and as a provider of luminance, warmth, and mood. Design patterns created by AkarStudios were printed on fabric-clad lampshades which are positioned prominently to complement the colours and shape of the dining spaces. A computerized lighting control system manages the lighting levels within different areas of the venue. The main dining space, with its polished concrete flooring, is rendered in a deep red shade and lined on one side with a screen made of solid teak. Displayed within the screen are traditional cooking utensils and artefacts that create a visual highlight. The use of fabric and leather banquettes gives a classic and timeless feel to the dining area. A large wall mural, created by AkarStudios, graces the entire width of this open space. Adjoining the main dining space is an intimate room that acts as the private dining room. With its monochromatic off-white walls and white leather banquettes, the room complements the main dining space.

â&#x20AC;&#x192; 573


Ta n zo r e     Ak a r St u d io s

  575


Ta n zo r e     Ak a r St u d io s

  577


Client/Owner Suppliers:    Furniture(Booths) Curtains/Blinds

Ta n zo r e     Ak a r St u d io s

Sudesh Sood    Design

AkarStudios    Photography

Derek Rath; Randall Michelson

Inn Decor    Flooring(Concrete) Ecoprocote    Artwork(Murals & Graphics) Maharam    AV System Sony & JBL

AkarStudios    Sanitary Ware

Toto    Upholstery

Maharam   

  579


Conra n & Pa r t ne r s

Zen Kolkata, India

250m2

‘Zen’ restaurant is the third venture undertaken by Conran & Partners as their ongoing phased renovation of the Park Hotel Kolkata, India. Originally opened in 1992, Zen was already an established venue in Kolkata. Conran & Partners was asked to update the rather formal design to give it a fresh, relaxing, and elegant look. Initially inspired by the overlapping petals of a lotus flower, Conran & Partners’ concept for ‘Zen’ is informed by the idea of layering and screens. The restaurant comprises a sequence of spaces which overlap and reveal one another through lighting, material, and vistas. The restaurant is entered via a linear space reminiscent of a shady forest path. Light penetrates by way of slots in an etched glass window, and through a series of twisted fins, which divide the space from the restaurant. A translucent fabric canopy, printed with abstract overlapping leaves, continues the forest ambiance. At the greeting desk, the first space of the restaurant is revealed; here, three large square tables, each seating eight people, are illuminated with glowing glass and light silk columns hanging from the ceiling. In the centre of each table is a shallow glass pool containing white lotus flowers. A solid partition of black and gold patterned Chinese silk hides a fourth table for private parties. Conran & Partners were asked to create a “theatre of food” for their Asian fusion style menu. The main restaurant space is found beyond timber screens. A white marble Japanese bar, serving sushi and teppanyaki dishes, takes centre stage. Behind this is an open kitchen, where customers can see Chinese, Japanese, and Thai dishes being prepared. Nature is found in all the details of the scheme with a simple materials palette of stone, timber, and metal. Colours include black, bronze, cream, and gold with a few vivid green accents. Solid teak is used in the parquet floor, patterned Chinese screens, and in bar tops and tables. The restaurant walls are clad in grey slate, and black anodised aluminium is used in a dynamic contemporary screen of twisted fins, which runs along two sides of the space. The space seats 80 people in a mixture of contemporary Chinese and Scandinavian furniture with teak dining chairs, and upholstered green and bronze armchairs.

581


Ze n a t t h e Pa r k K o l k a t a     Co nra n & Par t ner s

  583


Client/Owner Apeejay Surrendra Group    Design Conran & Partners    Lighting Consultant Integrated Lighting Design, Los Angeles    Photography Interscape, Mumbai    Main Contractor Suppliers:    Bespoke entrance light raft & custom glass feature pendants C&P    Upholstery Jim Thompson Silks    Gold Mosaics to back-wall of open kitchen

Ze n a t t h e Pa r k K o l k a t a     Co nra n & Par t ner s

Amit Pasricha Strata Tiles, UK

  585


B lack s h e e p

Inamo London, UK

310m2

Inamo is 310 sq. m. Soho restaurant and downstairs bar, offering customers high quality Asian fusion cuisine. It also offers a whole new paradigm in the way people can order food, with menus projected onto tabletops, allowing diners to order food and beverages interactively, to change the ambiance of their individual table, to play games or even to order up local information and services, such as booking a cab. It was an ambitious project and a tricky concept to get right. Great attention had to be paid especially to ensure that lighting levels and proportions were spot on for the restaurant to work at all hours of the day and night. The restaurant design also had to have an overall strong sense of identity as a space, neither overwhelming nor being overwhelmed by the technology at its heart. ‘Cocoon’ projectors are set at the same height throughout within the suspended high gloss black ceiling. When customers sit down, there are white spots for plates and an individual ‘e-cloth’ for each table. Touch panels enable customers to order food and drink or change their table top pattern. The restaurant has been treated partly in monochrome to allow the tabletop illuminations to stand out and partly with further graphics (inspired by the colour choices of kaleidoscopes and origami for an Asian feel) to mirror the strong graphic sense created by the tabletops. Walls are therefore in a white vinyl wallpaper with mirrored graphic panels, which work effectively like lightboxes with an etched pattern and a cut pattern, with light allowing the cut pattern to shine through. Seats are either a silver vinyl banquette with feature red stitching or else two-tone flip chairs with black backs and white frontage. The tables themselves have a black base and a white Corian top.

587


Ina m o     Bl ac k s he e p

  589


Client/Owner Compurants Ltd    Design Blacksheep    Design Team Monteros    Photography Francesca Yorke Designs    Main Contractor

Ina m o     Bl ac k s he e p

Tim Mutton, Benjamin Webb, Helen Gilbert    Decorative bar lighting

Ben Rousseau

  591


B uck l ey G ray Ye o m a n

Dim T Victoria, London, U.K.

440m2

Set within an existing ground and basement shell close to Victoria train station, Buckley Gray Yeoman were asked to design an elegant dining space with an intimate atmosphere for a modern, affordable, oriental restaurant group. The concept for the layout of the rectangular shell centres around a linear dining area, flanked by textured stone walls, whilst the dark back wall to the unit complements the glazed shopfront. The water feature in the entranceway enhances the inviting, calming experience of the space, from which the dark stained oak bar area leads to the main restaurant floor. This central space responds to the long glazed elevation of the unit, the stained oak slatted feature ceiling over the linear dining space returning at either end into glazed ladder screens whilst oversize, crisp, mirrored light bulbs by Jonathan Coles drop at varying heights. The action of stepping down into the lower banquettes towards the back of the unit provides two alternative dining zones with a more relaxed feel; the soft seagrass lamp shades, gold accents in the back bar and deep glow of the backlit red screens setting a rich and moody ambiance.

593


D im T     Bu c k ley G ray Ye o m an

  595


Client/Owner Took Us A Long Time Ltd    Design Jonathan Coles Lighting Design    Main Contractor

D im T     Bu c k ley G ray Ye o m an

Buckley Gray Yeoman    Design Team RDA    Photography Hufton & Crow

Matt Yeoman, Peter Thomas, Amrita Mahindroo, Rob Jarratt    Lighting Consultant

  597


SWe e T co. , L td.

Arata Minatoku, Tokyo, Japan

480m2

The design theme was“Edo Japanese modern”with two focal points. The first point is【東洲斎写楽】art in the main dining which is made from SUS frame and features 18,000 pieces of 20mm diameter crystal balls. Lighting was installed which enables popular art from the Edo era to be shown through a contemporary art filter. The second focus was on having a bar space which is not common in Japanese dining spaces and makes it more international. When the first floor plan was conceived, the designer suggested the extension space be turned into a bar area. There were more problems than expected during construction but the restaurant project was finished in three months.

599


A r a t a     SWe e T co. , L td.

  601


Client/Owner

A r a t a     SWe e T co. , L td.

Huge Co.,Ltd.    Design

SWeeT co.,ltd.    Main Contractor

Ten-nen-sha Co., Ltd    Photography

Nacasa & Partners

  603


D esig n A RC L A

Katsuya Hollywood, California, USA

855m2

The centrepiece of this restaurant is a 4-sided sushi bar where chefs are put â&#x20AC;&#x153;on stage,â&#x20AC;? creating and serving their craft beneath the traditional folds of the black and red fabric Noren. Conceived as a kind of luxurious wooden Bento box, the sushi space is carved with compartmentalized dining booths, while backlit panels portray modernized fragments of the traditional Geisha â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as well as other provocative and sensual imagery of the skin and body. Katsuya is part of a larger movement to revisit, revitalize, and reinterpret the classic elegance and glamour of old Hollywood.

605


Like a traditional Japanese Bento box, the interior space of the restaurant is strong and simple. Clean geometric forms, rendered in wood and stone, highlight the beauty and intricacy of the food.

Ka t s u y a Ho lly w o o d     D e s ig nA RC L A

  607


Client/Owner SBE    Design DesignARC LA    Design Team Starck Network, SBE, DesignARC LA    Lighting Consultant Lighting Design Alliance    Kitchen Consultant Abrams and Tanaka Associates    Acoustical Engineer 45db.com    Main Contractor Taisei Construction Corporation    Photography James Merril Suppliers:    Furniture Philippe Starck

Oversized, fragmented imagery of the Geisha illuminate the interior spaces of the restaurant. The Geisha, seen to represent all things Japanese, associates the modern space with traditional customs.

Ka t s u y a Ho lly w o o d     D e s ig nA RC L A

  609


Crè me

Mumon New York, USA

465m2

Named after the Japanese and Chinese characters that mean “dream and dream”, Mumon offers traditional Japanese cuisine with a modern twist. The entire space is surrounded by shelves of red painted cubes, inspired by traditional Japanese architectural structures, and stained wood panels. At the entrance, grand wooden lanterns hang randomly from the ceiling and invite customers into the space. The space is divided into five distinct dining rooms. By not physically blocking off each dining area, the restaurant reads as one open space with many unique characteristics. The surrounding banquette layout defines the main dining zone with a soothing consciousness. The patterned Japanese wallpaper, stools and lamp shades, jars filled with dried herbs, and screens with large open areas bring an energetic and contemporary feel to the space. The cocktail bar has maple leaves embedded in the resin countertop, which gives one a feeling of maple leaves floating in a clear stream. Unexpected blue-coloured table tops blend will with blue noren and blue-patterned wallpaper.

611


Design

Mu m o n     Cr è m e

CREME    Design Team

Gina Seung Oh, May Korranun Pakarnseree, Alex Reh, Anna Unierzyski    Photography

Fanny Allié

  613


Crè me

Chifa Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

735m2

Chifa is named after the unique hybrid of Peruvian and Cantonese cuisines found in Peru. With a brilliant colour palette, the stunning restaurant features a centre-stage ceviche bar that sits atop a Chinese apothecary cabinet, a glowing 16 seat gold resin communal table adorned with lazy Susans reminiscent of Chinese porcelain, and a chic lower lounge perfect for late night gatherings. Chifa boasts three distinctive dining rooms. The first is the main dining room and bar area furnished with banquettes of ochre and brown leather. The soft flicker of candlelight peaks through shutters of handcrafted cabinetry mounted along the walls. Large open ceiling fans, custom wallpaper embellished with blue and white Latin tile, full tropical plants, and floral fabric accents all help to establish an open airy atmosphere. The second dining room, which features the ceviche bar, is painted vibrant red and accented throughout with dark wood screens carved in Chinese-inspired geometric patterns. Behind the ceviche bar stands a glimmering golden wall of historically styled apothecary cabinets. Two twin round booths are each wrapped in a sepia-toned landscape of Machu Picchu and enclosed by a dazzling metal bead curtain for privacy. The lower lounge has a sexy, clandestine feel inspired by an opium den with its own bar, lush fabrics, red and black lacquered tables, hanging lanterns, plush purple couches, and ottomans. Connected to the lounge is the private dining room, which seats up to 34 and features an expansive treatment of the Chinese apothecary cabinetry which lines the walls like bricks of glimmering gold.

615


Cient

C h if a     Cr è m e

Garces Restaurant Group    Design

CREME    Design Team

May Korranun Pakarnseree, Kisho Oshima    Photography

Fanny Allié

  617


Index by designer

acarquitectos www.acarquitectos.pt

560

Agence Jouin Manku www.jouinmanku.com

58 Tour Eiffel Oth Sombath

AkarStudios www.akarstudios.com

Crescent Heights Seoul Bros. Tanzore

Andrea Langhi Architect www.ec2.it/andrealanghi

The Piper’s

Architects EAT www.eatas.com.au

Maedaya Bar

Berge Strugar Architekten www.buerobergestrugar.com

Transit

Blacksheep www.blacksheep.uk.com

Inamo

BOX Interior Design Inc. www.boxinteriordesign.com

Buckley Gray Yeoman www.buckleygrayyeoman.com

Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. www.c7a.com

Concrete Architectural Associates www.concreteamsterdam.nl

Conran & Partners www.conranandpartners.com

Denis Kosutic www.deniskosutic.com

328 322 296 468 5 72 214

Design Research Studio/Tom Dixon www.designresearchstudio.net

486 460 586

252 142 148 278 Dim T 592 Nando’s 394 Zizzi 380 Zizzi II 384 Zizzi III 388 Hard Rock Café 74 Sushi-Teq 464 The CBS Scene 80 Nevy 364

Coast Market by Jean-Georges Society Trattoria

Crème www.cremedesign.com

452

Skylon Zen Chifa Distrito Mumon

246 580 614 372 610

Orlando di Castello

Design Spirits Co., Ltd. www.design-spirits.com

DesignARC LA www.designarc.net

Circus Tazmania Ballroom The Dock Kitchen

Beijing Noodle No. 9 Food Louver Nautilus Teeq Katsuya

DPWT Design Ltd. www.dp-wt.com

Can.teen The Mira

Elliott + Associates Architects www.e-a-a.com

Entasis www.entasis.com.mx

Biko Oca

Estudi Arola www.estudiarola.com

Citrus Doctor Coffee Vinoteca Torres

Ezequiel Farca Design Studio www.ezequielfarca.com

Elements Fuel Café POPS Red Prime Steak

Segundo Muelle

Gilles et Boissier Design www.gillesetboissier.com

Hakkasan Steak 954

Glamorous Co., Ltd. www.glamorous.co.jp

DBL(double)

Inarc Design Hong Kong Ltd. www.inarcdesign.com.hk JOI-Design Interior Architects www.JOI-Design.com

Owners Box

Jump Studios www.jump-studios.com

Calla Vlet The Modern Pantry

306 136 12 444 480 512 222 26 604 516 520 504 532 536 164 238 230 152 528 494 376 542 156 310 406 274 268 448

Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture www.kjellgrenkaminsky.se

Mirage

428

Himeji Monolith Takasaki Monolith

52 40 508

Ladakh Design Associates www.ladakh.co.jp

MoreySmith www.moreysmith.com

Vizeum

Mr.www.misterimportant.com Important Design

Ultra

104 94 86 198 178

Wallop

302

Tomo Izakaya

334

Matrix Pizza

472

Ara Pizza

456

The Grove

432

Made in Kitchen Made in Kitchen II

186 192 122

Gitane JohnnySmalls Motif Pure

Munge Leung www.mungeleung.com

Nigel Coates Ltd. www.nigelcoates.com Ong&Ong Pte Ltd. www.ong-ong.com Onoffice www.onoffice.no Pablo Tellez www.pablotellez.es

PageSoutherlandPage www.pspaec.com

Panorama www.panoramahk.com

Paul Kelly Design www.paulkellydesign.com.au

Tongue and Groove

Planet 3 Studios Architecture Pvt. Ltd. www.planet3studios.com

Project Orange www.projectorange.com

Richard McCormack Design www.richardmccormackdesign.com

T-Crossover Tube Ville Chaumiere I-Talia Whitechapel RockSugar

412 30 340 348 344 552

Roman and Williams Buildings and Interiors www.romanandwilliams.com

Rottet Studio www.rottetstudio.com

Bar Pleiades

498 438 34

Scarpetta

354

Dion Nu Asia Departure

170 564 18

Barbie Café

524

Poncho No.8

476

Breslin The Standard Grill

S. Russell Groves www.srussellgroves.com SHH www.shh.co.uk

Skylab Architecture www.skylabarchitecture.com

Slade Architecture www.sladearch.com

Something from Us www.somethingfromus.com

Stanley Saitowitz I Natoma Architects Inc. www.saitowitz.com

Studio Gaia, Inc. www.studiogaia.com

SWeeT co., Ltd. www.sweetdesign.jp

Conduit Toast Américas

130 358 316

BOA Steakhouse

598 206 282 112

ELLA

288

Vaillo + Irigaray Architects www.vailloirigaray.com

El Merca’o

418

Westar Architects www.wagnarchitects.com

Reflections

400

1901 Anne-Sophie Pic au Beau-Rivage Palace Kitayama-Monolith Yasui Hideo Atelier www.yasui-atr.com

258 264 66

Arata Rigoletto Bar and Grill Rigoletto Short Hills

Tagwww.tagfront.com Front

UXUS www.uxusdesign.com

Wilsdon Design Associates www.wilsdon-da.com

  621


Index by location

Australia   ACT  |  Canberra Tongue and Groove 122   Victoria  |  Richmond Maedaya Bar 486 Austria   Vienna Orlando di Castello 306 Bahrain   Manama Nu Asia 564 Canada   BC  |  Vancouver Coast 252 Market by Jean-Georges 142 Society 148 Trattoria 278   Ontario  |  Toronto Ultra 178 China   Hong Kong Can.teen 516 Owners Box 406 Tazmania Ballroom 12 The Mira 520   Shanghai Barbie Café 524   Wuhu Made in Kitchen II 192   Xuzhou Made in Kitchen 186 F r a n c e    Paris Oth Sombath 322 58 Tour Eiffel 328 G e r m a n y    Berlin Transit 460   Hamburg Vlet 268 Calla 274 I n d i a    Bangalore  |  Indranagar T-Crossover 412 Tube 30 Ville Chaumiere 340   New Delhi I-Talia 348   Kolkata Zen 580 Indonesia   Jakarta Food Louver 512 Italy   Milan The Piper’s 214   Syracuse Matrix Pizza 472

J a p a n    Gunma  |  Takasaki City Takasaki Monolith 40   Hyogo  |  Himeji City Himeji Monolith 52   Kyoto Kitayama Monolith 66   Osaka DBL(double) 310   Tokyo  |  Minatoku Arata 598 Rigoletto Bar and Grill 206 Rigoletto Short Hills 282 Malaysia   Kuala Lumpur Teeq 26 M e x i c o    Mexico City Segundo Muelle 376   Mexico City  |  Polanco Oca 230 Biko 238 Portugal   Lisbon 560 452 S i n g a p o r e  Nautilus 222   Clarke Quay Tomo Izakaya 334 S p a i n    Barcelona Citrus 152 Vinoteca Torres 494 Doctor Coffee 528   Barcelona  |  Sant quirze del Valles Ara Pizza 456   Navarre  |  Pamplona El Merca’o 418 S w e d e n    Scania  |  Falsterbo Mirage 428 S w i t z e r l a n d    Lausanne Anne-Sophie Pic au Beau-Rivage Palace 264 T h e N e t h e r l a n d s    Amsterdam, Nevy 364

U K    Buckinghamshire  |  High Wycombe Zizzi III 388   Buckinghamshire  |  Milton Keynes Zizzi 380   East Sussex  |  Lewes Wallop 302   Hertfordshire  |  St Albans Zizzi II 384   London 1901 258 Dion 170 Inamo 586 Skylon 246 The Modern Pantry 448 Vizeum 508 Whitechapel 344   London  |  Covent Garden Circus 136   London  |  Portobello Dock The Dock Kitchen 444   London  |  Spitalfields Poncho No.8 476   London  |  Victoria Dim T 592   Manchester  |  Spinngfields Nando’s 394

U S A    California  |  Pasadena Seoul Bros. 468   California  |  Beverly Hills Tanzore 572   California  |  Century City RockSugar 552   California  |  Hollywood Katsuya 604   California  |  Novato Toast 358   California  |  Sacramento ELLA 288   California  |  San Diego Crescent Heights 296   California  |  San Jose Motif 86   California  |  San Francisco Gitane 104 Conduit 130   California  |  West Hollywood BOA Steakhouse 112   Florida Steak 954 156   Florida  |  Miami Hakkasan 542   Florida  |  Naples Pure 198   Massachusetts  |  Boston Sushi-Teq 464   Massachusetts  |  Foxborough The CBS Scene 80   New Jersey  |  Atlantic City Reflections 400   New York  |  New York Bar Pleiades 34 Breslin 498 Mumon 610 Scarpetta 354 The Standard Grill 438   Nevada Beijing Noodle No. 9 480 Hard Rock Café 74   Nevada  |  Las Vegas JohnnySmalls 94   Oklahoma  |  Oklahoma City Elements 504 Red Prime Steak 164 Fuel Café 532   Oklahoma  |  Arcadia POPS 536   Oregon  |  Portland Departure 18   Pennsylvania  |  Philadelphia Chifa 614 Distrito 372   Taxas Américas 316   Texas  |  Houston The Grove 432

  623


Acknowledgements

At www.beisistudio.com, I would like to thank my former team members at Pace Publishing, Polly Leung and Olivia Ko, for continuing to provide design, editorial, proofreading, research and administrative support. Without their support, this publication could not have been completed within a short spell of six months. All this was possible, thanks to the Internet and the formation of a virtual team enabling collaborative effort. I would also like to thank Raka Dewan for writing an introduction. And finally, a big thank to all the architecture and design firms, their press staff and photographers who have spared their precious time and provided information and materials.

designzens


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