Page 1

2014 - 2015

m a g a z i n e

100 DAYS on the mountain

ANCILLARY

ACTIVITIES Photo Essay

GEOLOGY OF

SCHWEITZER

HOW TO RAISE A

SKIER OR BOARDER


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schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015

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co n te n ts

schweitzer magazine 2014 - 2015 vol 7

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS 6 INSIDE LINES

With CEO and President Tom Chasse

8 FACE SHOT: SAFETY FIRST Arlene Cook heads up Ski Patrol

10 MOUNTAIN LIVING

MountainSide: Schweitzer Real Estate is on the rise

30

16 TIPS FROM THE TOP

Special social media edition

12 FOOD AND WINE

22

19

15 SCHWEITZER BY THE NUMBERS

Fun facts about the mountain in an infographic

19 A LEGACY IN THE MAKING

How to raise a skier or snowboarder

22 THE GEOLOGY OF SCHWEITZER

The forces that formed what we ski and see today

30 THE HEART AND SOUL OF 100 DAYS Two skiers achieve the elusive triple-digit day

Small House Winery: vintages by wine aficionados

25 PHOTO ESSAY: ANCILLARY ACTIVITIES Celebrating less traditional ways to embrace winter at Schweitzer

35 OFF THE MOUNTAIN

5 favorite live music venues

36 DINING A LA SANDPOINT A guide to noshing in town

38 THIS IS SCHWEITZER

Stats, the particulars, calendar and more about the mountain and its town

42 SUMMER AT SCHWEITZER

Come summer, the mountain blooms with activity

2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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inside lines

CREATING LEGACIES

A publication of

I

t’s hard to imagine that last season we celebrated Schweitzer’s 50th anniversary! Personally, it was the conclusion of my eighth season, and it helped me realize how many different people have been involved in Schweitzer since its beginning. We kicked the season off with Founders’ Day and were able to thank many of the original founders – the Browns, Huguenins and Fowlers. They were some of the visionaries that turned the idea of Schweitzer into a reality. The season finished with our annual Season Pass Holder Appreciation Party for people like you who help the spirit of Schweitzer live on. I am often asked, “How was last season?” As I look back, I can now say it was one of the best seasons we’ve had. If you asked me the same question throughout the season, I may not have given that answer. It wasn’t a season that felt like an amazing season. We didn’t have the huge dumps of snow, the monster crowds or the feeling of being out of control. The season progressed. We opened early, the weekend before Thanksgiving; we had great weather over all of the key holidays; and we finished the season with more than a 100-inch-base depth well into April. It just goes to show, an average year in the Pacific Northwest is usually better than a good year anywhere else. As we move forward Schweitzer CEO and President Tom Chasse and start the next 50 years, the future looks bright. Although we can never predict exactly what will happen next, another popular question I hear is, “What is in store for the future?” One project that bodes well for the mountain – and our whole community – is the progress in MountainSide, and I invite you to read the article inside to learn more. We’re excited about future projects that will be possible due to the success we have in these real estate sales. It is natural for one’s thoughts of the future to include the legacy they leave behind. Skiing and snowboarding are typically sports that are passed down from one family member to another – the legacy of our sport. Growing up in New England, I learned to ski at a young age. As I grew older and started a family of my own, we were all involved in the sport. The feature article in this issue portrays the story of a family that has started their third generation of Schweitzer enthusiasts, creating a legacy of their own. I encourage all of you to find a friend or family member that has never skied or snowboarded, take them to the mountains and start your legacy. See you soon!

Tom Chasse, CEO and President 6

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Road Sandpoint, ID 83864 208-263-9555 www.schweitzer.com

Published by KEOKEE CO. PUBLISHING, INC. Sandpoint, Idaho

Publisher CHRIS BESSLER Editor BILLIE JEAN GERKE Copy Editor BETH HAWKINS Art Director JACKIE PALMER Sales Director CLINT NICHOLSON

Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 405 Church St. Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 208-263-3573 www.keokee.com Entire contents © Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 2014 All rights reserved Schweitzer Magazine is the official publication of Schweitzer Mountain Resort, published annually and distributed to Schweitzer visitors; local advertisers’ restaurants, retail shops and other establishments; and by mail to season pass holders, mountain lodging guests and potential real estate clients. Schweitzer Magazine is published for Schweitzer by Keokee Co. Publishing of Sandpoint. For advertising information, contact Keokee Publishing. View the digital flip-page edition at www.schweitzermagazine.com On the cover Snowboarder Tracy Tuttle rides Bud’s Chute in the South Bowl, overlooking the top of The Basin Express. With 2,900 acres of terrain to choose from and hardly any crowds, it’s easy to find plenty of space that will put a smile on your face. Contents page Nothing beats the views from South Bowl and the Lakeview Triple on a snow-covered, bluebird day.


Photo courtesy Schweitzer Mountain Resort

The heart to Care. The Art to Heal.

Bonner General Health: Your urgent care headquarters Whether you’re at Schweitzer Mountain Resort or in town, Bonner General Health is your first choice for immediate care. Your community hospital encompasses Bonner General Immediate Care, a convenient solution when you need prompt medical attention. We are your hometown hospital and health care center – all in one! Two clinic locations to serve you, 7 days a week! 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Road Sunday – Thursday: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Holidays: 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 400 Schweitzer Plaza Drive, Ponderay (2 miles from Sandpoint) Monday – Friday: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday – Sunday: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Patients receive immediate medical attention from Bonner General’s professional health care providers in the clinic at Schweitzer Mountain Resort or in Ponderay. It’s just another way Bonner General Health nurtures quality of life and helps you heal close to home.

520 N. Third Avenue • Sandpoint, ID 83864 • 208-263-1441 • www.BonnerGeneral.org


fa c e s h o t

SAFETY FIRST ARLENE COOK HEADS UP SKI PATROL

By Katie Ross

A

rlene Cook may be Schweitzer’s first female ski patrol director, but she knows a thing or two about the job. Cook, 53, has spent more than 20 years on patrol, including 17 years as an assistant to patrol legend John Pucci, before becoming director two seasons ago. “When I started, women on patrol were very rare,” Cook said. “Now, there’s a lot more.” As patrol director, the safety of all on the mountain fall under Cook’s domain. “My job is to make sure we do all the safety things to make sure we get open for our guests, including marking, avalanche patrol, first aid, responding to incidents,” she said. Cook oversees a crew of about 30 patrollers in the winter season and about six bike patrollers in the summer, including husband Ted Cook. In the winter, 13 to 17 ski patrollers are out on the mountain at any given time, she says. In the summer it’s considerably less, with just two bike patrollers on at a time. Cook was raised on a dairy farm in the Selle 8

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015

Valley; she first started skiing at Schweitzer in 1980. However, that wasn’t her first time on a pair of skis. “Out where I grew up someone had built a rope tow in this field with an old combine engine; that’s actually where I first skied,” she said. “I wouldn’t say I really learned to ski there; you just point ’em downhill and go.” Cook began her career at the mountain in 1980 as a lift operator. The next season she tried out for patrol and got on part-time, and by her third season, she was on patrol full-time. “I’ve been on patrol ever since,” she said. Beyond downhill skiing, Cook is an avid mountain biker and outdoor sports enthusiast. “I guess I just like most outdoor personal sports,” Cook said. “I like to water-ski, kayak and I’ve got a paddleboard. I love to skate ski, and biking is very much a passion for me.” In fact, in 2012 she was part of a four-person, women’s team in the Race Across America, bicycling across the entire country in a little over eight days. Talk about passion!


2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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mountain living

MOUNTAINSIDE SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN REAL ESTATE ON THE RISE

F

our years ago a collection of cozy, distinctive homes quietly sprouted above the village. Stunning in every way, these new homes turned heads for their contemporary, sustainable designs and top-shelf decor. MountainSide was introduced as the newest slopeside community adjacent to and just above the Schweitzer Mountain Resort Village, offering single-family homes as well as premium lots for custom construction. Homes were designed for environmentally conscious buyers interested in enjoying the outdoors and simplifying their lives. Unfortunately, the real estate market in 2010 wasn’t quite ready. Fast-forward to the present, and the situation is completely different. During the winter of 2013-2014, Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Copper Basin Construction and Tomlinson Sotheby’s joined forces on a multiyear construction project in MountainSide. Based out of Hayden, Idaho, Copper Basin Construction has been building homes since 1995. Co-owner

10

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015


Greg Gervais is not only experienced in the business of building quality homes, he’s also an avid skier and Schweitzer homeowner. “Getting involved in the MountainSide project at Schweitzer is more than just another construction project,” said Gervais, who plans to purchase one of the new homes. “It’s a chance to create a lasting impact on the community I love.” Encouraging local economic growth and supporting organizations in need is the true meaning of being a community member. By utilizing local subcontractors, aligning themselves with local organizations, and contributing to greater causes, Copper Basin has continually stepped up

to the challenge of working in their communities, not just within them. The original three homes built in MountainSide will be incorporated into the new community design as Release 1. Release 2 consists of four, stand-alone homes and one duplex, providing six modern, ski-in/ski-out units. Within 48 hours of Release 2’s introduction to the market, all six units were under contract and deposits received. Release 2 homes are scheduled for occupancy Christmas 2014. The success of Release 2 allowed the MountainSide project to transition quickly to a smaller Release 3, also set for occupancy this winter. Although Release 3 consists of only two units (in a sin-

gle duplex), they are much larger – more than 2,000 square feet each. The excitement for new inventory on the mountain has continued, and one of the two units was quickly under contract. Release 4 includes six more units scheduled to be ready in fall of 2015; information will be coming soon. The future of real estate at Schweitzer Mountain Resort is looking bright, and the view of the skyline from the village this winter will include a few new homes on the mountain side – with more on the way. Visit www.schweitzerrealestate.com for more information on MountainSide, or contact the Schweitzer Mountain Real Estate Discovery Center at 208-255-7300.

2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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fo o d a n d w i n e

SMALL HOUSE WINERY VINTAGES BY WINE AFICIONADOS

Above, Small House wines are expanding distribution around the area, but you’ll always find them in the Gourmandie at Schweitzer paired with something delicious

Founders Patrick Werry (left) and Jon Harding take a short break from wine making

12

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015

By Sean Briggs

“Y

ou know … why don’t we make wine?” was the simple question that was muttered between friends after a couple glasses of pinot noir. Who knew that phrase would be the start of Small House Winery, a Sandpoint company consisting of two wine aficionados, Jon Harding and Patrick Werry. Both men have long histories with Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Harding was the rental and retail manager for Schweitzer for 14 years while Werry is a Realtor for Century 21 RiverStone on the mountain. The two share a simple vision when it comes to their winery: “To lovingly create delicious, approachable wines, and to one day, just be wine makers.” Like true entrepreneurs, they experiment quite often – making for some comical moments. The bottling phase used to take five hours to fill 25 cases, a long, slow process. When they switched to a gravity-fed system, it was a chaotic hour. This new process was much faster than anyone had anticipated. While Harding filled bottles, Werry feverishly tried to keep up with corking them. Pretty soon he was surrounded by corked bottles everywhere, basically trapping himself until someone helped him. The new bottling method took one-fifth the time. Just for the record, these two guys do know what they’re doing. In fact their 2010 Grenache/Syrah was recently honored with a silver medal at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition, and it received a Beverage Tasting Institute rating of 90 points. To put that in layman’s terms for beer chugging friends out there, that’s exceptional. As the winery continues to grow, the partners will begin putting new systems in place to increase supply and meet future demand. The same love will go into each barrel of wine, just a little less muscle. Tastings at the winery are scheduled to start in summer 2015. “We’re just a couple of friends pursuing a passion,” said Harding. “Every time we step into the winery, we learn a little more and get a little better.” Small House Winery became available at Schweitzer in December 2013 – available on the mountain at Chimney Rock Grill and Gourmandie. Bottles online start at $20, and can be purchased at www.smallhousewinery.com.


2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015


schweitzer by the

Numbers number of people who skied/snowboarded every single day of the 2013/2014 season

2

629

5,497

total years teaching experience by SMR instructors

number of NASTAR runs in a year

average number of winter employees

652 number of PBR tall boy cans sold yearly

16,488 number of free Wi-Fi antennas

42

20% le git

pounds of french fries served in a year

3,000+ 80

%

number of e-mails received daily

48,000

spa m 2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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t i p s f ro m t h e to p

social media special

EDITION

We solicited comments from guests for this special social media edition of Tips from the Top. Enjoy our top 10 picks from these Facebook fans and a Twitter follower.

Bruce @7bBruce @SchweitzerID After a storm think about which way the wind blew

Kevin Glynn Never leave powder to find powder.

Randy Evans If you can’t see, ski the trees.

Ryan Wells Check Schweitzer.com for great activities that are always happening in addition to amazing riding. You can always have even more fun! David Reseska Always pack a ski gee.

Tracy Hogue Check out the kids’ activities and camps to allow the adults some “free ski” time. With plenty of terrain/acreage and restaurants featuring great wine selections, you’ll be happy you did. Dustin Bise Scout your drops before you hit ‘em! Schweitzer has a great progression of cliff drops to hone your skills on, but they often require a specific approach or direction to be fun. A good progression would be Lakeside Chutes, then Midway Rock, then Wayne’s Woods upper, followed by Wayne’s Woods mid/ lower. After that if the snow is good and you feel like some hangtime, check out Lakeside Chutes and South Bowl Chutes (for the more technical drops/lines). Be safe and have fun! Lisa Julian If it’s foggy on the front, go to the backside to Stella. Visibility is usually better.  Ryan Bolin For the Canadians coming for the first time (like my wife and I last year), be prepared to ski right onto the lifts because usually the lines are small.  Sandra Brown Simpson Skiing is best in the trees off Snow Ghost lift and the T-Bar. In the afternoon check out the front off the triple if it is sunny.


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schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015


a legacy in the

Making

HOW TO RAISE A SKIER OR SNOWBOARDER

D

By Katie Ross. Photos by Tracy Tuttle ave Van Hersett has been skiing at Schweitzer since 1979, when he was 8 years old. This fact itself isn’t distinctive; many have grown up calling Schweitzer’s storied peaks their home slope. What distinguishes the Van Hersett family is the level of commitment Dave and wife Lisa, also a longtime Schweitzer loyalist, have to continuing the tradition with their two sons, Jackson, 10, and Cole, 8. “We have raised our kids to be outdoor kids and love being outside,” Dave Van Hersett said. “Skiing has always been a big part of our lives and they have grown to love it and enjoy it as much as we do.” Dave and Lisa started teaching Jackson and Cole to ski as soon as they could walk, starting in their driveway before progressing to Schweitzer. “Lisa would put them between her legs and run them up and down Musical Chairs ’til they couldn’t stand and she couldn’t either!” Dave said. Jackson and Cole generally got to ski leash-free, even as newbies, Lisa remembers. “ ‘Rescue Pack’ is what the kids called it,” she said. “I’m not a big fan of harnesses.” After the initial learning process, both boys participated in the KinderCamp, Mountain Explorers, and Funatics ski programs. It wasn’t long before both were tackling some grown-up runs. “When Cole was 5 we took him on his first black diamond; it was B Chute,” Dave said. “You could watch him come over the edge and he made turns down it!” Skiing has long been a family affair for the Van Hersetts; Dave, his parents and siblings used to make the trip from Spokane to Schweitzer every weekend, sometimes staying with friends, and sometimes just driving back and forth. Now, Dave and Lisa usually rent a condo in Pinnacle Ridge for the season. “I grew up skiing at Schweitzer with my family, and we all still ski here, and I want to pass that on to my kids,” Dave said. “It’s the love of sharing the mountain and sharing it with our kids just as my parents did for us. We always make skiing fun and talk about how special it is to our family.” The influence of other relatives and peers is another motivational force. “Having them ski with friends and family helped keep them going. My nieces, Emily and Morgan Armstrong, would always take them out for special runs without their parents, and it was a big deal to ski with just the kids at ages 6 and 7. Now they’re 8 and 10 and ready to explore the mountain with other kids,” Dave added. Jackson, who’s already learned to snowboard as well as ski, says his favorite area of Schweitzer is the terrain park, where he focuses on learning as many new tricks as possible. “I like the terrain park,” Jackson said. “I do everything I can do: rails, kink rails, jumps. I just want to get really good at the terrain park. I wish they’d let you in the Stomping Grounds, but now you have to have a pass.” Younger brother Cole, however, shows signs of being a true powder hound.

Jackson Van Hersett catches some air near the Great Escape Quad

2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

19


“I like the runs off the trees,” he said. “I just like everywhere: Toomey’s, Kathy’s Yard Sale, Glade-iator. I like it more when it’s powder and stuff.” Watching their sons grow up on the mountain, the Van Hersetts have had many experiences at Schweitzer and have witnessed the mountain evolve into what it is today. However, some things remain the same: Dave says that as kids, he and his siblings occasionally ran afoul of Schweitzer’s legendary ski patrolman, John Pucci. “Throughout the years we watched the whole mountain change; from 1979 to 2014 it’s changed a lot,” Dave said. “I remember, we watched Pucci go across the top of South Bowl with a cigar and a stick of dynamite. He was one of our favorite people and would sometimes, not pull our passes, but take it and have our parents come get it when we went out of bounds.” Dave says he also remembers many of the chairlift changes that the mountain has gone through over the years, including adding the Great Escape Quad in 1990. “We watched the old chairs go away, and the Great Escape came in,” Dave said. “When that came in, I think it was really neat. It was the first time when the lift lines on holiday breaks went down.” Looking toward the future, the Van Hersetts have a few things they would like their kids and future generations to have at the mountain they call home. “It’d be really nice if they put a restaurant at the top of the quad,” Lisa said, “and move The Wang (Shack) to the top of the Triple. … I would also get RFID (Radio Frequency Identification Device passes) like Crystal and Whistler; you just keep moving.” For his part, Dave says he would like to see even more terrain added to the inbounds territory. “I’d like them to open up the backside, where Selkirk Powder goes right now,” Dave said, “and add a couple more quads. I’d like them to run Chair Four more too. It’s your own little place; everyone goes to the fancy chairs. I spend most of my time in the less-traveled trees.” Cole says he would like to see more runs like Toomey’s Trail, shorter lines, and chicken strips at the Outback Lodge. Jackson also has some culinary, and mechanical, recommendations to make. “More tacos; bigger spaghetti bowls; make the chair move faster,” he said. It’s hard to argue with that. 20

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015

Jackson, Lisa, Dave and Cole Van Hersett enjoy a day of family skiing at Schweitzer

The Van Hersett family takes a run down Pend Oreille on a bluebird day at Schweitzer


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the GEOLOGY of

Schweitzer HOW UPLIFTED GRANITE, MASSIVE GLACIERS AND COLOSSAL FLOODS FORMED WHAT WE SKI AND SEE TODAY

w

By Billie Jean Gerke. Photos by Bruce Bjornstad inter visitors may not see much of the granite that dominates Schweitzer’s terrain, but they certainly get to reap the benefits of granitic doming that formed the Selkirk Mountains some 140 million years ago. As for that spectacular view of Lake Pend Oreille, skiers and snowboarders can credit Ice Age floods that repeatedly destroyed ice dams 12,000 to 17,000 years ago. Look east: We can thank uplifting during the Cretaceous period for flinging those older, sedimentary rocks off the Selkirks to form the Cabinet and Purcell mountains. The two bowls that make up Schweitzer Mountain Resort – known as cirques – resulted from mountain glaciers that joined 22

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015


Photos clockwise from far left: Looking at Lake Pend Oreille from the Mickinnick Trail, similar to the view people see from Schweitzer. Aerial of Lake Pend Oreille and the Monarchs where the ice lobe slammed up against the mountains and formed a dam that made Glacial Lake Missoula. Aerial photo of Clark Fork showing where the ice dam and Glacial Lake Missoula were. Lake Pend Oreille cross-section

the Cordilleran Ice Sheet during the last ice age. Glacial ice left behind a depression now occupied by Colburn Lake – known as a tarn – in the Outback Bowl. That huge ice sheet advanced from the north, and its Purcell Trench Lobe is responsible for reaming out the beautiful valley between the Selkirk and Cabinet/Purcell mountain ranges. The Purcell Trench is that seam between the granitic dome on its west side and the older, sedimentary rocks to its east. That Purcell Lobe of ice was as much as 2,000 feet thick over present-day Sandpoint and extended as far south as Farragut State Park at the south end of Lake Pend Oreille. Simultaneoulsy, another sublobe of ice moved UP the Clark Fork

River, forming the ice dam for Glacial Lake Missoula, the source of those colossal floods. “Schweitzer is one of my favorite places to ski, and the view is phenomenal because you can look right down where the ice dam used to be,” said Bruce Bjornstad, a licensed geologist based in the Tri-Cities, Wash., and author of two volumes of “On the Trail of the Ice Age Floods. “In summertime, you can actually see evidence of glaciation in the granite in the form of grooves and striations, or scratches.” For the complete lowdown on local geology, see the sidebar on page 24, “Overview of Geologic History” by Roy Breckenridge and Dean Garwood of the Idaho Geological Survey at the University of Idaho. 2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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overview of GEOLOGIC HISTORY

N

orthern Idaho has a rich geologic history, the incomplete record of which extends from 2.6 billion years ago. The oldest-known rocks, exposed near Priest River, originated as sedimentary layers deposited in an ancient ocean. About 2.6 billion years ago, these deposits were intruded by granitic magmas and at some later point metamorphosed to form metasedimentary gneisses. The geologic record improves dramatically at 1.47 billion years when widespread deposition of the Belt Supergroup began; it continued for at least 70 million years and produced a tremendous thickness of sedimentary rock that contain remarkably well-preserved mud cracks, ripple marks and algal mats. The Belt rocks are widely exposed east of Sandpoint and were deposited in a rifted basin. The upper strata were deposited in a shallow sea, perhaps similar to the Caspian Sea. The geologic record is again limited until about 800 million to 600 million years ago when continental separation occurred and coarse sediments and volcanics of the Windermere Supergroup were deposited. An ice age has been documented at this time as well. Mountain building began in the Cretaceous – about 140 million years ago – as the entire region underwent compression. Rocks in the west were thrust up and over rocks to the east and the crust was thickened. Strata low in the geologic column were buried to great depths and metamorphosed. Erosion was extensive, and sediments were shed eastward into central Montana off the uplifted land mass. Granitic magmas intruded into the middle and upper parts of the Earth’s crust and cooled slowly, forming batholiths. Most of the central and northern parts of the Selkirk Mountains are underlain by this Cretaceous granite, and isolated granitic bodies intruded east and south of Sandpoint. In the Eocene about 50 million years ago, compression gave way to ENE-WSW extension that allowed localized areas of the crust, such as the Selkirk Mountains, to rise. The overlying rock was stripped away by erosion. During the same time, more magma intruded, forming dikes in the area northwest of Hope and a granite pluton at Wrencoe. Basins developed, and conglomerate was deposited in the area north of Sandpoint. North-south trending, extensional faulting in the Purcell Trench also occurred at this time. The youngest bedrock in the area is the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group that flowed north toward Sandpoint about 16 million years ago. The bedrock at Schweitzer includes intrusive (granitic) and metasedimentary (gneiss and quartzite) rocks of the Priest River Complex. The lower bowls contain glacial deposits left by the ice. The lower elevations in the Purcell Trench from Sandpoint south to the terminus area were repeatedly inundated by ice age floods from Glacial Lake Missoula. During the last ice age (Wisconsin Glaciation) the Purcell

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Lobe of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet blocked the mouth of the Clark Fork River and created Lake Missoula. At maximum extent this glacial lake was up to 2,000 feet deep and covered 3,000 square miles of western Montana. Catastrophic failure of the Clark Fork ice dam released more than 500 cubic miles of water at a rate estimated at 10 times the combined flow of all the present-day rivers on Earth. The torrent of water, sediment and ice thundered across the states of Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon to the Pacific Ocean. –Roy Breckenridge and Dean Garwood Geologic mapping of the area and other resources are available for free download at the Idaho Geological Survey website: www.idahogeology.org. Look up the Ice Age Floods Institute and its local chapter, Coeur du Deluge at www.iafi.org for more information on the floods.

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ancillary ACTIVITIES

p h o to e s s ay

Downhill skiing or snowboarding

is the top choice for nearly all Schweitzer fans, but there’s more to winter than spending the day linking turns. Add variety to your ski season or embrace winter more with Schweitzer’s “Ancillary Activities” – from a mellow snowshoe hike to a fast and fun adventure. Schweitzer hosts many events, live music every weekend and lots of other fun activities. Hermit’s Hollow Snowtubing is perfect for the whole family with campfires, a warming yurt and a relaxing tow ride after every exciting lap. The Nordic Trail system is the “quiet side” of Schweitzer – 32 kilometers of trails to explore on cross-country or skate skis, snowshoes or even a snow bike. The 3,000-acre “back side” of Schweitzer satisfies more adventurous folks who go cat skiing or on guided snowmobile tours with Selkirk Powder. As the photos in this “Ancillary Activities” photo essay prove, winter doesn’t have to be the “Dreaded Shoveling Season.”

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SKATE SKIING

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HERMIT’S HOLLOW SNOWTUBING

ancillary activities

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SNOW BIKES

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LASER SHOW

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SELKIRK POWDER SNOWMOBILE TOUR

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BONFIRE

HERMIT’S HOLLOW SNOWTUBING

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SNOWSHOEING

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2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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100 days

the heart and soul of

By Jen Forsyth

30

M

ost skiers, at some point in their life, have dreamt of bagging a 100-day ski season. This goal will frequent any serious skier’s bucket list. Those who set out on the journey for 100 days of “epic-ness” will encounter bluebird powder days; socked in, low-visibility days; and high-pressure cold snaps under brilliant sunny skies – all while battling endless leg fatigue, lost toenails, battered gear and everything else Mother Nature and Murphy’s Law decides to throw in their direction. Many log that 100th day and some don’t due to unforeseen circumstances. Those who do have a lifetime of bragging rights and the endless drive to continue that same goal for as many years to come as their bodies, finances and lives allow them.

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015

One hundred days isn’t an easy feat, especially if your profession isn’t up on the ski hill or retirement hasn’t landed you a ski pass, condo up at the mountain and endless time to spend charging toward your goal. For those who still work, it is a carefully calculated numbers game that allows for the impression that you are still working while still logging the days on the mountain. Let’s break the ski season down into some relevant numbers. Schweitzer’s ski season fluctuates in the number of days from year to year. Last season, Schweitzer was open 135 days over approximately 19 weeks. To obtain a 100-day ski season, one would have to ski approximately five days each week to achieve the goal within the bookends of Schweitzer’s opening and closing day. Two Schweitzer skiers who have made it their goal to reach the elusive triple-digit day


A Schweitzer skier yearning for the 100-day milestone. Depending on the dedication of your ski buddies, the journey can be a lonely one

have been achieving it – for the better part of a decade – all while maintaining life as usual in their professions. Larry West, 61, a lawyer based in Spokane and selfappointed trash collector (more on this later), boasts the ability to ski every day, not just 100. It all started five years ago when he began living on the mountain during the winter months, full-time. “I got 99 days that year and then set a goal to get 100,” West said. Since that time, he has skied more than 100 days for the past four seasons. He continues, “132, 124, 133 and 135,” referring to the number of days he has skied each season. “My new goal is to ski every day for the rest of my life.” John Grollmus, a restaurateur based in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene, set the goal in his mid-20s when he moved to Schweitzer to cook in the hotel. “I lived up on the mountain full-time for two years during that time. I didn’t make 100 days either of those seasons due to

injuries,” he said. Fast forward almost 15 years. Grollmus, now 46, said: “The year I turned 40 was the first year I did it (skied 100 days). I then changed the goal to ski 100 days every year between my 40th and 50th birthday.” The definition of a ski day varies from one person to the next and is highly contested. Grollmus defines a day as making six runs but adds: “There is some flexibility depending on weather. The beautiful thing about a Schweitzer powder day is that you can ski the majority of the day and really never come across other tracks.” And those are the days that a day goes from logging six runs to skiing all day while losing count. West also takes it day by day. “Last season, we had six super cold days – frigid – but the sun was still brilliant each day. We also had two days with rain. Those were the days when I’d take four or five runs and then be happy for a day of rest,” 2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

31


Above, John Grollmus gets a little wacky while in Japan … but who can blame him on a dream trip like that Below, to reach 100 days, you can’t always ski on the warm, sunny days as Larry West knows better than most

West said. He typically averages about 20 runs per day, although almost all of them are on high-speed chairs. Another defining aspect of a 100-day season is when it starts and when it ends. Grollmus loosely defines the season as “Northern hemisphere ski season.” His traditional start of ski season aligns with the anticipated Schweitzer opening. “I usually get going the day before Thanksgiving and finish up right around the last day,” he said. West defines his season, “Opening, closing and every day in between (at Schweitzer).” What keeps these guys motivated? Passion and positivity. Grollmus said of past seasons, “I’ve never had a bad one.” No matter how bad the conditions are: “I always think to myself, This is awesome. It’s keeping a positive attitude. Without a hesitation, my favorite thing in the world to do is ski.” What is West’s secret to a successful 100-day season? “I’ve found that once you start, you can’t quit. It’s one of those healthy addictions,” he said. West has also made it part of his daily routine to pick up trash around the mountain. It started five years ago when he noticed a ski patroller picking up trash from under the Great Escape Quad. He thought that was a waste of ski patrol time, so he started picking up trash. “It has become part of my skiing routine and my self-appointed job,” West said. He even has a motto: “Schweitzer Mountain, Trash Free.” West says he doesn’t have a “most memorable day” during his quest for 100 days: “They all blend. There have just been so many great days.” Grollmus felt the same way until a memory of an early morning in the Outback Bowl surfaced: “It was first tracks (on a powder day) down Kaniksu. After skiing down, I loaded Chair 6, and when I got back to the top, the only tracks on Kaniksu were mine. So I skied it again. When I returned to the top, the only two tracks were mine. That’s pretty much the ultimate. And at Schweitzer, you can do that most of the day.” Both West and Grollmus have their own words of wisdom on the secrets to success. Grollmus’ wisdom comes with some unfortunate firsthand knowledge, as last season, which would have been his sixth consecutive, 100-day season, fell short due to an injury that occurred while on a ski trip in Japan. “Don’t get hurt. Stretch a lot, and staying in shape year-round helps significantly,” Grollmus said. West added: “It’s a long season,” and for him one that doesn’t include any days off, “which means you can’t get hurt, you can’t get sick.” He finishes it off with, “You must have boots that are comfortable.” At Schweitzer, you see many of the same faces on a daily basis. Some are on the quest for 100 days; others are just up skiing and not counting. The common theme is the passion and dedication they have for the mountain and skiing. Luckily, they are rewarded with fun times, beautiful days and meeting great people along the way. Author Jen Forsyth skied 100 days during the 2012-13 season, celebrating the 100th on the last day of regular season operations at Schweitzer Mountain Resort.

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schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015


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2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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34

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015

ATHLETIC CLUB

SANDPOINT WEST


5

off t h e m o u n t a i n

FAVORITE

LIVE MUSIC VENUES

By Matt Conger

A

ll great mountain towns are accompanied by live music, and Sandpoint, Idaho, is no different. Many local businesses host a number of live music events for all tastes and preferences throughout the year. Each venue has its own, unique character, and they all offer a great atmosphere for music. Here is a list of some favorite places to catch a concert or relax to some live music.

1 2

EICHARDT’S PUB, GRILL AND COFFEE HOUSE 212 Cedar St., 208-263-4005 Eichardt’s is one of Sandpoint’s favorite hangouts, with frequent live music events from blues and country to rock ’n’ roll. Its cozy pub atmosphere makes this the perfect place to have a casual meal while listening to great music. THE HIVE

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY 301 Cedar Street., 208-265-8545 The winery is the preferred place for sitting down with a glass of award-winning, locally made wine while listening to some soothing live music. Local and regional acts perform every Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Pend d’Oreille Winery recently moved into a new location in a renovated, historic downtown building.

3

THE HIVE

4 5

DOWNTOWN CROSSING (DTC)

DOWNTOWN CROSSING

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY

Photo by David Marx

207 N. 1st Ave., 208-290-3048 The Hive is a fairly recent addition to Sandpoint’s live music scene; this large indoor venue is a fantastic place to catch a concert. The Hive gets artists from all over the country and with renovations including a new exterior facade, new roof, complete interior remodeling and increased capacity to nearly 1,000, there is sure to be enough room for you to unleash those dance moves. 202 1/2 N 1st Ave., 208-265-6767 DTC is known for its open mic nights, DJs and their live music on most weekends. DTC has a great nightclub atmosphere with plenty of room to dance. This is the spot to get a latenight cocktail and dance the night away.

IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (IPA) 203 Cedar St., 208-290-2280 With a constant rotation of beers on tap and more bottles of beer than you can count, this is my favorite place to try something new. IPA holds plenty of live music events , and with its convenient downtown location this is a great place to start your night out on the town.

For an up-to-date list of live music events in Sandpoint, check the calendar on SandpointOnline.com.

EICHARDT’S

2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

35


Sandpoint Dining a la

BANGKOK CUISINE

Take Oute Availabl

202 N. Second Ave. Enjoy authentic Thai food in a welcoming atmosphere. All of Bangkok’s dishes, including a wide variety of vegetarian, are cooked to order using the freshest ingredients with no added MSG. Bangkok offers a fine selection of wine and beer as well as Thai tea and coffee. All desserts are made on-site. Enjoy your meal on our sidewalk dining area. Closed Sundays. 208-265-4149

EVANS BROTHERS

IVANO’S RISTORANTE

524 Church Street, by the Historic Granary tower. A craft Roasting Studio and Café focused on the very best coffee experience. Top scoring micro-lot coffees are roasted onsite, sourced directly from our partners at origin. Talented baristas prepare espresso drinks, pour-overs, and high quality chai, loose leaf tea, and fresh baked pastries. Café is newly renovated in an urban rustic style, with indoor and outdoor seating, and a giant rollup door to the espresso bar.

102 S. First Ave. Serving the community for more than 27 years, Ivano’s Italian dining accompanied by classic wines and gracious atmosphere add to the enjoyment of one of Sandpoint’s favorite restaurants. Pasta, fresh seafood and steaks, veal, chicken and vegetarian entrees round out the fare. Gluten-free menu. Also open on the Hope Peninsula in summer and at the La Rosa Club, a casual gathering place featuring craft cocktails, martinis and an innovative food menu with plates and bites designed to be shared.

208-265-5553 www.EvansBrothersCoffee.com Like us on Facebook!

208-263-0211 www.IvanosSandpoint.com

MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE 208 N. Fourth Ave. Sandpoint’s original coffee roastery serving Idaho’s freshest coffee since 1993. Bring all your friends for the very best espresso drinks, real fruit smoothies made with all-natural ingredients, handcrafted milk shakes, granitas, iced or hot tea, yerba mate and fresh lemonade. Enjoy Monarch Mountain’s half-pound breakfast burritos or homemade soup.

208-265-9382 www.facebook.com/monarchmountaincoffee

SPUDS 102 N. First Ave. Located on beautiful Sand Creek overlooking the marina, Spuds Waterfront Grill offers the freshest of lunch and dinner entrees specializing in American regional recipes. Spuds Waterfront Grill has been a landmark restaurant in Sandpoint since 1995. 208-265-4311 www.SpudsOnline.com


CONNIE’S CAFÉ

EICHARDT’S PUB & GRILL

323 Cedar St. Historic hospitality! Connie’s Café, the landmark Sandpoint restaurant, is known as ‘a coffee shop with dinner house quality.’ The eatery’s wholesome, made-from-scratch menu is filled with mouth-watering breakfast, lunch and dinner dishes of the highest quality, while the relaxed, beautifully restored 1950s decor makes everyone feel right at home.

212 Cedar St. A comfortable pub and grill, Eichardt’s is located downtown in a charming, historic building. This relaxing pub mixes casual dining with seriously good food. There’s something for everyone – more than a dozen beers on tap, good wines including oak cask local red wines, and regional touring live music. Upstairs you’ll find a fireplacewarmed game room with a pool table, darts and shuffleboard. Eichardt’s has been nationally recognized and locally supported since 1994. Open daily at 11:30 a.m. for smokeless dining seven days a week.

208-255-2227

JALAPEÑO’S RESTAURANT 314 N. Second Ave. A Sandpoint favorite for over 20 years offering both traditional Mexican dishes and some gringo favorites in a fun family friendly atmosphere. Full bar, patio seating, banquet facilities, gluten free menu, quick to-go menu, indoor waterfall and fish tank offer something for everyone.

Like us on Facebook! 208-263-2995 www.sandpointjalapenos.com

208-263-4005

MICKDUFF’S BREWING CO. 312 N. First Ave. Come and enjoy MickDuff’s fine handcrafted ales in a family dining atmosphere. They offer a variety of top-of-the-line beers ranging from fruity blondes to a seasonal porter. MickDuff’s also brews a unique-style root beer for those young in age or at heart. The menu is packed full of flavor with traditional and updated pub fare. You will find toasted sandwiches, hearty soups, gourmet hamburgers and much more at this cozy brewpub located in downtown Sandpoint. 208-255-4351 www.MickDuffs.com

SWEET LOU’S In Hope, 46624 Highway 200, overlooking Lake Pend Oreille at Holiday Shores Marina, check the website for hours. In Ponderay, 477272 U.S. Highway 95, open every day 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Proudly serving hand-cut steaks, freshly gound burgers, wild salmon and smoked ribs. Both locations offer a family-friendly atmosphere with full bars and tasty items. Come hungry, stay late, eat well. Hope 208-264-5999 Ponderay 208-263-1381 www.sweetlousidaho.com www.facebook.com /sweetlous

AT C I T Y B E A C H

TRINITY AT CITY BEACH 58 Bridge St. The “new Café Trinity.” Enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner with the best view of Lake Pend Oreille. Deck seating. Outstanding menu featuring seafood, steaks, salads and appetizers. Full bar serving a great selection of wines, beers and cocktails featuring a daily happy hour. Open daily from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Located at the Best Western Edgewater Resort adjacent to Sandpoint City Beach. 208-255-7558 www.TrinityatCityBeach.com


this is schweitzer

THE MOUNTAIN WHERE

MEMORIES ARE MADE

S

ituated in the Selkirk Mountains in Idaho’s Panhandle, Schweitzer Peak towers above an open bowl easily visible from the idyllic town of Sandpoint, Idaho. As a glistening beacon, that snow-loaded peak guides people to Schweitzer Mountain Resort. While Schweitzer Bowl may cause onlookers to gape, their jaws really drop when they discover that’s less than half the mountain. The Outback Bowl adds a whole ’nother side, totaling 2,900 acres of terrific terrain, not to mention many more acres of accessible backcountry. Since its beginning in 1963, Schweitzer Mountain Resort has transformed into a destination ski and snowboard mecca lauded for superb tree skiing, outstanding snow and dramatic views. Exploring all those acres is made all the more fun with 2,400 vertical feet and an average annual snowfall of 300-plus inches. Schweitzer isn’t the only one winning accolades. Its music-and-arts-loving hometown of Sandpoint has been named a “Top Ski Town” and “Most Beautiful Small Town in America” by USA Today and Rand McNally and one of the “Top 10 Coolest Mountain Towns” by Men’s Journal. Titles aside, it’s the friendliness of both the town and the mountain that keeps people coming back year after year for a truly unforgettable experience. Beyond its unspoiled and uncrowded terrain, Schweitzer Village offers shopping, dining, nightlife and luxurious perks – all at an easygoing pace that invites guests to really relax. 38

schweitzer magazine | 2014 • 2015


VILLAGE DIRECTORY

ski and ride center

The Ski and Ride Center features top-quality rentals from Rossignol and a full-service tuning and repair shop with one of the region’s most extensive alpine demo fleets. Lesson packages and specialty clinics taught by certified coaches are offered for skiers and riders of all levels and ages. (208-255-3070)

lodging

The condominium-style, slopeside White Pine Lodge boasts gas fireplaces, views overlooking Schweitzer Village or Lake Pend Oreille, and other amenities such as full kitchens, cable TV and DVD players. Also slopeside, the Selkirk Lodge features similar amenities in European-style hotel accommodations. Other condominiums are located throughout Schweitzer Village and feature full kitchens, gas or wood fireplaces, and luxury amenities. (Schweitzer.com, 877-487-4643)

selkirk powder

Located 100 yards from Schweitzer’s Great Escape Quad, Selkirk Powder’s guided snowmobile tours zip along groomed logging roads through thousands of acres of private and state-owned forests on four-stroke Arctic Cats. Daylong cat-skiing adventures have skiers and riders on untracked powder by 9:30 a.m., thanks to Schweitzer’s six-minute summit lift. Ski the backcountry side down to the cat waiting at the bottom. Customers typically complete up to 10 runs and rack up as much as 14,000 vertical feet on 3,000 acres of diverse terrain. (www.SelkirkPowder.com, 866-464-3246)

meetings and events dining

Schweitzer Village has something to suit everyone’s cravings, from the Chimney Rock Grill’s fine-dining atmosphere, featuring burgers, steaks, salads, pasta and seafood, to the Mojo Coyote Café’s casual eatery, offering lunch specials and freshly baked pastries. Other village options include tavern fare at Pucci’s Pub, Mexican cuisine at the Lakeview Café, après-ski at Taps, gourmet pizza at Sam’s Alley, and coffee at Cabinet Mountain Coffee. The Outback Inn, located in the mountain’s Outback Bowl, offers hot food and cold drinks inside or on the deck near the bonfire. For the gourmet with a flair for food, Gourmandie stocks everything needed to create delicious hors d’oeuvres or full-blown meals, plus an amazing selection of wine and beer from around the world.

shopping

Anyone needing a ski break can choose from several shopping options at their fingertips in the village. The Source and The

Alpine Shop sell mountain gear essentials like goggles and gloves, plus specialty equipment and demo rental equipment. The Artists’ Studio, a local artist cooperative, showcases unique photos, drawings, paintings, glass art, jewelry and more. Gourmandie offers highend provisions, beer, wine and culinary treats from around the world. The shop also features unique local artisan jewelry, gifts, and home/ condo décor. Just in case you forgot something, or are looking to kick your evening in gear, The Market at Schweitzer features fine spirits, sundries and ice cream.

services

Drop off your children, ages 4 months to 6 years, at Kinder Kamp for lessons, crafts and snacks, then head to the Ski and Ride Center to try the latest demo equipment. Afterward, treat yourself to the healing services at the Solstice Center for the Healing Arts, providing a wide range of therapies that specifically target ski-related aches and pains.

Looking for a place to host your mountaintop wedding, corporate retreat or family reunion? Schweitzer’s Group Sales provides a unique setting for events, customized to fit any group’s needs. Features include comprehensive audio/visual equipment, custom banquets, bars and more. Outdoor group activities – skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, geocaching and tubing. Beyond coordinating all the tiny details, the Schweitzer staff is wholly committed to creating memorable experiences for groups. (208-263-9555 ext. 2820)

mountain activity center

Staff members at the Mountain Activity Center, located on the first floor of the Selkirk Lodge, offer a variety of adventures and day-out suggestions to help round out a vacation at Schweitzer. Guests may opt for a moonlit snowshoe hike or an evening in Sandpoint. The center staff also operates Hermit’s Hollow Snowtubing located a short walk from the village. The Mountain Activity Center makes it easy to organize a day on or off the mountain. (208255-3081)


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Park features are groomed nightly by those who ride them daily, and the crew aims to add new features each week. Rangers staff the park whenever the resort is open, bringing safety, education, oversight, support and a fun vibe to the park.

Schweitzer is located at 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. in Sandpoint, Idaho. The resort is 45 miles from Coeur d’Alene/I-90 and two hours from Spokane International Airport. The nearest business district is 11 miles away in the city of Sandpoint and can be reached via the SPOT bus connection.

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Y LE AL M’S M SA EA DR ’S N CK RU JA E R’S IPL HE TR AT W HE CE VIE A E E F AK TH L E UT TE CH A HU SC D’ BU

The Stomping Grounds Terrain Park offers an extensive variety of some of the most unique custom park features around. Rails, boxes and jumps keep the experts entertained while beginners build skills in the Terrain Garden on smaller rails and jumps. The Southside Terrain Park features hiker-friendly, unintimidating, medium-sized features. It’s Schweitzer’s most popular park and is located on Crystal Run.

6375 FT

TO OUTBACK BOWL

6389 FT

GATE

TL E BLUE RIDGE RUN

terrain parks

6117 FT AR R T-B E OU IDYL

3960 FT.

OUTBACK BOWL


stats

calenda r DECEMBER 2014 12 Community $10 Day Fundraiser 100 percent of ticket proceeds benefit local nonprofits.

23-24 Santa Skis at Schweitzer Santa skis and visits on the hill, delivering treats and leading a balloon parade from the Basin Express with Mrs. Claus on Christmas Eve, followed by cookies and taking last-minute wishes at the Selkirk Lodge.

2014-2015

6-8 Chad Engstrom YSL Race 13-20 Sandpoint Winter Carnival Family-friendly events to celebrate winter in Sandpoint including the Winter Carnival Parade (Feb. 13), Taste of Sandpoint (Feb. 19), Skijoring (Feb. 14-15), K-9 Keg Pull and more.

14-16 Presidents Weekend Celebration Sunday night skiing and Laser Light Show.

21 Winter Carnival Finale

31 New Year’s Eve Parties

Fireworks in the village.

Parties for all ages including the rockin’ concert in Taps, the tubing party and the ever-popular “tween” party for the kids. These parties sell out – be sure to purchase your tickets early! Tickets available at The Activity Center starting Dec. 1.

26-March 1 Masters Racing and Clinics

JANUARY 2015 10-13 Can Am Super Series Ski Race with SARS

MARCH 2015 20-21 24 Hours of Schweitzer

9-30 Junior Race Series on NASTAR Local race series on Friday nights in January.

10 Winter Trails Day Learn to cross-country and skate ski.

27 Final Starlight Party Our annual themed party is a “not to be missed” event!

24-hour skiathon raises funds for cystinosis research.

APRIL 2015 Closing Weekend Tropical Daze and the Rotary Ducky Derby

Torchlight Parade and Fireworks. Party follows in Taps.

Bring out your Hawaiian shirt for some fun in the sun! Pond skimming and lots of family activities daily, plus the ever-popular Downhill Dummy Derby Sunday.

20-26 Western Regional Speed Series (SARS) on Zip Down

SUMMER 2015 EVENTS June 28 Summer Celebration

24-25 Stomp Games

July 18 Mountain Music Festival

30 Toyota Ski Free Day

August 2 Huckleberry Festival

30-Feb. 1 College Daze

September 5-7 Fall Fest

FEBRUARY 2015 6-27 Starlight Racing

All dates and information subject to change. For more events and up-to-date information, visit www.Schweitzer.com or call the Mountain Activity Center at 208-255-3081.

17 Northern Lights at Schweitzer

A perennial favorite for locals, Friday night races followed by fabulous, fun 21-and-over parties in Taps.

MOUNTAIN TERRAIN Skiable Terrain: 2,900 acres Tree Skiing: more than 1,200 acres Summit Elevation: 6,400 feet Village Elevation: 4,700 feet Lowest Elevation: 4,000 feet Vertical Drop: 2,400 feet LIFTS Schweitzer features nine lifts with an uphill capacity of 12,500 people per hour. LIFT Lakeview Basin Express Great Escape Sunnyside Stella Snow Ghost Musical Chairs Idyle Our Musical Carpet

TYPE Triple Quad Quad Double 6-Pack Double Double T-bar Carpet

RISE 710 feet 1,063 feet 1,678 feet 1,280 feet 1,550 feet 1,906 feet 592 feet 60 feet 100 feet

TIME 4.5 minutes 4 minutes 5 minutes 8 minutes 5.5 minutes 13 minutes 6 minutes 4 minutes 4 minutes

TRAILS Alpine Runs: 92 designated runs Longest Run: 2.1 miles (Little Blue Ridge Run) Open Bowls: 2 (Schweitzer and Outback) Nordic: 32 kilometers ABILITY-LEVEL BREAKDOWN Beginner: 10 percent Intermediate: 40 percent Advanced: 35 percent Expert: 15 percent HOURS 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Twilight skiing: Fridays, Saturdays and holidays from Dec. 26 to March 1 from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

2014 • 2015 | schweitzer magazine

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summer

W SUMMER

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schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014

inter guests to Schweitzer may have a difficult time imagining a summer world of hiking, biking, wildflowers and waterfalls beneath all that snow, yet that’s exactly what the resort offers up when the seasons change. From late June through Labor Day, the mountain features unique thrills, from liftserviced mountain biking and downhilling to scenic chairlift rides, zip line, live music, festivals and much more. Take the Great Escape quad chairlift to the top for jaw-dropping views of Lake Pend Oreille and the rugged Selkirk and Cabinet mountains. From the top, a variety of mountain biking trails are available, including the signature Beargrass Route. For hiking, a scenic summit loop won’t disappoint, or enjoy the nature trail back to the village. A mountaintop summit activity center is available, as is horseback trail riding through Mountain Horse Adventures, located on-site. There are plenty of other options for young and old, including mining for gems at the Cranky Jennings Mining Company sluice box, aerial thrills on the 750-foot zip line, and the popular “Air Jumper” bungee trampoline. Not to be missed is huckleberry picking, with August providing prime picking opportunities. This tasty and uniquely Northwest fruit is a celebrated part of the local culture. In fact, Schweitzer’s own Huckleberry Festival in early August pays homage to the berry and should be part of any summer itinerary. Other summer festivals of note are the Mountain Music Festival in July and Fall Fest over Labor Day weekend – featuring more than 60 Northwest microbrews and wines available for tasting. In the village, the Chimney Rock Grill serves up tasty options for lunch or dinner, either indoors or out. Other activities include shopping at The Source and the Artists’ Studio, enjoying a selection of fine wines and provisions at Gourmandie, or stocking up on sundries and spirits at the Market at Schweitzer. Schweitzer’s lodging options position guests in the heart of the action and within close proximity to town and the lake. Several popular package options are available, including the valueoriented, third-night-free program, plus cabin rentals at Bottle Bay Resort and Marina. Speaking of Sandpoint, summer is high season for this gem of northern Idaho. A wide range of events, including the highly anticipated Festival at Sandpoint outdoor music series, delights young and old alike. Summers in Sandpoint revolve around the lake, with City Beach a central gateway to water adventures. Summer is also high time for group events at Schweitzer. Each year, the mountain successfully plays host to mountaintop weddings, casual family reunions and company outings. The group sales team is ready to help make any group function a reality with a call or visit to their office in the White Pine Lodge; phone 208-263-9555 ext. 2820.


A magnificent collection of Ski in/Ski out homes strategically located above the village, offering a blend of convenience and amenities with open views of the lake and mountains. Copper Basin Construction has outdone itself combining a luxury experience with an affordable price.

For more information:

Please contact Jeff Bond at 208.255.8270 | jeff.bond@sothebysrealty.com or Chris Chambers at 208.290.2500 | chris.chambers@sothebysrealty.com AnyTime Info available at 208.449.0071 property code: 1006

tssir.com

www.copperbasin.com


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Schweitzer Magazine 2014-2015  

Lifestyle and visitor magazine for Schweitzer Mountain Resort