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Join us in Kernville

Map of the Flat on page 10-11

February 14-17, 2014

February

2014

Whiskey Flat, Californiia

FREE

Enjoy the old-fashioned fun as Kernville returns to the 1860’s for

Whiskey Flat Days! Town mayoral race has begun Old west town returns to life

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper Let your mind go back in time, back 150 years when the California was a state only 12 years old, when large portions of it were still Spanish land grants. The mighty Kern River splashed unfettered by concrete, dams or controls of any kind, down to a swampy San Joaquin Valley. The swampland down below, a vast area known as Tulare Lake, was full of tule reeds and was home to millions of birds. In those days, there was little travel in the San Joaquin Valley itself because of the almost impassable land. Travel existed mainly in the foothills, where rivers and streams still had to be forded, but riding by horseback or muleback was much easier. Gold had been discovered at about the same time California had become one of the United States. Gold seekers came from every corner of the world, many by sailing ship into the port of San Francisco. They streamed overland into the interior portions of California. Gold was rumored to have been discovered at a place where two forks of a big river met, a place called the Kern River Valley. They streamed over the Greenhorn Mountains that formed the western boundary of the valley, their wagons slowed on the downhill side by

Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Cheers - To mayoral canadates “Nickel and Dime Nicole” and “Rango Rocky Stone”

Exactly where was the town of Old Whiskey Flat? Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper A lot of visitors wonder, as they enjoy Whiskey Flat Days in the town of New Kernville, exactly where the town of Old Kernville was. They know the original location is out in the lake bed, but where was Whiskey Flat? A clue to where Whiskey Flat was is the old part of the Kern River Valley Cemetery, which was a part of Old Kernville originally and is now part of the town of Wofford Heights. big logs cut for that purpose. They came in mainly through Keyesville and down over the route that is now State Highway 155. In the year 1860, a man by the name of Adam Hamilton was one of those who made the trip over the Greenhorn Mountains. He was an American entrepreneur who decided to make himself a bit

Wofford Heights is adjacent to the former site of Old Kernville. Wofford Heights is named after an old-time rancher by the name of Irven Wofford, who sold off part of his ranch to valley folks who needed new places to live when the lake went in during the early 1950s. Old Kernville was located just to the northeast of Wofford Heights. Look in the lake bed just south of the Old Cemetery and you’ll see foundations. Those were part of Old Kernville. There are still people in New Kernville who of money by selling what many of the miners craved after a hard day’s work – a drink of spirits. So he led his burro laden with two barrels of whiskey down the eastern side of the Greenhorns. He had heard about a gold strike at the bottom of the gulch he was travel-

See Old West pg. 6

can tell you what buildings those foundations belonged to. Many of them serve as docents at the Kern Valley Museum in Kernville, just down from the post office. In years when the lake is higher, you can’t see the foundations at all. They’re covered by the waters of Isabella Lake. But in lower water years, the former location of Old Kernville/Whiskey Flat is visible again. The lake recedes and little sandy flat where Old Kernville was becomes much as it was, with the placid Kern River as it did in the old times.

Wild West Encampment rides into town

pages 6 & 7

With “Nickel and Dime Nicole” counting her nickels and dimes to come up with enough to buy one dollar bribes and “Rango Rocky Stone” wearing a hat big enough to fit the whole town of Kernville, the Whiskey Flat Mayor’s race has begun. Each year the Kernville Chamber of Commerce holds Whiskey Flat Days and the pretend mayor’s race to raise the opperating funds needed for the year. Meet the Mayor Candidates Rango Rocky Stone’ Rocky Stone, a Native American Tubatulabal Indian, was born in Onyx in 1953 and raised in the Kern River Valley and attended Southfork Elementary school in Weldon and graduated from Kern Valley High School. Rocky and his wife Judi have a very large extended family of children and grandchildren in the Kern Valley. He is employed by Next Era Energy Solar Plant at Kramer Junction and spends his leisure time working at the White Blanket property. He is also an active team roper. "Rango Rocky Stone" is campaigning for Whiskey Flat Mayor selling bribes to support two organizations that represent the rich heritage of the Kern Valley. The first is the Tubatulabal tribe. The Tubatulabal Indians are the original inhabitants of this beautiful valley and have been working diligently for years to preserve their language and culture, along with obtaining national recognition for their tribe. The second is the Kern

INSIDE:

2

Make sure that you know all the Whiskey Flat gun requirements.

4 5

What the heck is this riches to rag publication?

Dicover the town that Holywood found in the 1920,s

9

The fun starts with the Whiskey Flat Calendar of events

15

Learn how to fix up some cowboy grub so’s you won’t starve.

19 The frogs are hoppin” at Whiskey Flat

See Mayors pg. 4

Whiskey Flat Daze Wild West Rodeo on pages 16-17


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February 2014

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Whiskey Flat Celebration 2014 Weapons Carry Regulations For anyone wanting to carry a weapon during the Whiskey Flat Days celebration, a weapons and ammunition check is required. There will be a weapons check station at the corner of Piute and Big Blue Road Kernville and for enactors it will be at the "Sheriff's" tent in Whiskey Flat Camp (across from the rodeo grounds) Thursday evening though the weekend. Those carrying weapons in the Whiskey Flat Parade can have a weapons check at parade line up/check-in on Saturday morning starting at 9 a.m. Each participant must sign a release agreeing to the following rules: 1. Safety is our prime concern; for the re-enactor and the viewing public. 2. Read and acknowledge your right and responsibilities under AB-144 and PC 26350. 3. In order to be eligible for weapon carry, participants must be in period costume and participating in the parade or organized event as authorized by the Kernville Chamber of Commerce, such as costume contest, WFD Encampment, etc. 4. Handguns must be carried in a holster. No "belt" carrying allowed. 5. No live ammunition to be carried in the weapon or on your person at any time. If live ammunition is found, that individual will not qualify for "open carry" for this event and the Sheriff's Department will be notified and the applicant will be so advised. 6. Dummy ammunition only. Spent primers are preferred. Participants with live primers will have to demonstrate that the cartridge contains no

powder. 7. For those participants engaging in 'Gunfight' routines, blank rounds should only be chambered just prior to the routine, and removed immediately after it concludes. 8. Participants will be issued a ribbon indicating that they have agreed to the restrictions listed above and those required by law (AB-144 and PC 26350). This ribbon should be displayed prominently on the participant's costume above the waist. The ribbon means that the weapon with or without blank ammunition, confirmed as "dummy" type ammunition "for show only" has been checked by authorized designee appointed by the Chamber and the participant has read/signed the required waiver. 9. Weapons carrying participants may be subject to random checks by the Kern County Sheriffs Department to confirm they are in compliance with the above regulations and AB -144. All parade and Whiskey Flat Days open carry gun checks are provided as a courtesy service to the Kernville Chamber and at all times, are subject to any directives and/or restrictions of the Kern County Sheriff's Office. Kernville Chamber of Commerce and gun check personnel will not be held responsible for any gun display or use beyond that whichis permitted by the weapons carry regulations or state law. Weapons carrying participants may be subject to random checks by the Kern County Sheriffs Department to confirm they are in compliance with the above regulations.

Message from the Kern County Sheriff's Office On January 12, 2012, a new law was enacted in California related to the open carry of unloaded handguns. The new law, PC 26350(a)(1), makes it a misdemeanor to openly carry an unloaded firearm in public. Local law enforcement is committed to keeping the residents and visitors of Kern County safe and secure. They have also committed to enforcing both the spirit of the law as well as the letter of the law. They recognize the long time tradition of the Whiskey Flat celebration. It is the intent of local law enforcement to enhance the safety of both the spectators and those participating in the celebration. This will require a commitment of the Kernville Chamber of Commerce in cooperation with the Sheriff's Office to notify the public attending the Whiskey Flat event. Penal code 26375 states, "Section 26350 does not apply to, or affect, the open carrying of an unloaded handgun by an authorized participant in…[an] event, when the participant lawfully uses the handgun as part of that production or event, or while the participant or authorized employee or agent is at that production or event, or rehearsal or practice for that production or event." The Kern County Sheriff's Office will require the following: 1. On Saturday, February 15, 2014 during the

parade and events on Piute Street, the public will be exempt from PC 26350 providing they and their weapon have been checked at an official inspection site and are visibly wearing the proper identifying marker indicating their weapon has been inspected. Or 2. They are a member of an officially recognized reenactment group performing during the event; and their weapon has been checked at an official inspection site and are visibly wearing the proper identifying marker indicating their weapon has been inspected. Or 3. They are within the Whiskey Flat encampment; their weapon has been checked at an official inspection site and are visibly wearing the proper identifying marker indicating their weapon has been inspected. Law enforcement has the authority to inspect weapons upon demand, make arrests; issue citations and seize weapons as evidence if the law is violated. It is the Sheriff's Office's intent to insure the visitors and participants of the Whiskey Flat celebration adhere to these requirements in order to provide a safe environment for all in attendance.

There is nothing more exhilarating than to be shot at without result. --Winston Churchhill (1874-1965)

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Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

February 2014

page 3

Like Martin the mule, the Law Office of Phyllis

M. Hix team is looking forward to helping you solve your legal problem. We'll be in the office from our rides, Monday thru Friday, 9am to 3pm Call us at 760-376-3761 or see us at 112 Buena Vista, Kernville, CA 93238 Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Hoofin’ it - Equestrian units are always a crowd pleaser at Whiskey Flat Days.

You can find us between Ewings Rapid and the Kernville Bridge with over 1,000' of Private Shoreline! Every site is equipped with water and electric (most include sewer)... no generators here! Our downtown location is easy and convenient for our guests to explore the restaurants and shops. Come visit us today to take a look around and book your next vacation to the Kern River Valley! Monthly (Long term) Sites are Available

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Mrs. Tuttle has had to close her tea and ale house on the far outskirts of Whiskey Flat temporarily because of a severe mattress shortage. “We like to serve our tea and ale to those rough miner boys on pure down mattresses,” said Mrs. Tuttle.

“Straw pallets just aren’t good enough for us.” Her 19 serving girls are out of work, she explained, until some new mattresses can be procured. “Some of them girls just really love to peddle their tea and ale on nice mattresses,” she said, “and they just can’t wait to get back to work.

B e t t y B ’s J u s t i n Ty m e Cottages in Historic Kernville 2 & 3 bedroom comfy Cottages 80 & 82 Sirretta St. Kernville. Stay 2 nights, 2 weeks or more. Located steps from the Kern River, Parks, Shops, Diner’s, Taverns, Museum & Adventure Tours. Completely furnished cottages w/satellite TV, Private fenced yards, Driveways & BBQ areas-Child and pet friendly. Visit our website for pictures and rates. bettybsjustintyme.com Cell: 714-814-3720 Local:760-376-4677

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What in the heck is this riches to rag publication? The publication you’re holding is called the Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper. It’s published once year, especially for the Whiskey Flat Days festival. And this is our 10th year! In 2004, then Kern Valley residents Dolly Ogawa and Allyn Amsk started this little gem of a paper, followed shortly thereafter with the introduction of the Kern River Courier. Back then today’s publisher, Michael Batelaan, was the Production Manager for this upstart paper. Other papers had come and gone and they said this one would never last, but here it is, ten years later! In 2009, Michael Batelaan and Michael Devich purchased KRV publishing and all its publications from Ogawa and Amsk, who had decided to leave the Kern Valley for other pursuits. They were both experienced newspaper men who relished the idea of promoting the Kern River Valley and all of its virtues. Then in 2011 Devich decided to retire, leaving Batelaan alone to keep the dream alive. Batelaan’s goal is to highlight the advantages of visiting and living in the Kern River Valley. For a few days every February, Kernville residents pretend it’s the 1860-1864 era of the Gold Rush, when the town went by its original name, Whiskey Flat. The Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper has always been put out by the folks who publish the Kern River Courier, a weekly newspaper in Wofford Heights. If you like this Claim Jumper, be sure to check out the Courier. It’s a free newspaper, available for pickup all over the Valley every week. Each week the Courier is also posted on the internet so up to date Kern River Valley information can be assessible to you if you aren’t able to pick up a paper. Or if you want the convenience of getting the Courier in your mail, you may want to subscribe. Get the Kern River Courier in your mailbox every week and find out what’s happening here in the beautiful Kern River Valley. It’s only $65 a year. Here’s a list of some of the Courier folks and friends who contributed to this year’s Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper. (If your name isn’t here, forgive us!): Michael Batelaan, Sara Wakeman, Val Minoux, Robert Bowman, Bodfish Bob, the folks at the Kernville Chamber of Commerce, and too many others to list. The Kern River Courier and Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper love to hear from its readers. If you’d like to make a comment on the Claim Jumper or get a hold of us at the Courier, here’s our contact information: Mail: P.O. Box 1145, Wofford Heights, CA 93285. Phone: (760) 3762860. Fax: (760) 376-2862. E-mail: office@kernrivercourier.com.

Call Fred @360-904-8812

CARQUEST AUTO PARTS WESTERN AUTO

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Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

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Mattress Shortage causes Mrs. Tuttle’s Tea and Ale house to close

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Valley 4H Club which is lead by many hardworking volunteers including retired Kern Valley High School agricultural teacher Gerald Wenstrand. The dedication of 4H insures that our storied agricultural past is alive and well in the hearts and minds of our Valley youth. Rango Rocky Stone says that "Every town needs a hero, and every story deserves a happy ending." "Nickel and Dime Nicole" Nicole Kent's family moved here when she was seven years old and she attended Southfork Elementary, Wallace Elementary and Junior High. She began playing saxophone at the age of nine and was the youngest member to ever join the Kern Valley Orchestra at age 12. At Kern Valley High School and played on the tennis team, took part in Academic Decathlon and was a member of FHA-HERO. In her senior year, the family moved to Oregon and Nicole played in an award winning marching band. Nicole got her first job at age 14 washing dishes at Frank's Diner and soon became a waitress. She worked at Frank's until he took over Nelda's where she followed. After high school Nicole moved back to her "home town," the Kern Valley and worked at the Superior Court in Lake Isabella

and Frank's Diner. She now is a banker at Alta One FCU. Nicole is in the band White Lightning that plays at the Kernville Saloon. Playing in the band is her favorite thing to do because she shares her love for music with her two favorite guys, her dad James on the drums and her boyfriend, Peter on the bass. The band is like a big family. Nickel and Dime Nicole is selling bribes to support the gazebo in Circle Park and for the Kern Valley chapter of Small Miracles that helps parents in the struggle when they deal with cancer in their children. Small Miracles Foundation accumulates the resources to assist families meet their daily challenges. What the Whiskey Flat mayors race is all about In 1991, the Kernville Chamber was having trouble getting Whiskey Flat Mayor candidates. Then Chamber president, Lanny Borthick got the idea of splitting profits with charitable organizations. The group then agreed on a 60/40 split with 60 per cent going to the Chamber. "That 60 percent promotes local business, promotes tourism, and keeps the visitors coming," said Cheryl Borthick, the current Kernville Chamber President. "An organization makes more money in a six week period than any other way. Whiskey Flat Days is the biggest four day event in the county."

K

continued from pg. 1

Mayors

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

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February 2014

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Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

February 2014

page 5

Movie Street

Old Kernville made for Western films Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Old Kernville was a real Old West town, but in the late 1920s, after its Old West day had passed, Hollywood discovered the town as the Western movie craze grew. The town responded to accommodate the increasing numbers of crews arriving to shoot movies by building a special street parallel to Old Kernville’s main street especially for them. The late Bob Powers, in his book “North Fork Country,” wrote about Movie Street: “Movie Street in Old Kernville was a replica of a typical frontier main street. Originally called Granite Street, it was about two blocks long

and ran north-south along the hill west of town. The Methodist Community Church and the grade school were at one end, and a large barn on the A. Brown property closed the other end of the street. The fronts of other buildings (the backs of which were only shells) were built, including, on one side, a general store, assay office, jail and livery stable. On the other side stood a blacksmith shop, saloon, dance hall, hotel and harness shop. It was hard to realize when walking along the street or viewing the set in movies that many of these buildings were only propped up like billboards.” “On this street gallons of ‘blood’ were shed and from the large old cottonwood tree in the schoolyard, many

a hangman’s noose swung.” In the evenings, many of the movie’s stars and crew would take part in local community activities in Old Kernville. Sometimes they would form a baseball team with the likes of Roy Rogers, Humphrey Bogart and John Huston filling the positions. Powers says in his book that other famous movie stars seen in the valley over the years included Dale Evans, Gabby Hayes, Yvonne DeCarlo, Victor McLagen, Audie Murphy, Andy Devine, Tom Mix, Hoot Gibson, Hopalong Cassidy, Gene Autry and Harry Carey. The Mountain Inn, at the time the only hotel in Old Kernville, served as headquarters for the film companies.

More history is to be found at museum Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

We hope you enjoyed reading about Old Kernville. There are many more historical photos than we could possibly use, and lots of stories and artifacts and maps and all kinds of good stuff at the Kern Valley Museum in Kernville. It’s not hard to find-- it’s across the street from Alta One Credit Union on Big Blue Road. If you like exploring the history of this area (and there’s a powerful lot of history here), the museum is a good place to start. Join the Kern River Valley

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Whiskey Flat Weekend Friday February 14th thru Monday 17th

Historical Society. They can tell you how at the meeting, because they run the place. If you want some great history, pick up Bob Powers’ books (he wrote nine of them) at the library, or Marge Powers will be selling them again at Whiskey Flat Days. Ardis Walker’s books are a requirement, too. Ken Wortley was another. A memoir of Old Kernville just before the lake went in is available, if you want to read about what the place was like. It’s called “River Children,” written by Barbara Hinkey and Pat McPherson. You can get it at http://www.riverchildren.net/

Wimmer’s

Many local people served as doubles, stand-ins and extras in the movies. Some working as extras donned cowboy costumes for a chase scene one day and then Indian costumes the next day for that side of the chase. Irven Wofford, owner of the ranch that would someday become Wofford Heights, provided much of the livestock for the films as well as wagons, buggies and other equipment. He also acted in some of the films. A list of films wholly or partially shot in the Kern River Valley is available at the Kern Valley Museum in Kernville. The list was assembled by the late Billy Couch, at the time the curator of the museum. Powers was also a curator of the museum.

9:00am to 6:00pm Riverside Park Basketball Court The Elks Lodge & Ladies of the Elks will be servin’ up mouth waterin’ Tri-Tip BBQ Sandwiches Hot Links Hot Dogs Water & Sasparilla All proceeds after bills,go to support the Elks charities, which include scholarships and other youth activities & Veteran’s needs in VA Hospitals.

Live Music 8-10pm Friday Night, Feb 14 •••

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Open 11:00am to 11:00pm


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February 2014

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Old West

continued from pg. 1 ing down. It was some mighty well-paying ore, and there were a lot of miners working in a mine called the Big Blue. So Hamilton found the center of the mining camp, found a plank of wood, set it across his two barrels and started selling his whiskey. Unfortunately, the spot he picked was in the middle of folks who did not care for the evils of spirits. They asked him to move his makeshift bar away from that spot, and he did. The spot he picked was on a little sandy flat next to the river, now more placid than it was higher up in the mountains. The miners started moving their own camps down closer to his establishment. As the ones who enjoyed a tipple now and again gravitated there, a town started to grow. That town was called by several names, but the one that stuck was Whiskey Flat. Four years later, things had changed a lot. A new county, Kern County, had formed. There were houses and hotels in the town, some eating houses and a few stores. There were real streets, a dry goods store, a feed stable, some saloons, a blacksmith shop and a brewery. The town was now too civilized to be called Whiskey Flat any more. So it was renamed. The name that they chose was Kernville. Kernville in its original location existed for almost 100 years. It survived the years when the gold ran out. The citizenry switched to ranching and similar pursuits. Kernville saw the coming of hydropower plants put in to serve the electricityhungry city of Los Angeles. The area was later discovered by Hollywood as an ideal place to make Western movies, and from time to time, stars like Tom Mix, Roy Rogers and Hopalong Cassidy could be seen here. John Wayne came here to shoot a scene for the classic “Stagecoach.” WWII came and went, and then the Kern

Experience the Whiskey Flat historical Encampment Find out what it was like in the 1800’s. There is a chuck wagon with cookin’ and coffee, ax throwing, period tool demonstrations and more!

The Indian camp will show you the Native American experience, fire pit cooking authentic foods, Native American games, crafts, and artifacts from the past!

See Old West pg. 14

WELCOME TO WHISKEY FLAT DAYS Come visit us at the

KERN VALLEY MUSEUM

Celebrate Valley History with the Kern River Valley Historical Society You will find artifacts and memorabilia which make the history of this valley come alive. Native American Objects • Gold Mining • Lumbering • Farming • Ranching • Western Movies • Gift Shop and Art Gallery. Museum HoursThursday ~ Sunday, 10am to 4pm ADMISSION IS FREE

49 Big Blue Road, Kernville (760) 376-6683 (Next to the Post Office)

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Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Encampment Cast & Credits ~ Event directors ~ Producer: Mike Woodward, Lone Star Productions Whiskey Flat Camp Director: Dave Ryskamp Mountain Man Camp & Indian Camp Director: Horse Robinson and Kate Devries Whiskey Flat Camp Manager: Francis Moore Mountain Man Camp Manager: DeeDee Moore Miner & Sawmill Camp Manager: Perry Steinhoff Safety Officer: Francis Moore Story Telling Coordinator: Dave Ryskamp Weapons Check Coordinators: Dave Ryskamp, Francis Moore, Dean Marshall ~ Groups represented ~ Lone Star Productions, Native American Indians, Old West Mounted Lawmen’s Assoc, Breckenridge Buckskinners, Blacksmithing, Gold Mining Sawmill & Small Engine Historians, 1st North Carolina Calvary, LawDawgs, Sweetwater Outlaws. Thanks to the Folks that help make Whiskey Flat Encampment possible Kernville Chamber of Commerce for on-going assistance. Mike Ludiker for our Web Page USFS for camp wood Kern County Sheriffs Department for outstanding cooperation and support. Kern County Sheriffs SAL Kids Chuck Barbee for Documenting the History of the Valley in "Wild West Country" on DVD.

Sunday Feb. 16. The Encampment is across from the Whiskey Flat Encampment is back. It's Rodeo Grounds down in the "Flats" by the hard to believe this year is the 11th anniver- River. There will be three camps for your The Whiskey Flat Camp, sary of Lone Star Productions Whiskey enjoyment: Flat Encampment. Every year the Mountain Man Camp, and the Native American Indian Encampment Camp. These has grown and attractions show last year it was you the real estimated that Whiskey Flat and on Saturday have been a feathere were ture of Whiskey upwards of Friday: Noon to sundown Flat Days celebra5,000 visitors Saturday: Immediately followtion for a decade treated to ing the Parade to sundown now. absolutely periSunday: 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Encampment od correct expeIt’s an educational encampis designed to give rience by over ment with authentic demonstrathe whole family a 100 re-enactors. tions of life in the Old West! On glimpse at what life This Camp Friday and Saturday at 2 and 4 may have been like promises a very p.m., and Sunday at 11 a.m, back in the 1800's. unique historiyou’ll see history and gunfights. Camp activities cally accurate All day there will be a Wells will be interactive experience for Fargo station and eatery, Chuck and there will be the whole family wagon cook'n and coffee, a many opportuniagain this year, horse trader and livery. There’ll ties to speak with says Mike be horse shoe'n and horse docthe residents of Wo o d wa r d , tor'n, the Whiskey Flats Saloon, Whiskey Flat, Producer of a Justice of the Peace, a Saddle Mountain Men, Whiskey flat maker and leather craft, a Bath and Native encampment. house, Beautifier and Hygienist, American Indians We even have a storytellers of the Old West, from the 1800's. surprise or two mining and sawmill demonstraCome smell the in mind for the tions and a Civil War Cowboy Coffee new and repeat Confederate camp! Old West and experience life visitors. This church on Sunday at 10 a.m. as the Pioneers Camp is dynamic did. Old Fashion and offers new Train Service experiences begins from the every year. When: February 14 thru the 16 during Museum to the Whiskey Flat Encampment. The Whiskey Flat Encampment will feaWhiskey Flat Days. Camp events begin at Noon Friday Feb. 14 and ends at 2 p.m. ture hold-ups and gunfights, immigrant Lone Star Productions

Encampment Schedule

wagon with period music, cowboy cookin', horse tradin', livery and wagon sales, blacksmithing and handmade trinkets, horse shoein' and horse doctorin', Whiskey Flats Saloon with dancing girls, Justice of the Peace and old west church service on Sunday at 10 a.m., saddle maker and leather craft, old west chuck wagon, old saw mill and mining demonstrations and story tellers of Old Whiskey Flats: Stories acted out by real actors and actresses of how Miners, Cowboys and Outlaws got along (or didn't get along) in the old days. A Hold-up or two of the scheduled coach service to the Whiskey Flat Camp will thrill the Coach Riders (or scare 'em to death). The Native American Encampment led by Horse Robinson will include authentic crafts, Native American hand games, Native American food, demonstration on basket making, beading, regalia making, and other items, drumming, singing, dancing, speaking in local native language, Native American cultural displays using artifacts from their ancestors, and actual building of the huts from natural native resources. There will be a display and Information of the local native plants used by Local Native Americans and activities throughout the day and constructed houses used in the 1800's by the Native Americans in this area, an open fire pit used for cooking and a story teller of Native Americans from the Valley. The Mountain Man Camp will include Fur trading, Tee Pee's, trapping and hunting demonstrations, period cooking demonstrations, mountain man shelters, winter camp and clothing. For further information and a schedule of events go to whiskeyflatcamp.org/ or on Facebook 'Whiskey Flat Encampment"

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page 7

Encampment’s 11th year

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376-6131 HOURS: 6am to 9pm Whiskey Flat Weekend

HOME COOKED FOOD FOR OVER 200 YEARS


page 8

February 2014

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Coming soon

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Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

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Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

February 2014

page 9

Calendar of Events

Whiskey Flat Days

1 p.m. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show

This schedule of events is subject to the information available to the Claim Jumper and the Kern River Courier at press time. All event times and locations are subject to change at any time without notice. Events may be canceled, postponed and/or rescheduled at any time due to weather, or any other circumstances beyond the control of the Kernville Chamber of Commerce, its independent entertainers, vendors, volunteers and groups involved.

“ ”

No matter where you ride to, that’s where you are.

Friday February 14 7 a.m. Breakfast All 'Round the Valley

Find your favorite eatery. In Kernville, there is Cheryl's Diner, Cracked Egg Café, El Rio, Jacalito's, Big Blue Bear, and breakfast items are available at Sierra Gateway and Primo's.

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Kern Valley Museum

Open on Big Blue Road next to the Post Office. Historical Society, mining info, Indian exhibits, artifacts and photos from yesteryear when Kernville was Whiskey Flat, 1857.

High Noon Golden Gulch opens.

Circle Park, Frontage Road, Riverside Park. Crafts, handmade jewelry, info booths, art and more! Food vendors are non-profit organizations: Kern Valley FFA, Sweet Adelines, Tubatulabal Indians, Rotary Club of KRV, Elks Lodge, and Mt. View Baptist Youth Group. Whiskey Flat Headquarters and Info is on the corner of Kernville Road and Tobias Street selling Whiskey Flat shirts and memorabilia. Pick up your Claim Jumper, Whiskey Flat Miner and the most "upto-date" Schedule of Events!

Contest Applications available

At Kernville Chamber info booth: Adult Costume Contest Child Costume Contest Pet Parade Contest Whiskerino Contest Epitaph Contest: Tombstones on display at the Encampment. Check ‘em out!

In Riverside Park.

5 p.m. Schoeppner Carnival opens

on Kernville Road, across from Pizza Barn, by the Forest Service Work Center. Great adult and children's rides and games. Chills and thrills. Save 50% on presale tickets: sales throughout the Valley until February 16! Open until 10 p.m.

Dinner is served

All around town at all your favorite restaurants.

7 to 9 p.m. Street Dance

On Piute Drive. Music by "Obsidian." Bring yer lawn chair and dancing shoes!

7 p.m. Whiskey Flat Melodrama

The Treasure of Shiver River, by Sierra Performing Arts. Kernville Elementary School Auditorium, $7/adults, $5/kids under 12. Cheer the hero, hiss the villain! You’ll laugh! you’ll cry!

Children's Activities Riverside Park:

by the Wild and Scenic Kern River Children can fish in the "Fish Tank" by Friends of the Hatchery. Amazing Bounce, with bounce houses, Monkey jump by Kiddie Amusements, and roll on water with Bubble Fun!

When you’re tryin’ somethin’ new, the fewer people who know about it, the better.

11 a.m. Whiskey Flat Days Parade

Boots, Belles and Bulls 157th anniversary of the Town of Whiskey Flat, a.k.a. Kernville. Sierra Way at Kernville Road. Awards given at 2:30 p.m. at Circle Park Center Stage. Get yer spot early! Parade Schedule: National Anthem, 2014 Grand Marshals, “Harley” Charlie & Jeanette Rogers-Erickson, 2013Whiskey Flat Honorary Mayor, "T. Totalin’ Tony", 2014 WFD Mayor candidates, Nicole Kent, "Nickel & Dime Nicole" and Rocky Stone "Rango Rocky", Special VIP guests and delightful parade floats! Parade announcer, Geoff Emery, KUZZ Radio. Parade route: From Sierra Way and Kernville Road, south. Across the bridge to Kern River Drive by Riverside Park. Around Riverside One Stop and up to Kernville Road to Tobias. Then Piute Drive to Big Blue Road and end at Kernville United Methodist Church, Big Blue Road and Sirretta Street.

Saturday February 15 7 to 10 a.m. "Breakfast"

$7 a plate, tickets at the door. Kern River Masonic Lodge, 562 James Road, Kernville. Turn uphill past Sierra Gateway Market. Always a favorite breakfast: get there early!

8:30 a.m. VIP Parade breakfast Kernville Chamber.

Circle Park, Frontage Road, Riverside Park. Crafts, handmade jewelry, info booths, art and more! Food vendors are non-profit organizations: Kern Valley FFA, Sweet Adelines, Tubatulabal Indians, Rotary Club of KRV, Elks Lodge, and Mt. View Baptist Youth Group. Whiskey Flat Headquarters and Info is on the corner of Kernville Road and Tobias Street selling Whiskey Flat shirts and memorabilia. Pick up your Claim Jumper, Whiskey Flat Miner and the most "up-to-date" Schedule of Events!

Cowboy and Mountain Man Encampments, on Scodie Avenue across from the Rodeo Grounds. Life in the Old West! Save the leather on yer boots and catch the Western Express Railway Train in town and ride to the encampments. Watch hold-ups and gunfights, horse shoein' and horse doctorin', turn of the century saw mill demonstrations. There's cowboy cookin', a Whiskey Flats Saloon, and Old West Mercantile Shoppe, shot gun weddings, saddle makin' and leather craft, and more! Story tellers, Dave Ryskamp, Dave "Horse" Robinson, and Nathan Eddy will tell stories about miners, cowboys and outlaws. Open til sundown.

On Big Blue Road next to the Post Office. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Historical Society, mining info, Indian exhibits, artifacts and photos from yesteryear when Kernville was Whiskey Flat, 1857.

Never follow good whiskey with water, unless you’re out of good whiskey.

9 a.m. Golden Gulch opens

Noon to Sundown Whiskey Flat Encampment

Kern Valley Museum Opens

9 a.m. 2012 WFD Parade Line Up On Sierra Way.

Children's Activities Riverside Park:

By the Wild and Scenic Kern River Children can fish in the "Fish Tank" by Friends of the Hatchery. Amazing Bounce, with bounce houses, Monkey jump by Kiddie Amusements, and roll on water with Bubble Fun!

Schoeppner Carnival opens

On Kernville Road, across from Pizza Barn, by the Forest Service Work Center. Great adult and children's rides and games. Chills and thrills. Open until 10 p.m.

Trout Hatchery Opens

Museum and Visitor Center 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sierra Way, one mile north of Kernville. Free admission.

High Noon Whiskey Flat Encampment

Immediately following the Parade. Cowboy and Mountain Man Encampments, on Scodie Avenue across from the Rodeo Grounds. Life in the Old West! Save the leather on yer boots and catch the Western Express Railway Train in town and ride to the encampments. Watch hold-ups and gunfights, horse shoein' and horse doctorin', turn of the century saw mill demonstrations. There's cowboy cookin', a Whiskey Flats Saloon, and Old West Mercantile Shoppe, shot gun weddings, saddle makin' and leather craft, and more! Story tellers, Dave Ryskamp, Dave "Horse" Robinson, and Nathan Eddy will tell stories about miners, cowboys and outlaws. Open til sundown.

1 p.m. The Rock Bottom Boys

Immediately following the parade. A new millenium vaudeville approach excites and entertains all with their spine tingling four part harmonies, homespun vocal styling, boot stomping music and well-seasoned showmanship. Check ‘em out at Circle Park!

Makin’ it in life is kinda like bustin’ broncs: you’re gonna get thrown a lot. The simple secret is to keep gettin’ back on.

1 p.m. Whiskey Flat Days Rodeo

McNally's Rodeo Arena. Cotton Rosser's Flying-U Rodeo sponsored by Bud Light. Open Team Roping, Bull Riding, Hide Race, Open Barrel Race, Junior Barrel Race, Calf Scramble, Sheep Riding, and more. Entertainment!! Sponsored by Bud Light and Alta One.

1:30 p.m. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show Cowboys and Indians exhibition at Riverside Park.

See Schedule pg. 12


page 12

February 2014

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Calendar of Events

Whiskey Flat Days Schedule

Children's Activities Riverside Park:

continued from pg. 9

Always take a good look at what you are about to eat. It’s not so important to know what it is, but it’s critical to know what it was.

2 p.m. "First Heat" of the Frog Jumpin'

Contest held at Piute Drive by Center Stage. Watch "Pie ala Toad" and "Sir Richtoad" compete, along with many more frogs. Bet on the Jumpin'est Frogs in the West! Finals Sunday at 11:30 a.m. Free admission.

2:30 p.m. Parade awards

At the announcer's stand in Circle Park.

3 p.m. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show Riverside Park.

3 p.m., 4 p.m. & 5 p.m. The Rock Bottom Boys

A new millenium vaudeville approach excites and entertains all with their spine tingling four part harmonies, homespun vocal styling, boot stomping music and well-seasoned showmanship. Check ‘em out at Circle Park!

7 p.m. Whiskey Flat Melodrama

The Treasure of Shiver River, by Sierra Performing Arts. Kernville Elementary School Auditorium, $7/adults, $5/kids under 12.

Don’t worry about biting off more than you can chew. Your mouth is probably a whole lot bigger ‘n you think.

7 to 9 p.m. Street Dance

On Piute Drive. Music by Obsidian. Bring your lawn chair and dancin’ shoes!

Sunday February 16

7 a.m. Breakfast All 'Round the Valley

Find your favorite eatery. In Kernville, there is Cheryl's Diner, Cracked Egg Café, El Rio, Jacalito's, Big Blue Bear, and breakfast items are available at Sierra Gateway and Primo's.

9 a.m. Golden Gulch opens

Circle Park, Frontage Road, Riverside Park. Crafts, handmade jewelry, info booths, art and more! Food vendors are non-profit organizations: Kern Valley FFA, Sweet Adelines, Tubatulabal Indians, Rotary Club of KRV, Elks Lodge, and Mt. View Baptist Youth Group. Whiskey Flat Headquarters and Info is on the corner of Kernville Road and Tobias Street selling Whiskey Flat shirts and memorabilia. Pick up your Claim Jumper, Whiskey Flat Miner and the most "up-to-date" Schedule of Events!

by the Wild and Scenic Kern River Children can fish in the "Fish Tank" by Friends of the Hatchery. Amazing Bounce, with bounce houses, Monkey Jump by Kiddie Amusements, and roll on water with Bubble Fun!

Whiskey Flat Days Rodeo

McNally's Rodeo Arena. Cotton Rosser's Flying-U Rodeo sponsored by Bud Light. Open Team Roping, Bull Riding, Hide Race, Open Barrel Race, Junior Barrel Race, Calf Scramble, Sheep Riding, and more. Entertainment!! Sponsored by Bud Light and Alta One.

2 p.m. Old Fashioned Whiskerino Contest

9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Whiskey Flat Encampments

Cowboy and Mountain Man Encampments, on Scodie Avenue across from the Rodeo Grounds. Life in the Old West! Old West Church Service today at 10 a.m. Save the leather on yer boots and catch the Western Express Railway Train in town and ride to the encampments. Watch hold-ups and gunfights, horse shoein' and horse doctorin', turn of the century saw mill demonstrations. There's cowboy cookin', a Whiskey Flats Saloon, and Old West Mercantile Shoppe, shot gun weddings, saddle makin' and leather craft, and more! Story tellers, Dave Ryskamp, Dave "Horse" Robinson, and Nathan Eddy will tell stories about miners, cowboys and outlaws.

“ ”

You can’t always tell a gunslinger by the way he walks.

10 a.m. Schoeppner Carnival opens

On Kernville Road, across from Pizza Barn, by the Forest Service Work Center. Great adult and children's rides and games. Chills and thrills. Open until 10 p.m.

Trout Hatchery Opens

Museum and Visitor Center 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sierra Way, one mile north of Kernville. Free admission.

Kern Valley Museum Opens

On Big Blue Road next to the Post Office. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Historical Society, mining info, Indian exhibits, artifacts and photos from yesteryear when Kernville was Whiskey Flat, 1857.

11:30 a.m. "Final Heat" Frog Jumpin' Contest

Held at Piute Drive by Center Stage. Watch the Jumpin'est Frogs in the West! These are the finals: Cheer on your favorite Jumpin' Frog. Free admission.

Sponsored by Val's Beauty Shop. Sign up by 1 p.m. Piute Drive by Circle Park.

Pet Parade

Five Categories: WFD's Theme, Matched Pair, Smallest, Largest, Funniest! Grand prize and ribbons awarded - Free. Sponsored by Critter Sitters.

Any time a large herd moves through a civilized area there’s a lot of #?@%! to clean up.

3 p.m. 2013 Honorary Whiskey Flat Mayor Announced!

Who will be the 2014 Whiskey Flat Mayor? Piute Drive by Circle Park. Drawings: Who will win candidate’s raffles and the $500 shopping spree?

3 p.m., 4 p.m. & 5 p.m. The Rock Bottom Boys

A new millenium vaudeville approach excites and entertains all with their spine tingling four part harmonies, homespun vocal styling, boot stomping music and well-seasoned showmanship. Check ‘em out at Circle Park!

Monday February 17 9 a.m. Golden Gulch opens

Circle Park and Frontage Road, free admission.

Children's Activities Riverside Park:

By the Wild and Scenic Kern River Riverside Park by the Wild & Scenic Kern River.

High Noon Lots of Contest Sign Ups!

10 a.m. Schoeppner Carnival opens

Pet Parade Sign Ups!

1860's Costume Contest sign ups. Adults and children forms at WFD Info Booth. Judging starts at 12:30 p.m. Forms at WFD Info Booth. Judging at 2 p.m. Pet Parade sponsored by Critter Sitters.

12 p.m. The Rock Bottom Boys

A new millenium vaudeville approach excites and entertains all with their spine tingling four part harmonies, homespun vocal styling, boot stomping music and wellseasoned showmanship. Check ‘em out at Circle Park!

12:30 p.m. Old Fashioned 1860's Costume Contest

Adult categories include Frontier Lady and Man, American Indian Lady and Man, Fancy Lady and Man, Authentic Indian Dress, Modern PowWow, Best Overall Family. Children categories include Frontier Girl and Boy, American Indian Girl and Boy, and Fancy Girl and Boy. Prizes awarded. Entry is free.

1 p.m. Sign Ups for Whiskerino Contest

Whiskers, beards, all mustaches apply. Ribbons awarded Free to enter! Forms at WFD Info booth.

On Kernville Road, across from Pizza Barn, by the Forest Service Work Center. Great adult and children's rides and games. Chills and thrills.

If you’re gonna drive cattle through town, do it on a Sunday. There’s little traffic and people are more prayerful and less disposed to cuss at you.

Ya'll come back, now next year, ya hear?!


Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

February 2014

page 13

Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Mayor race - Many fundraising events are hosted by mayor candidates.

Store: 760-379-2041 Cell: 760-549-3330

For your family of animals,from hounds to horses,pigs to poultry and lots in between If what you need is not already in stock we will gladly order it for you. Delivery Available 6400 Lake Isabella Blvd. Lake Isabella across from the Senior Center

Store: 760-379-2041 Cell: 760-549-3330

Hours: Monday, thru Friday 8:00am to 6:00pm Saturday 9:00am to 5:00pm Sunday 12:00am to 4:00pm

Lake Isabella’s Full Service Rv Resort • Free Ice Cream Social, Outdoor Movie Night, Pancake Breakfast* *summer season • From Tents to Cabins • OHV ride in/out • Rates vary by claim size • Outdoor Camper Kitchen • CampStore & onsite beer/wine pub • Great family fun and more... 15627 Hwy 178 Weldon, California

lakeisabellakoa.com

Ring: 1-800-562-2085


page 14

February 2014

Old West

continued from pg. 6 River Valley saw something new coming in that changed the face of it forever. Kernville was told its days were numbered. Residents who had grown up here, some whose families had been here for generations, were told they had to move away. A government flood control reservoir was coming into the Kern River Valley. The citizens of Kernville were told they had to move to higher ground or have their houses by covered by the rising lake. Kernville refused to lose almost 100 years of history. Many of the citizens of Kernville decided to move en masse to higher ground a few miles to the north, onto the former Burlando Ranch, where they could establish a new Kernville. By the early 1950s a new Kernville stood. Some of the original buildings from Old Kernville were moved there; others were newly built. The people of New Kernville picked up their lives and started a new history. But the citizens couldn’t forget the original town’s old history, a colorful Gold Rush past that was matched by very few communities. So the townspeople decided to hold a yearly celebration in the winters when times were slower and people could enjoy the fullWestern

mountain experience and remember the Gold Rush times. Each year the townspeople of New

Kernville put on their Western duds and prepare to greet the many thousands of visitors who come to join in the celebration that celebrates the 1860-64 days of Whiskey Flat. People come from all over to see the Whiskey Flat Days Grand Parade and the shoot-’em-up shows, take part in the many contests such as the old-time costume contest or the frog jumpin’ contest, partake of the carnival rides, enjoy the shenanigans of the Honorary Whiskey Flat Mayor contest (during which the candidates try to out-joke each other), eat some great food, or just walk around and enjoy the clean mountain air in one of the nicest little towns you’ll ever see. People flock to the Kern Valley Museum to see photos of the original Kernville, maps of the area before the lake was here, and displays featuring the history of the Indians called this area home long before settlers came. Want to see some of the other original buildings from Whiskey Flat? Go to Silver City Ghost Town in Bodfish, where they moved a lot of local old-time historical buildings in order to save them. Enjoy the music, the parade, the oldfashioned contests, the mountain views, even the weather as we celebrate the era of 1860-64 all over again, when Old Kernville was Whiskey Flat.

Kernville Carriage Co. Advertising • Weddings Transportation • Events Serving the Kern River Valley Mike Woodward

310-480-4252 kernvillecarriageco.com lonestar@kernvalley.com

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Curb appeal -

The Whiskey Flat Days Grand Parade takes place on the Saturday morning of Whiskey Flat Days.

Town loves a parade Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

The Whiskey Flat Days Parade started about the fifth year of the festival in 1961. John E. McNally was master of ceremonies that year, and he announced the parade for many years before he passed away in 2007. Lloree Knowles, a local real estate agent, organized the first parade and was chairman for many years. Over the years, the parade has grown to become possibly the highlight of Whiskey Flat Days. Each year many thousands of visitors and locals line both sides of Kernville Road and other

locations in Kernville to see the many floats, equestrians, marching re-enactors and clowns make their way along the parade route. The parade starts at the corner of Kernville Road and Sierra Way, ready to cross the bridge and enter the Circle Park area. From there the parade turns left on Kern River Drive and goes along Riverside Park. Then it turns right on Kernville Road again around Riverside One-Stop and up Kernville Road to Tobias, the street on the east side of Circle Park. Then up to Piute Drive to Big Blue Road and another right turn to Whitney Drive.

Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Boo, hiss - Don’t miss seeing the villian of Whiskey Flat. Rick Gonzalez

760-379-4422 Aaron Dretel

661-867-2390

Complete Water & Solar Systems Serving Kern County & Surrounding Areas

The Treasure of Shiver River

Best melodrama ever! Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

The 2014 production of the Whiskey Flat Melodrama is "The Treasure Of Shiver River," Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. at the Kernville School. It is, in a word, hilarious. It is a marvelous cast, including the incomparable Chuck Smith as the villain, Rod Enreel. Valley newcomer Jennifer Colley is the heroine, Heidi Claire Sanders. Local river guide Tom Peltier plays her dashing whitehat hero, Marshal, Marshal Law, Lawman. Our favorite radio personality and event emcee, Charlie Busch plays Heidi's father, Colonel Sanders. Joining the ranks of evil-doers are Rod Enreel's girlfriend Paige Turner, played by Dawn Modrovich Jordan, and con-artist

and master of all accents, Doctor Ophelia Payne, played by Kathleen Creighton Fuchs. Lydon Olivares plays hotshot reporter "Scoop" O'Malley, and Django Stauffer takes on the thankless role of long-suffering Gail Nail, wife of auctioneer Rusty. Rusty is played to comedic perfection by Josh Gordon. His is a performance not to be missed! Roberta Piazza Gordon is pirate queen Burlap Bonnie, sidekick of crusty old prospector Orin Gold, played by Dan Christenson. These two have been looking for the Treasure of Shiver River for years and years. Last but not least, Mary Hanawalt, plays innkeeper and reformed gambler, Lotta Luck. This may be one the best Whiskey Flat productions ever.


Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

February 2014

page 15

How to fix cowboy grub so’s you won’t starve About ¼ Cup Brown or Raw Sugar Cayenne Pepper, for sprinkling.

Recipes by Bodfish Bob Bodfish Bob’s

Scrambled Eggs with Bacon and Avocado

Preheat oven to 400?F. Line a large baking pan with tin foil. Place a wire rack on top of the prepared pan. Arrange bacon slices in a single layer and coat evenly with sugar. Lightly press the sugar into the bacon, sprinkle them with cayenne pepper. Bake for about 20 minutes, flip over, and continue to bake for another 8 to 10 minutes or until the bacon caramelized with deep red color. Remove from the oven and let cool completely.

2 slices bacon 2 large eggs Coarse salt and ground pepper 1/4 avocado, diced Toast (if desired) Brown bacon in a small skillet over medium heat, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Remove bacon; pour off all but 1 teaspoon fat. In a bowl, beat eggs with 2 tablespoons water; season with salt and pepper. Pour into pan; cook, scraping bottom frequently with a flexible heatproof spatula, until just set, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Crumble bacon over top; sprinkle with avocado. Serve with toast, if desired. Bodfish Bob’s

Barbeque Sauce 3 cups tomato sauce 1 chopped onion 6 tbsp. vinegar 4 tsp. celery seed 2 tsp. sugar Garlic salt and hot sauce Mix and simmer ingredients 20 min. Add garlic salt and hot sauce to taste. Add water to thin for marinade. Bodfish Bob’s

Bacon Wrapped Smokies 1 pound sliced bacon, cut into thirds 1 (14 ounce) package beef cocktail wieners 3/4 cup brown sugar, or to taste Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Refrigerate 2/3 of the bacon until needed. It is easier to wrap the wieners with cold bacon. Wrap each cocktail wiener with a piece of bacon and secure with a toothpick. Place on a large baking sheet. Sprinkle brown sugar generously over all. Bake for 40 minutes in the preheated oven, until the sugar is bubbly. To serve, place the wieners in a slow cooker and keep on the low setting.

Carne Seca Y Arroz) 6 -8 sticks of dried smoked beef jerky 1 quart boiling water 1 tablespoon lard or 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 3/4 cup rice 3 ripe tomatoes, chopped 1 yellow onions, chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 whole dried chilies 1 green sweet peppers, cored seeded and diced (optional) In stockpot add boiling water and jerky. Let set 15 minutes. Take out of water and cut in small pieces. Return to pot.Heat on low setting. In frying pan, add lard or oil, add rice and onions and salt. Brown the rice and cook the onion until slightly browned. Add tomatoes and chili pepper. Cook for about 10 minutes. Add all ingredients to stockpot. Simmer about 15 minutes until rice is cooked. Take out whole chili pepper before serving. There should be enough salt in the jerky so you do not need to add except for the 1/2 tsp of salt called for in the recipe. Serve with tortilla chips.

Bodfish Bob’s

Bodfish Bob’s

Beef Jerky & Rice Soup (Sopa De

Candied Bacon 8 thick slices Smoked Bacon

LakeView HideAway

SALOON

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760-376-4717

1/3 cup hoisin sauce 1/4 cup soy sauce 3 tbsp. Dry sherry 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 tbsp. Sugar 3/4 tsp. Red food coloring 1/4 tsp. Chinese five spice powder 1-2-lb. Slab spareribs cut into individual ribs

Liver and Onions 2 pounds sliced beef liver 1 ½ cups milk, or as needed ¼ cup butter, divided 2 large Vidalia onions, sliced into rings 2 cups all-purpose flour, or as needed Salt and pepper to taste Gently rinse liver slices under cold water, and place in a medium bowl. Pour n enough milk to cover. Let stand while preparing onions. (I like to soak up to an hour or two, whatever you have time for.) This step is SO important in taking the bitter taste of the liver out. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Separate onion rings, and sauté them in butter until soft. Remove onions, and melt remaining butter in the skillet. Season the flour with salt and pepper, and put it in a shallow dish or on a plate. Drain milk from liver, and coat slices in the flour mixture. When the butter has melted, turn the heat up to medium-high, and place the

Coca Cola Barbecue Sauce

Simmer 1 hour or until thick.

Bodfish Bob’s

Chinese Barbecued Spareribs

Bodfish Bob’s

Bodfish Bob’s

Cook 1 chopped onion and 2 chopped cloves garlic in 2 tablespoons butter until soft. Add: 2 c. Catsup 6 oz. Coke 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1 tsp. Mustard 2 tbsp. Vinegar

coated liver slices in the pan. Cook until nice and brown on the bottom. Turn, and cook on the other side until browned. Add onions, and reduce heat to medium. Cook a bit longer to taste.

Whisk together hoisin, soy, sherry, garlic, sugar, food coloring, and spice powder in a large bowl. Add ribs; toss to coat with marinade. Set aside, covered with plastic wrap, to let marinate at room temperature for 1 hour. Heat oven to 350°. Arrange a baking rack on top of a rimmed, foil-lined sheet pan. Remove ribs from marinade (reserve marinade); arrange on the rack, meat (not bone) side up. Place pan on middle rack of oven; pour in enough water that it reaches halfway up the sides of the pan, making sure the water does not touch the ribs. Bake ribs for 35 minutes. Baste ribs with reserved marinade; flip and baste again. Bake for 35 minutes more. (Add more water to pan if it dries up.) Raise heat to 450°. Flip ribs again; baste with remaining marinade. Continue baking until ribs are glazed, browned, and tender, about 20 minutes more. Serve with Chinese mustard or duck sauce, if you like.

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page 16

February 2014

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Kernville's Whiskey Flat wild West Daze Rodeo John E. McNally Arena Kernville Saturday & Sunday February 15th & 16th DW-20 while working on the Isabella Dam project in the late 40s, early 1950s. Along with author/historian, Ardis Manly Walker, John helped to start the annual Whiskey Flat Days Parade in 1957 and he was there announcing from a portable stand in Circle Park for 28 years. He also served as the parade's Grand Marshall. Before his death at age 94 in July 2007, John E. McNally, Jr. said, "I wouldn't trade anything I've done. I'd do it all over again. My life has been very interesting with lots of experiences."

Barrel Racing

Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

A lot of bull - Rider and spectators get a run for their money at the rodeo. Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper The Kernville Whiskey Flat wild West Daze Rodeo is the town's first Rodeo of the season and a rip roarin' western gathering. Get your boots and saddles and head on up for this leap back to the good ol' wild west days. The 2 day event is held at McNalley Rodeo Arena in Kernville at 1:00 p.m.

Kernville Rodeo History

Irwin Wofford had the contract to provide horses and cattle for these Westerns and John E. McNally, Jr. was one of the ranchers who rented out his stock to the movies. In the 40s and 50s, McNally also supplied horses and cattle for rodeos as far away as Nevada and Oregon. He supplied animals for the Kernville Rodeo and maintained the grounds and buildings for several years. The Kernville Chamber of Commerce named those rodeo grounds the "John E. McNally Rodeo Grounds" and they remain in active use. McNally also worked as a logging truck driver for Mount Whitney Lumber Company. He drove a

In this event, time is the only enemy and horsemanship is a rider's greatest weapon. Because of barrel racing's fast and furious pace it is always a crowd favorite. Each contestant enters the arena on a sprinting quarter horse at full gallop. An electronic eye begins time the moment the rider enters and ends the instant they leave. Every contestant must ride a cloverleaf pattern around three barrels before exiting the arena. A five-second penalty is awarded for each overturned barrel; however no penalty is given for touching or moving a barrel. The final times are recorded to the hundredths of a second.

Bull Riding

This is one rodeo contest the novice spectator can enjoy fully as much as does the hard core fan. It, of course, demands athletic skill and hard-won knowhow. But, essentially this is a contest of raw courage and a true, deep-seated spirit of try. In short, it takes good, honest guts. A loose rope straps a man's hand to three-quarters of a ton of awesome power. There isn't time to think and react. It must be natural, automatic coordination and determination that keeps the man on top. If the spirit hesitates for a split second, even subconsciously, the rider is doomed. Though the rider isn't required to move his feet as in bronc riding, you will see many cowboys do so. They are scrambling to keep contact with the bull, whose power is too great to permit a solid lasting hold with the rider's feet. The animal is still judged for how hard he bucks, and the bulls that perform in a tight, fast spin usually draw the highest scores.

Steer Riding

This event is offered for our teenaged cowboys and cowgirls ages 12 to 15. It is similar to bull riding only the riders are mounted on steers-which can buck as any bull! The rider must stay mounted for eight seconds and is judged on how the animal bucks as well as how the contestant rides.

The cowboy or cowgirl with the highest score wins.

Mutton Bustin

This even has evolved over the past several years for our young buckaroos ages 5 to 7. These youngsters can give you a run for their money as they bounce out of a chute mounted on the back of a wooly sheep. No rope is used, and these youngsters, wearing protective helmets, can give as exciting a ride as seen anywhere. Each buckaroo is awarded a ribbon and bandana for their daredevil ride.

Hide Racing

The hide race is exciting and unique to the Kern River Valley. The race consists of a team of two of any gender. One person is mounted on horseback; the other is mounted on a rawhide attached to the end of a lariat. The person on horseback holds the other end of the rope usually dallied around the saddle horn and races around the arena, pulling their teammate on the rawhide. The excitement comes as the one on the rawhide is dragged around the arena flipping, turning and eating arena dirt at breakneck speed. The team with the fastest time wins.

Bell Calf Roping

For this event, the calves have turned into young steers. A group of steers is turned loose in the arena, and one wears a bell around his neck. At the same time, all mounted contestants, cowboys or cowgirls, enter the arena on horseback with ropes ready. The contestants attempt to rope the steer wearing the bell. The one who ropes the belled steer first wins.

Team Roping

In team roping, two riders are in a race against the clock to rope both ends of a steer. The "header" rides from the left-hand box behind the barrier. The header's task is to rope the steer first, ideally by the horns, but no penalty is awarded for catching it by either the neck or "half head," which is one horn and neck. After the catch, the header "dallies," or wraps the roe around the saddle horn, and turns the steer to the left in a wide arc. His teammate, the "heeler," who rides from the right box, stays behind the steer until the header turns it. The heeler's task is to rope both the steer's back legs with one throw. If he manages to catch only one hind foot, the team receives a five-second penalty. Time is stopped when both ropes are tight and cowboy's horses are facing each other.

Two grizzlies found killed by one shot Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

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Mick Schlick, who lives up at Corral Creek, a couple of days ago found two grizzly bears killed by a single shot under unusual circumstances. The Forest Service found this to be doubly unusual because grizzlies are supposed to be hibernating this time of year, yet one was out and about. The day before, Schlick heard a hog squealing. He and and another man, retired deputy Allen Montgomery, went to the spot and found the hog dead from a grizzly’s attack. Supposing the bear would return

to eat the pig, Schlick that evening fixed a gun with a string attached to the hog. During the night the gun went off. On returning in the morning, Schlick found, not just one, but two grizzlies dead. “It was amazing,” Schlick said. The Alice McGill, of the local chapter of PETA, was shocked that someone would entrap an innocent bear in this manner. The grizzlies happened to be close together when the gun was discharged, and one ball passed through both of them. Each bear weighed about 300 pounds. Game Warden, Zeke Cartwright, said that no citation would be issued.


Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

February 2014

page 17

Kernville's Whiskey Flat wild West Daze Rodeo John E. McNally Arena Kernville Saturday & Sunday February 15th & 16th Rodeo Terminolgy

Fair

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Arena Director

The person responsible for conducting a fast, smooth-running rodeo.

Average

At rodeos with more than one g-round, contestants earn money for each go, and those with the best total scores or times win additional money.

Bareback Rigging

A leather fixture with a suitcase-like handle that the rider grips with one hand.

Barrier

A line stretched across the roping box that is released when a calf or steer crossed the scoreline. If the contestant rides through, breaks the barrier before it is released, a tensecond penalty is added to his total time.

Bull Rope

Rodeo Official who signals the end of elapsed time in the timed events.

Flank Strap

A sheepskin-lined strap with a quick-release buckle that is passed around th flank of a bucking horse or bull. It causes no pain but encourages the animal to buck. The hand not used to hold on during a ride. The rider is not disqualified if he touches the animal, himself or his equipment with his free hand.

Go-round

That part of a rodeo event in which every contestant has competed on one head of stock .

Hazer

A cowboy who rides alongside a steer opposite the steer wrestler. His job is to keep the steer running straight and close to the contestant's horse.

Cantle

Hondo

Catch-as-catch-can

A calf roper is allowed to catch the animal in any way he chooses as long as he turns loose of the rope when throwing the loop, and so long as the rope hold the calf until the roper reaches it.

Contact Rule

States that bucking horse riders must place their heels above the horse's shoulders, making contact until the first jump is completed. If the rider fails to do so, he "misses the mark" and is disqualified.

Dally

A turn of the rope around the saddle horn. Team ropers dally their ropes after a catch to secure the steer.

Dink

A bucking horse with a reputation as a poor bucker.

Dog-fall

Downing the steer in steer wrestling so all four feet and the head are not facing the same direction. Illegal. To get a time, the cowboy must turn the steer over or let it up and throw it again legally.

Draw

Stock selection.

The money paid by the contestant before he can compete at a rodeo. Contestant must pay a separate entry fee for each event entered.

Michael Batelaan Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Free Hand

High Roller

The seat back of a bronc riding saddle. The rider attempts to reach the cantle at the end of a spurring stroke. This is called "cantle-boarding."

Barrel racing is always a crowd favorite at the Whiskey Flat Daze Rodeo Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. at the McNally Rodeo grounds.

Flagman

A flat, braided rope that circles the bull's chest and is the rider's only means of holding on. No cinches or buckles are allowed-it's held in position by the grip of the rider. A heavy bell attached to the rope pulls the rope free after the ride.

Entry fee

Barrels of fun -

(Legal) Catch: In team roping, the header must catch the steer around the horns, head or neck.

A horse that leaps high into the air when bucking. The eye in one end of a lariat through which the opposite end is passed to form a sliding loop.

Hooey

The half-hitch knot a calf roper uses to tie three of the calf's legs.

Lap and Tap

An even start where the cattle in timed events do not get an advantage of 10 to 30 feet; used in small arenas.

No Time (NT)

Failure to qualify on timed event cattle, signaled by field flagman waving his flag side to side.

Pickup Man

Mounted arena official who assists bareback and saddle bronc riders in dismounting from their horses.

Piggin' String

Small soft rope, six feet long used by calf ropers to tie the animal's feet.

Pulling leather

When a saddle bronc rider touches any part of the saddle with his free hand during the eight-second ride he is said to be pulling leather, or "grabbing a the apple" and is disqualified.

Rake

Spurring action of the rider on roughstock. Bareback and saddle bronc riders are required to continue spurring throughout the rides; bull riders are not, but sometimes score higher when they do so.

Re-ride

Another ride given to a bronc or bull rider in the same go-round when either the animal or

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cowboy is not afforded a fair opportunity to show his best, such as a chute-fighting animal that is impossible to get mounted on, when the animal falls or drags the cowboy off the chute gate.

Rowel

Circular, notched, bluntly pointed and free-wheeling portion of a spur. They do not cut a bronc or bull.

Score

1. Distance between the chute opening and the score line; the head start timed event cattle are given in roping and steer wrestling, determined by the size of the arena. 2. The marking given rough-stock riders by the judges after a qualified ride.

Turn Out

To withdraw from a competition.


page 18

February 2014

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Century 21 Crew The Best Team In The Valley Marty O’Hara, Julie Jones, Becky Starr-Harris, Linda Phillips, Betty Heins, Paul Mooney, Broker, Linda Mooney

Michael Batelaan/Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

Grounds for fun - Thousands have enjoyed McNally’s legacy.

Rodeo Grounds named after McNally Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

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760-379-3684 http://www.century21lakeisabella.com

One attraction of Whiskey Flat Days that is not to be missed is the Wild West Daze Rodeo, held Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. at the John E. McNally Rodeo grounds on the north end of Kernville. You can get there on the Western Express Railway train that runs through town. There has been a rodeo in the Kern River Valley for many years. The late John E. McNally produced the Sierra Roundup Rodeo at Scovern Hot Springs during the 1940’s before the lake came in and the town of Isabella moved onto and around the site. The McNally barn is still there, behind Isabella Supermarket.

McNally went on to be a rodeo stock contractor until the mid-1950’s, producing shows not only in California but Nevada as well. McNally and his wife Pauline started a steakhouse in the late 1940’s at Fairview that still bears their name. Retiring from the resort business, John E. McNally became a legendary Tulare County Sheriff deputy, covering 1,000 square miles of back country. McNally passed away in 2007 at the age of 94. He was truly a legend larger than life. Today, the Whiskey Flat Rodeo is presented by Cotton Rosser’s Flying U rodeo that has been around for 58 years, 43 in the Kern Valley.


Whiskey Flat

m ai Cl

Ju m pe r

Februay 2014

page 19

Frog doping scandal continues at a leap

Whiskey Flat

Frog

Jumping lineup

Sponsor Frog Name

Alta Sierra Broadcasting Alta Sierra Broadcasting Alta One FCU Amazing Bounce Betty B’s Justin Tyme Cheryl's Diner CJ’s Hair and Nail Salon Click Realty Cowboy Bail Bonds Cynthia Cowden Investments Erskine Creek Water Co. George & Darlene Randall Harry P. Thal Insurance Kern River Candle Company Kern River Courier Kern River Valley Gun Association Kern Valley Sun Kernville Chamber Kernville Inn L & M Lumber Lanny Borthick General Contractor Old West Kettle Corn Shepherd of the Hills Sportsman’s Trailer Park Sweet Adelines The Drug Store The Mother Lode

Tastes Like Chicken Don’t Fear the Leaper LOAN-ly Leaper Amazing Bounce Betty’s “Justy Boy” Pie Ala Toad Fine as Frog’s Hair Slick Click Coffin City Pete Fast Bucks Liquid Gold Leroy Bud-wei-ser Wick It Claim Jumper Hop-a-long Sun Spot Sir Richtoad Floyd Knot-Head Douglas Fir Banks Lola Ann Saved by Grace Sportsman’s Trail 4-part Hoppity Pill Popper Mother’s Free Loder

Why the leap to frog jumping? In 1863, a young journalist named Samuel Langhorne Clemens, traveling from San Francisco, CA to Virginia City, NV spent the night in Angels Camp, Calaveras County, California. Here, he heard the story of Daniel Webster, a famous frog who jumped higher and further than any other frog around. His owner, local gambler Jim Smiley never got tired of placing bets on his celebrated jumping frog. One day, a stranger took the bet. But when Jim wasn't looking, the stranger poured quail shot into Daniel Webster's mouth making it impossible for him to jump at all. The stranger won the $40 bet and escaped before Jim realized the con.

The story was first published in 1865 in New York's Saturday Press and the young journalist used the pen name Mark Twain. It not only laid the foundation for his fame, it also put the tiny mining town Angels Camp on the world's map. Here at Whiskey Flat, we celebrate this history with a frog jumping contest of our own. Everyone has a fun time placing wagers on the frogs and cheering the little guys on. It is fun to try to beat the odds. The winning frog nets you "frog bucks" script worth merchandise at local participating Kern Valley merchants. See Whiskey Flat schedule for the times and place of the races on Saturday and Sunday.

Dangerous Levels of Water found in local whiskey Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

The newly reorganized Environmental Interference Agency has found dangerous levels of water in the whiskey at Whiskey Flat, they said in a statement released Thursday. “The government has found that the whiskey sold in Whiskey Flat along the Kern River in California,” the statement says, “is contaminated with large amounts of water. The levels of nitrates, arsenic, cyanide and mouse droppings are just fine--good whiskey needs that for flavor--but unadulterated water is bad for your health and should be avoided.”

The EIA has warned local Whiskey Flat saloons that in case any of their patrons gets a water overdose to serve them lots of Corn Nuts, and buffalo wings with their whiskey to compensate. Beer is also a good alternative, since the brewing process tends to temper the negative effects of the water. The Claim Jumper consulted Whiskey Flat local, Eric Giddens, PhD. advises that large quanities of locally brewed beer should counter any ill effects of water overdose. He recommends beer that is just outstanding. For more information, telegraph the EIA in Washington D.C.

Illegal doping has been detected in three of the frogs scheduled to jump at the Whiskey Flat Frog Jumping Contest this year. Contest officials were tipped off by a neighbor of an unnamed frog owner who said he saw frogs in the neighbor’s back yard jumping all the way over the house to a pond in the front yard. “These was no ordinary frogs,” said the neighbor, who has asked to remain anonymous due to the known cutthroat tactics of champion frog owners. “They is a devilish lot, those frog folks,” he said. Contest officials rushed to the home along the river in Whiskey Flat and, using a baseball mitt, were able to capture three frogs as they plummeted from a 100-foot height. After the watching crowd did the Wave, the three sample frogs were rushed to a laboratory, tested for drugs and came up positive. “This is a scandal of the highest proportion!” hollered the current

mayor of Whiskey Flat, “Tee Totalin’ Tony.” “We won’t rest until we find every single one of these illegal frogs. The Whiskey Flat Frog Jumping Contest has always been an honest racket... er, I mean competition, and we don’t cotton to no fixin’ of the contest.” “Except by me,” one former mayor of Whiskey Flat was heard to say, who goes by the handle of Rapid Richard. Contest officials were unsure of how to handle the scandal, but it was generally agreed that all the frogs should be tested and all those that tested positive would be disqualified. “It may be a coincidence and it may not be, but I’m planning a special on frog legs the day after the contest,” said Cheryl Borthick of Cheryl’s Dinner House. “Actually, I’m hopin’ there’ll be a lot of disqualification goin’ on.” The following unnamed frogs will not be competing in this year’s contest: Springer, Jerry Atrick, Ker’Mi’, Napolian, and Forget Me Not. Surprisingly, Pill Popper was not suspended from this year’s event.

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page 20

February 2014

Whiskey Flat Claim Jumper

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Whiskey Flat Claimjumper 2014  

Whiskey Flat Claimjumper 2014

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