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N IPPON N EWS V OLUME 1, I SSUE 1

A PRIL 5 TH , 1860

J APANESE E MBASSY ’ S ARRIVAL TO S AN F RANCISCO The long waited

ing ship. Shortly after be-

arrival of our very own

tween sheets of fogs the USS

Japanese Embassy has

Powhatan was standing be-

ended. The USS Powhatan

fore us in all its glory.

had docked in the San Francisco Bay on the 29th of March, as its first stop. Crowds of people and a Japanese flag which hangs proudly on shore welcomed them. The press and other journalists battled for space to report their arrivals. Not before long, gunshots were heard, signaling the incom-

The ship first began its journey February 9th. A stop of thirteen days in Honolulu, Hawaii was made, along with a visit from Queen Emma of Hawaii. The three officers of the Japanese Embassy are Masaoki Shinmi, Norimasa Muragaki, and Tadamasa Oguri. The three ambassadors were met with the seventy-seven Samurai Bodyguards. The Samurais were sent just four days before the ambassadors were, and they arrived two weeks before they did. They came to San Francisco

in one of Japan’s first navy ships, Kanrin Maru. The Kanrin Maru is currently being repaired by the United States for its battle against the violent winds along the Pacific. So the Kanrin Maru will not be taking the Ambassadors to their next stop, but return to Japan on the 5th of April. The original plan was altered and the Japanese Embassy will yet again take the USS Powhatan to their next stop, Panama.

A picture of the United State Navy Ship

A picture of the Japanese Navy Ship

USS Powhatan

Kanrin Maru

WAS

J APAN

O PENING ITS DOORS A GOOD OR A BAD THING ? BY: TIFFANY COOPER

S EE M ORE AT PAGE 3

This is a picture of the Three Ambassador of Japan

(From left to right) Masaoki Shinmi, Norimasa Muragaki and Tadamasa Oguri.


N IPPON N EWS

P AGE 2

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Nama Sushi Different Culture, Same Thought Lilian Chan Nippon News 1860

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V OLUME 1, I SSUE 1

P AGE 3

Article 2- “Was Japan Opening its Doors a Good or a Bad Thing?” According to many Japanese, they think that the Open Door Policy is unfair. But yet us Japanese have to agree. We were forced to open our doors against our will. Many Japanese felt that because of Commodore Matthew C. Perry the sudden unexpected and unwelcomed change in our Japanese government and society occurred that should have been stopped. But we were so engrossed and fascinated by Perry's "black ships" that it quickly provided a sense of urgency for critics of Japanese isolation. Since the early 1600s we had declared ourselves officially closed to the West with the exception of still importing and exporting goods with the Dutch at Nagasaki. But, because of the arrival of the American warship, the Kanrin Maru, a number of Japanese people thought that it would be easier to remove the barriers that we had set up to block out trade with the West and acquire western knowledge. Many thought that it was a bad idea and

Phony Peace Plead For Trade Lilian Chan Nippon News 1860

opposed it but we really had no choice but to open our doors because we were. But when you really think about it, we have benefited greatly from it. We now think of it as a good thing that we opened our doors to the outer world but there are many that still feel differently. In an effort for us to preserve our sense of power and respect, the Tokugawa government organized the first Embassy to the United States. I think that our main purpose was to figure out how the Americans thought and to formalize relations between the United States and Japan. I am positive that the most memorable part of our journey was that we got to be a personal audience for President James Buchanan. That was the best experience ever. So for now we are elated with the idea that we agreed to open our doors to this wonderful country! The Japanese embassies toured the country and were greeted with lavish parades in large cities like New York. Oh, how wonderful we looked when we arrived in San Francisco; marching down Broadway Street with Japanese and American flags flapping in the breeze. Everywhere we went; newspapers carried quite a number of articles about our somewhat “peculiar” Japanese envoys. I hope that for many years to come we are known as celebrities that captured the American imagination. The main issue of our journey was that if the Tokugawa government could adapt the “modern” ways of the west and still function under its own dilemma of having a internal political issue. But as for now we are greatly enjoying our stay here in San Francisco in the beautiful land of the United States!


Bibliography Article 1 Ambassadors Photo: Norimasa Muragaki, Norimasa (Translated by Miyoshi, Shigehiko). Diary of the First Japanese Embassy to the United States. Tokyo: America-Japan Society, 1920. Article 1 USS Powhatan Photo: USSPowhatan. 2 Nov. 2009. flickr. 11 Feb. 2010 <http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobswanson/4069843906/>. Article 1 Kanrin Maru Picture: Kanrin Maru 150th Anniversary Celebration. 20 Nov. 2009. Kanrin Maru 150th Anniversary Celebration Committee. 11 Feb. 2010 <http://www.kanrin-maru150.com/>. Article 1 Information: First Japanese Diplomatic Mission History. 3 Feb. 2010. Consulate-General of Japan in New York. 8 Feb. 2010 <http://www.ny.us.emb-japan.go.jp/150japanny/en/history.html>. Norimasa Muragaki, Norimasa (Translated by Miyoshi, Shigehiko). Diary of the First Japanese Embassy to the United States. Tokyo: America-Japan Society, 1920. Advertisement 1 Photo: Sukiyaki/Shabu Shabu" Japan-i. 2008 <http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.japan-i.jp/food/ sukiyakishabushabu/d8jk7l00000397cy-img/d8jk7l00000397ds.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.japan-i.jp/food/ sukiyakishabushabu/index.html&usg=__KMIs_YCHqDQBNHDv7RUhVXN5okY=&h=480&w=640&sz=470&hl=en&start=11&u m=1&itbs=1&tbnid=COpbUHoeoMuIbM:&tbnh=103&tbnw=137&prev=/images%3Fq%3D1860%2Bjapan% 2Bfood%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG%26tbs%3Disch:1> Advertisement 2 Photo: "Diecast Model Replicas." 2002. <http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.mdiecast.com/ pictures/sunstar/1860.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.mdiecast.com/productinfo.php%3Fmodel_id% 3D695&usg=__BaVjiwKvJJbIl80sp42Veq8fiQk=&h=321&w=640&sz=34&hl=en&start=1&um=1&itbs=1&t bnid=7f1kqGw1dyuTSM:&tbnh=69&tbnw=137&prev=/images%3Fq%3D1860%2Bcars%26um%3D1% 26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG%26tbs%3Disch:1> " Article 2 Information: Sandow, Bob. Lock Haven University, Department of History, Political Science, and Economics. 22 February 2010 <http://www.lhup.edu/rsandow/1860embassy.htm> Page 4

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