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_K E R R Y F R A N K

PORTFOLIO 2016

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_COVER ART

THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE RESULTS OF A PINHOLE PHOTO TAKEN ON THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CAMPUS.


_CONTENTS 01

RESUME

45

PATH VOID

02

REFERENCES

46

FACETED LEGS

03, 04

MIXED MEDIA

47, 48

URBAN STUDY / SALTILLO DISTRICT

05, 06

SKETCHES

49, 50

URBAN PLAN

51 - 54

07

VOID STUDY

08

PLANAR ABSTRACTION

55

MAP / MARFA, TX

09

FIGURE STUDIES

56

PINHOLE CAMERA

10

ROCKITE CAST

57, 58

PINHOLE PHOTOS

11

MICROPROGRAM

59, 60

STAR TOWER

12

URBAN STOP

61 - 64

AMTRAK MARFA

PERFORMANCE

65 - 72

LOWELL WORK

13, 14 15

IMAGE IMITATION

16

FREE HAND

17, 18

WOOD JOINT

19, 20

FREE TAILED BAT

21

BAT PATTERNS

22

DIGITAL VAULTS

23, 24

ANALOG VAULTS

25

BURST*003 HOUSE STUDY

26

MODULAR ABSTRACTION / BAT TEETH

27, 28

BAT PLATFORM

29, 30

BAT INFO CENTER

31

CARBON

32

BOTTA / EXISTING

33, 34

BOTTA / LIBRARY ADDITION

35, 36

SOUTH CONGRESS READING PAVILION

37

THE FUTURE OF THE LIBRARY

38

SOCO LIBRARY / CONCEPT

39, 40

SOCO LIBRARY

41, 42

EVENT MASS

43, 44

STACKS WALL

URBAN HOUSING / MARKETHAUS

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_KERRY FRANK

RESUME CONTACT

kerryfrank@utexas.edu E 1.847.987.5376 T 806 W. 24th St. #312 A Austin, TX, 78705 SKILLS Personal Leadership, Work Ethic, Flexibility Client Meetings, Communication Spanish Fluency, Design Passion Digital AutoCAD, Revit, 3dsMax Rhino, Grasshopper Microsoft Office Adobe Creative Suite Sketchup, Podium Lasercutting, Digital Workflow Analog Sketching, Drafting, Painting Mixed Media, Model Making Woodshop RECOGNITION ‘15 ‘15 ‘15

Distinguished College Scholar Published, ISSUE:011 Brandon Shaw Memorial Endowed Scholar ‘15 Engineering Scholarship Recipient ‘14 Henrietta King Endowed Scholar ‘13 Nominated, Design Excellence VOLUNTEER ‘14, ‘15 ‘14, ‘15 ‘10 -’13 ‘09 -’13 ‘06 -‘13

AIA Austin Homes Tour UTSOA Undergrad Mentor Willow Creek Food Pantry Snowflake Youth Leader ALS Tag Days Fundraiser

OBJECTIVE To obtain an internship in the design field as an opportunity to learn and positively contribute to our rapidly changing and increasingly important built environment. EDUCATION The University of Texas at Austin Bachelor of Architecture B. S. Architectural Engineering Spanish Minor

2013 - 19 Austin, TX

WORK LPA, Inc. Intern Architect Worked on projects from the San Diego Unified School District’s design guidelines to large targeted development offices and retail. Assisted in design and technical work, schematic design to CD’s. Lowell Management Services Intern Architect Worked on projects from remodels to 9,000 sf custom lake homes. Participated in all stages of the design/ build process: producing elevations, plans, and interiors, and participating in client communication. Earned the respect and responsibilities of a licensed professional. Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Tour Docent, Youth Camp Leader Led groups of 10-20 on tours of Wright’s Home and Studio. Provided expertise on the architect’s life and work.Taught elementary kids about architecture and FLW. Assisted with the construction of models and drawings of home and city designs.

Summer 2015 San Diego, CA

2014 - Present Lake Geneva, WI

2006 - 14 Oak Park, IL

Current NCARB Hours / 920

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REFERENCES Scott Lowell

Owner, Lowell Management slowell@lowellmanagement.com

Todd Cauffman

Architect, Lowell Management tcauffman@lowellmanagement.com

David Gilmore

Principal, LPA dgilmore@lpainc.com

Eric Jones

Associate, LPA ejones@lpainc.com

Kate Mraw

Associate, LPA kmraw@lpainc.com

Laura Andrews

Interiors Project Manager, LPA landrews@lpainc.com

Shannon Greve

Director, Youth Services, FLW sgreve@flwright.org

Oscar Mathis Alexandra Stevenson Ty Gorman

Technical Director, General Kinematics omathis@generalkinematics.com Art Teacher, Barrington High School AStevenson@barrington220.org Vice Principal, Barrington High School TGorman@barrington220.org

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_MIXED MEDIA PERSONAL ENDEAVOUR 2011 - PRESENT A constant outlet for personal exploration and challenge, my art varies greatly in size, materials, media, subject matter, and composition. Though ultimately directionless, my work centers on the line between abstraction and reality, studying the interconnectivity of forms, ideas, and realities and testing the capabilities of color, materal, and layering. 03


04


_SKETCHES PERSONAL ENDEAVOUR 2012 - PRESENT Sketching is a constant activity in my design process and life. Often scribbling while note-taking or traveling, I doodle anything from abstract compositions to remodels, concept studies to personal visions for empty lots. Ultimately, sketching and doodling keeps my design process sharp and constant, but also playful and imaginative.

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06


_VOID STUDY FALL 2013 INSTRUCTOR / JOYCE ROSNER Beginning with a solid prism, simple rectilinear volumes were carefully subtracted from the greater whole, defining individual spaces while simultaneously redefining the understanding of the whole. Although conceived on the scale of a glass of water, it is easy to see how the drawings could be a schematic parti for buildings of a much greater scale.

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PLANAR ABSTRACTION_ FALL 2013 JOYCE ROSNER \ INSTRUCTOR Flipping the solid / void narrative, planar surfaces such as paper and chipboard were challenged to embody the same qualities that were achieved with the void study. By allowing planes to visually define volumes and subtractions without fully enclosing them, the planar abstraction is a jumping point for the ability to tectonically construct stereotomic volumes.

08


_FIGURE STUDIES FALL 2013 INSTRUCTOR / JOYCE ROSNER As a means of dissecting human proportion, anatomical relationships, and occupied / implied space, nude models were studied and drawn given varying time intervals, allowed media, and formal drawing techniques. The drawings developed a greater personal understanding of a human’s formal characteristics, structure, and interactions with their surroundings.

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ROCKITE CAST_ FALL 2013 JOYCE ROSNER \ INSTRUCTOR Continuing early study of solid / void relationships, the process of casting concrete required a reverse perspective. Rather than considering the final solid, casting called for designing the void. The cast was then a surprise, due to having only a vague idea of how the placing of bubble wrap and plastic containers would dissolve the beginning rectangular prism.

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_MICROPROGRAM FALL 2013 INSTRUCTOR / JOYCE ROSNER Expanding the stereotomic narrative to the built environment, simple activities were studied for their visual, physical, and perceived spatial requirements. From these sectional implications, mass was carved to accomodate and enhance the experience of the microprogram, considering light and view. The result is more a conceptual composition than practical space.

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URBAN STOP_ FALL 2013 JOYCE ROSNER \ INSTRUCTOR Given a busy downtown Austin intersection, the task was to create a void subtraction from the corner of a building that might accomodate a multitude of activities and people. Thinking practically about the potential functions desired of a street corner, I decided to focus on the programs of gathering, taking respite, and observing. The lower space is outfitted with large overhangs to provide shade, allowing pedestrians to escape the sun or view their phone screens. Additionally, vast bench masses provide space for rest or large group conversation. These spaces lead to the more individual ‘room’ above that encourages escape from the hustle of the city by allowing separation and elevated views, a perfect space to read the newspaper with a morning coffee. 12


_PERFORMANCE

Shade, Circulation, Variable Space SECTIONS

FALL 2013 INSTRUCTOR / JOYCE ROSNER NOMINATED / DESIGN EXCELLENCE Performance takes a hypothetical building envelope for an urban lot and carves voids for large concerts and public space. Beginning with a diagrammatic study of people moving in concerts relative to built constructs, mass was removed providing spaces of varying sizes, views, and levels of involvement. Working to engage the city in a meaningful way, the corner is removed for a public gathering space complete with seating and an arcade-like ‘front porch’. From this entry, pedestrians are encouraged to either embark down to the large crowd arena or up to an intimate and separate view of the performance and city beyond. Completed by large apertures in the roof plane, the space provides shade during the day and promotes acoustical performance and community engagement by night, directing sound out to the crowd and city, and splaying light on surrounding buildings capturing the attention of passersby. 13

Movement, Light, Sound, Architectural Constructs CONCERT STUDY


PERSPECTIVES Experiencing a Concert

MODEL Playing with Light and Shadow 14


_IMAGE IMITATION INSTRUCTOR / JOYCE ROSNER FALL 2013 After capturing a photo that used light to define positive and negative space, the task became rendering the same qualities in a tonal graphite reproduction of the photo. Due to the cropping of the image in addition to the prescribed size of the drawing, the final result is less of a reproduction and more an arrangement of black, white, and the gray scale.

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TOOL DISSECTION Operation, Structure

FREE HAND_ INSTRUCTOR / JOYCE ROSNER FALL 2013

CONSTRUCTED PERSPECTIVE Intersecting Volumes

Prohibited from use of straight edges, rulers, triangles, and any drafting equipment, these drawings were challenges in technical skill as well as the ability to visually communicate with nothing more than line and lineweight. Ultimately the drawings are also an exercise in effective compositon, learning the best ways to arrange objects in space. 16


_WOOD JOINT INSTRUCTOR / JOYCE ROSNER FALL 2013 Through study of finger joints and the way two hands are joined, ideas of material connection were reconsidered. Defining actions became form driver for the wood joint, tailored to the limitations of the wood. The result is a greater understanding for the importance of the smallest details and how to build to fit both the concept and reality. BLIND CONTOUR STUDIES 17


Interlock, Clasp FORMAL ABSTRACTON 18


_FREE TAILED BAT INSTRUCTOR / BRETT GREIG SPRING 2014 As a means for exploring natural structure, pattern, and climate / site specificity, the Mexican Free Tailed Bat, current resident of Austin’s South Congress Bridge, was studied using various media and perspectives. Discoveries made became the inspiration and formal spring point for a viewing platform and an information center to folllow.

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MIGRATION PATTERN STUDY Local, Regional, Annual

SITE SECTIONS 20

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_BAT PATTERNS INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG SPRING 2014 Through digital scaling and manipulation of certain features of bat anatomy, patterns were made emphasizing natural proportions, but abstracting so far as to obscure any relationship to the original anatomical drawings. Later evolution of the project led to watercolor pattern paintings focusing on color theory and creating effects like spatial depth.

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DIGITAL VAULTS_ INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG SPRING 2014 Moving one step furter, simplified versions of the bat patterns went on to inspire the plan and structure of repeatable digital vaults. Furthering digital model making techniques and lineweight fluency were main goals of the simple project which resulted in a large arcade of legs that become fairly reminiscent of bat wings, though originally derived from bat tooth anatomy.

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_ANALOG VAULTS INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG SPRING 2014 To encourage fluency in both digital and analog means of designing, the Rhino-created vaults were reconstructed by hand as perspectives and a physical model. Having both physical and digital understanding of the design allowed the best means to encouraging physical manipulations and the abililty to test experiential qualities.

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_BURST*003 HOUSE: STUDY INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG SPRING 2014 The Burst*003 House was a concept by GAuthier Architects. Both built for a site and additionally for exhibitions, it was a ground-breaking prefab housing design intended to be adjusted to each site’s environmental considerations. My studies focused specifically on how the home interacts with the ground as well as how the orientation of its many axes relate to its unique solar and weather conditions. Although a technical assignment, the drawings would inspire the way the bat platform and information center would interact with their site.

25


MODULAR ABSTRACTIONS / BAT TEETH_ INSTRUCTOR / BRETT GREIG SPRING 2014 Along a separate branch of formal abstraction, the bat tooth was iterated into a modular element. When repeated, the collection could take on many forms dependent on orientation of connection as well as its structural dependencies. The variability of planar orientation combined with the strength of triangulated structures would carry on to be the basis for the structure of the bat platform.

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29


_BAT PLATFORM INSTRUCTOR / BRETT GREIG SPRING 2014 Inspired by anatomical studies, the platform for nightly viewing of the bat departure from the South Congress Bridge took on a light, wing-like form, connecting observants to new vantage points without obscuring current views from the park or affecting current parkland. Only touching ground on currently fenced off areas, the platform adds additional public space to the beautiful park that is not only useful for the summer event, but all year for great skyline views, shade, and taking a break from the park trail.

FINAL MODEL Creating New Vantage Points 27


EXPERIENTIAL SECTION Viewing, Engaging

FINAL MODEL Wing-like Structure 28


Maximizing Natural Temperature Control SITE DESIGN

_BAT INFO CENTER INSTRUCTOR / BRETT GREIG SPRING 2014 Continuing the exploration of form begun by the bat platform, the information center pushed the winglike structure to respond to site and environmental considerations. The new building reshapes land to better route water to the river, configures roof planes to direct natural cooling and heating effects through the building, minimizes solar heat gain through glazing orientation, and reclaims area of the park that had been left to waste. Programmatically, it contains public restrooms, an exhibition space, and a visitors center. Springing from an elevator connecting the bridge to the park, these three spaces were nestled under the roof with specific relations to each other, the views, and the park path. Concept, Refinement, Reality FORMAL DEVELOPMENT

SECTION Programmatic Separation 29


Reclaim Unused Land, Connect SITE PLAN

FINAL MODEL

Progression of Space / View PERSPECTIVES 30

33


_CARBON INSTRUCTOR / ALLISON GASKINS FALL 2014 Natural morphology was studied as a way to conceptually consider additions and renovations. Of my particular interest was that a large group, like allotropes of carbon, contains such great diversity in appearance and structure, yet share the same element. These drawings are abstract representations of existing allotropes of carbon, with the fourth being a morpological possiblity, a layered, liquid carbon. This ‘morphological possiblity’ is a metaphor for an addition. It is not important that an addition match the existing structure, but rather that it speaks the same language as what was there before.

GAS

LIQUID CARBON Morphological Possibilty 31

DIAMOND

GRAPHITE


DIAGRAMMATIC AXON Intersection / Compositon of Ideal Proportions

BOTTA / EXISTING_ INSTRUCTOR / ALLISON GASKINS PARTNER / COLE WENDLING FALL 2014

SITE PLAN Local, Regional, National ‘Sitedness’

The Bianchi House at Riva San Vitale is a home designed by Mario Botta in 1971. Not known for its function, the home was more an exercise in ideal proportions. In searching for the morphological origin of the home, our group found that the home seemed to be about a perfect moment in time. It was the cleanest expression of pure geometries constructible at that time. A composition of intersecting volumes that prescribed the golden proportions set off a bridge away from reality, the house contrasted the imperfection of an untamed landscape. 32


_BOTTA / LIBRARY ADDITION INSTRUCTOR / ALLISON GASKINS PARTNER / COLE WENDLING FALL 2014 With the understanding that the concept guiding the Bianchi house was more about ideal proportions and moments in time, our addition was seen as the most ideal thing that could be built now. Conceptually, we suspended a large, ‘perfect’ glass cube from the existing building. Continuing the proportional intersections of form that are seen throughout, the cube is not entirely occupiable, but intersected with the main home. An extension of the existing truss bridge pulls a resident into the addition, a large, all glass space revolving around a three story book chamber, picking up on the infinitum of the bridge. Similar to the book chamber, a powder room completes a previously unfinished geometry of the opposite corner. Though the structure is neither practical nor actually ‘perfect’ in a Euclidean view, neither is the existing house. Both the addition and the house are perfect pieces for a moment in time; visually striking, they speak the same language.

CONCEPT Ideal Proportions, Diagram-fueled Form

SECTIONS Introducing a New Volume 33

PLAN


34

37


SITE ANALYSIS AXON Traffic, Pavement, Tree Cover, Topography

_SOUTH CONGRESS READING PAVILION INSTRUCTOR / ALLISON GASKINS FALL 2014 Continuing a semester study on reading, learning, and public engagement, the South Congress Reading Pavilion is an occupiable shade structure located on a currently blank lot in one of Austin’s busiest shopping and dining districts. Designed as a nexus of gathering, sharing, and learning, the structure is a symbolic connector of the residential communities and the visitor population of South Congress. Elevated above a large public stage, the pavilion provides separate spaces for individual reading, group readings and performances, book and bike storage, and simple park space, using large moments of circulation and intersection to connect the disparate programs. The resultant design allows pedestrians to be a place apart or a part of place, allowing opportunity for individual engagement and opportunity, a key quality for places of learning and social interaction.

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Connecting Urban / Residential, Tourist / Local CONCEPT

Intersecting Program and Circulation CONCEPT MODEL

Balancing Individual / Group SECTION PERSPECTIVE 36

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CONCEPT DIAGRAM / SITE ANALYSIS

_THE FUTURE OF THE LIBRARY INSTRUCTOR / ALLISON GASKINS FALL 2014 Given the pace of technological evolution combined with busier and more disconnected lives, its seems that the cultural stronghold of the library may actually be fading away. After researching libraries of maintained communal importance, it became apparent that a library must offer more than simply books to have the same cultural impact it once had. Looking specifically at a South Congress Library, the reality was that the future of the library is not only a library but a community center, a living room, a community catchall, in addition to a space that fosters maintenance, creation, and sharing of knowledge.

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SOCO LIBRARY / CONCEPT_ INSTRUCTOR / ALLISON GASKINS FALL 2014 Taking cues from environments of learning in my life, I was inspired by the arrangement of neighborhoods. As a child, home was a place of individual learning, while the space between home and my neighbors was a zone of mutual interest, sharing, and understanding. The street was a connector for all neighbors to come together or separate their spaces. Conceptually, the neighborhood had great relevance to how programs should be laid out in a library, offering variable amounts of space and flexibility and defining edges, but allowing for individualization and interaction to thrive.

Negotiating Program with Scale and Concept SECTION DIAGRAMS

Neighborhood Arrangement / Circulation, Variable and Permanent Program CONCEPT STUDY 38


_SOCO LIBRARY INSTRUCTOR / ALLISON GASKINS FALL 2014 PUBLISHED / ISSUE: 011 Designed for the future, the South Congress Library looks at what a library should be: a piece of social infrastructure, a place between home and work, and a reinforcer of community. By bridging South Congress, the library encourages participation in the sharing and creating of knowledge while also defining the neighborhood through its display of information and activity. Acknowledging the evolution of technology, the library aims to create flexible space for the diversity of programmatic needs. Spaces of variable size focus inward to the central courtyard, promoting sharing and community gathering. The bridge acts as a divider and connector, assigning distinct locations for static and dynamic programs, small and large groups, and a wide variety of user-defined activities. Through unobstructed sightlines and spatial relationships, the library promotes interaction and cross-pollination of activity. Uniquely situated in response to the personality of the neighborhood, the library anticipates the needs of a growing city, to connect its users and provide them with resources.

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_EVENT MASS INSTRUCTOR / KORY BIEG, MARLA SMITH FALL 2014 An exercise in Rhino form-making and Revit rendering, the resultant mass with its occupiable but striking angles captured the drama of a performing arts center. Though a quick project, the spaces and light qualities created became quite intriguing.

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_STACKS WALL INSTRUCTOR / KORY BIEG, MARLA SMITH FALL 2014 Learning the capabilities and limitations of Revit’s screen wall and component editing, this project took a simple box frame with variable projections and mapped it across a large surface, creating an unprogrammed jungle gym full of possibility. Envisioned as an inhabitable bookcase, its simplicity and variability permits quite a bit more.

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_PATH VOID INSTRUCTOR / KORY BIEG, MARLA SMITH FALL 2014 In learning the basics of 3ds Max rendering and material creation, this simple form challenged materials to imply the programmatic use of the void. A netting surface could imply a bird sanctuary, while a stonelike material might be suited for rock climbing, and a metal wall might act like an inhabitable Serra-like structure.

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FACETED LEGS_ INSTRUCTOR / KORY BIEG, MARLA SMITH FALL 2014 As a first attempt with Grasshopper definition creating, this large, faceted structure alternates perceived function by simply its orientation in space. It could be a sculptural shade structure on the beach, public bleachers and steps to the train in the city, or a fun, illuminated gathering area and support structure beneath an overpass.

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PEABODY TERRACE STUDY

I35 LIGHT / STRUCTURE STUDY

LARGE DEVELOPMENT SITES / AUSTIN

_URBAN STUDY / SALTILLO DISTRICT INSTRUCTOR / DEAN ALMY SPRING 2015 Spending an entire semester with urban design, the study began by gathering data and understanding historical precedent. Specifically dealing with the Saltillo Neighborhood in East Austin, a rapidly gentrifying and growing urban transit oriented development, mapping analysis focused on the disparity between current and future conditions, and the ideal perspective of sustainable growth versus the reality of the situation. Ripe for destruction by corporate desire, poor planning, and zoning limitations, the culturally rich and historical neighborhood is in need of a reevaluated master plan. Additionally analyzing the urban housing project of Peabody Terrace for its high density and unique layout, these diagrammatic studies set the basis for an urban growth plan and urban housing project. 47


PLANNED DEVELOPMENT / SALTILLO DISTRICT

EXISTING BARRIERS / SALTILLO DISTRICT

IMMEDIATE CONDITION / SALTILLO DISTRICT 48


_URBAN PLAN INSTRUCTOR / DEAN ALMY PARTNERS / MAXWELL BAIRD MCKENZIE EDWARDS YEE SANG WONG SPRING 2015 Confronted by economic, social, and political pressures, the Saltillo Neighborhood in East Austin is bound to change within the next ten years. Tasked with envisioning what growth might be, our team decided to break with trends we have been seeing and focus on what could be done to create a more successful urban environment. After studies into the neighborhood’s best and worst features, we boldly altered infrastructure in three ways to allow development of a purposeful urban fabric. Redirecting the existing lightrail, reducing its speed, and adding a stop would increase use of public transportation, free up land, and promote a vibrant street. Honoring the old rail line, a pedestrian path would connect downtown and East Austin by linking to the Waller Creek development, furthering the ‘chain of parks’. Finally, removing the berming beneath I35, and redirecting the frontage road, we created a welcoming transition without allowing downtown to sprawl. Being mindful of cultural hotspots, building volumes were arranged, scaled, and programmed to create diverse, responsible urban environments. Comparing statistics with the existing plan, our proposal increased public space from 2.5% to 34% and housing units per acre from 40 to 72.5. In attempting to be mindful of Austin’s future without forgetting the rich past of the Saltillo Neighborhood, our project is a conceptual look at how large-scale planning might contribute to a city that successfully responds to rapid population growth without undermining existing communities. 49

ABSTRACTED GROUND EXPERIENCE


SITE PLAN / SECTIONS Building Envelopes, Street Typology, Intended Program, Urban Public Space

50

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_URBAN HOUSING MARKETHAUS INSTRUCTOR / DEAN ALMY SPRING 2015 In the face of population growth, sprawl, and gentrification in Austin, MarketHaus is a study on how housing might reclaim and revive unused areas, restitch urban fabric, and maintain culture while being adaptable to changing needs of the city. Embracing the developmental and cultural lines created by I35, the project occupies property adjacent to the highway and space created by the removal of berming beneath it, attempting to increase porosity and define a welcoming threshold to East Austin. A repurposed existing building, permeable and inhabitable graffiti art wall, and a light, unprogrammed vertical structure interact three dimensionally to create spaces of varying scales, privacy, and programmatic capabilities. Formally proportioned to its existing and projected future surroundings and permeated by enhanced means of circulation, the structure is simply an occupiable grid allowing a inhabitants to personalize their own space within. Programs as distinct as boutique hotels and offices, shops and apartments, studios and four bedroom townhomes could exist in a diverse neighborhood of spaces, customized by their inhabitants and protected by a manipulatable skin of screens for privacy and environmental control. Grounded by the hypostyle hall under the highway offering opportunities for markets, concerts, events, and public gathering, MarketHaus shows how more adaptable and integrated urban housing and infrastructure might create a more lively, diverse, and connected environment for living. 51

MASSING DIAGRAMS


CONCEPT SECTION 52


Connecting Downtown, Repurposing Wasted Opportunity SITE PLAN / SECTION

53


PLANS

Public Space, Unit Variability, Historic Preservation PERSPECTIVES 54

57


SHADE STUDY

_MAP / MARFA, TX INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG FALL 2015 In an attempt to grasp the complexity of Marfa, TX, sanborn maps along with current data were studied and graphic maps were created to piece together the evolution of this cultural mecca. Information was compiled and layered to highlight underlying relationships and patterns. Collectively, the exercise gave greater understanding as to how to further develop downtown. THRESHOLD STUDY 55

BUILDING / TOPOGRAPHY STUDY


PINHOLE CAMERA_ INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG FALL 2015 Using photography as a medium to explore the intricacies of light and shadow, a pinhole camera was designed to capture and manipulate the intense light of Texas. Fabricated from lasercut plywood and walnut, the camera works for film and paper photography with lens filters that can be arranged to have varying effects on light entering through the three pinholes. 56


_PINHOLE PHOTOS INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG FALL 2015 All taken with the pinhole camera, this collection shows a range of subjects, exposures, sun conditions, and filters. Though most are too abstracted to see the true subject, the compositions alone are interesting studies on the relationship between positive and negative space. By obscuring reality, the image is left with the feeling, which is often more meaningful.

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_STAR TOWER INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG FALL 2015 Inspired by the ‘event’ culture that persists in Marfa, the design for a stargazing tower aimed to celebrate the sky and landscape of Marfa. Composed of four legs capable of moving and growing, the tower can adjust to focus its apertures on intersellar events, to stretch its nets so visitors could lay and view the sky, to provide shade during the hot summer, or to follow a sunset. By providing a variable tower, each night is an event different than the last, every visit is special, and when it’s over the tower recedes into the ground. A simple metaphor for life in Marfa. Occupiable nets in the center provide a communal gathering space while platforms sprung from the scalable legs provide individual respite. Picking up on the industrial aesthetic of the town, the legs are rugged trussed structures that run on tracks, dependent on each other as well as tensile forces to stand. The net too would be variable based on the tension placed on it, acting sometimes as a wall to lean on and other times as a hammock to lie in.

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_AMTRAK MARFA INSTRUCTOR / JUDY BIRDSONG FALL 2015 With Marfa’s growing popularity, the possibility of adding an Amtrak station is becoming realistic. With the removal of a market, residents and visitors lack a space to gather away from museums and hotels in the city. Amtrak Marfa stitches together communal spaces through a station and market hall, defining the heart of downtown and the social ‘living room’. Concerned about desert sunlight, the roof was designed to formally and conceptually connect the public realm, picking up on steel roofed surroundings and using apertures to indicate path and function beneath. Under the roof, variation in the ground plane and small occupiable volumes create more private spaces, and moveable partitions allow the market hall to be divided or open for events. Wholely customizable, Amtrak Marfa can host the desires of the town and provide a space for everyone to come together.

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CONCEPT SKETCH Circulation, Aperture, Zones

MARKET PLAN Path, Porosity, Variability of Size, Scale

SHADE STUDY Sun Paper Capture of Acutal Shade Quality 63


ROOF STUDY

Shade, Dividers, Circulation MARFA MARKET

Programmatic Variety, A Place for Everyone, Light Control MARFA’S LIVING ROOM 64


_LOWELL WORK MENTORS / TODD CAUFFMAN, SCOTT LOWELL SUMMER 2014 - PRESENT Beginning the summer following my first year in architecture school, I was fortunate to be employed by a design-build firm in Lake Geneva, WI, Lowell Management. Specializing in luxury custom homes in Southeastern Wisconsin, the company is known for their quality of construction and timeless, traditional designs. Given a small architecture staff and large quantity of incoming work, I have been able to make significant contributions to the company’s portfolio over the past two years. Although originally working on interior details and builtins, after two weeks I was fully imersed in the entire design process from schematic design to construction drawings. The following imagery is a collection of the projects for which I have headed design direction either through floor plans, elevations, interior details, or any combination of the three. In addition to the design opportunities gained, the internship has given me great exposure to the residential construction industry. I am knowledgeable in practical construction techniques; I understand the design-build process; and I am capable of participating and contributing in client meetings as well as those with construction superintendents.

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Lakeland Builders Association Homes Tour 2016 HILLTOP SHINGLE STYLE 66


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COUNTRY FARMHOUSE


CABIN IN THE WOODS

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HILLSIDE SHINGLE STYLE 69


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LAKESIDE MANOR

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CLIFFSIDE COTTAGE

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_K E R R Y F R A N K E kerryfrank@utexas.edu T 1.847.987.5376

Kerry Frank | Portfolio 2016  
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