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KEVIN D. SCHMITT Tulane University Master of Architecture, 2014 kevin.d.schmitt@gmail.com // e-mail 1.630.542.7048 // mobile 739 Thornapple Drive, Naperville, IL 60540 // address


TABLE OF CONTENTS

NEW ORLEANS CYCLE SHARE

BASEL PAVILION OF CULTURE

2012

2013

2

LANGELINIE SCHOOL EXTENSION


NEW ORLEANS CULINARY INSTITUTE

FRENCH QUARTER PUBLIC LIBRARY

URBAN DESIGN SKETCH WORK

3 IN 1 EXHIBITION

2011

30 KEVIN SCHMITT // 3


NEW ORLEANS CYCLE SHARE Fall 2013 New Orleans is currently ranked sixth in the nation for percentage of cyclists and could potentially become the most bicycle friendly city if the right steps are taken. The environment is perfect for cyclists as the city offers a flat landscape, as well as a humid subtropical climate allowing for easy, year-round cycling conditions. However, what New Orleans currently lacks is infrastructure to support large numbers of cyclists. This project envisions a series of stations that can support not only private bicycle parking, but a new bicycle share system for the city. These stations can then be replicated across the city with various social programs such as bicycle repair and cafes for hydration to help beat the New Orleans heat. By allowing people to lease these spaces, existing cycling organizations within New Orleans can promote themselves while also strengthening the social aspects of biking. The architecture is based upon a formulaic design which can adapt to varying site conditions. Once the stations multiply, the buildings will act as a branding tool for this healthier mode of transportation

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Existing Bike Lanes - Separate from Traffic Existing Bike Lanes - Merged with Traffic Proposed Bike Lanes Site

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 5


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6 // NEW ORLEANS CYCLE SHARE // Fall 2013


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A - Section 1 B - Section 2 C - Ground Floor D - Second Floor E - Ramp to Second Floor F - Second Floor Deck

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 7


BASEL PAVILION OF CULTURE Fall 2013

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The Pavilion of Culture utilizes sound as an abstract representation of the city to create an experience that is unique and perhaps unknown for tourists and residents alike. The total sound environment of the city is split into three different sonic categories: Human, Nature, and Machine. These environments form the three formal spaces of the pavilion. While inside, visitors are at once connected to the immediate square surrounding them, while at the same time sonically transported to different areas of the city. Each module contains glass panels that use magnetostriction technology converting them into speaker systems. Each panel produces a different sound related to one of the three distinct environments. Motion sensors detect pedestrian movement through the pavilion and trigger the panels to produce sound when someone is in close proximity. The pavilion effectively becomes an instrument. Sounds of each environment can be layered or isolated depending on how many people occupy the space at once. These sounds that most are not cognizant of on an everyday basis are now brought to attention providing a new definition of Basel’s culture.


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A - Pavilion Exterior B - Function Diagrams C - Site Plan

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 9


NATURE

MACHINE

HUMAN

Rhein

Basel SBB Rail Station

Barfusserplatz

St. Albanteich

Rheinhafen

Sinfonietta

Bruderholz

Basler Verkehrs-Betriebe

Fasnacht

Kannenfeld Park

Pharmaceutical Lab

Marktplatz

Wiese

Baselland Transport

Stadion St. Jakob-Park

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10 // BASEL PAVILION OF CULTURE // Fall 2013

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A - Sound Map B - Floor Plan C - Sonic Environment D - Structural Module E - Pavilion Interior F - Pavilion Aerial

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 11


LANGELINIE SCHOOL EXTENSION Fall 2012 While in Copenhagen, we designed an addition to an existing school within the neighborhood of Østerbro. There is a strong sense of homegeneity within Østerbro due to its consistent building heights. Datum lines run continuously from one building to the next forming a connective thread that defines the atmosphere of the neighborhood. To respect this connective thread while also providing a new dimension to the neighborhood, these datum lines are manipulated horizontally out over the street to welcome people into the school and establish the school as a landmark within the neighborhood. At the front of the building, the floors peel back from one another over the street forming a sheltered entrance. To avoid wasting precious open space within the courtyard, the floors then peel back to provide outdoor balconies. These outdoor balconies connect to interior social spaces which all look down upon the playground in the center of the school’s courtyard.

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A - Front Exterior B - Process Diagrams C - Site Plan

KEVIN SCHMITT // 13


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14 // LANGELINIE SCHOOL EXTENSION // Fall 2012

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A - Ground Floor B - Second Floor C - Third Floor D - Fourth Floor E - Section F - Atrium Interior

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 15


NEW ORLEANS CULINARY INSTITUTE Spring 2012 Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard is currently undergoing extensive renovations to re-establish its status as a major cultural corridor within New Orleans. The boulevard was known historically as a bustling commercial center for Central City, however, it fell prey to disinvestment over time leading to its degradation. Post-Katrina, there has been large interest in returning the corridor to its former glory by branding it as a culinary hot spot within the city. The New Orleans Culinary Institute acts as an anchor to this development by sitting at a major entrance to the boulevard. The three-story building is divided into three programmatic components: education, implementation, and presentation. The educational component points back toward the neighborhood inviting the residents to take part in the new available amenities. The rest of the building contains teaching kitchens, a restaurant, and a small bakery that are formally arranged to visually connect with the Central Business District. This formal gesture is branded with the logo of the school to officially acknowledge the corridor’s new identity. A

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A - Southeast Exterior B - Process Diagrams C - Site Plan

KEVIN SCHMITT // 17


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18 // NEW ORLEANS CULINARY INSTITUTE // Spring 2012

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Site Plan - A Diagrams - B Final Model - C Section Details - D


Gravel Splicing Cement Roof Membrane Vapor Retarder Treated Wood Nailer Thermal Insulation Metal Decking Concrete Slab Welded Web Stiffener Seat Angle Steel Beam - W16x40 Steel Beam - W18x50

Drop Ceiling

Aluminum Handrail

Glazing

Wood Flooring Seating Block Anchor Bolts Aluminum Soffit Steel Girder - W21x62 Air Duct Diffuser Water Pipe Recessed Fluorescent Lighting

Insulated Glazing

Steel Cable Aluminum Louver Rubber Bushing Spider Fitting Steel Wire for Vine Screen

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20 // NEW ORLEANS CULINARY INSTITUTE // Spring 2012

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A - Ground Floor B - Second Floor C - Third Floor D - Section E - Demo Kitchen

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 21


FRENCH QUARTER PUBLIC LIBRARY Fall 2011 The French Quarter is by far the most famous neighborhood in New Orleans. It also happens to be one of the densest neighborhoods in New Orleans. To relieve this density, most blocks are punctuated by hidden courtyards that allow residents and shop owners privacy from the street noise outside. The design of the library exploits this unique characteristic of the Quarter. A public thoroughfare cuts through the center of the ‘L’-shaped site forming an atrium that allows the public access to the interior of the block. This thoroughfare passes by the main programmatic components of the library while the stacks and reading rooms occupy the upper three stories. The atrium is punctuated by bridges that allow ease of circulation and visual acuity from above and below. Facade and interior walls are pushed and pulled in order to emphasize the natural movement of visitors through the space, while multiple, twisted, steel louvers line these facades acting as an abstraction of the shutters prevalent within the Quarter. The location of the louver openings are dictated by the surrounding context. They provide both shading and privacy for those within, while inciting intrigue to all pedestrians who gaze inside while passing.

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A - Toulouse Exterior B - Process Diagrams C - Site Plan

KEVIN SCHMITT // 23


C H A RT R E S ST R E ET

T O U L O U S E ST R E ET

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Ground Floor - A Study Models - B Final Model - C Section - D


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A - Auditorium B - Facade Section C - Chartres Exterior D - Toulouse Exterior E - Atrium

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 29


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URBAN DESIGN SKETCH WORK Fall 2012 While studying abroad in Copenhagen, a sketching course was offered that was based in urban design. Each week, trips were taken to various sites within the city to examine the successes and failures of Copenhagen’s cityscape and Nordic design in general. Assignments ranged from exploring street elevations to playground and public park design. We were also encouraged to continuously sketch our surroundings whenever possible.

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A - Skyline of Copenhagen viewed from Rundetaarn B - Courtyard case study

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32 // URBAN DESIGN SKETCH WORK // Fall 2012


A - Koldinghus case study B - Public lighting case study

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KEVIN SCHMITT // 33


3 IN 1 EXHIBITION Summer 2013

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During the summer of 2013, I was privileged to work as an intern with the Architecture and Design Department at the Art Institute of Chicago. The majority of my internship was spent conducting research for projected exhibitions. However, I was also offered the opportunity to assist in designing one of the exhibition spaces for their show ‘3 in 1’ that took place from September 2013 to January 2014. The exhibition showcased the works of three renowned designers: Issey Miyake, Greg Lynn, and Scholten & Baijings. I was charged with the task of designing a gallery space for Japanese fashion designer, Issey Miyake, utilizing podiums of various sizes to showcase a small collection of fashion, lighting, and furniture pieces, as well as a monitor for a video display. The final arrangement displays the pieces in a ‘U’-shaped configuration that surrounds visitors as they approach the collection. The items are separated by typology to allow a coherent progression through the space. Each item is also displayed at its own height in order to individually frame each piece.


A - Floor Plan B - Elevation C - Exhibit Photos (credit: Art Institute of Chicago)

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