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WINTER 2020

AT EVERY

SPEED

By ski, 'shoe, sled, or fat tire... get your rush on this winter

GRANARY DISTRICT BLOOMS

Art & culture of historic Sandpoint

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ALL ABOARD THE YETIBUS Carbon-neutral living on wheels

A HIGHER EDUCATION Idaho’s Teacher in Space

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www.TSSIR.com Anytime Info

For recorded information or to speak to the listing agent, call 208.449.0071and use the 4-digit property code.

KullyspellLuxuryEstate.com ATI #1158 $20,000,000 Hope, Idaho 21 Acres w/Island, Private & Secure

LochHavenEstate.com ATI #1564 $16,900,000 Sagle, Idaho 135 Acres 2200’ of Lake Pend Oreille Frontage

LakesideEstateAtCapeOfArt.com ATI #1538 $6,995,000 Hope, Idaho 2.53 Acres, Private, Gated Community

GlengaryWaterfront.com ATI #1239 $3,950,000 Sagle, Idaho 9.8 Acres, 975’ of Lake Pend Oreille Frontage

MeadowviewRanchAtPackRiver.com ATI #1431 $2,295,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

140 Acre Equine Property, ¼ Mile Pack River Frontage

WaterfrontAtCrookedEar.com ATI #1242 $1,549,000 Sandpoint, Idaho 3822 SF Home, Panoramic Lake & Mountain Views

ScenicBottleBayHome.com ATI #1338 $1,499,000 Sagle, Idaho 4756 SF, 5 Bdrm/6 Bath, Striking Views

RanchAtHiddenValley.com ATI #1374 $1,495,000 Sandpoint, Idaho 20 Acres, Equine Property, 4714 SF 3Bdrm/3.5 Bath

WarrenIslandShore.com ATI #1577 $1,195,000 Sandpoint, Idaho 4.17 Acres, Private Vacation Destination

Cindy Bond,

Associate Broker, GRI, CRS www.CindyBond.com cindy.bond@sothebysrealty.com 208.255.8360

Jeff Bond, Associate Broker, GRI, CRS jeff.bond@sothebysrealty.com 208.255.8270

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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www.TSSIR.com

33 BIRCH BANKS ROAD, SAGLE • $1,590,000 • MLS #TBD

66 TAM TAM DRIVE • $1,295,000 • MLS #20192830

Private, gated 5 bedroom waterfront stunner with dock and boatlift. Warm timberframe home was built for entertaining with 2nd kitchen in family recreation wing. All rooms have a view to courtyard with pool and casita.

Incredible 6 bed/6 bath home on 5 rolling acres, with southern exposure, adjacent to Round Lake State Park. 6 car heated garage, RV parking and hook ups, lower level game room with 2nd kitchen and theater room

ED! REDUC PRICE

ED! REDUC PRICE

N. RIVER LAKE DRIVE, CLARK FORK • $1,249,000 • MLS #20191416

301 IBERIAN WAY, #250, SANDPOINT • $395,000 • MLS #20190642

Casually elegant North Idaho home is tucked into the trees on 300’ of Clark Fork River frontage adjacent to municipal airstrip. Fully renovated designer kitchen, gleaming wood floors, open beams & soaring stone fireplace complete the idyllic property.

CLARK FORK, IDAHO $1,300,000 • MLS # 20192890

160 wooded acres just minutes from Clark Fork! Completely off grid and ideal for the outdoor enthusiast with a creek and pond, abundant wildlife and old growth timber.

PEND OREILLE RIVERFRONT $352,000 • MLS # 20183618

This .44 acre waterfront lot is in the community of Swan Shores and sits on 100 feet of private shoreline along the pristine Pend Oreille River.

MERRIL MARTIN ROAD, SAGLE $595,000 • MLS # 20190558

79 acres of endless potential 15 minutes from Sandpoint with lake & valley views. Longing for the country life? This is the perfect spot for horses with ample meadowland & wooded cover. Potential also exists for further subdivision & development.

Freshly renovated 2nd floor at Condo Del Sol is an open concept design featuring sleek finishes, warm wood accents and abundant natural light.

1569 RED TAIL HAWK LN., SANDPOINT $550,000 • MLS #20191905 20+ pristine acres with panoramic views of Pend Oreille Lake and River. Located on a paved road in a neighborhood of private estates 10 minutes from Sandpoint.

DOVER BAY LOT $185,000 • MLS #20191286

.4 acre lot sits at the edge of Dover Bay’s green space in an area of custom waterfront homes. Unique property has coveted southern exposure and access to shared dock.

LOWER SYRINGA, DOVER $89,500 • MLS #20192805

Ready to build? This is the property for you! 6.78 acres, 1.5 miles from Sandpoint, with 1200 sf shop, 20 gpm well, septic, underground utilities AND panoramic views of Lake Pend Oreille.

1321 WALNUT AVE. SANDPOINT $225,000 • MLS #TBD

Pretty .42 acre lot below Syringa Heights with filtered views of Pend Oreille River. Syringa Water and City of Dover sewer hook ups available.

Dedicated to the extraordinary the exceptional and the unique.

1569 GOOBY RD., SANDPOINT $539,000 • MLS #20191646

Darling home, to be built by Idagon, in Sandpoint’s new Walnut Cottages neighborhood. These space-efficient homes are designed to pack a punch with designer finishes, open floorplans & energy conservation at the forefront.

Chris Chambers www.ExtraordinaryIdaho.com 208-290-2500 chris.chambers@sothebysrealty.com 200 Main, Sandpoint, Idaho

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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IDAHO REGISTERED MASTER HOME BUILDER + COMMERCIAL CONTRACTOR

208.304.2394

WWW.IDAGON.NET 1 2 2 5 Wa s h i n g t o n Av e . S a n d p o i n t , I D 8 3 8 6 4

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Sandpoint's Finest LUXURY VACATION HOME RENTALS

Schweitzer Headwall Townhomes

Seasons Condos

27 Lakewood Lodge

Villa Z Estate

Stay in the *best* luxury vacation home rentals in the Sandpoint area. From exceptional waterfront ‘family reunion’ retreats, Seasons at Sandpoint condos, Dover Bay homes or Schweitzer. Each home is fully appointed and comes with 24/7 concierge service. Performance boat rentals, paddle boards, Hobies available for rent too. At a Daugherty Management home, you’ll create memories that will last a lifetime!

208-263-1212

Stay. Play. Getaway.©

101 N. First Street, Ste 2, Sandpoint

Local, Professional Vacation & Long Term Rentals Full Service Property Management & Home Care

BOOK ONLINE:

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www.dm-vacations.com

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Becky Freeland 208-290-5628

Curt Hagan 208-290-7833

Charesse Moore 208-255-6060

Courtney Nova 208-290-7264

Ron Nova 208-304-2007

Kathy Robinson 208-255-9690

Maddie Gill 208-597-3955

John Dibble 208-290-1101

Danny Strauss 208-290-2946

Brian Jacobs 208-610-3188

Chelsea Nova 208-304-8979

Kris Kingsland 208-290-1509

Luke Webster 208-255-8597

Mystic Webster 208-255-8199

“Top producing Independent Real Estate firm for the past 35 years!” www.Evergreen-Realty.com // www.SchweitzerMountain.com 321 North First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID Toll Free 800.829.6370 // Office 208.263.6370 // Fax 208.263.3959 Evergreen Realty is pleased to sponsor our local Habitat for Humanity Charlie Parrish 208-290-1501 001-011 Entry_SMW20.indd 6

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departments features

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features 40 47 49 55

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80 86 90 PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

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down-to-earth, humble & alive

Granary Arts District inspires new wave of arts, artisans

ready to roll

Yetibus converts transportation into carbon-neutral living

bringing the classroom to real life Community partners with schools to jump start careers

our wonderful world

Wood ducks add color to area waterways

the oxygen to grow

Percussionaire continues to drive forward

august kale on february’s plate Farmers braving winter to bring produce to locals

the best schweitzer ever

This winter, skiers will find more and more... and more

in deep and On top of the world Snowmobiling summons young and old

new winter wonders at Pine Street Woods

rollin’ fatties North Idaho Style Fat tire biking a hot winter sport

SANDPOINT

MAGAZINE WINTER 2020, VOL. 30, NO. 1

ON THE COVER. Photographer Todd Williams captured this shot of professional rider Regan Sieg only minutes from downtown Sandpoint. He’s riding a snow bike from Timbersled, a division of Polaris, Inc., whose product development and manufacturing is headquartered right here in Sandpoint. You can learn more about Timbersled, and see more of Williams’ photos, at www.Timbersled.com.

SA N D P OI N T M AGA Z I N E .C OM SandpointMagazine.com

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SANDPOINT M A GAZINE AG

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almanac

Who, what, where, when, and why in Sandpoint

29 calendar

Annual and upcoming events

32 interview

Idaho Teacher in Space Barbara Morgan

39 pictured in history The big snow of ‘68/’69

96 photo essay Frozen in time

122 marketwatch

148 29

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Desperately seeking more

125 natives and newcomers

Introductions to the old and new of the area

160 sandpoint of view

Ray Miller dreamed of cowboys and space

REAL ESTATE 100 designing for winter

Architecture firm offers tips for winter design

109 part of the community

New clubhouse and restaurant set to open at The Idaho Club

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113 a new lease on life

Following tragic fire, First Avenue gets a face lift

117 there’s more than shopping

Businesses work together to promote downtown

121 25 years of art and love

Northwest Handmade celebrates a quarter century

EATS & DRINKS 138 get your game face on Local hot spots for game day

143 meatless wonders

Veggie burgers and melts a Sandpoint fave

L A

Bey on pri bes arr San an

146 go east, young man

Clark Fork offers simple, good food

148 do winter with wine A tour of local wine spots

154 sandpoint area dining guide Sandpoint area dining guide/map

Tea

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WINTER 2020

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LIVE AS AS BIG BIG LIVE AS THE THE LAKE. LAKE. AS Beyond mere beauty of the lakeshore, Seasons Sandpointrests rests Beyond thethe mere beauty of the lakeshore, Seasons at at Sandpoint a beautiful of life. residents guestsofofSeasons Seasonsareare on on a beautiful wayway of life. TheThe residents andandguests privileged to enjoy a private resort-style club tuckedmagnificently magnificently privileged to enjoy a private resort-style club tucked beside lake, framinginspiring inspiringpanoramas, panoramas,and andoffering offeringanan beside thethe lake, framing array of amenities to enhance experience all-seasonliving livinginin array of amenities to enhance thethe experience of of all-season Sandpoint. Because at Seasons, living is on lake, stepsfrom fromtown town Sandpoint. Because at Seasons, living is on thethe lake, steps delivered with moon stars. andand delivered with thethe moon andand thethe stars.

Located on the Shores of Lake Pend d’Oreille

Located on the Shores of Lake Pend d’Oreille

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Walking distance to Downtown Sandpoint, Starbucks and Several Restaurants

Walking distance to Downtown Sandpoint, Starbucks and Several Restaurants

SEASONS D P ON I N TS S E AAT SSA NO

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Adjacent to Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail

Adjacent to Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail

A T S Waterfront A N D P O ICommunity NT A Luxury A Luxury www.seasonsatsandpoint.com Waterfront Community www.seasonsatsandpoint.com

A L U X U R Y WAT E R F R O N T C O M M U N I T Y

A L U X U R Y WAT E R F R O N T C O M M U N I T Y

Teague Mullen 208.255.6650 teague.realm@gmail.com // Tom Puckett 208.255.8269 puckett.tom@gmail.com RealmIdaho.com Teague Mullen 208.255.6650 SeasonsAtSandpoint.com teague.realm@gmail.com //// Tom Puckett 208.255.8269 puckett.tom@gmail.com

Teague Mullen 208.255.6650 teague.realm@gmail.com // Tom Puckett 208.255.8269 puckett.tom@gmail.com

SandpointMagazine.com

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THE PUBLISHER ADMIRING STUDY HALL RUN IN THE NORTH BOWL AT SCHWEITZER, WHERE YOU’LL OFTEN FIND HIM SQUEEZING IN SOME RUNS BEFORE WORK.

MIKE KIRKPATRICK AND EZRA STAFFORD ON THE VIEWSKI LOOP TRAIL AT SCHWEITZER. PHOTO BY BEN GARRISON

Publisher’s note

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Even for those of us who have been knocking around here for a while, winter stormed in this year with unusual panache. One fine September Sunday we were still enjoying a beautiful Indian summer; one hardy soul from our office took a brisk dip in the lake at Green Bay after an invigorating bike ride. Six days later, on September 28, winter blew in, with high winds, driving snow, power outages, and downed trees. It eased up a few days later and our regularly scheduled autumn returned. But notice was served—especially for those who love a stout North Idaho winter. As we present this, our 29th annual Winter Sandpoint Magazine, the coming season is pregnant with promise. Up at Schweitzer, a pair of new ski lifts will bring transformative change to skiing and riding the North Bowl. Two miles from downtown Sandpoint there’s another transformative change, with the opening of the Pine Street Woods and a new XC ski center. And on our cover we’re featuring our first-ever snow sled, reflecting the dynamic growth of this sport that takes riders into our wondrous winter backcountry. What kind of winter is coming? In North Idaho, bold weather predictions are well known to backfire. But as we go to press the first week of November, we don’t need the Magic 8-Ball to venture this: All signs point to YES. CB

contributors

Publisher Chris Bessler COO Jeff Lagges Editor Trish Gannon Assistant Editor Beth Hawkins Advertising Director Clint Nicholson Sales Assistant: Miriam Robinson Art Director Pamela Morrow Design Team Robin Levy, Ben Garrison, Jackie Palmer Social Media Chase Urquhart Office Manager Susan Otis IT Manager Ethan Roberts

Contributors: Action Northwest Photography, Sandy Bessler, Bonner County History Museum, Kami Bremer, Susan Drinkard, Jennifer Edwards, Mary Franzel, Lisa Gerber, Jesse Hart, John Hastings, Fiona Hicks, History, Tom Hollman, Cate Huisman, Jordan Jonas, Brandon Kaastad, Lyndsie Kiebert, Jennifer Lamont Leo, Bob Legasa, Al Lemire, Marianne Love, Doug Marshall, Charles Mortensen, Isabella Mortensen, NASA, Ben Olson, Teresa Pesce, Cameron Rasmusson, Luke Roberts, Carrie Scozzaro, Dan Sorenson, Carolyn Thibault, Dennis Thibault, Tracy Tuttle, Ryan Wells, Woods Wheatcroft, Todd Williams

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Doug Marshall has been capturing images from Sandpoint and afar for over 20 years. His goal with his photography is to engage the viewer to take action or invoke an emotion, an “awaking” so to speak. When Doug is not out photographing skiing, biking, and hiking, among other things, he enjoys skiing, biking, hiking, and photographing ... and being with family and friends. He has a variety of photos in this issue, including snowboarding at Schweitzer on page 7. Carolyn Thibault is a freelance indexer and longtime resident of Hope. She enjoys looking at the world around her, soaking up the sights, and immersing herself in the outdoors. She has loved ducks since bringing home two ducklings from the county fair at age 9, and writes about our local mallards in the wild in “Our Wonderful World” on page 55.

Charles Mortensen, a Sandpoint resident for over 20 years, is an avid skier and cyclist and an active member of the local bike club, the Pend Oreille Pedalers. Trained as a geologist, in recent years he’s been busy running his bike shop, Syringa Cyclery, and organizing annual cycling events. He writes about the growing sport of fat tire biking in “Rollin’ Fatties Through Winter” on page 86.

Sandpoint Magazine is published twice yearly, in May and November, by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 405 Church St., Sandpoint, ID 83864 Phone: 208-263-3573 Email: inbox@keokee.com ©2020 by Keokee Co. Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Subscriptions: $12 per year, payable in advance. Send address changes to the address above. Visit our web magazine published at www. SandpointMagazine.com. Printed in USA by Century Publishing, Post Falls, Idaho.

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Truly

Exceptional Real Estate Services

Going Above & Beyond is our

Standard. 208.265.7362

113 N First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 83864

JAKE OLIVER (208) 290-5233

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JEREMY DUNN (208) 610-5501

TOBY ATENCIO (316) 305-5599

www.SandpointIdahoRealEstate.com

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“Alone“ Sandpoint’s own Jordan Jonas wins History Channel’s

J

ordan Jonas, winner of History television’s sixth season of the survivalist reality show “Alone,” came from humble beginnings as a farm kid raised near Kelso Lake in Bonner County. “When you grow up on a little farm in Idaho, there’s a level of resilience you develop that’s helpful,” he said. “It’s a big part of laying those [survivalist] foundations for me.” Jonas, whose “Alone” victory came with a $500,000 prize, graduated from Sandpoint High School in 2000 and went on to lead a life rich with wild experiences in unforgiving environments. Perhaps most integral to building his passion for the survivalist lifestyle was his time in Siberia living and working with nomadic Evenki reindeer herders. That experience, he said, brought him closer to his core human needs. “You just have your needs and meeting your needs directly,”

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he said, explaining survivalism. “You feel designed for it.” “Alone” chronicles the experiences of 10 survivalists completely on their own in a foreign environment with only 10 handpicked survival tools to assist them. For season six, contestants were dropped at various locations around Great Slave Lake in the Canadian Arctic. Jonas’ tool choices were a saw, ax, sleeping bag, frying pan, ferro rod, fishing supplies, multitool, a bow and arrow, trapping wire, and paracord. The contestants spend the entirety of the competition in solitude–though medical assistance is nearby–filming themselves as they build shelters, hunt, gather, elude predators, evade harsh elements, and figure out how, exactly, to pass the time until only one survivalist is still healthy or willing enough to continue on. Jonas—who won on day 77 of the show—said he spent a lot

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localalone buzz | Al man ac

... I enjoyed it, but I wouldn’t want to be the last person on earth indefinitely.”

of time thinking about the future, but also about all the people he’d met in his life. Overall, he said, he didn’t mind being alone with his thoughts. “For the most part I enjoyed it, but I wouldn’t want to be the last person on Earth indefinitely,” he said. “Fortunately I had enough calories to keep active.” Those calories came from many sources; most notably from a moose Jonas killed early on with his bow and arrow. He said the experience was a “roller coaster,” as he worked for hours to butcher, pack, and safely store his main food source—all with only the small knife on his multitool to help him. He also foraged and fished, a favorite moment on the water coming on what Jonas didn’t know would be his last day of competition, when he caught a large pike with a handmade net. “On the last day, when I caught that huge pike, it made me

PHOTO AT LEFT: JONAS ON HIS LAST DAY. TOP: THE AX WAS ONE OF JONAS’ CHOSEN SURVIVAL TOOLS. BOTTOM: JONAS SAID HE GAVE UP ON EVER THAWING HIS BEARD. AX PHOTO COURTESY HISTORY, OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY JORDAN JONAS

change my whole perspective,” he said. “Before that I thought I wasn’t doing enough. I was just assuming I wasn’t doing very well the whole time ... [After the pike I realized] I could be out there as long as I needed, it seemed. I had a whole new positive outlook.” Now, back to his day-to-day life in Virginia, it seems “Alone” did nothing but further solidify Jonas’ love for surviving with only those basic needs at hand. “The modern world has so many distractions that it’s easy to float on by,” he said, “but this way of living connects you to yourself.” His winnings from the show will be used, in part, to help Jonas and his family—he and his wife, Jahnahlee, have two children, with a third on the way—move back to this area.

- Lyndsie Kiebert SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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Almanac

THE CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT FOR CONSERVATION

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ust before Christmas, if you spot a bunch of people in a nondescript car pulling slowly past your house and peering through binoculars, don’t be alarmed! It’s likely a group of birders participating in the Audubon Society’s annual Christmas bird count. The count began Christmas Day 1900 as an alternative to a less benign custom, in which hunters competed to see who could shoot the most birds on the holiday. Conservationists concerned over declining bird populations encouraged bird enthusiasts simply to count the birds instead. The idea caught on and today, the Christmas bird count is the largest, most continuous citizen science project in the country. In Sandpoint, it’s usually held on the weekend before Christmas Day. Birders congregate in the wee, dark cold hours at a local restaurant, and then split up into teams that each cover a portion of a large area centered around City Beach. Birder Rich del Carlo has served as local coordinator for more than a decade. It’s his job to wrangle volunteers and to add up the numbers as darkness falls and the thoroughly chilled counters reconvene to reheat and share figures. He notes that 60 to 70 species of birds are observable in Sandpoint in the winter, including large numbers of waterfowl and bald eagles, as well as common redpolls and bohemian waxwings. In general, however, the total number of birds the count reveals has fallen over the past several years. The National Audubon Society uses our local numbers—along with the numbers of thousands of other counters around the country—to determine how bird populations are faring and to guide their conservation and advocacy efforts.

PHOTO BY RYAN MAGSINO

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- Cate Huisman

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GENEROUS DONATION A REMINDER OF TIMES PASSED

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he Bonner County History Museum has a new addition to their Native American exhibit thanks to a generous donation made by local artist, Connie Scherr, a featured artist in the local Artist Studio Tours. Scherr spent 35 years creating in watercolors before switching to oils over a decade ago. Her art finds expression in a range of subjects—Plein Air is a passion—but photos and artifacts at the museum inspired a large body of Native American art. “My husband and I love going to galleries near the Four Corners area and Taos, and they all have paintings and art both of and by the Native Americans of the Southwest. It made me wonder for many years why there wasn’t more of that in our area since there is such a rich history here in the Northwest of the area’s first inhabitants.” And so she put brush to canvas and, when it came time to find a home for the collection she had created, the museum was a natural choice. “Anytime we can collaborate with local artists, it’s a great experience,” said Heather Upton, museum curator. “Connie has a following in town; I feel her art donation has attracted visitors.” “I feel very thankful and honored,” said Scherr, “to have the whole collection hanging and be a permanent part of our Bonner County Museum.” The museum, located at 611 S. Ella Ave. in Sandpoint, opens for the winter November 22. Visiting hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with free admission the first Saturday of every month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Learn more at www.BonnerCountyHistory.org.

- Isabella Mortensen

ARTIST CONNIE SHERR WITH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS, AND THE ARTIFACT THAT INSPIRED IT. STAFF PHOTO

Ready For Winter. We Love Where We Live!

116 N. First Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 • 208.263.3166 • www.LakeshoreRealtyNorth.com SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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Almanac

SELF-PUBLISHED BOOKS BY LOCAL AUTHORS FILL SHELVES

THIS IS Y. For unlimited classes, free childcare and finding time for YOU. LITEHOUSE YMCA 208 263 6633 | www.ymcainw.org

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 504 Oak Street 12,000 square feet of Shopping in Sandpoint

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EVERYTHING FROM ANTIQUES TO YARN

yarns 208-263-5911

Baggage

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at Something Old Something New

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pparently we North Idahoans are a prolific group of writers. Just browse through the newest wave of self-published books authored by local and regional residents, which were designed and published through Sandpoint’s Keokee Books. The titles include imaginative children’s books— horses appear to be a favorite topic—along with Sandpoint history, Caribbean fiction, and more. New nonfiction titles published in 2019 feature an assortment of subjects: “Bury Me With My Fly Rod” by Dennis Dauble; “Sandpoint’s Early History” by Gary Pietsch and the Bonner Historical Society; “Fish of a Lifetime” by Al Van Vooren; “Air America (Second Edition)” by Bill Collier; a memoir on friendship and food titled “Sea Food Bash” by Helena Czepiec and Margie Stevens; and “Finding the Light Within,” the true account of Holocaust survivor Mary Berges. Perfect for holiday gift-giving, new children’s books include the journeys of a young Clydesdale stallion in “My Name is Ramsey” by Jack Parnell; “Amazin’ Jason” by Kathy Joyce-Garrison; and the dazzlingly illustrated “Whinny Nicker Neigh: Equine Interviews” by Shellby Young. There’s even a new work of fiction (although you may spy some real-life local characters) with “The Mysterious Journey of Captain Hart and Other Tales” by Brooks Tessier. With 10 new books out on the shelves just this year, Keokee Co. Publishing (parent company of Sandpoint Magazine) on Church Street stays busy working with local authors to see their manuscripts become books through consultation, design, lay out, and publishing assistance. “I really enjoy helping authors bring their stories to fruition and being a part of that process,” said Ben Garrison, book design lead at Keokee Publishing. He advises wouldbe authors that being fully prepared before hiring a book designer is the best strategy. “Have the manuscript of the book as complete as possible—content, grammar, pictures, etcetera. This will save time and money and make the process smoother.” Garrison also assists authors in the transfer of print books into digital files for e-books. It’s a trend that continues to dominate the marketplace. According to Publish-

= Oak Street + 208-263-9447

mercantile

Vintage • Furniture • Gifts • Home Decor Signs •Vintage & New Apparel Milk Paint & Chalk Paint •208-627-6621

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keokee books loc al bu zz | |AlAman l m aac n ac

ers Weekly, self-published books now represent 31 percent of e-book sales on Amazon’s Kindle Store. Since we all have a story to tell but not necessarily the room or desire to devote a spare bedroom to book storage, the big boom in self-publishing can also be attributed to the cost-saving technology of print-on-demand. “This allows authors to order smaller batches of books at a time, so they don’t have to pay a large sum of money up front for a big order of books,” said Chris Bessler, publisher at Keokee. Plus, with print-on-demand, there’s a seamless sales and distribution line through Amazon and other venues to get the book in front of potential readers. That’s an important factor, and one that can even eclipse the writing process. “Connecting to readers and getting your book to sell is the hardest part of the entire endeavor,” said Bessler. In Sandpoint, both Vanderford’s Books and Corner Book Store carry many of these titles, as does Bonners Books in Bonners Ferry, or find them online at www.KeokeeBooks.com

- Beth Hawkins

SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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Almanac

Local writer goes

BIG STAGE CHRIS HERRON IS NOW A PUBLISHED PLAYWRIGHT

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riendly, yet private. Courteous, yet blunt. A true-north friend with a solitary streak. Chris Herron is best described as complex, which is why, as a playwright, he is such an insightful commentator on humanity at its best, worst, and truest. A master of black comedy, his relationshipbased plays are squirmingly dark yet hysterically funny. His characters make us laugh when they aren’t making us cry. And now, he is not only a Sandpoint playwright, he is a published Sandpoint playwright. Unlike other playwrights, with desk drawers crammed with rejection letters, Herron was accepted by the first publisher he and his wife, Madeline, approached. They submitted “Quick Exit”—a dark comedy about suicide—to Heuer Publishing, found in one search and chosen because it had the fewest submission requirements and would respond within three months. Heuer responded in one week with an offer. Chris and Madeline celebrated with a six-pack of Zima (often mentioned in the script), brought by actress/director friend Dorothy Prophet. His path to playwright was defined by a detour. While working on a literary magazine at Pacific University in Oregon, Herron attended a staff party. Well along in merriment due to imbibing pear cider, he said “Why not?” to a friend’s suggestion that he attend Bath Spa University in England for a year. He returned with an MA degree in creative writing and a film script as his thesis, and found his Sandpoint writing tribe. His name bubbled up in the theatrical community with co-written plays like “In Between” and “Once Upon a Pizza.” His first full-length play was “Separate Checks,” and audiences loved his wickedly bitter brand of relationship comedy spiked with sarcastic wit, bleakness, hope, and humor.

PHOTO BY BEN OLSON

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In 2014, Herron and his actor/director/producer wife Madeline founded the Unknown Locals, producing two to four plays a year. Herron continued to perfect his craft with “Quick Exit,” “Your Mom,” “No Service,” “Cold Feet,” “Secret Shame,” “Blind Panic,” “True Believer,” and “First Wave.” “Every title has to have two words and ‘the’ counts as a word,” Herron said. “It’s a compulsion at this point.” How does he write? Uniquely. Play ideas pop up in surprising forms. “Your Mom” appeared as bullet points in his mind. “Quick Exit” emerged from an imagined conversation about spirituality and faith. He writes his plays by hand on lined paper with about two pages per scene, “telling the story incrementally and finding it along the way” because he doesn’t know what will happen next until it does. How does he direct? Again, uniquely. “He sits on the floor with his eyes closed and he listens,” Madeline said. His scripts contain no visual specifics or stage directions. These unusual methods give the actors interpretive freedom, and they like it. Amazing dialogue, characters so intriguing actors will fight to be cast, minimal sets, small casts … little theaters across America are going to love Chris Herron plays. And why not? Sandpoint certainly does! @UnknownLocals can be found on Facebook.

- Teresa Pesce

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Barking up the Right Tree PUPPY TRAINING ORGANIZATION SAVING THOUSANDS OF LIVES ACROSS THE COUNTRY

DIRECTOR PEGGY FRYE AND BONNER COUNTY KEN AT THE LILLYBROOK FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER. STAFF PHOTO

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onner County Ken doesn’t quite look or act the same as the other Kens in the area. He’s lazy, covered in black hair, and enjoys getting pampered more than your typical male. However, some say he’s “the goodest boy” in town. Ken, of course, is not a human; he’s a Courthouse Facility Dog that spends most of his time at the LillyBrook Family Justice Center, a Sandpoint organization providing services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and elder abuse. Ken’s primary role is to serve as a calming presence for victims who come to LillyBrook for assistance. He sits next to them when they come in for their initial forensic interview, as well as when they’re testifying in the courtroom. LillyBrook Director Peggy Frye said it’s hard to put into words how much of an impact Ken has had since joining the team in August 2015. “You can’t really picture it until you see it happen,” Frye said. “I’ve had kids on the stand with him who disclosed more on the stand than we had ever heard.” There’s a reason Ken is able to sit calmly for so long; he’s a proud Canine Companions for Independence graduate. CCI is a nonprofit organization headquartered in Santa Rosa, California. Its mission is to provide highly trained, specialized assistance dogs to individuals with disabilities. They train four types of assistance dogs: service dogs, hearing dogs, skilled companions, and facility dogs, all at no cost to the recipient. Some of the tasks they are trained to do include turning lights on and

off, pulling a lightweight wheelchair, retrieving and delivering dropped items, and, as in Ken’s case, simply sitting still and relieving stress. The majority of training for each dog is conducted by a vast army of volunteers located all across the country. Puppy raisers receive their puppies at 8 weeks of age and they train them for about 18 to 20 weeks. During the initial training period the puppies learn basic obedience and socialization skills. Afterward, the dogs are sent to one of six regional training centers across the country where they receive specialized training from CCI staff. After an additional two-week training in Santa Rosa with the recipient, each participant receives a dog that is well-suited to handle their individual needs. “People say, “How do you give them up?” That’s the question I get the most,” Lilly Mitsui said. Mitsui is the president of Lake Pend Oreille Puppy Raisers & Volunteers, and the chair of DogFest, an annual fundraiser held locally for CCI. Despite her first name, she is not connected to the justice center. Mitsui has been raising dogs for CCI since the 1990s, and recently picked up her fifth dog for training. Mitsui moved to Sandpoint about five years ago and saw an opportunity to introduce the community to CCI. Over the last five years she’s spearheaded the creation of a full fledged chapter—the Inland Northwest Chapter—one of 44 located across the country. Ken is currently the only CCI graduate serving this area, but Mitsui envisions that will soon change. She said that many residents have added their names to the waiting list, making it only a matter of time before they’re called to Santa Rosa, to train with a new companion. Learn more at www.cci.org

- Chase Urquhart

SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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Almanac

AT LEFT: A RENDERING OF WHAT THE BUILDING MIGHT LOOK LIKE IN THE FUTURE. ABOVE: KARIN WIDEMEYER AND KATHI SAMUELS SIGN THE PAPERS FOR THE PURCHASE OF THE OLD CITY HALL. COURTESY PHOTOS

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usic Conservatory of Sandpoint’s executive director Karin Widemeyer could barely contain her excitement recently as she and Board President Kathi Samuels shared some exciting news: as of late this summer, the MCS transitioned from renter to owner. “It’s hard to keep the excitement under a lid,” began Widemeyer, describing the announcement to KRFY Community Radio listeners during a late September appearance on the station’s “Morning Show.” From the outside, little has changed at the “old” City Hall and fire station, located at 110 Main Street. But inside, plans are underway to transform the 12,000 square foot building, the majority of which is occupied by MCS, which offers accredited programming for students of all ages in the form of instruction in vocal and instrumental music, as well as theater. Popular programs include an after-school program called Music Matters! and various summer camps, which culminated in this past summer’s collaboration with Shakespeare in the Park. MCS will retain its primary space on the ground floor alongside Pend Oreille Arts Council, which relocated to the building earlier this spring. New, however, is a triphase renovation, explained Widemeyer, who founded the nonprofit in 2009 with Ruth Klinginsmith. The first phase involves opening the firehouse doors and remodeling the performance space known as “Little Carnegie,” said Widemeyer, who estimates they serve around 300 students per week inside the building in an ever-expanding list, which this year includes Clark Fork students. Opening the firehouse doors will allow whatever is happening inside to spill out onto the street. In the meantime, POAC has artwork in the space and is part of the coordination efforts to incorporate more artwork in the building, including murals and other artistic touches by local artist Peter Goetzinger. Phase two will focus on elevating the interior ceiling height closer to its original measurements and upgrading bathrooms, while phase three addresses the building exterior. The hope, said Widemeyer, who cautions that much depends on financing and continued community support, is to restore the historic cupola or domed structure on the roof as well as the rooftop event space. “We’re looking to make this building really energy efficient,” added Widemeyer, who said that good stewardship is a primary concern. They’re working with the Idaho State Historical Society to navigate the complexities of historically appropriate remodeling, and eye-balling the potential to install solar panels to promote energy sustainability. “Having found partners who helped us realize our dream,” said Widemeyer, “we can help realize Sandpoint’s dreams of becoming an arts community.”

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for the camera, Sandpoint

Smile WHEATCROFT

GUIDES CHAMBER’S

INSTAGRAM

When it comes to promoting Sandpoint, seeing is believing. That’s the mindset behind the Greater Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce’s entry onto the photo sharing site Instagram, in a collaboration with outdoor lifestyle photographer Woods Wheatcroft, who has singlehandedly maintained a Visit Sandpoint page for the past several years. This page will now transition to the Chamber’s Visit Sandpoint tourism group, while Wheatcroft will manage and continue to contribute his stunning photography. “We ... have been using his photos in the visitor guide for years,” said Kristin Carlson, communications specialist at the chamber. “He has a unique eye and his work is immediately identifiable.” Wheatcroft will be posting photos of the Sandpoint area four or five times per week, and plans to mix things up. “I have focused primarily on lifestyle and scenic beauty,” he said. “Moving forward, I intend to focus on the connection pieces of our town on a more internal level: food, dining, events; scenes and situations that bring our town together while still maintaining the strong visual narrative and high quality integrity of solid photography.” It’s a strategy aimed at helping Visit Sandpoint market the area. “[Wheatcroft’s] clout and reputation will only enhance the Visit Sandpoint brand,” Carlson said. Look for Visit Sandpoint on Instagram, or go to www.Instagram.com/ VisitSandpoint. -Beth Hawkins

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Almanac THE MAHONEY BROTHERS IN FRONT OF THEIR UPCOMING NEW BREWPUB LOCATION. STAFF PHOTO

HISTORIC BUILDING TO HOST HOPPY HAPPINESS

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n August, Mickey and Duffy Mahoney announced their popular First Avenue restaurant, MickDuff’s Brewpub, would be moving in 2020 to a new home—the historic building located at 419 Second Ave., at one time Sandpoint’s Federal Building. Plans for the three-story, 12,000-square-foot building include offices in the top level, with a kitchen, dining room, and bar on the main level. The basement will house a small brewery, along with storage space. There are

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plans for a large, outdoor dining area for use in the summer months. “We love the building, the history, and are excited about this next phase in our business in downtown Sandpoint,” said Mickey Mahoney, owner and director of brewing operations, in a press release about the purchase. “We plan to keep it as original as possible while we make upgrades and remodel it for our restaurant’s use.” This marks the fourth iteration for the 91-year-old building, which began life as the community’s federal building and post office, transitioned into a public library, and then became the offices for a local title company. It was 1928 when the doors first opened on architect W.D. Lovell’s building, described as having an Italian Renaissance Revival style construction, given its mass and symmetry, and predominantly Spanish Colonial Revival style design thanks to details like arcaded windows, iron balconies, red tile roof, and a tiled parapet wall. Rarely seen in northern Idaho, the five windows in the front are set in brick arches with “each containing a gargoyle,” wrote local historian Nancy Renk. It was registered in the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. Although funds to build the original building were obtained in a 1913 federal appropriations bill—to the tune of $70,000—the property on which to build it wasn’t chosen until 1916, and a construction bid was not awarded until 1926; it finally opened to the public in March 1928. Lumber for the building came from the nearby Humbird Lumber Company, while bricks were

obtained from kilns near Spokane, Washington. The main floor of the new building housed the community post office, while the U.S. Forest Service held most of the offices on the second floor. The basement provided rooms for the Internal Revenue Service, the Civil Service, and a military recruiter. In 1967 the post office moved to its current location on Fourth Avenue, and the East Bonner County Library, which had been housed on the second floor of City Hall, moved in. They utilized a ‘chain’ of students and others to move books from the old location to the new—a process that would be duplicated when the library moved on to its own new location on Cedar Street in April 2000. That same year the building was purchased and remodeled to house First American Title, which has occupied the building until the present. “The federal building... is locally significant as an excellent example of an important period architectural style,” Renk wrote in the application to designate the building as historic. Now it will become an excellent example of a community business that’s committed to Sandpoint’s downtown vibrancy. According to the Mahoneys’ press release, “After 13 years, we are excited to be investing in and adding to the vitality of downtown.” No firm opening date has been set, but the pair hope to have the new brewpub open in summer 2020.

- Trish Gannon

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NOTEWORTHY

PHOTOS, FROM LEFT: THE LION’S ROAR OF SEPTEMBER’S END WAS CAPTURED AT CITY BEACH BY LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER RYAN WELLS. THE CAROUSEL OF SMILES IS MOVING CLOSER TO A PERMANENT HOME. STAFF PHOTO. MIKE AND SHAWN KEOUGH HAD TIME FOR A SOME FAMILY FUN BEFORE SHE ACCEPTED A NEW ASSIGNMENT TO THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. COURTESY PHOTO.

CAL Marks Four Decades of Giving The

fall to showcase the company’s new SR4 model solar panel, installed atop a newly designed, recycled rubber base. The new panels will produce up to 50 watts of electricity, an upgrade from the 36 watts produced previously.

fall of 2019 marked 40 years of area support and giving by Community Assistance League. Begun by Ginny Jensen, Marilyn Pagano, and Sydne Van Horne back in 1979, early efforts by CAL included sponsoring a state volleyball tournament (the first to be held in Sandpoint); a partnership with Schweitzer to bring Special Olympics into the area; the establishment of “Afternoon Academy” in our schools (enrichment classes in music, art, and science); plus the creation of the Kaleidoscope Art Enrichment Program. These days, funds are raised, primarily, through Bizarre Bazaar, a resale store at 502 Church St. in Sandpoint, and the group provides a number of grants to community groups each fall. In 2019, they gave out grants totaling $105,000.

Power Upgrade The Solar Roadways demonstration project at Sandpoint’s Jeff Jones Town Square was updated this

Sandpoint’s premier spa experience.

Remember Winter Parking Rules Once snow begins to fall, be aware of winter parking regulations. Downtown, there is no on-street parking from 2 a.m. to 6 a.m., beginning November 1 and lasting through March 1, unless posted differently.In residential and other business areas, parking is restricted to the even side of the street—that is, the side which includes addresses with even numbers. This is also in effect November 1 through March 1. Out Like a Lion September of 2019 went out like a lion, taking summer with it and setting weather records around the area. The cold weather set records: Sandpoint’s high

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Nicole Albright

spa manager/aveda hair

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temperature of 43 degrees on the 28th was 24 degrees below the historical average of 67 degrees; the previous coldest recorded temperature here since records began being kept in 1910 was 45 degrees in 2000. The cold was coupled with gale force winds that left thousands without power around the region as crews scrambled to repair downed power lines. And then there was the snow. “Getting measurable snow in September has either never happened, or only once in the entire climate record for all towns across the area except Priest River,” reported the National Weather Service out of Spokane, Washington. Schweitzer Mountain Resort saw over 4 inches in the village on September 28.

Carousel Moves Closer to City Beach As the city moves forward with a master plan to update the city’s parks, early plans are calling for possible placement of the “Carousel of Smiles” (see Sandpoint Magazine Summer

Schweitzer Mountain in the Village 208.255.1660

2019 to learn more) at City Beach. There are two possibilities for its location there. Because this is the preferred location spot for the carousel owners—Reno and Clay Hutchison—they are excited about its initial inclusion in the master plan.

Education Board Appointment Shawn Keough, who served as a senator for Idaho’s District 1 from 1996 to 2018, was appointed this fall to serve on the Idaho State Board of Education by Governor Brad Little. Keough, said Little, “displays the right demeanor and vision to help Idaho’s public education system serve our communities and prepare students for careers and a lifetime of learning.” Keough works as the executive director for the Associated Logging Contractors. She said, “I have always been and remain passionate about public education—K-through-career—and I look forward to serving.”

213 Church St Downtown Sandpoint 208.263.5157

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Winter 2019-2020

calendar of events November

3 Flamenco Pacifico. See POAC calendar. www.ArtinSandpoint.org 9 Holiday Farmers’ Market. Sandpoint Farmers’ Market hosts their annual Holiday Market in the Bonner Mall. www. SandpointFarmersMarket.com 9 SARS Ski Swap. Shop great deals on snow gear, or sell stuff, at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. Proceeds benefit the Schweitzer Alpine Racing School. www.SARS.snowproportal.com 16-17 Bonner County Fairgrounds Christmas Fair. Holiday tradition. See Hot Picks. 23-27, 29-Dec. 1 K&K Thanksgiving Fishing Derby. Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club’s annual fall fishing contest. www. LPOIC.org 29 Tree Lighting and Santa’s Arrival. Festive family fun at Jeff Jones Town Square with tree lighting ceremony, caroling, and Santa’s arrival. www. DowntownSandpoint.com 30 Shook Twins ‘Giving Thanks’ Concert. The Shook Twins return to the Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., at 7:30 p.m. for their annual Thanksgiving concert. Featuring Sandpoint natives Katie and Laurie Shook, with performances by Honeysuckle and John Craigie. Tickets available at www. Panida.org, and at the door on the night of the show.

DECember

Dec. 5-7 Festival of Trees Kinderhaven fundraiser at the Bonner County Fairgrounds; Family Night on Thursday, Luncheon Friday, Gala Saturday. www. KinderhavenSandpoint.com. 6 Backcountry Film Festival. Selkirk Outdoor Leadership & Education hosts the Winter Wildlands Alliance film festival at the Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. Proceeds help fund SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program. www. SoleExperiences.org 13 Schweitzer Community Day. $10 lift

tickets at Schweitzer Mountain Resort benefit local charities. www.Schweitzer. com 18 Eugene Ballet’s The Nutcracker. See POAC calendar. www. ArtinSandpoint.org 23-24 Santa Skis. Santa and Mrs. Claus ski the slopes at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. On Christmas Eve, all the kids can join them for a balloon parade followed by a visit in the Selkirk Lodge to hear last-minute wishes. www. Schweitzer.com 31 New Year’s Eve Parties. At Schweitzer Resort and in town at The Hive. www.Schweitzer.com and www. BeeswaxSystems.com/TheHive

JANUARY

17-19 Banff Mountain Film Festival. Now in its 24th year of showing breathtaking adventure films, the festival raises money for local and international good deeds. Tickets always sell out; get them in advance at www.Panida.org (when they become available). 18-20 MLK Weekend. Check out all the special activities over the holiday weekend including Saturday night’s Northern Lights fireworks show and the torchlight parade, followed by live music in Taps. www.Schweitzer.com 25 Winter Trails Day. Enjoy free access to snowshoe and Nordic ski trails at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. www.Schweitzer.com

FEBRUARY

7-28 Starlight Racing on NASTAR. Four weeks of Friday night racing at Schweitzer, followed by fabulous parties in Taps. www.Schweitzer.com 14-23 Sandpoint Winter Carnival. Every winter, Sandpoint pulls out all the stops to celebrate the season that brings recreation and family fun to our area! Find it all continuously updated at www.SandpointWinterCarnival.com

15-17 Schweitzer President’s Weekend Celebration. The holiday weekend is jam-packed with family fun including the Let it Glow! Night Parade and Fireworks Show, plus Sunday night skiing! 21 Northern Stars Rising. See POAC calendar. www.ArtinSandpoint.org 29 PAFE Mega Demo Day. At Schweitzer. See Hot Picks.

MARCH

4 Living Voices’ Hear My Voice. See POAC calendar. www.ArtinSandpoint.org 6-7 The Follies, Angels Over Sandpoint’s annual wild & crazy fundraiser is held in the Panida, and benefits the charity’s good deeds in the community. Tickets go on sale Groundhog Day (Feb. 2). www. AngelsOverSandpoint.org 28 2,400 Feet of Schweitzer. Topto-bottom giant slalom fundraiser at Schweitzer Mountain Resort benefits cystinosis research. www.Schweitzer.com

APRIL

4-5 Schpring Finale and Rotary Ducky Derby. Celebrate the end of another great season at Schweitzer Mountain Resort with fun events and live music! www.Schweitzer.com 18 Missoula Children’s Theatre— Cinderella. See POAC calendar. www. ArtinSandpoint.org 25-May 3 K&K Spring Fishing Derby. Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club holds their annual fishing derby on Lake Pend Oreille. Pin auction is April 24, and an awards banquet follows the derby on May 9. www.LPOIC.org

MAY

14-16 Lost in the ‘50s. Retro celebration hits its 35th anniversary! Parades, car displays, dances, concerts—this event has it all! www. Sandpoint.org/Lostin50s or Lost50s@ Facebook.

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See complete, up-to-the-minute calendars at www.sandpointonline.com

POAC

2019/ 2020

HOT PICKS

performing arts series World-class entertainment arrives in Sandpoint with the 36th season of the Pend Oreille Arts Council Performing Arts Series. Tickets are available in the POAC office, 110 Main St., Ste. 101, or online at www.ArtinSandpoint.org

Home(made) for the holidays

In what’s become a tradition for many, the annual Christmas Fair at the Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd., is a festive outing held this year from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17. Find something unique and handmade for everyone on your list, and have a blast with kids’ activities, lively music, Christmas treats, and coffee. Santa visits both days from noon to 2 p.m., and there will also be the 2nd annual Gingerbread Competition benefiting the Bonner Community Food Bank. Free admission! For more information, call 208-263-8414 or visit www.BonnerCountyFair.com

Ski smarts

It’s pure genius when Schweitzer Mountain Resort hosts the annual MEGA Demo Day—a special Saturday event during the winter sports season when representatives from major ski vendors bring their demo equipment for trial rides by ski enthusiasts. And the brilliant part is that the event has raised more than $45,000 over the past four years for Panhandle Alliance for Education, which benefits children in the Lake Pend Oreille School District. Now in its fifth year, it’s all going down Saturday, Feb. 29 (leap day!). The venue is a tent city of easy-up booths at the base of the mountain, where skiers enjoy the camaraderie of like-minded skiers, the knowledge of certified equipment specialists, the opportunity of demoing multiple types of skis, and a first peek at next year’s gear. The day culminates with music, beer, and munchies. www.Schweitzer.com 30

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Flamenco Pacifico, 7 p.m. Nov. 3 in the Heartwood Center—Flamenco is a living culture, steeped in history, with many roots and branches. Flamenco Pacifico presents a dynamic range of modern, original Flamenco composition by Berto Boyd. The traditional pieces invite you to journey through a musical landscape that can be haunting and deeply moving, and the lighter, chico compositions create infectious melodies with lively interpretations by two skilled flamenco dancers. Eugene Ballet’s The Nutcracker, 7 p.m. Dec. 18 in the Panida Theater—For the 32nd year, Clara’s adventures through the Land of Sweets with the Nutcracker Prince come to life on the Panida stage during this favorite holiday performance. Keep an eye out for the Baby Mice, Bon Bons, Angels, and Party Children—they are all played by local dance students who have been rehearsing at Allegro Dance Studios! Northern Stars Rising, 7 p.m. Feb. 21 in the Heartwood Center—Northern Stars Rising is a showcase music competition for all ages that exists to further the ability of local performers to pursue their careers. Performers audition and then compete for cash prizes and further performance opportunities. Auditions will be held in early January. Living Voices’ Hear My Voice, 7 p.m. March 4 in the Heartwood Center—Hear My Voice is an account of the American women’s suffrage movement, told through the eyes of a young fictionalized composite character. Jessie is introduced to the suffrage movement by her great-aunt Charlotte. Despite her parents’ objections, Jessie joins the battle for the right to vote while her brother is pulled across the ocean to fight in World War I. Missoula Children’s Theatre’s Cinderella, 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. April 18 in the Panida Theater—Missoula Children’s Theatre brings to life one of the classic fairy tales with the help of over 60 local students. They spend only one week learning all the lines, songs, and dances of a fulllength musical! Auditions for Cinderella will be held April 13.

CAST OF FLAMENCO PACIFICO. COURTESY PHOTO

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RCA


How Long Have We Been Fighting To Protect Our Lake From a Monster Mine? Hint: 1995 was a bad year in

now be going full bore, releasing its toxic runoff the national news. Locally and metals-laden water too. That’s when the first towards our Lake every mining company, ASARCO, single day. launched its serious run But mining compaat exploiting the Cabinet nies have deep pockets, so we need Mountain Wilderness Area. deep resolve. Their goal, build a monster mine under And the continued support of everyone this pristine land that would generate 100 who loves our unique Lake. Please, become million tons of waste piled right beside the an RCA member, write your representative, Clark Fork River. The main tributary to donate money, visit our website, like us on Lake Pend Oreille! Facebook and follow us on Instagram. And that’s when we stepped in to preYes, it seems like this struggle has been vent them. going on a long time but consider this: Now—a quarter of a century, dozens of If built, such a mine would lawsuits, and four mining comcontinue to damage both the panies later—the fight goes on. Wilderness and Lake in perpeBut Lake Pend Oreille remains tuity. In other words, virtually unscathed. forever. Had we, and several others, rock creek alliance Now that is a long time. not resisted, the mine would

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A Truly Higher

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An Intimate Interview with

IDAHO’S TEACHER IN SPACE, BARBARA MORGAN by Cameron Rasmusson

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eacher and Boise State University instructor Barbara Morgan couldn’t have dreamed a career in education would take her out of this world. But that’s exactly where she found herself in 2007, during a mission to the International Space Station. An elementary school teacher in McCall during the 1980s, Morgan was selected by NASA to train as a back-up Teacher in Space candidate for the Challenger mission in 1986. When that mission ended in disaster and claimed the lives of its crew, including teacher Christa McAuliffe, Morgan continued to work with NASA as the Teacher in Space Designee. In 1998 she became a Mission Specialist with NASA. Just over two decades later, they achieved the mission first laid down by President Ronald Reagan to put a teacher in outer space when she flew aboard the shuttle Endeavour to the International Space Station, spending 12 days, 17 hours, 55 minutes, and 34 seconds in space. Although semi retired, Morgan still works hard to educate and inspire students. In the spring of 2019 she visited Priest River Elementary School—with a message to students to work hard toward big dreams—as the culmination of teacher Chris Naccarato’s year-long, space-themed curriculum through the National Astronauts in the Classroom Association. She was the 45th astronaut to visit there since Naccarato began the program in 1993. Later, she talked with Sandpoint Magazine about her own journey chasing a feat few have achieved: leaving Planet Earth.

AT LEFT: MORGAN SHOWS THE EFFECTS OF NO GRAVITY. ABOVE, LEFT: MORGAN JUST PRIOR TO TAKE-OFF OF STS-118. ABOVE, RIGHT: MORGAN (AT BOTTOM) TRAINING WITH CHRISTA MCAULIFFE AND PAYLOAD SPECIALIST GREG JARVIS PRIOR TO THE ILL-FATED CHALLENGER MISSION. ALL PHOTOS COURTESY NASA.

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interview Q: What was it that first attracted you to the idea of space travel? Was there any single moment you recognize as inspiring that ambition? A: Actually no. Sorry to disappoint you! When I was growing up, I was very, very interested in space and the stars and the planets and astronomy. As a Girl Scout, I spent a lot of time looking up and out and was fascinated by that. A lot of astronauts will tell you it was Neil Armstrong stepping on the moon. I had just graduated from high school, and I definitely watched Apollo 11 and the build up to that. But as a girl growing up in that time frame, it’s just not what girls did. Girls became teachers, moms, nurses, secretaries. So it never occurred to me that was something I would do. Q: The Challenger disaster was a national tragedy, and as someone who trained with Christa McAuliffe, you had a very personal connection to it. What was your reaction to that moment? Did it sow any doubt about your own dreams of space?

A: I was very lucky to be selected as Christa’s backup and [to] train with the crew. It was just wonderful. I really want people to know that the Challenger is something we should never, ever forget. We should never forget Apollo. We should never forget Columbia, and the folks that have given their lives to help us understand the universe and our place in it. What happened with the Challenger should not have happened. But what NASA and the crew were trying to do was absolutely the right thing. Afterward, NASA asked if I wanted to continue on and step into Christa’s shoes. This was on national TV, and we had children around the country watching adults in that horrible, horrible tragedy. As a teacher, I know kids learn first and foremost by doing, and then by watching ... and I felt it was really important to see adults doing the right thing. And that meant finding out, for a start, what went wrong, and more importantly, fixing it and keeping the future open for our young people. So I had no trouble at all saying yes, I would continue on. Also, teachers had

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made a commitment to NASA, and NASA had made a commitment to the teaching profession. And I felt it was important to continue that. Q: What was that next decade like? When NASA contacted you to resume training, did it come as a surprise, or was there regular communication between you and the agency? A: I went back to McCall in the fall to continue teaching after I had completed both Christa and my schedules for what we’d be doing after Christa’s flight. I also continued working with NASA headquarters in the education division. In 1998, many years later, NASA asked me to apply to the astronaut office because they wanted to fully infuse education into the Astronaut Corps. In [its] 50 years of human space flight, NASA started with test pilots, and then they opened it up to engineers, and then to include women. In 1998, I was kind of the guinea pig. As a new requirement, in addition to having a science or a math or an engineering degree, you had to have experience in education. Q: Tell me about the night before launching on a space flight mission. What goes through your mind in those moments? Do you sleep at all? A: You sleep. You’re definitely ready to go. After all that training … and about a year before your mission is scheduled, your crew is assigned mission-specific training. All the simulations you do, you do with your particular crew mates and mission control teams. In our case, our job was to help construct the International Space Station. We spent a year [training], working specifically on those tasks. For this job, you spend a little more time in space, and you become a little more specialized in skills that are needed for the long haul. And you are ready. You’re still going over procedures. You have briefings with ground control. There are all kinds of steps that the launch team is taking to make sure everything is ready to go. We’re excited. We can’t wait to launch. Q: What were the feelings of your family as they prepared for this moment? A: My family was always very supportive. They were

TOP: MORGAN (AT RIGHT) AND TEACHER CHRIS NACCARATO (AT FAR LEFT) WITH STUDENTS AT PRIEST RIVER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN EARLY 2019. ABOVE: MORGAN WITH TEACHER CHRIS NACCARATO AT PRIEST RIVER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. PHOTOS BY CAMERON RASMUSSON

excited about it, and I’m sure they had some nerves, too. When we’re ready to launch, we’re ready to go. But I can tell we’re helping out with other crew launches … and you’re excited for your colleagues, but you’re also concerned.

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interview Q: Launching must be a sensation like no other: having that amount of power driving you into outer space. A: It’s the biggest push you’ve ever felt! It’s quite a ride. You’ve got three Gs on you, so you’re three times what you weigh on Earth. You’re really feeling that push, and there’s lots of thumping and shaking. Once you’re off the rocket boosters and just on the three main engines, then it’s a smooth, smooth, quiet ride. When you leave Earth, you’re accelerated until you reach 17,500 miles per hour. That’s five miles per second. That takes basically eight and a half minutes, and then you’re in space. So it’s a quick ride. Then when you … shut off the engines … even though you’re still traveling at a tremendous speed, you don’t feel it. And everything that’s not strapped down is floating.

NASA ASTRONAUT BARBARA MORGAN. PHOTO COURTESY NASA.

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Q: You tell how you would bond with International Space Station astronauts over gifts of food. Were there any other ways you were able to form connections across national lines? A: The International Space Station is an amazing scientific laboratory and an incredible engineering feat. ... to me, its most critical value is that it is international. We’ve got 16 nations around this planet that designed, built, worked on, and are working on this incredible scientific laboratory. Our partners are people we don’t always get along with here on Earth, right? So the way we’re able to set aside differences and work on something really, really challenging even when we have different engineering techniques, measurement standards, languages, and cultures is really critical. One of my favorite stories, and it’s a sad one, is from early on when we were building the space station and I was serving in mission control. The date was September 11, 2001, and our mission control team was just about ready to get off shift. The flight director had his monitors on CNN … and we watched in shock as the planes flew into the twin towers. Here was this International Space Station with two Russians and one American, and we were a national facility, so we went into immediate shutdown. While we were

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teacher teacherin in space space | working with the crew in orbit ... the flight director got a call from the Russian mission control. They gave their very heartfelt condolences and expressed sorrow at what happened. They said, “Let us know what you would like us to do. Whatever comes next, we’re here to help.” My thought was that if we didn’t have this International Space Station— something we could work on together that’s extremely challenging for the good of the entire planet—I don’t think the Russian response to 9/11 would have been the same. Q: Tell us a little about looking at Earth from the International Space Station. A: You travel around the Earth in 90 minutes, so it’s 45 minutes of day, 45 minutes of night. All those beautiful pictures that you see of Earth where it’s shining and glowing and you see the clouds are all on the daytime side of the planet... . It is absolutely pitch black, all the way down to the edge of the planet. And all that atmosphere we look at from our perspective on Earth that looks like it goes on forever? It’s like an eighth of an inch or a quarter of an inch. It’s like the skin on an apple. That’s a perspective I wish everyone could see. And that’s when you really understand we are all on this planet traveling through space. We are on spaceship Earth. Q: What was the return journey like? Were you ready to leave? A: You’re excited to go home, but you’re sorry to leave. It’s mixed emotions. The sad time was when it was time to come home, we made sure everything we needed on the shuttle was on the shuttle side, and everything the crew needed on the station was on the station side. So we’re on the shuttle side, and the crew staying was on the station side, and we said our goodbyes and closed the hatch. That was a really tough time because we weren’t going to undock until the next morning. And knowing you just spent two weeks working really hard together and knowing the door is closed. You can’t see them. The next day we undocked from the station, our orbits get very far apart. Then we fire our engines, and that

MISSION STS-118 TAKING MORGAN TO SPACE IN AUGUST 2007. PHOTO COURTESY NASA

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slows us down—just enough for gravity to pull you back down to Earth. You land 10 minutes later at the Kennedy Space Center. You have a pen floating, so you can watch as gravity starts to build. The pen just kind of drops to the floor, and you feel pretty heavy in your seat. I was really proud of our team. We practiced re-entry and landing many times over a year, and our commander and pilot did a beautiful job landing the shuttle. I did not feel the main gear touch the ground. And then we were zooming down the runway, we let out the parachute to slow us down and then we came to a stop. Our CAPCOM welcomed us home, and he said something like, “Welcome home, you’ve given a whole new meaning to higher education.”

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blizzard of ‘69 | pini c t u r ed nthi story | iin e rv iew teacher space

the big

snow F

OVER 100 INCHES OF SNOW LEFT SANDPOINT STREETS CHALLENGING TO NAVIGATE. PHOTO COURTESY BONNER COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

by Jennifer Lamont Leo

olks of a certain age like to recollect how much worse winters were when they were kids. How snow piled up to the roof, covering windows. How Fido needed a tunnel to go outside. How they built the greatest snow fort ever. Sometimes this is just nostalgia talking. But sometimes it’s true; 1968-’69 was such a winter. After a record-breaking cold snap on December 30, 1968, when temperatures plummeted to 37 degrees below zero in Sandpoint, and 40 below in outlying areas, snow began falling. And falling. And falling. By the end of January, 68.8 new inches of the white stuff mounded on top of December’s 32.5 inches and November’s 4 inches. It finally stopped on February 6. Meanwhile, winds brought drifts of up to 12 feet in Sandpoint and 20 feet outside of town. For adults, it was a nightmare. Streets were impassable with waist-deep drifts. Businesses shuttered. Hardware stores ran low on space heaters, car batteries, block heaters, and jumper cables. All over town, furnaces failed, including the one at Safeway grocery. For children, it was a dream, a magical fairyland of snowfort-building awesomeness and plenty of time to enjoy it, as schools were closed for weeks. Kids sledded straight off their roofs and down the tall snowdrifts, sparking countywide spikes in parental blood pressure. Snowmobilers were the heroes of the day. Granted permission to ride on city streets, the Sandpoint Snowmobile Club, whom Sheriff Robert Wilcox lauded as “unselfish,” performed countless volunteer mercy missions, rescuing stranded motor-

ists and checking up on people in isolated areas, often carrying groceries, water, and battery chargers. Public Works Superintendent Floyd Parks had his hands full trying to clear the streets. Six private dozers were added to the city’s equipment. Crews ran out of places to put the snow and had to resort to piling it in parks and front yards. Commissioners pitched in with the plowing, the newspaper reported, “catching a few winks of sleep at the courthouse” between shifts. Even as streets were cleared, drivers had to use extreme caution because they couldn’t see over the drifts. Drivers attached flags and orange “Union 76” balls to their cars’ radio antennae to increase visibility. Even Schweitzer ski resort, where heavy snowfall is generally cause for celebration, had to shut down due to impassable roads and stranded employees. The “Papa Bear” lift (#4) opened to much less fanfare than anticipated. A 55-member ski club from Moscow High School were blizzard-bound in town, as buses could neither get them to the mountain nor return them to Moscow. Shirley Conger recalled getting stuck at a Sandpoint hotel with Elks from all over the state who’d traveled up for the club’s state convention. A snowmobile had to be sent to collect the chef from his snowbound home so they could eat. But the group didn’t let the inclement weather dampen their spirits, and the principal “ailment” was cabin fever—until Shirley slipped on the ice and broke her leg. December 30, 1968 remains Sandpoint’s coldest day on record. SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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granary granarydistrict district || ffe eat atu re s

Granary Arts District inspires new wave of arts, artisans by Cameron Rasmusson

DOUG MARSHALL

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teve Holt and John Edwards saw promise in the Granary District when they first purchased the centerpiece property in the late 1990s. They just didn’t know what, precisely, that promise was. Scouted out as a potential location for their expanded Misty Mountain Furniture, the property was sandwiched between Oak and Church streets near Sixth Avenue. It was a promising piece of real estate, reasonably close to downtown Sandpoint and home to the iconic and historic granary, one of the town’s tallest buildings. The business partners ultimately decided not to move their furniture store there. But they followed through with the purchase anyway. Two decades later, the promise Holt and Edwards saw has blossomed into a Sandpoint district with an identity all its own. It is home to anchor businesses like Evans Brothers Coffee and, opened just last year, the new Matchwood Brewery. Artists have come and gone over the years, with Woods Wheatcroft being one prominent mainstay. Thrift stores line the streets, funding many of Sandpoint’s philanthropic efforts. Recently under new ownership, Murphy’s is a legacy building buoyed by fresh perspective, while Charles Mortensen’s Syringa Cyclery brings in new entrepreneurial energy. Nearby, the Heartwood Center and Foster’s Crossing Antiques and Gifts add to the district’s vibe. Moving into the ‘20s, the now-called Granary Arts District is a place for creation—of art, of artisanal goods, of dreams both old and new.

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The modern iteration of the Granary Arts District began in 1999, when Holt and Edwards purchased the granary property from the Co-op. The farming supply store was planning its move to Ponderay, and Holt and Edwards stumbled upon the real estate opportunity while it was still under wraps. “We asked them how much they wanted for it, and we agreed on a price before it even went on the market,” Holt said. “We got our foot in the door early on, so yeah, we got lucky.” “We thought, oh, this is a huge opportunity,” added Edwards. Built in 1934, the iconic building ground grain for area farmers. Its location next to the Spokane International railroad tracks (later Union Pacific), meant area grain could be sold to points further south. Those tracks were removed in 1995. The property’s value was immediately evident. It was close to downtown and well known to the public. But Holt and Edwards wanted to move it from industrial use to a community centerpiece. They saw the center stretch near where Evans Brothers exists today as a prime location for live music, fundraisers, and special events. From the beginning, challenges to that vision cropped up. The Idaho Transportation Department owns right-ofway adjacent to the granary. And twice now, transportation officials have proposed constructing a highway extension diverting U.S. 2 traffic using that rightof-way. Dubbed “the Curve” project, the first proposal surfaced in the early 2000s shortly after Holt and Edwards purchased the property. ITD officials told them a portion of one of the buildings butted against the right-of-way. “They told us we’d either have to move the building or tear it down,Well,

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– WOODS WHEATCROFT –

“Now the business partners can truly say their original vision for the area—a community gathering place enhancing Sandpoint’s culture and character—has come to pass.”

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granary district we knew we weren’t going to move it,” said Holt. That project ultimately fizzled. But a decade later, ITD was back to propose the project a second time. This iteration of the Curve was proposed to divert highway traffic from downtown Sandpoint in conjunction with the recently completed Sand Creek Byway. This time, transportation officials assured Holt and Edwards the proposed roadway would bend around any Granary Arts District buildings. But the city of Sandpoint ultimately shut the proposal down, worried about the effect a large new roadway would have on the center of town. It was a pivotal decision for the District, one that preserved its peaceful, neighborhood character. Another key moment came more recently when Kaniksu Health considered buying the whole property for a move into town. Holt and Edwards weighed the option carefully. Though potentially lucrative, it was an evolution that didn’t match their vision. While medical services are valuable and important, they don’t generate the cultural cachet and community presence that the pair felt was vital. “We looked at it seriously because it would have been some money for us,” Edwards said. “But it wasn’t really what we wanted, and in hindsight, it was great it didn’t work out.” Instead, the Granary Arts District has defined itself by the businesses and organizations that have planted roots there over the years. Some were transitory, like Beet and Basil. Originally a food truck stationed in the Granary District, the restaurant has since expanded to become a successful brick-and-mortar

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restaurant in downtown Sandpoint. Other businesses, like Evans Brothers Coffee, have remained. Holt and Edwards consider its founding 10 years ago to be one of the most important events in the development of the Granary Arts District, establishing an anchor business in the area that sparked people’s creativity and invited them to linger over a cup of joe. “It’s a milestone for sure,” co-owner Randy Evans said. “In some ways it feels like it’s gone by pretty quick, but a lot of businesses have come and gone in that time, and we feel very lucky to still be doing what we do.” Originally, Randy and his brother, Rick Evans, planned to open shop in Ponderay, intending to focus on coffee roasting without the now-familiar cafe. They were sold on their Granary Arts District location, however, when local artist Jeff Dunwoody spread the word about an open building. “It was very much an eleventh-hour thing, but we knew right away this is where we were meant to be,” Rick Evans said. The subsequent decade proved that intuition true. Evans Brothers is among the most successful of Sandpoint’s artisanal businesses, distributing its coffee throughout the Inland Northwest. Along with a milestone anniversary, 2019 saw the pair celebrate the first year of a new Evans Brothers Coffee location in Coeur d’Alene. “We definitely feel that a part of our success has been our location,” Randy Evans said. Charles Mortensen sees the Granary Arts District as an

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features ideal location for his business, Syringa Cyclery. Located on Oak Street in the former home of the Sandpoint Arts Alliance, Syringa Cyclery offers an attractive, remodeled store interior where bike enthusiasts can eye new models or have their favorite wheels reworked. Mortensen said many of his clients wander off for a coffee at Evans Brothers or a beer at Matchwood while their bike is maintained. “It’s kind of symbiotic in a way,” Mortensen said. “And the

new street improvements on Oak Street last summer, with the bike paths, make things more appealing and more convenient for people.” The District is a hot spot for special events, from art installations to beer gardens to holiday parties. And Mortensen is contributing to that culture by introducing the Three-Quarter Minus Cykeltur. A timed gravel ride benefiting the Pend Oreille Pedalers, the Cykeltur kicked off its inaugural race in May 2019,

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We fell in love with this neighborhood and then fell in love with the building,” Hazan said. “It’s just a humble, down-to-earth, cool part of Sandpoint.”

BEN GARRISON

Syringa Cyclery

and Mortensen aims to make it an annual tradition. “That’s the nice thing about the whole Granary District there with Evans Brothers and Matchwood, who both supported that event,” he said. “It’s perfectly set up for that kind of thing.” Like Syringa Cyclery, the nearby bike path and amenities are also important for the new Murphy’s. Operated for decades as a saw shop offering small engine repair, the building was purchased in early 2018 by Bart Murphy. The fact that the new owner’s name matched the iconic storefront was a happy coincidence. But the building’s name and character is about all the new Murphy’s has in common with the previous business; while they’ll work to help your family have fun, sadly, they won’t sharpen your chainsaw. “I think everyone is very pleasantly surprised that we’ve kept the charm and history that this building has while putting a fun spin on the business,” said Lisa Hazan, who manages the shop. The new Murphy’s is all about family fun, offering ice cream, milkshakes, and fresh doughnuts daily. It is the retail location for 7B Apparel, offering custom-designed clothing. And it rents out a full range of bikes, from electric bikes perfect for longer trips to fat-tire bikes ideal for wintertime to Surrey bikes that can seat multiple people. “Starting a new business is always scary, and everyone that comes in here is really excited to see the business keep on keeping on,” Hazan said. It was no easy task rehabilitating the Murphy’s building for its new life. Cleanup proved a substantial effort, but Murphy and Hazan tried to incorporate elements of the old building, like its chain-link fencing, into the interior design. That commitment to history and community is reflected in the new Murphy’s approach to business, too. Hazan and Murphy provide space and opportunities for local musicians and artists, host workshops, and interface SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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PHOTOS, P. 40: THE GRANARY TOWER IS ONE OF SANDPOINT’S MOST RECOGNIZABLE LANDMARKS. P. 41: A RIDER CHECKS OUT THE BAND SETTING UP FOR A GRANARY ARTS DISTRICT EVENT. P. 42, TOP: JEFF “SPROUTS” RICH AND LOCALS HOLDING DOWN THE WEEKEND VIBE WITH THE INFAMOUS STUDIO 524 “ART CART.” BOTTOM: BAREGRASS PLAYS AT A MUSIC EVENT UNDER THE MAIN GRANARY TOWER. P. 45 TOP: BICYCLISTS FIND THE DISTRICT A WELCOMING PLACE. BOTTOM: EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE CELEBRATES 10 YEARS IN BUSINESS. PHOTO ABOVE: THE NEW/OLD MURPHY’S. THERE’S NO MORE LAWNMOWERS, BUT LOTS OF MILK SHAKES.

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features with organizations like Greater Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce. It’s a communal space in every sense of the term. “We fell in love with this neighborhood and then fell in love with the building,” Hazan said. “It’s just a humble, down-to-earth, cool part of Sandpoint.” The neighborhood’s latest major addition, Matchwood Brewing, aims to follow in Evans Brothers’ footsteps as a true Granary Arts District anchor. The new business required a major renovation of one of the Granary District buildings, but Holt and Edwards believe the end result speaks for itself. With a year of business under its belt, Matchwood brings its own unique spin to the local brewing scene. And its location is an important part of its style. It offers meeting space across two stories for everyone from local organization and business staffers to neighborhood families seeking a night out. For Edwards and Holt, Matchwood’s completion represents just how far the Granary Arts District has come in 20 years’ time. It’s taken on a life of its own as local businesses have come and gone. Now the business partners can truly say their original vision for the area—a community gathering place enhancing Sandpoint’s culture and character—has come to pass. “I was sitting over here in Matchwood a month and a half ago,” said Holt. “The sun was setting. Matchwood was humming. And I was just sitting here with all these people around thinking, man, it’s just so gratifying.”

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granaryyetibus district | | ffeeat atu ure s

Ready to

ROLL

Trio converts transportation into carbon-neutral living by Isabella Mortensen

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f it’s on wheels, it can be lived in. That idea jump-started a personal hobby that soon grew into a business idea and finally a fully formed LLC established in 2018. Josh Volkman, Kyle Volkman, and Calen Papke started Yetibus after realizing that this hobby of theirs could be a full-time gig. It was ten years ago when the original Yetibus was born: a 1986 International school bus that has been fully renovated and restored into what it is today, Kyle’s humble home of seven years. After living in the original Yetibus part time for a few years, Kyle decided to fully commit and move in full time in 2012. It was a smart move financially, and it gave Kyle the ability to properly maintain his ideal way of life. “I spent summers in a Volkswagen, that’s what got me hooked on the lifestyle. I wanted something that’s more sustainable and could be an investment for the future,” Kyle said. Running on vegetable oil, powered by solar electricity, and featuring a composting toilet, the original Yetibus is making moves to combat climate change and lower greenhouse gas emissions. As environmentalists, Josh, Kyle, and Calen built their business around that convention. All rigs renovated by Yetibus are equipped to be carbon neutral, which allows the vehicle to be as sustainable as possible. The carbon-offsetting service they provide greatly reduces the carbon footprint of the rigs by outfitting each one to emit fewer greenhouse gasses. This has been a big step for Yetibus in terms of environmental

advancement because regardless of how little water or power is used while living in a Yetibus or tiny house, driving around all day and using gasoline or diesel will have a negative effect on the environment that could outweigh the environmental benefits of living small. Josh, Kyle, and Calen understand this and bring these concepts to their business. Their business started by word of mouth, when people would check out the original Yetibus driving around and no doubt wanted one of their own. The trio started fixing up old buses and vans for whoever was interested, but it was mostly a side gig for them. Soon enough though, Yetibus began requiring more of their time than they could properly give, and they decided to make Yetibus a full-time job for the three of them, and give their growing business the attention it deserved. Yetibus sees a lot of business from retired folks who are looking to downsize and/or for a change of pace and scenery, and that’s exactly what Yetibus can give them. Another big part of their business is consulting others on their trade and giving tips to DIY-ers who aren’t necessarily looking for the “whole-meal-deal” as Kyle called it, but want advice on how to get started for themselves. Business is great right now, and Yetibus is starting to outgrow its current space; they are hoping to expand their business, hire more staff, and allow Yetibus to fully thrive in the near future. Learn more at www.YetiBusBuilds.org.

AT TOP: THE ORIGINAL YETIBUS WAS FORMERLY A 1986 INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL BUS. AT RIGHT: BUILDER KYLE VOLKMAN LIVES IN THE YETIBUS, WHICH HAS 200 SQUARE FEET OF INTERIOR FLOOR SPACE. FAR RIGHT: “THE LOAF,” A 2018 EXTENDED CARGO FORD TRANSIT, IS A PERMANENT HOME FOR JOURNALIST TRACEY KAPLAN.

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BRINGING THE

CLASSROOM TO REAL LIFE Community partners with schools to jump start careers by Lisa Gerber

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or the past several years, Lake Pend Oreille School District’s schools have been a bright spot in Idaho’s education system, with a high national “Go On” ranking, successful Advanced Placement, and an active Career Technical Education program to prepare students for a career in the trades. This is no small feat considering Idaho’s low financial ranking when compared nationally. It’s truly remarkable what our teachers, school leadership, and community support can accomplish together. Perhaps one of the reasons for this success is a symbiotic relationship that local businesses have with the school district. Whether it’s apprenticing at a local tech firm or building something that will be used by the community, students benefit from the collaborative relationships the school district has built with local businesses and organizations. It’s a relationship that brings textbooks and classrooms to life, opening students’ eyes to the infinite possibilities that exist after they graduate. The relationships are an asset to the community, too. Local business leaders are quick to point out that strong schools are essential in attracting workers, which can be challenging in an economy with low unemployment and in an area that’s highly desirable, yet “off the beaten path” like Sandpoint. “If we’re recruiting from outside the area, the first question prospective employees ask is about the quality of our schools,” said Susan Jordan, CFO at Daher, formerly Quest Aircraft.

CTE PROVIDES MORE THAN TECH SKILLS

PHOTO, TOP: SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL’S CTE DEPARTMENT CHAIR, ALEX GRAY, WITH STUDENT VICTORIA HEWITT. LOWER PHOTO: STUDENTS PLANTING IN THE CLARK FORK DELTA. PHOTO COURTESY JOHN HASTINGS

“Students who know how to weld, use a lathe, a mill, and a CNC machine become more valuable employees,” said Jake Stark, who teaches welding, fabrication, and engineering manufacturing as part of Sandpoint High School’s career technical education department. His students work on real-world projects for the community while developing skills they need for a better future.

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Albertson named LPOSD Superintendent Lake Pend Oreille School District’s new superintendent is no stranger to the area. Tom Albertson was born and raised in Sandpoint and has more than 30 years’ experience with the school system here. Looking to the future, Albertson cited the district’s five-year strategic plan, and said a top priority is ensuring academic success and a viable post-secondary plan for every student leaving high school. Albertson emphasizes the role that community engagement plays in meeting this goal. “Our students perform well comparatively in the state of Idaho. This can only happen by partnering with the community and having common educational goals which provide unique opportunities for students to grow—including an emphasis on Career Technical Education, STEM, arts and theater, and advanced opportunities to gain college credits while still in high school through AP and dual credit courses. “LPOSD has a student-centered mindset,” he added. “Our staff and administrators listen to student voices and develop opportunities accordingly. We believe student success can’t happen until a positive community of learners is built in each classroom based on trust.”

TOM ALBERTSON ON THE FAMILY FARM WITH HIS TWO GRANDSONS, RILEY AND NASH, THE FIFTH GENERATION OF THE FAMILY HERE. COURTESY PHOTO

Albertson said he plans to build on the communication that has already started in the district by sharing updates of student successes along with important district news.

-Lisa Gerber

n o i t i r t u N l a n o i Funct

The Center for

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superior education granary district || Each year, Stark’s class collaborates with local businesses and organizations to build community projects. Students recently were tasked with building a burrito bar and palm tree for local Mexican restaurant Joel’s. They also created the CNC metal cut-outs of dog silhouettes for the dog park fence in Ponderay. “Even if they never go into this field, they know how to build something from start to finish. It teaches them a lifelong skill—something they’ll have for the rest of their life.”

A ‘CLASS’ THAT LETS STUDENTS GO TO WORK As part of their senior project, all students at Clark Fork High School are required to participate in an Independent Track program in which students shadow someone in the community, based on their career interests. A wide range of businesses and organizations throughout the Inland Northwest have participated, offering diverse professional opportunities from aerospace engineering to restaurant management and equine therapy. “Some students find that they are even more excited to pursue the career while others find that they don’t like it after all,” said Rebecca Palmer, the program coordinator. “This is invaluable for them as they think about their post-secondary options. Regardless of the path they choose, they learn soft skills like professional communication, timeliness, interview techniques, and customer service. Most of the students who have participated in the program over the last four years have been offered

fe e at at u u re re s s f

employment or excellent references.”

LEARNING COMES ALIVE IN LESSONS OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM Track programs are available to all students at Clark Fork Jr./ Sr. High School. The initiative evolved from the school’s efforts to introduce experiential learning—a concept that involves more hands-on learning opportunities for students of all ages. Taking place over 10 Fridays in a semester, students can select from Health & Wellness, Business, Culinary, Outdoor or Parks & Rec, Art, and Robotics. History teacher K.C. MacDonald leads an outdoor-oriented track with participation from local organizations such as Selkirk Outdoor Leadership Center, Schweitzer Mountain, and Kaniksu Land Trust. The track gives students an outdoor experience that can include ice skating, fly fishing, or learning outdoor survival skills. MacDonald says there’s typically a ‘good citizen’ aspect to the experience in which students give back to the local benefactor by clearing land or doing needed property repairs. “I remember sitting in my classroom when I was this age and the only pictures we saw of the world were in our textbook,” said MacDonald. “Our students get to see their science lessons come alive.”

LEARNING ABOUT CAREERS IN HEALTHCARE In 1995, Kathy Holm created a clinical health education pro-

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It’s a relationship that brings textbooks and classrooms to life...” careers in healthcare.”

PROJECTS THAT PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT

And all of lifes a caper

- Wm S h a k e s p e a r e

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All the Worlds a Stage

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John Hastings teaches ecology, environmental science, horticulture, and forestry at Sandpoint High School and is passionate about developing projects that allow students to apply their classroom lessons in the real, i.e. natural, world. Hastings and his students work closely with Idaho Fish & Game on numerous restoration and habitation projects. At the Clark Fork and Pack River deltas, for example, they helped to rebuild islands, establish new vegetation, and monitor the restoration progress. They’ve also worked on habitat evaluation procedures by running transects, or evaluating the habitats at specific measured areas and entering the data they gather into statistical formulas to gauge how suitable the environment is for certain species. ‘Learning by doing’ is more than just a saying in Hastings’ classes; students leave the classroom to clear land and gather information about local flora and fauna. One can see the result of this effort at the Bonner County offices’ native plant demonstration garden on Highway 2. Future plans have students working with the local Kaniksu Land Trust to develop self-

Open i ng

gram for Sandpoint High School students in collaboration with local health facilities. Holm’s niece, Trina Kennedy, has led the Health Occupation Pathway program for the past four years and calls it an incredible opportunity for students interested in health occupations. “Starting in their sophomore year, students can take an introduction to health occupations class that offers a broad overview of the profession,” said Kennedy. “In their junior year they can enroll in a medical terminology class that earns them dual credit with North Idaho College. And for the capstone their senior year, they can spend about six months in various clinical settings to earn their certified nursing assistant degree.” During the clinical rotations, students are sent to Bonner General Health, Life Care Center, and Valley Vista Care Center, all in Sandpoint. They have the opportunity to observe a wide range of health professionals, from physical therapists to lab experts to medical records professionals. “Lots of kids come out of these classes with jobs,” said Kennedy. “I’ve always been amazed by the support that our medical community gives the students. The incredible commitment and collaboration contributes to help students jumpstart their

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we give back to the Sandpoint community we love.”

FROM TECH TO CAREER OR COLLEGE

COMMUNITY SUPPORT THROUGH TEACHER GRANTS

In her senior year of high school, Victoria Hewitt worked after school as a support engineer at Kochava, a data solutions company headquartered in Sandpoint. She monitored networks and worked with the tech support team. “The classes at the high school helped me prepare,” said Hewitt. “And working here has shown me this is what I want to do as a career.” She is now studying in the same field at college in Boise. “Sometimes students decide to move right into their career from high school, which is uniquely possible in tech fields,” said Kimberly Manning, Kochava’s senior brand director,” but working here doesn’t always mean those students are foregoing college because of a tech career. We want to provide a wide range of opportunities with varying outcomes for our local young people.” “We like to see our school system invest in the natural talents of individual students,” said Charles Manning, Kochava’s founder and CEO. “That’s how they really blossom and that’s the right chemistry to get local young people to move successfully from high school to a career environment. Providing training and career opportunities for students in our community benefits both the students and our company, as local young people are often excellent contributors to our team. Education is the most effective investment there is, as far as return on investment, and it’s a primary focus for Kochava in terms of how

In 2002, a small group of citizens concerned about their public schools formed the Panhandle Alliance for Education. This nonprofit local education foundation supports public schools in the Lake Pend Oreille School District by raising money to fill the gaps taxpayer-financed programs aren’t able to cover in an effort to help raise the achievement levels of all students. “Residents and businesses throughout our community are engaged in a myriad of ways in support of schools, teachers and families,” said Marcia Wilson, executive director at PAFE. “There is widespread, ongoing support of LPOSD and its essential role as a magnet for new jobs, workers, and community prosperity. There is a tangible culture of pride for quality education and the community understands that LPOSD is an economic and societal asset.”

If you are interested in serving as a mentor or a judge for Clark Fork’s senior projects, contact Rebecca at 208-255-7177 ext. 4353 or rebecca. palmer@lposd.org Learn about job openings at Kochava at their website, www.kochava.com/careers/.

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wooddistrict ducks | granary

f e at u re s

Wood Ducks Our Wonderful World:

by Carolyn Thibault PHOTOS BY DENNIS THIBAULT

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s cars and trucks zoom by one of the quiet inlets of the Clark Fork Delta area, just 30 minutes east of Sandpoint, several wood ducks perch serenely atop a log amid water dotted with lily pads. Painted turtles also sun themselves along portions of the halfsubmerged log, while an occasional osprey flies overhead in search of fish lurking near the surface. Completely nonplussed by all the vehicles driving by, some of these ducks slip back into the water to continue their dabbling activity in search of tasty morsels to sustain them. Occupants in many of the cars and trucks passing by fail to glance out their side window and notice these birds, especially the decorative male, that are within their immediate view. Fewer still ever pull over for a

longer look, and that suits these shy birds just fine! It is springtime, and one of the male wood ducks, which many consider to be the most colorful duck of all, is intent on keeping an eye on his chosen mate. The female, meanwhile, is busy satisfying her appetite before settling down, hopefully, to nest on eggs in an old hollowed-out tree trunk or, if found nearby, a man-made nest box. Yes, wood ducks are aptly named, for they owe their start in life to the availability of safe nesting sites in either tree cavities or wood boxes that are near a water source. Once the incubation period for the clutch of eggs is over, and shortly after all the ducklings have hatched, the brave little baby ducks jump out from the nest (sometimes from as high as 30 to 50 feet) to the ground below, or, if they’re lucky, they’ll SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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"Now, there are over a million wood ducks in North America.

© Jay Dash Photography

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find a softer landing in water. As one of the most beautiful of American waterfowl, wood ducks were hunted nearly to extinction during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. But their numbers rose steadily for two decades once hunting seasons for these unique ducks were closed in 1918, thanks to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act between the United States and Canada. Now, there are over a million wood ducks in North America. Unfortunately they face a high mortality rate, especially the young, and so most do not typically live past the age of four in the wild. Facing risk from predators, along with loss of wetlands and natural tree cavities, life for wood ducks can be tenuous—so spotting a female duck with ducklings is a joy to behold. Like all young, often a lone duckling will venture out past the protective realm of its mother, causing great consternation and a reprimand from her once she spots the boundary violation. It is the female wood duck that bears all responsibility for brooding and raising the ducklings, as the males leave their mates once the incubation period sets in. More recently, these ducks have benefited from efforts to restore North American wetlands, as well as from installation of artificial nesting boxes in many areas. Wetland restoration, like what has been undertaken for the Clark Fork Delta here in North Idaho, is crucial in helping to restore and maintain the habitat these ducks need to continue successfully mating, breeding, raising their young, and migrating. The American wood duck is commonly found throughout North America from British Columbia and Quebec, Canada, to as far south as Florida and even Mexico. Most wood ducks that nest in higher latitudes, like the Pacific Northwest, will migrate south and therefore are spotted in larger numbers here in springtime through late summer. So, during the spring and summer months, glance out that window when driving through the Clark Fork/Hope area of Highway 200 by Lake Pend

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Oreille, and hopefully you’ll be lucky enough to see the resplendently colored male wood duck—it only takes a moment in time to notice them and marvel at our wonderful world!

PHOTOS, OPENING PAGE: AS WITH MANY SPECIES, THE MALE WOOD DUCK IS A COLORFUL CREATURE. PREVIOUS PAGE: THIS MALE AND FEMALE PAIR WILL STAY TOGETHER UNTIL A NESTING SITE IS CHOSEN AND THE FEMALE LAYS HER EGGS. THIS PAGE, TOP: THE FEMALE MALLARD, THOUGH NOT AS COLORFUL AS HER MATE, HAS A QUIET BEAUTY OF HER OWN. BOTTOM; DUCKLINGS (LIKE TURTLES) ENJOY CATCHING THE SUN FROM A PARTIALLY SUBMERGED LOG.

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HOME WITH 2 SHOPS & YEAR-ROUND CREEK

CUSTOM BUILT HOME, two insulated shops, greenhouse and year-round creek on 2 sides! 3,900 sf, 4 bed, 4 bath, wood-burning fireplace, office, chef’s kitchen with eating bar and open to the dining area. In-floor heat, wonderful backyard, 2-car garage with walk-in storage room. Nearby beach with boat launch and recreational public lands. $675,000 #20191056

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STUNNING ARCHITECTURE, custom stone work & high end materials used in this 2,700sf home with inspirational views from every room. 4 bed, office, 2.5 bath, natural lighting, vaulted ceiling, native stone fireplace & hardwood flooring. Laundry w/sink, built-ins, pantry & 2-car garage w/built-in cabinets. $989,000 #20191501

WATERFRONT PARCEL ON 35 ACRES

CUSTOM HOME ON 36 ACRES WITH MOUNTAIN VIEWS

EXCLUSIVE ONE-OF-A-KIND property with beautiful 3 bed, 3 bath cedar home & approx 1,000’ shoreline & includes the entrance to South Gold Creek. Dock with high/low water access & electric boat lift. Boat house with rail system into the lake for year-round access. $1,290,000 #20191655

NEW CRAFTSMAN HOME WITH LAKE ACCESS

SINGLE-LEVEL 2,234 SF HOME with 3 bed, office, 2.5 bath, lake access with launch, beach and dock. Chef’s kitchen with custom cabinets, granite counters and fireplace. Beautiful master suite. Central AC, covered patios, landscaped, sprinkler system and mature trees. $569,000 #20193098

ONE-OF-A-KIND SETTING includes 4 parcels, mostly level to gently sloped, mature trees and privacy. 4 bed, 2 bath, laundry room with storage and pantry. Kitchen with custom cabinets, granite and SS appliances. Fenced garden, garden shed, wood shed and 2-car garage. $639,000 #20193115

QUALITYCONSTRUCTED CONSTRUCTEDLOG LOGHOME HOMEON ON1+ 1+ACRE ACRE QUALITY

BRIGHT AND OPEN floor plan with a beautiful updated kitchen, mostly all new living area with vaulted ceilings, a cozy heat stove and newer floor coverings. 3 bedrooms, loft, 2 baths, office, expansive outdoor living areas, covered decks, sprinkler system, mature trees and RV parking! Located on the edge of town! $469,500 #20191594

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3.2 3.2ACRES ACRESON ONPRIVATE PRIVATELAKE LAKE

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GUEST HOME with 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, jacuzzi tub, walk-in closet, laundry room and large area for additional rooms. 2nd homesite with driveway, power, water, septic tank and drain field installed. Level shoreline, sandy beach and dock. $479,000 #20192811

SINGLE-LEVEL HOME with an open floor plan, new kitchen cabinets, Quartz counter, SS high-end appliances and tile accents. 3 bed, 2 tile accented baths, new flooring throughout and a wrap-around deck. Most furnishings included and all appliances. 2-car attached garage close to town. $649,500 #20192019

THIS IS ONE OF THE LAST vacant lots in the neighborhood! Community lake access with a boat launch, beach & dock! Large, level, surveyed, ready-to-build parcel with available services; sewer, water, power and phone. $99,500 #20192989

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PANORAMIC VIEWS from this larger slightly sloping parcel in an area of high-end homes, located across from the Idaho Club Golf Course! Paved, county maintained roads right up to the property’s edge allows for year-round easy access. No HOA fees and power and phone already on site & ready to build. $85,500 #20191833

5 ACRE PARCEL in Garfield Bay. Power to property. Close to the restaurant and marinas at Garfield Bay, and only minutes to downtown Sandpoint, Schweitzer ski resort, and all that North Idaho has to offer. This recreational paradise is a great place to enjoy all the lake has to offer. Owner will finance! $159,000 #20190978

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BORDERING YEAR-ROUND creek, mature trees, level half acre parcel. Bring your RV, park and relax or build! Nearby is Lake Pend Oreille’s beautiful beach park and boat launch. Terrific drilled well, installed septic system with drain field, 2 full RV Hook ups, fire pit, power and a park like setting. Owner may finance. $140,000 #20191203

BORDERS GOVERNMENT LAND Exceptional opportunity to build your home in a well developed Community of Trickle Creek, located just outside of Sandpoint. beautiful, scenic territorial views, convenience, privacy & located in an area of Estate homes on 11 acres with easy paved access. $165,500 #20190464

MATURE TREES level land with mountain views! Convenience, privacy and located in an area of Estate homes on acreage with easy paved access. PAID WATER HOOK-UP, underground power, natural gas, surveyed and an approved perc test when subdivision was completed. $249,000 #20192153

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MATURE TREES & PRIVACY to a nice large building site with a foundation, rock outcroppings & bordering seasonal creek! Ready for your home with power, phone, natural gas and a beautiful building site. Located a few miles from town on Baldy Mtn. $199,900 #20191606

STUNNING WATER VIEWS from this parcel and an installed RV cover, drilled well (40+ GPM 620’ deep - shared) an installed pump that is in use, building shed, southern exposure, 400 amp underground electric on site and almost ready to build on! Located close to Downtown Sandpoint and Dover Bay. $399,000 #20191671

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19,583 SF BUILDING PARCEL on the perfect corner location of Division and Baldy Mtn with lots of visibility! Zoned Industrial with surrounding businesses: Miller’s Country Store, Litehouse, Habitat for Humanity, Interstate Concrete & Asphalt & so much more! $295,000 #20193140

COMMERCIAL BUILDING sitting on 2 commercial lots on Hwy 200 in Clark Fork! Endless opportunities for retail center, restaurant, gift store, office space or more and has drive-thru potential. Hydronic in-floor heat & energy efficient. $228,000 #20190410

TWO LARGE (18,250+/-sf) industrial-style improved commercial buildings with 3-phase power in the City of Sandpoint on 1.12 acres. Both buildings currently tenant occupied. Opportunity for investors or for end user. $1,150,000 #20192539

HWY 2 RETAIL CENTER: 5,346 sf multi-tenant, income producing commercial property on .68 acres. Signalized intersection of Hwy 2 & Division St. Commercial C zoning, high visibility, easy access & plenty of parking. $1,200,000 #20180709

SAGLE’S NEWEST gated community features water access, 5 acre estate parcels, mature trees, underground power, phone, surveyed and septic approval. OWNER WILL FINANCE! Starting at $139,500 #20192679

BEAUTIFUL .80 ACRE PARCEL with lawn to the water’s edge and mature trees in a waterfront community. Easy access, drain field installed and area of great producing wells. $145,000 #20190726

51 ACRES BORDERS National Forest Service Lands, year-round creek, views, pasture and cleared home site nestled off the road in the trees. Owner financing is available. $299,500 #20192784

BEAUTIFUL PANORAMIC VIEWS from this larger slightly sloping parcel in an area of high-end homes. Located across from The Idaho Club Golf Course allows you to spend your days on the green while returning to the privacy of your home with tranquil views of the Cabinet Mountains. Owner will finance. $100,000 #20192127

TREED PARCEL - HOOK-UP PAID to the community water & available community sewer, power, phone & all on site. Easy access with county maintained roads to your property. Price includes plans for a 3,772 sf home with a 2-car garage & boat stall ($2,500 value)! $79,500 #20192460

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percussionaire fe eat atu ure res s granary district || f

The Oxygen to Grow Percussionaire continues to drive forward by Chase Urquhart

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t the Percussionaire headquarters in Kootenai, the walls sport dozens of framed pictures and news stories featuring the company’s founder, inventor, aviator, and biomedical engineer Dr. Forrest Bird. The company, which manufactures respirators that have saved thousands of lives, was founded by Bird at his ranch in Glengary Bay in 1983, mostly as a hobby to begin with. Four years after his death in 2015, his accomplishments still echo off the walls in every room you enter, including photos from his receipt of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from then-President Barack Obama, and former President George W. Bush awarding him with the Presidential Citizens Medal in the Oval Office. A man with such accolades ought to be easily identified in the community; however, this was not always the case for Bird. “It’s surprising when you talk to people that have been in the area forever, sometimes they haven’t even heard of him,” Percussionaire employee Loren Speilman said. Speilman has worked at Percussionaire since 1985, spending most of his time with the company doing facility maintenance. He said that Bird, who died in 2005 at age 94, was a quiet man, mostly keeping to himself. Perhaps it was his introverted nature that allowed him to think through complex problems and develop solutions that benefit thousands of lives today. “We would be talking about issues on the ranch, and at the same time you could tell that in the back of his mind he would be working on an issue with a respirator,” Speilman said. Bird’s impact on a global scale is undeniable despite a sur-

prisingly low name recognition locally. One of Bird’s earliest inventions, an infant ventilator named the BABYBird, lowered premature infant mortality rates from 70 percent to 10 percent when it was released in 1971. According to the Percussionaire website, former Prime Minister of Cuba Fidel Castro requested Bird’s respirators from the U.S. government in exchange for prisoners that were captured during the Bay of Pigs invasion. Needless to say, when Mark Baillie took over as CEO in January 2016, he knew he couldn’t outdo the legacy of the company’s originator. “No one could ever compete with Forrest’s legacy with what he’s done,” Baillie said. “But I certainly wanted to keep his mission going and maintain his legacy if I could.” One of the first steps Baillie took as CEO was move the company to a much bigger building in Kootenai. He decided that if the company was going to grow, the old location was not going to move the needle. The company’s quarters at Glengary Bay near Bird’s ranch was located in a flood zone, the power was running out consistently, and the internet was quite slow, according to Baillie. It became clear that moving was inevitable. “When they first started talking about moving here from out there, I was a little hesitant,” Speilman said. “Ultimately, the company has been growing so much and it’s been a good thing. I think Dr. Bird would be proud.” Finding local commercial real estate that fit the company’s growing needs was challenging, but leaving the area was never on the table. “I knew that Bird’s legacy was in Sandpoint,” Baillie said. “I SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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features thought it would be very nice to stay in Sandpoint and to give back to the community. We wanted to keep Dr. Bird’s legacy here.” Baillie said the main focus for the company now is to modernize the product range. He points out they’ve been selling the same products for 20 years with no change in the design. The goal is to make their products more user-friendly and visually appealing, a strategy that other competitors have already undertaken. The core designs will remain the same, because it’s these core designs, crafted by Bird, that have given the company their competitive edge over the years. “There hasn’t been another product on the market for the last 30 years that could compete with Bird’s product, the Phasitron,” Baille said. The Phasitron provides lung expansion, secretion clearance, and oxygen to patients in need. Baillie envisions the company growing exponentially in the next 10 years. He believes there’s great opportunity for growth because they are a disruptive technology. “We go out into the world and we disrupt because our products are better than everything else,” Baillie said. The inventions Bird created at his ranch decades ago continue to supply the oxygen for Percussionaire to move into the future. PHOTO, PREVIOUS PAGE: MARK BAILLIE BECAME CEO OF PERCUSSIONAIRE IN 2016. AT RIGHT, ABOVE: DR. FORREST BIRD DEVELOPED HIS PROTOTYPE RESPIRATOR IN THE 1950S, WHEN POLIO STILL RAVAGED THE NATION. BELOW : BAILLIE WITH STAFF ON THE PRODUCTION LINE. STAFF PHOTOS

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February’s plate

North Idaho farmers are braving winter to bring produce to locals by Lyndsie Kiebert

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hen North Idahoans choose salad fixings from a grocery store shelf in February, chances have always been that those greens arrived by way of truck from a warmer, more vegetable-friendly climate. Now, thanks to innovative practices and new equipment, local farmers are raising the chances that those greens actually grew in North Idaho—possibly months before—and have been kept alive by the sun and soil of the Panhandle until it was time to become a February salad. The keepers of all things green are no longer taking the sea-

son of ice and slush to rest, as is evidenced on a number of local farms producing goods all winter long. “A lot of farmers—this used to be me, too—looked forward to taking the winter completely off,” said Katherine Creswell of Moose Meadow Farm (www.MooseMeadowOrganic.com) in Clark Fork. “That’s totally not the mentality anymore. The winter income and growing allows us to even out the workload.” Creswell and Spencer Nietmann spent their first summer in Idaho building their house and preparing the garden portion of their property. It wasn’t until early fall that they got SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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OPENING PAGE: MOOSE MEADOW FARM UNDER A BLANKET OF SNOW. ABOVE, TOP: KATHERINE CRESWELL AND SPENCER NIETMANN PREPARE FOR A NEW SEASON. BOTTOM: CHICKENS AT FOUR SEASONS FARM PROVIDE EGGS THROUGH A LARGE PART OF WINTER. RIGHT: SPENCER NIETMANN DURING WINTER HARVESTING. OPPOSITE, TOP: CARROTS WILL GROW DOWN TO 50 DEGREES—AND WILL KEEP UNDERGROUND THROUGHOUT THE WINTER. OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: DARREN CLOUD AND BREIGH PETERSON HAVE 45 ACRES DEVOTED TO GARDEN, ORCHARD, AND ANIMAL GRAZING. ALL COURTESY PHOTOS.

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things in the ground, and by winter, Moose Meadow began selling produce. Breigh Peterson began growing produce in the winters in Colorado at 7,000 feet. Now, farming Mountain Cloud Farm (www.MountainCloudFarm.com) in Clark Fork, Peterson said she and her small crew take only the last three weeks of April to recoup. She said winter vegetable production in Idaho has its own set of challenges. “It’s not as cold here, but that sunlight is really crucial,” she said. From November through February North Idaho has more hours of darkness than of sunlight. Winter sunlight is the main heating component for most farmers keeping crops through the cold months. While it might be 20 degrees outside, a sunny day can bring the temperature in a high tunnel greenhouse—huge, plastic-covered growing structures—to upwards of 55 degrees. To keep crops from freezing at night, farmers utilize blankets which are taken off during daylight hours to allow the soil to absorb thermal mass, then placed over the plants at night to contain that warmth. Both Moose Meadow and Mountain Cloud also use heaters, though Creswell said “heating” on her farm means about 28 degrees— just to keep the “hard freeze” off. “When people learn that we grow in the winter, the assumption is that we’re heating greenhouses. We are, but very, very minimally,” Creswell said. “You don’t have to heat things in the winter—if you choose your crops wisely, they’ll survive. The

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tunnels really just keep the snow off them so you can get in there and harvest.” Crops commonly grown during winter are salad greens, spinach, carrots, kale, cilantro, bok choy, scallions, parsley, and microgreens. Farmers also store part of their fall harvest—easy-keeping crops like onions, garlic, winter squash, turnips, and potatoes—to draw from while filling winter orders. Creswell explained that crops she and Nietmann plant in the greenhouses in early fall need to grow to maturity by November. Those heads of lettuce and other greens then must last them all winter as they pick produce to fill orders. “We’re making withdrawals every week from what we have going. We stockpile crops and every week in the winter we withdraw, but it’s not growing,” Creswell said. “By late February things do start to grow again really slowly. Like spinach—we’ve picked it every week and it will start to put on some new leaves. March and April can be really good months for us because we don’t have to plant anything, we’re just getting regrowth so we can go harvest again.” “It’s eye-opening to people that the kale they’re eating in February was planted in August,” Nietmann added. Still, high tunnels do require upkeep. Snow removal is crucial, even if the structure is heated above freezing. Peterson said she lost a greenhouse to a wind storm a few Thanksgivings ago—something she didn’t anticipate when moving to Idaho from the windy mountains of Colorado. Along with the upkeep, winter growing is fairly capital intensive. Still, Peterson said everything tends to even out in the end. “They pay for themselves pretty quickly,” she said, noting that there are even grants available to small-scale farmers through agencies like the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service that can help pay for things like high tunnels. “It’s pretty cool, what’s available right now to people who want to produce food.” Being able to buy produce from local farmers during a season when North Idahoans have typically relied on chain gro-

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cery stores also has larger economic and environmental implications, said Creswell. “In terms of food economy, it’s fairly resource intensive to do what we do in the winter, but when you compare what we do on the local scale to trucking in all this lettuce from California and Arizona, it’s either a wash or we’re coming out greener,” Creswell said. “We feel good about it for those reasons, and hopefully consumers do, too.” While winter vegetable farming is a relatively new concept in North Idaho, extended-season farming doesn’t stop at the greenhouse. Meat farmers toil all winter to be sure there’s a spring harvest. One such farmer is Toni Carey of Four Seasons Farm (www.FourSeasonsFarm. com) in Priest River, who’s been raising animals on her land for 20 years. Her focus is on laying hens, meat birds, goats, and hogs. “Hence the name Four Seasons Farm,” she said. “As a meat producer, you have to work all year.” Carey sells whole and half hogs to customers through the year, offers specific cuts at the Farmers’ Market at Sandpoint during the summer and fall, and provides meat through her summer CSA. She also delivers eggs to Sandpoint and Newport once a week, all year long. These are the fruits of her sometimes cold, grueling labor. “No matter how big the storm is, no matter if there’s power, you need to feed your animals and get water to them,” she said. Despite those chilly trips to the barn, Carey said she can’t imagine her property’s crown structure empty at any point during the year. “It’s a satisfying feeling at the end of the day when I look out at the barnyard,” she said. “It makes my heart happy.” Happy hearts abound in the local farming community, as farmers agreed that extended growing seasons and the ability to sell food all year has added a new, enjoyable dimension to the profession. “It feels good to be feeding our community,” Nietmann said, “and interacting with the people who are eating the food we grow.”

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Serving the North Idaho and Eastern Washington region Sandpoint Branch 200 Main Street Sandpoint, Idaho 208.263.5101 800.282.6880

www.TSSIR.com

Coeur d’Alene Branch 223 E. Sherman Avenue Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 208.667.1551 800.621.3163

Stunning long range lake and mountain views from a 5.03 acre lot in Hope offering complete privacy in an area of million dollar homes. This property has a roughed in driveway, a drilled 9GPM well and a septic system installed. #20192298 • $350,000 Call Alison Murphy 208-290-4567

A remarkable ski-in, ski-out home with almost 2000SF of elegant living space. An open concept floor plan features a beautiful rock fireplace under cathedral ceilings with a wall of windows allowing natural light in and long-range mountain views. #20192063 • $780,000 Call Alison Murphy 208-290-4567

True Ski-In, Ski-Out building lot with lake and mountain views in The Spires at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. #20192696 • $125,000 Call Alison Murphy 208-290-4567

Pend Oreille waterfront! Stunning 5 bdrm lodge style home in a private wooded setting on almost 4 acres with 475’ of waterfront! Oversized 4 car garage and two shops for all the toys! #20192918 • $1,329,000 Call Gil Morris 208-290-5200

Nearly 7000 square foot residence boasts 5 bedrooms (one set up as an office) 6 baths, a large theater room, exercise room, and even a 2nd kitchen on the lower level. Commanding views of Lake Pend Oreille and a deeded boat slip on the lake in your private marina. #20191587 • $1,399,000 Call Gil Morris 208-290-5200

Custom waterfront home on the Pend Oreille River on 2 acres with its own private cove. Motorized window coverings, travertine heated floors, gourmet kitchen with built in coffee center, two dishwashers, etched entry doors, granite counters, custom draperies, 2 bars, 2 beverage refrigerators & ice makers. #20191560 • $1,686,500 Call Gil Morris 208-290-5200

Fly-in Private Retreat on over 131 acres. 5 bedroom, 5 bathroom Custom Green-built Country Home with deluxe hangar +upstairs apartment. Home features a chef ’s kitchen, spacious Master Suite, formal Dining Room, main floor guest suite with private entry, radiant heated tile. #20190570 • $1,990,000 Call Bill Schaudt 208-255-6172

Lakefront home with 72 fronting feet on Lake Pend Oreille. Grandfathered-in boat house w/ 2 slips, wraparound dock. 3 bed/1bath cabin, remodeled in 2002. Huge insulated shop has a spacious lakeview studio apt, a 3 car/bay garage. #20191942 • $550,000 Call Bill Schaudt 208-255-6172

With just over 10 acres and 1,000+ feet of frontage on Pend Oreille River. Protected bay for calmer water on windy days. The main water frontage has a mixture of deep water for boat mooring and gentle entry for swimming or water sports. #20183638 • $5,000,000 Call Will Nicholson 215-208-6585

Will Nicholson, REALTOR®

Gil Morris, REALTOR®

215.208.6585

208.290.5200

will.nicholson@sothebysrealty.com

gil.morris@sothebysrealty.com

Alison Murphy, REALTOR®

Bill Schaudt, REALTOR®

208.290.4567

208.255.6175

208.290.5700

alison.murphy@sothebysrealty.com

bill.schaudt@sothebysrealty.com

carlene.peterson@sothebysrealty.com

Carlene Peterson, REALTOR®

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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h e

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Custom Lodge Home Estate. 37.5 acres with 1500’ water frontage on Chase Lake. The Lodge boasts over 11,000 sqft of living space, a commercial kitchen. The 2350sqft guest house with “shouse’’ (house + shop) boasts 4 BR 2.5 BA. Perfect for Air B&B! #20191732/19-6518 • $1,850,000 Call Carlene Peterson 208-290-5700

Beautiful waterfront building lot on the Pend Oreille River. Inlet location provides wake and wind protection. 12x20 floating dock! Community water with no fee to connect. Community drain field with no fee to connect. #20193041 • $329,000 Call Carlene Peterson 208-290-5700

The Unicorn Farm. One of a kind custom design; a green living roof with classic modern details; 2961sf, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms; 2 offices, Pack River frontage, sandy beach, nature pond, organic garden on beautiful 19.63 acres. #20193116 • $900,000 Call Karen Battenschlag 208-610-4299

Spectacular Lake Pend Oreille and mountain views. 100’ lot on the lake with seawall installed below. Buyer to drill well power & phone are in the street, drainfield is across the street. #20171810 • $595,000 Call Susan Moon 208-290-5037

FOUND HORSESHOE RANCH 7592 SF home on 1650 feet of the Pend Oreille River, WA. 84 acres, 72 x 40 shop & barn #20193157 • $3,500,000 Call /Text Cheri Hiatt 208-290-3719

WWW.771MARTINBAY.COM 5298 SF 3 bed 2.5 bath custom waterfront home. Wood shop, boat garage, game room and art studio in additional 2414 SF lower level. #20190717 $1,495,000 Call /Text Cheri Hiatt 208-290-3719

Warm, cozy 3BR, 3BA Lodge Home at The Idaho Club, Idaho’s only Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course. Private setting, close to the absolutely fabulous new clubhouse yet has the feeling of privacy and remoteness, overlooking beautiful pond. Membership in The Idaho Club is included! #20191917 • $599,000 Call Stan Hatch 208-290-7024

Susan Moon, REALTOR®

Stan Hatch, REALTOR®

Dawn Meyer, REALTOR®

stan.hatch@sothebysrealty.com

dawn.meyer@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-7024

208.290.5037 susan.moon@sothebysrealty.com

Karen Battenschlag, REALTOR® 208.610.4299 karen.battenschlag@sothebysrealty.com

One of the Last Large Waterfront properties on the Big Lake! This absolutely stunning Hope Peninsula property offers 4.46 acres of level to gently sloping property with 178 feet of crystal clear Lake Pend Oreille frontage. 4 bedroom/3 bath home with 2 car garage & wrap around decking. #20181356 • $1,400,000 Call Dawn Meyer 208-290-4149

Residence is in South Sandpoint, a highly desirable neighborhood. Close proximity to Downtown. 3 bedroom 2 bath and is 1104 sq ft on .14 of an acre. #20193006 • $235,000 Call Fabiola Ferris 907-360-7931

208-290-4149

Cheri Hiatt, REALTOR®

Fabiola Ferris, REALTOR®

cheri.hiatt@sothebysrealty.com

fabiola.ferris@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-3719

907-360-7931

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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Serving the North Idaho and Eastern Washington region Sandpoint Branch 200 Main Street Sandpoint, Idaho 208.263.5101 800.282.6880

www.TSSIR.com

Coeur d’Alene Branch 223 E. Sherman Avenue Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 208.667.1551 800.621.3163

Ben Fisher, REALTOR®

Amber Gildersleeve, REALTOR®

Beth Hall, REALTOR®

208-290-6307 Ben.Fisher@sothebysrealty.com

208-597-1600 Amber.Gildersleeve@sothebysrealty.com

208-610-5858 Beth.Hall@sothebysrealty.com

Alison Murphy, Associate Broker

Amy Delducco, REALTOR®

Bill Schaudt, REALTOR®

208-290-4567 Alison.Murphy@sothebysrealty.com

208-946-9979 Amy.Delducco@sothebysrealty.com

208-255-6172 Bill.Schaudt@sothebysrealty.com

Licensed in ID & WA

B

Danielle Lopez, REALTOR®

Desiree Staples, REALTOR®

Fabiola Ferris, REALTOR®

208-610-2252 Danielle.Lopez@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-8303 Desiree.Staples@sothebysrealty.com

907-360-7931 Fabiola.Ferris@sothebysrealty.com

Cindy Bond, Associate Broker

Dawn Meyer, REALTOR®

208-255-8360 Cindy.Bond@sothebysrealty.com

DJ Johnson, REALTOR®

208-290-4149 Dawn.Meyer@sothebysrealty.com

Licensed in ID & WA

Jessica Turco, REALTOR® 208-610-5510 Jessica.Turco@sothebysrealty.com

509-869-5181 Deborah.Johnson@sothebysrealty.com Licensed in ID & WA

Jim Watkins, REALTOR®

Kellee Daugherty, REALTOR®

208-255-6915 Jim.Watkins@sothebysrealty.com

509-981-1469 Kellee.Daugherty@sothebysrealty.com

Jessica Jamison, REALTOR®

Jim Shiffler, REALTOR®

Joey Few, REALTOR®

208-661-7920 Jessica.Jamison@sothebysrealty.com

208-255-6915 Jim.Shiffler@sothebysrealty.com

208-610-8542 Joseph.Few@sothebysrealty.com

Rich Curtis, Associate Broker 208-290-2895 Rich.Curtis@sothebysrealty.com

Ron Mendenhall, REALTOR® 208-255-8766 Ron.Mendenhall@sothebysrealty.com

Unrivaled. Unmatched.

Sandy Wolters, REALTOR® 208-290-1111 Sandy.Wolters@sothebysrealty.com

Sarah Mitchell REALTOR®

Stan Hatch, Associate Broker

208-290-3402 Sara.Mitchell@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-7024 Stan.Hatch@sothebysrealty.com

Exceptional properties deserve exceptional marketing. With expertise on the local level combined with our access to important international markets, we ensure that the properties we represent receive the far-reaching exposure they deserve, whether locally, nationally, or internationally.

- Video Marketing – Sotheby’s International Realty has more YouTube subscribers than the next 9 brands combined delivering your listing video to an exponentially larger audience.

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- Cascading Listings Sotheby’s International Realty’s Global Cascading Platform connects every Sotheby’s listing with every Sotheby’s office in the world.

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. “Maine Bay Bar Harbor Area” by John Newcomb used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal

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www.TSSIR.com Cheri Hiatt, REALTOR®

Carlene Peterson REALTOR®

Carrie LaGrace, REALTOR®

208-290-5700 Carlene.Peterson@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-1965 Carrie.LaGrace@sothebysrealty.com

Brian Harvey, REALTOR®

Jeff McClintock, REALTOR®

Gil Morris, REALTOR®

Jeff Bond, Associate Broker

208-290-5200 Gil.Morris@sothebysrealty.com

208-255-8270 Jeff.Bond@sothebysrealty.com

Linda Tolley, REALTOR® 208-561-1234 Linda.Tolley@sothebysrealty.com

m

Lea Few, REALTOR®

208-946-7816 Jennifer.Ivey@sothebysrealty.com Licensed in ID & WA

Lyle Hemingway, REALTOR®

Natalie Leatherman, REALTOR®

509-939-1340 Lyle.Hemingway@sothebysrealty.com

Natalie.Leatherman@sothebysrealty.com

Will Nicholson, REALTOR®

208-290-5037 Susan.Moon@sothebysrealty.com

215-208-6585 Will.Nicholson@sothebysrealty.com

Welcome Rob Orth!

208-610-4785

Mickie Caswell, REALTOR®

800-282-6880 Luz.Ossa@sothebysrealty.com

Susan Moon, REALTOR®

208-304-2863 Jenny.Cannon@sothebysrealty.com

Jennifer Ivey, Associate Broker

Luz Ossa, REALTOR®

208-627-8726 Lea.Few@sothebysrealty.com

Jenny Cannon, REALTOR®

208-290-4431 Jeff.McClintock@sothebysrealty.com

Broker 208-255-9890 Harry.Reichelt@sothebysrealty.com

®

208-290-6576 Casey.Krivor@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-2500 Chris.Chambers@sothebysrealty.com

Harry Reichelt, Associate

m

Licensed in ID & WA

Casey Krivor, REALTOR®

Chris Chambers, REALTOR®

208-290-2486 Brian.Harvey@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-3719 Cheri.Hiatt@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-5116 Mickie.Caswell@sothebysrealty.com

Keeley Walker, Office Manager Steve Battenschlag, Sales Manager John Herron, Managing Broker

208-263-5101 Keeley.Walker@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-6275 Steve.Battenschlag@sothebysrealty.com

208-290-5386 John.Herron@sothebysrealty.com

Tomlinson Sotheby’s International Realty welcomes Rob Orth as Designated Broker and Regional Vice President.

Rob has spent his career in service to others, working to make a positive difference in the lives of people around him through coaching, mentoring and team building. For the last few years, Rob has developed a very active and trusted real estate business representing buyers and sellers across the North Idaho Panhandle specializing in larger acreage rural properties. Rob’s dedicated professionalism and leadership will guide the Tomlinson Sotheby’s International Realty real estate team in continuing to build on the excellence and service we are known for. Opportunity Opportunity Company. Company. Equal Equal Housing Housing Opportunity. Opportunity. Each Each Office Office Is Independently Is Independently Owned Owned AndAnd Operated, Operated, Except Except Offices Offices Owned Owned AndAnd Operated Operated By By NRT NRT Incorporated. Incorporated. Sandpoint Sandpoint office: office: 208-263-5101, 208-263-5101, 200200 Main Main Street, Street, Sandpoint, Sandpoint, ID ID 83864. 83864.

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Beautiful Bridges of Bonner

County

by Jennifer Edwards

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daho isn’t known for its famous architecture, but sometimes the coolest thing about a location isn’t what you see, but rather, how you get there. Especially when ‘how you get there’ is by crossing some amazing bridges.

SANDPOINT’S LONG BRIDGE. PHOTO BY DON SORENSEN

SANDPOINT’S LONG BRIDGE Sometime around the 1900s, Tom Craig’s two-and-a-half-yearold son accidentally chopped his toe off. The family lived south of the Pend Oreille River and the only way to get to the doctor in Sandpoint was by ferry, rowboat, or the train trestle. Tom jumped onto a passing train and rode into Sandpoint, where his son was able to see a doctor for treatment. The emergency highlighted the need to build a bridge to link communities on both sides of the river. County commissioners began to plan for a new bridge. Sandpoint’s most famous bridge, the Long Bridge, was advertised as the “Longest Wooden Bridge in the World” when it was opened for use in March of 1910. The Wagon Bridge, as it was called, included a drawbridge to allow steamboats to pass through. A second bridge was built in 1933 when the wood of the first began to fail; again, it was constructed of wood. Just under larch pilings were driven into the river bottom to support the bridge, and almost three million feet of lumber was used in stringers, SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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features braces, and decking. Years of Idaho winters were hard on this wooden bridge, and by 1956 a replacement was again needed; a two-mile-long, concrete and steel open bridge was built. A fourth bridge, next to the third one, was built in 1981, and the third bridge was left as a walking/biking route, offering breathtaking views of the lake, river, and mountains.

SANDPOINT’S CEDAR STREET BRIDGE Almost as famous is downtown’s Cedar Street Bridge, which began life as a foot bridge on L.D. Farmin’s property crossing Sand Creek late in the 19th century. Damaged by high water in 1893, it was rebuilt in 1895. But by 1901, Sandpoint residents were petitioning for a new, and safer, bridge to be built across Sand Creek. After failing to get the city to purchase his bridge and build a new one in its place, Farmin built a bridge himself, selling the span over the creek to the city in 1906 to carry foot traffic from downtown to the train depot. In 1933 it was expanded to allow for automobile traffic. As train travel declined, the bridge fell into disrepair once more and was closed to traffic in 1971, and condemned in 1980. But local businessman Scott Glickenhaus saw the opportunity to create a unique structure

for Sandpoint, leasing the property from the city and constructing an Idaho version of Italy’s Ponte Vecchio covered bridge. Today the bridge is an enclosed public market that spans 400 feet across Sand Creek; it is the only marketplace on a bridge in the United States. The bridge features a unique passive solar design, multiple support pilings driven into Sand Creek, and tamarack timbers selectively harvested in Idaho and Montana.

SANDPOINT’S BRIDGE STREET BRIDGE The Bridge Street bridge is historically connected to the Cedar Street bridge. A dueling bridges battle began when L.D. Farmin sought to have the city purchase his bridge across Sand Creek; the city declined, stating it didn’t have the funds to rebuild it as was needed. U.S. Commissioner and local beer salesman Ignatz Weil wanted a bridge built on his property just south. That kicked off a dispute when Farmin tried to get an injunction to prevent Weil from building his bridge. Farmin had to travel to Rathdrum, the county seat at the time, for his injunction. During his two-day trip Weil saw an opportunity and had his bridge built before Farmin arrived home. That bridge is the Bridge Street bridge, which now con-

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HOPE’S BRIDGE TO NOWHERE. PHOTO BY JENNIFER EDWARDS

CLARK FORK’S PEDESTRIAN AND RAILROAD BRIDGES. PHOTO BY JENNIFER EDWARDS

bridges | f e at u re s granary district | | ffeeat atu ure re s s

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features nects to City Beach.

SANDPOINT’S RAILROAD BRIDGE Building a bridge for the railroad that crossed Lake Pend Oreille was no small feat in the early 1880s, but placing the tracks leading to the bridge was reportedly harder than building the bridge itself, and required three separate trestles in the last 3 miles approaching the lake. The finished bridge, including the earthen causeway leading to it, was 1.6 miles long, and some of it crossed water so deep it needed pilings up to 100 feet in length. The BNSF bridge itself is almost three-quarters of a mile long. Thousands of men worked on the project. Repairs were made to the bridge in 1905, and again in 2008, but the historically significant through truss swing span is still in place. This bridge was an iconic image in the novel “Housekeeping,” which earned author Marilynne Robinson a PEN/Hemingway award for best first novel. The book was a finalist for a Pulitzer prize, which Robinson won with her second novel. Because there is only a single railroad track across the bridge, trains often have to wait at idle for their ‘turn’ to cross, many times blocking local roads. This caused BNSF railroad to petition to build a second bridge at this location; that work began in the fall of 2019.

HOPE’S BRIDGE TO NOWHERE The “Bridge to Nowhere” in Hope was built in 1967. A redesign of U.S. Alternate Highway 10 (now Idaho Highway 200)

that sought to avoid steep hills and dangerous curves required building a bridge over a railroad right-of-way that needed to arc out over Lake Pend Oreille in order to protect the historic cemetery located above it, and the nearby Hope School. With pilings initially stretching out into Lake Pend Oreille, seemingly headed to Warren Island, the media soon dubbed the project “The Bridge to Nowhere.” The project was plagued with problems. An initial embankment built for abutment 2 slipped into the lake overnight (instead of finding more fill, the crew initiated a change order, replacing the abutment with a pier); the barge holding the project’s crane sank twice during storms; and a few times the boom collapsed when moving supplies. A more exciting development occurred when the crew discovered pieces of silver ore in the core samples pulled from the fifth tower location. The bridge opened to traffic in 1976, after 100 years of construction.

CLARK FORK’S BRIDGES The area of Clark Fork was one of the easiest ways for people to reach the northern part of the state during the gold rush years. The first bridge to be built was for the railroad around 1891; people crossed the river via ferry. But in the early 1900s, the community was calling for the construction of a bridge they could use. As early as 1912 local papers carried notices calling for bids for a wagon bridge across the Clark Fork, estimating in 1916 a cost of $88,000 for this “much-needed bridge,” and in 1918 carried notice that W.E. Johnson, John Derr and others peti-

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THE BRIDGE STREET BRIDGE OVER SAND CREEK. BY JENNIFER EDWARDS

CEDAR STREET BRIDGE. PHOTO BY JENNIFER EDWARDS

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© 2019 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. (BRP). All rights reserved. ®, TM and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. In the U.S.A., products are distributed by BRP US Inc. This offer is valid in the U.S.A. only at participating Ski-Doo ® dealers on new and unused Ski-Doo snowmobiles (excluding racing models and units sold under the Spring Fever promotion) purchased, delivered and registered between October 1, 2019, to October 31, 2019. The terms and conditions may vary depending on your state, and these offers are subject to termination or change at any time without notice. See your Ski-Doo dealer for details. ‡Save up to $1,500 on select 2019 models: Eligible units are select new and unused 2019 Ski-Doo models. Rebate amount depends on the model purchased. While quantities last. Promotions are subject to termination or change at any time without notice. Offer may not be assigned, traded, sold or combined with any other offer unless expressly stated herein. Offer void where restricted or otherwise prohibited by law. BRP reserves the right, at any time, to discontinue or change specifications, prices, designs, features, models or equipment without incurring any obligation. Always consult your snowmobile dealer when selecting a snowmobile for your particular needs, and carefully read and pay special attention to your Operator’s Guide, Safety Video, Safety Handbook and to the safety labelling on your snowmobile. Always ride responsibly and safely and wear appropriate clothing, including a helmet. Please observe applicable laws and regulations. Remember that riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix.

SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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SANDPOINT RAILROAD BRIDGE. STAFF PHOTO

SANDPOINT’S OLD WAGON BRIDGE, CIRCA 1932, WAS ADVERTISED AS THE WORLD’S LONGEST RAILROAD BRIDGE. PHOTO COURTESY BONNER COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

tioned for the construction of “a bridge about 1,000 feet long across the Clarksfork River at or near where the present ferry is situated.” Those calls took root, and in the fall of 1919 a fair was held to dedicate the new bridge, which featured “five steel spans each 200 feet long, resting on six concrete piers... [and] designed to carry a load of 20 tons,” reported the Northern Idaho News. An order of the county commissioners (Idaho Statute No. 1392) was posted on a sign over the bridge: “For riding or driving over this bridge faster than a walk $100 fine or three months in jail.” In 1956 Northern Pacific constructed a new railroad bridge across the river, and paid Bonner County $1,500 to take their old railroad bridge off their hands. The 78

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county immediately began revamping the bridge to handle heavy load truck traffic to service trucks hauling logs to area mills. The one-way bridge had a tenfoot roadway, and was designed to hold a load of 250 tons. Regular traffic still used the old wagon bridge, but in 1991 it was closed due to safety concerns and all traffic was diverted to the one-way former railroad bridge—which by 1999 had the lowest safety rating in the state. In 2002 the county finally secured funding to build a new vehicle bridge next to the existing former railroad bridge, which then

became a pedestrian bridge. The original wagon bridge was torn down. The pedestrian bridge is also part of the route of the Idaho Centennial Trail, a 900-mile long trek designated as the official state trail in 1990, connecting the state from north to south. Few have completed the entire journey. Although many of the oldest bridges are rapidly being replaced, keep your eyes peeled when you’re out and about and take a close look at what is used when crossing the water. There’s history under your wheels.

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This winter at Schweitzer, skiers will find more and more...and more by Sandy Compton

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With change comes growth: New hotel, more lifts, more runs, more adventure

he face of Schweitzer is changing—again. Not the Face, you understand. The double-black, thrill-asecond, “show-me” run off the top of the Lakeview Triple remains the same, as does the rest of the skiing and boarding at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Or it gets better. Which is the point of a snow resort operation, right? Right. As you go to the slopes, though, notice that Sandpoint Independent Highway District took the rough edges off the road. Summer bikers loved it. Winter drivers will as well. Next, notice the construction site just south of the Selkirk Lodge. There, in the fall of 2020, will rise a 30-room hotel, restaurant, and bar, owned by Schweitzer. “It will provide more beds on the mountain,” said Schweitzer CEO Tom Chasse, “and let us do a better job of managing lodging overall.” Guest lodging, including the Selkirk Lodge, is currently handled by Schweitzer, but the units are all individually owned condominiums. Stop for a mocha at the Mojo Café, check the weather on your phone, and you will note that WiFi is over-the-top better. Fiber optics arrived at the mountain in September. As you wait for the bell to ring at the Basin Express, you’ll see that the area under the Taps deck at the Day Lodge is enclosed, providing additional inside seating. Ride to the Outback for lunch, and you’ll note they have brought the deck indoors, as well. In fact, the Outback got a major overhaul, though some of it might not be that obvious. “We found some interesting stuff during the rebuild,” said Schweitzer employee Mike Murray, and well they should have. The Outback is 48 years old this winter. Imagine the party when it turns 50. “The building is solid,” said Murray, “and it’s going to be there for a long time.” The newly enclosed deck will have big windows that can be opened on bluebird days. Most exciting news: a new stairway to the bathrooms was installed, eliminating what some referred to as the toughest run on the mountain. So, what else is new? Wait for it. Before we continue to the elephant in the Outback—the $9 million dollar lift expansion in Colburn Basin—let’s take a ramble through what used to be.

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features Back in the day, Schweitzer lifts were named very simply. In the beginning was Chair One. Beginning in 1963, it carried skiers to the top of the South Bowl for 44 years. Then came Chairs Two and Three; (1967); Four (1968); Five and Six (1971); and Seven (1974). They were simple, durable, safe double Riblets—albeit kind of slow—conceived by Byron Christian Riblet of the Riblet Tramway Company. He was semilocal, with a house on a bluff northeast of Spokane (the Cliff House) that is now headquarters for a winery. One, Two, Three and Four became Grandpa, Baby, Mama, and Papa Bears— in that order. Grandpa eventually went back to being Chair One. Four, Five, and Six became Sunnyside, Timber Cruiser, and Snow Ghost, though the monikers didn’t always stick with those who knew them before the change. The other two Bears and Seven disappeared, parts to the “boneyard,” and portions to other ski areas. This was also the fate of four T-bars original area manager Sam Wormington moved all over the mountain in a quest for the perfect skiers’ access. One stayed at the Bunny Hill until Chair Two was revived to replace it in 1990 and renamed Musical Chairs. Six—as it shall hence be referred to— originally loaded below the Outback and, according to Schweitzer veteran John Grollmus, immediately traversed a “misty swamp” full of terrors only a six-yearold could dream up. It unloaded at the bottom of Siberia, boasting “a view of the

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schweitzer

EULOGY FOR A RIBLET That is sad news for some of us. Mention the removal of Six, and some get a distressed look. Asked how she felt about it, one young-ish woman looked away and sadly said, “I learned to ski at Schweitzer when I was two-and-a-half years old,” as if that explains it all. And it does, if you spent days of your youth and your not-so-youth riding the slowest chair to get to the fastest, deepest, steepest slopes on the mountain. Some incredible, indelible memories were cast in those 146 blue chairs, even though all were not pleasant. Grollmus wrote, in the December 2018 Inlander’s “Ode to the Snow Ghost,” “I’ve spent more time than I’d care to remember gripping that ancient center pole tightly as the wind howled with the chair stopped at what somehow always seemed to be its highest point just before it reaches the relative safety of the Midway unload.” This was not a singular experience. But Six made up for it on sunny spring rides with a friend or a brother or a lover—or on lonely, anticipatory trips on fill-in-your-tracks powder weekdays. We are indebted to Six for returning us again and again to the source of some of the most

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exhilarating runs we ever experienced. “Chair Six was the only one worth the wait,” said Marjolein Groot Nibbelink, who made her first black diamond run in the North Bowl, “and the most exciting one to get off of, especially at Midway.” Six is gone. Sad as that might seem, some not-so-fun things are gone with it. No more frantic, U-turn unloads at Midway. No more heart-jarring emergency stops with no safety bar. No more up-the-hill lines on busy weekends. No more praying for the chair to restart while clutching that center bar and swinging above the chasm below Midway on a ten-degree day, winddriven ice crystals tenderizing your forehead. As they get ready to turn the bull wheels at Schweitzer this winter, lovers of Chair Six can take consolation in the fact that it was such a great lift that it took two to replace it, like it or not. And there will be a lot to like.

THERE WILL BE MORE RIDES While the two new lifts were being built, new intermediate runs were cut off of Kaniksu both to the north and south. More glades were opened up for mid-level tree skiers to enjoy. There will be better return access to the North Bowl steeps, and shorter lines at every lift on the mountain, especially Stella. “It’s going to take a tremendous amount of pressure off of Stella,” Chasse said. “Our goal was to create a whole new pod in the back bowl. We expanded the amount of skiing terrain, and we expect

WO O DS W HEATC RO FT

best skiing you can’t get to.” The 1988 move to its final location opened up the wondrous steeps and trees of the North Bowl. In 1990, the Great Escape made Four an auxiliary lift. Sixpack Stella replaced Five in 2001, and Six inherited the title, “longest ride on the mountain.” In 2005, the Idyle Our T-bar opened the northern reaches of the Colburn drainage. The Basin Express and Lakeview Triple replaced One in 2007. The Basin Express unloads where Seven once did. The Triple unloads where the top of One was. Got all that? Good, because there will be a test at the end of the 2019-20 season. One of the questions will be, “Where, exactly, were the load, midway, and top of Chair Six?” That will be a good question, because Six is gone.

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Our goal was to create a whole new pod in the back bowl. We expanded the amount of skiing terrain, and we expect people to stay in that pod for hours.”

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features people to stay in that pod for hours.” The $6 million Cedar Park Express is a detachable, LeiterPoma quad that loads at the top of Cedar Park and unloads just above where Six Midway was, accessing all the runs reachable from Midway plus the new ones off of Kaniksu. A new cutoff from Little Blue Ridge will allow Idyle Our riders to get directly to the new Quad as well. The $3 million Colburn Triple is a fixed-grip Skytrack. The unload is kind of a given; just a few yards south of the old Six unload. After some speculation about where the triple would load, it was great to learn that it would be at the intersection of Vagabond and Will’s Runout—think skier’s left of Colburn Lake. Anyone coming from anywhere between Lakeside and Debbie Sue will get to do it again, only sooner. Those who want to avoid returning to the village from the top of Stella can instead go quickly via the new triple. A last run from the top beats dawdling along the cat track.

LONESOME RIDES STILL AVAILABLE Ron Nova, Schweitzer skier and ski industry veteran, who was Schweitzer general manager from 2002 to 2006, is excited about the new lifts. “It’s a well-thought-out plan that’s going to

affect how crowds move on the mountain in a positive way. I think it’s going to be good for everybody.” The new lifts will bring more riders to the Colburn side, surely, but there will still be lots of room for the rider looking for their own private Schweitzer. “We’ll see an uptick in our visitor counts,” said mountain manager Rob Batchelder, “but north of Pucci’s Chute, the experience isn’t going to change.”

AND THERE ARE ALWAYS WEEKDAYS The skiing and boarding just got better at Schweitzer. Shorter, safer rides. More runs. More glades. More family- and intermediate-friendly terrain. More fun for snow lovers. Which is the whole point of a snow resort operation, right? Right.

OPENING PHOTO: LOCAL SKIER BOB LEGASA TAKES FULL ADVANTAGE OF FRESH SNOW, STEEPS AND SUNSHINE ON BUD’S CHUTE, PHOTO BY WESLEY WHITE/FREERIDE MEDIA. P. 82, TOP TO BOTTOM: A FAMILY ENJOYS A BRIEF RESPITE RIDING THE LIFT; TWO NEW LIFTS WERE ADDED TO SCHWEITZER THIS SUMMER; IT’S HARD TO BEAT THE VIEWS IN THIS PHOTO OF A SKIIER ON CORDUROY, ALL THREE PHOTOS COURTESY SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT. P. 83, LEVI BONNELL SHOWING SOME “STEEZE” AT SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN, PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT. BELOW: EVERY RESOURCE WAS USED WHILE CONSTRUCTING SCHWEITZER’S NEW LIFTS, PHOTO COURTESY SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT

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schweitzer Through the Eyes of Duane “Blacky” Black

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and the Lynch Family

hen Schweitzer Basin opened in 1963, Duane “Blacky” Black was a teenager with no money. Every winter, he and friends would drag their old cross country skis to the top of Pine Street Hill and ski down. With a new mountain to conquer, Black worked all summer mowing lawns to earn the money to buy his first ski pass—for $32. The price had climbed to $45 when he bought the next one, and while that price continued to increase throughout the years, he’s never been without one since.

Patrick and Meredith Lynch, avid telemark skiers, moved to Sandpoint in the 1990s, thrilled with a ski resort just outside their back door. “We would never have moved here without it,” said Pat. “Sking is such a huge part of our lives.” The family has held season passes every year here, adding Nordic passes to the mix eight years ago. Over two decades—and two children—later, their love of Schweitzer hasn’t changed. “Skiing is what keeps us young. I see myself racing down the slopes in my 70s,” Pat said, “and teaching my grandchildren to ski.”

The Lynch Family

60s

1963 Schweitzer Basin opens with General Manager Sam Wormington 1968 Papa Bear, Mama Bear, Baby Bear chairlifts added

70s

1969 is a banner memory

for Black. “It snowed so hard you couldn’t even see across the street. The only roads that were plowed were the highway, Boyer, and the road to Schweitzer. We didn’t have school, so we spent the entire month skiing every day.” It was a different experience in those days. “We skied in blue jeans and it was 15 to 20 degrees below zero. We could take one run to Midway, then we’d have to sit on the radiant heaters in the lodge for an hour to warm up before we could do it again.”

1971 Back area of Colburn

Basin developed, Chairs 5&6 1972 Restaurant, overnight lodge and 20-unit condominium built 1973 Schweitzer road paved 1974 Chair 7 added 1978-’79 Bierstube, Mill Building and ski shop debut. In 1972, with the back side of Schweitzer open, the ski patrol added 13 new members. Black joined, and would stay for 35 years. “The Ski Patrol is responsible for avalanche control with the mantra, “Stay on the right side of the crack!” A number of patrol members skiing the North Bowl once set off an avalanche, knocking seven off their feet, but I was the only one buried.” said Black.

“Blacky”“Blacky” Black Black

80s

1980s “When it

snowed, you got to ski a powder storm for three days straight. It’s hard to explain how great that is. When we were kids, we knew a month in advance if we were going to Spokane. Schweitzer opened up winter for everyone.” said Black.

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20s

1990 The Great Escape, a detatchable, high speed, quad chairlift and lights for night skiing added; 10-year plan begins including Green Gables Lodge, Headquarters Day Lodge 1991 Road washout strands guests for two days 1995 Construction of first half pipe 1997 Brown family files for bankruptcy 1998 Resort was purchased by Harbor Properties, terrain park opens.

2000-’01 Stella, Idaho’s only highspeed, 6-passenger chair lift installed 2005 McCaw Investment Group becomes sole owner of resort; 400 acres and 5 new named trails added 2007 Basin Express, Lakeview Triple lifts installed.

By 2005, Pat and Meredith Lynch were taking their daughters skiing, first in backpacks but by age two the girls were skiing on their own.

10s

2012 Ski & Ride Center

revamped; Musical Chairs rebuilt 2013 50 year anniversary 2019 Fiber optics arrived; Cedar Park Express and Colburn Triple lifts added.

2019 “The improve-

ments just keep making things better,” said Pat Lynch. “And even today, it’s still an undiscovered gem. There are so many secret places to ski, that even on the busiest day, you can still find the untracked runs and ski them all day. This mountain just shines,” he added.

“We wouldn’t have moved here if it wasn’t for Schweitzer. Skiing is a huge part of our lives.” Despite a first day skiing in pouring rain, he said, “It was great!”

Decades of fun & memories for the Lynch family

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In deep & On top of the

world A winter sport for the young and old alike can carry riders to the top to experience majestic views by Todd Wendle

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hether you’re an avid snowmobiler or just dreaming about riding one for the first time, North Idaho is the place to be. With over 300 miles of groomed trails on Bonner County’s forest service roads, plus another 400+ miles of groomed trails at Priest Lake State Park, the opportunity to go snowmobiling likely lies not far from your back door. Snowmobiling is a rare activity: Those who have never ridden can learn the basics in a day, while those who have spent their lives riding are able to challenge themselves every 86

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single ride. “We like to go out and have a lot of fun,” said Clayton Meserve, president of the Sandpoint Winter Riders, the local affiliate of the Idaho State Snowmobile Association. “It gets us together with something unique to do and really helps beat the monotony of our long winters. I love to snowmobile. I learn and see more every time I go out.” He added, “And like skiers at the start of the season, when most people are looking at their La-Z-Boy recliners, snowmobilers are looking forward to getting their legs back under them and getting started on this year’s great winter adventures.”

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Families can ride groomed trails in the morning and then the experienced riders can hit the deep powder ridges, hill climbs, and bowls in the afternoon.”

PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: WES FREE SOARING OFF A SCENIC LEDGE ABOVE HOPE, PHOTO BY LUKE ROBERTS.RIDER TREVOR SCHNEIDER IN THE SELKIRKS AFTER AN OVERNIGHT 2-FOOT SNOWFALL, PHOTO BY MAT KRAMER. A RIDER ON A BREAK TAKING IN THE SCENERY (BELOW).

Snowmobiling is an activity that has been growing and evolving for 40 plus years. In 2018, almost 40,000 snowmobiles were registered in the state of Idaho. Geoff Smith at Sandpoint Marine and Motorsports said it’s a growing winter activity in this area. “Sales have been going through the roof,” he said. The primary avenue for snowmobiling is along the area’s Forest Service roads. In every county these roads are groomed on a regular schedule. The trails are wide and generally are not steep, making them a perfect place for beginning riders, or for those who just want a leisurely ride out into the backcountry. For those who desire a bit more adventure, these trails are the gateway to huge, untracked playfields and woods full of deep powder, hill climbing, and side hilling into the area’s publicly owned land. When not at work on county business, commissioner Dan McDonald likes to hit the trails in the winter; one of his favorite areas goes into the Selkirks off the Upper Pack. “The snow is almost always awesome and the SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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views are spectacular when there’s no cloud cover,” he said. “The trail extends into Boundary County, and there’s a good mixture of terrain.” Another popular destination is Roman Nose north of Sandpoint. “Roman Nose is a great ride,” said Meserve. “The trail is groomed right to the first of three lakes. There you can ride around on the lake, have lunch, whatever. If you are interested in more technical riding there are two more lakes up above. It is a ride for all types of riders.” Although you can reach Roman Nose from the parking area near the Upper Pack River Road, most riders park at Falls Creek, just outside of Naples. Ruby Ridge is another access point, but parking there is limited. Trestle Creek is another favored riding area. Accessed just west of Hope, it’s about 4 miles up to the snowmobile parking area. From there, the groomed trail leads to a gorgeous vista, then to a beautiful warming hut, and the Lightning Creek drainage. This is also the door to beautiful, open acres upon acres of terrain and for the adventurous, Lake Darling and Moose Lake. The county received a grant to pave at least the first three miles of Trestle Creek Road—work is expected to

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begin in 2020—which will undoubtedly increase the popularity of this area. The backcountry around Schweitzer Mountain Resort is another sought-after destination, and Selkirk Powder is the way to get there. “We are a very unique operation. We are a top down tour company. That means we start out every trip at the top of Schweitzer Mountain. We begin the day with sweeping vistas and mountaintop terrain,” said owner Ken Barrett, who has been serving up North Idaho’s winter offerings for 16 years. He added, “We offer guided trips to families brand new to snowmobiling that include hands on training and snowmobile safety along with the obligatory snowball fight with Mom and Dad. We offer trips to seasoned veterans where the guides take our guests to places they never ever expected.” One group of guests was literally speechless. Their guide quipped, “When you are not on the road, you are in the mountains. And they are steep!” This year it will be possible to use Selkirk Powder’s private groomed trail coming from the Priest Lake side to travel up to Schweitzer’s new Sky House Lodge for lunch and a quick trip down the quad to the village for some mountain shopping.

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snowmobiling resources Parking at motorized trailheads is available on Trestle Creek, Johnson Creek, Falls Creek, Snow Creek, and on Upper Pack River roads, as well as at Priest Lake State Park. See map below. Snowmobile rentals are available in Coolin at Crown Jewel Winter Sports (208-691-3719) and Priest Lake from Priest Lake Powersports (208-443-2415). There are no snowmobile rentals in the Sandpoint area, but those without a sled of their own can take a guided tour with Selkirk Powder (208-263-6959). Snowmobile resources are available from Sandpoint Winter Riders (on Facebook, or call Clayton Meserve, club president, at 208-610-5366) and via www.PriestLake.org, which offers a hiking/snowmobile app for Android and iPhones. A map of winter recreation trails is available at the U.S. Forest Service office at 1602 Ontario St. in Sandpoint. Avalanches are an ever-present danger in Idaho’s high country. The Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center issues regional advisories on Tuesday and Friday mornings. Call 208-765-7323 for the current advisory before you head out.

where to ride BONNERS FERRY

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PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: A TIMBERSLED IN POWDER, PHOTO BY TODD WILLIAMS. REFLECTIONS OF A RECENT TREK, PHOTO BY KYLE KNOX ACTION NORTHWEST PHOTOGRAPHY; WES FREE CLEARS A VERTICAL JUMP NEAR HOPE, PHOTO BY ACTION NORTHWEST PHOTOGRAPHY; CLIMBING THROUGH POWDER, PHOTO BY ACTION NORTHWEST PHOTOGRAPHY; SCOUTING THE BEST ROUTE UP THE WIGWAMS, PHOTO BY TOM HOLLMAN; A TRIO OF TIMBERSLEDS, PHOTO BY TODD WILLIAMS.

Looking to get a little further away? Priest Lake State Park provides around 400 miles of groomed trails and endless play areas. “The Priest Lake area is one of the top 10 areas to ride in the United States. It has a little bit of everything for every type of rider. It is unique in that you can jump on a groomed trail directly outside your hotel and ride all day,” said Matt Shardy, owner of Priest Lake PowerSports. “Families can ride groomed trails in the morning and then the experienced riders can hit the deep powder ridges, hill climbs, and bowls in the afternoon.” As all snowmobilers know already, snowmobiling is the perfect “excuse” for getting out of the house. North Idaho winters are long in these parts, but gliding along through the trees, exploring new areas, fresh tracks, finding unbelievable vistas, making new friends, and, unlike within the four walls of a house, getting fresh crisp air all day long is something that cannot be beat. Snowmobiling is truly a great family and friend affair. It is easy to learn to ride. There are new friends to be made. And Ol’ Man Winter is waiting for you just around the bend.

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Walk, ski, bike, snowshoe... get out & into the woods

New Winter Wonders at Pine Street Woods by Cate Huisman

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hen a community survey a few years ago revealed that only 30 percent of Sandpoint’s youth participate in snow sports, avid Nordic skiers Ross and Vicki Longhini decided they had something to offer local young people. They formed the Sandpoint Nordic Club, developed the University of Idaho property on Boyer Avenue for Nordic skiing, and recruited youngsters from local schools to learn to ski. In the intervening six years, their initial crop of 15 to 20 young skiers has bloomed to about 70. And other locals of all ages have also taken to the new ski trails in droves. The Longhinis’ concerns mesh well with the mission of the Kaniksu Land Trust, which aims not only to conserve undeveloped land in northern Idaho and western Montana, but also to encourage community members to get outside and enjoy their wondrous surroundings. KLT acquired Pine Street Woods, its 160-acre “community forest” just west of town, with this aspect of its mission specifically in mind. So it’s no surprise that the Longhinis hoped that the Woods could be used for skiing. “SNC has been working with Kaniksu Land Trust on the Pine Street Woods project informally for four or five years,” said Ross. As 90

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KLT completed the land acquisition last spring, the Nordic club geared up to prepare the area for winter use. Volunteers from both organizations spent hundreds of hours last summer removing barbed wire and cutting brush. Longhini himself spent much of July in a cherry picker clearing high branches from above the new trails so snowfall could reach the forest floor. The club, along with KLT, also received a grant to build an outdoor recreation building on the property, and this timber-framed building now includes space for skiers to wax their skis or take a break from the cold, as well as storage for the 50 pairs of skis and 50 pairs of snowshoes the grant also paid for. The gear is available free of charge to school groups, and a large inventory of adult gear is available for rent as well. “This is a huge thing for our community, ” said Longhini. Nordic skiing is inexpensive or even free, and it’s easy to access from town. The Woods have seven kilometers of tracks through meadows and woodland, significantly more than at the UI property. And the icing on this crosscountry cake is that the new area is approximately 500 feet higher than the UI site, which will provide a ski season four to six weeks longer than has been possible

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pine street woods || schweitzer down at lake level. An unusual aspect of the club’s youth program is that “the vast majority of our kids do not have parents who ski,” said Longhini. Despite this, some of its young skiers have gone on to do very well competitively. Annaby Kanning, now a junior at Sandpoint High School, has competed at the national level for the past two years, and another half dozen youngsters are competing regionally. In addition, three middle schoolers have gotten interested in competing in the biathlon, a sport that combines Nordic skiing and shooting. “Kids love the idea of combining skiing and hunting,” said Longhini, and the sport provides a unique challenge to competitors, who must alternate skiing hard with calming their breathing so they can shoot accurately. Readers who are unfamiliar with the various approaches to the sport of skiing may wonder what all the flap is about—don’t skiers need lifts to get to the top of hills, since they can ski only down, not up? This is indeed true of the alpine skiers at Schweitzer, whose boots are attached to their skis at the toe and heel, so they can’t lift their heels. Nordic skiers, however, wear boots that are attached at the toe only, enabling them to stride and glide on flat land or even uphill (as well as downhill, albeit with somewhat less control than alpine skiers). Nordic skiers can, in fact, just put on their skis and take off through any open country. And striking out across an untracked winter landscape has a lot of appeal for experienced skiers with sturdy skis and good route-finding skills. But skiing on groomed tracks and trails has a different appeal: Beginning skiers can follow the tracks and enjoy a good workout even if they have only minimal skills. As their

capabilities improve, they can go much faster and farther on tracks than off through the puckerbrush. The Nordic club grooms the trails at Pine Street Woods regularly during the winter—at least once a day when the weather cooperates. The seven kilometers of “wide” trails allow for two different styles of Nordic skiing: “classic,” where skiers stride forward leaving two more-or-less parallel tracks, and “skating,” where skiers leave a V-shaped track. The latter is faster, makes for a better aerobic workout, and requires technique and skill if the skier is not to be left heaving and breathless. The former works well for anyone who can walk. An additional two kilometers of “narrow” trails have been built for snow-biking. Like the wide ski trails, the narrow trails are designed to get new users out in the winter, so they are beginner-friendly. Once their skills have advanced a bit, other options abound for skiers to widen their Nordic horizons around Sandpoint. Favorite local sites for trackless skiing include the snow-covered frozen river (most easily accessed via the boat ramps at City Beach or at the end of Boyer Avenue), as well as the playing fields at Centennial and Great Northern parks. A bit further afield, tracks can be found at Farragut State Park to the south, Western Pleasure Guest Ranch in the Selle Valley, and at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, which has the longest season. If you’re ready to broaden your winter recreation horizons, it’s a good time to be in Sandpoint. A quick trip to Pine Street Woods offers the promise of new ways to enjoy the wonder of winter. Learn more at www.KaniksuLandTrust.org.

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Rollin’

features

North Idaho style

Fat-tire biking is becoming a hot winter sport by Charles A. Mortensen

ABOVE: SCHWEITZER OFFERS FAT TIRE BIKING WITH VIEWS. PHOTO BY TRACY TUTTLE/SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT. RIGHT: JULIE MEYERS AND HER DOG, CRACKERS, ON FROZEN LAKE PEND OREILLE. PHOTO BY CHARLES MORTENSEN. NEXT PAGE: DIXIE TAKES JAMES ROWLAND ON A FAT TIRE RIDE ALONG THE SHORES OF LPO. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL.

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randon Kaastad of Sandpoint, an avid mountain biker and a landscaper by trade, spends the growing months of the year running Cabinet Mt. Landscape, his landscaping operation, a venture that affords precious little time on his mountain bike. While he manages to squeeze a ride in here and there on the weekends, it’s not ‘til the snow flies, when the business is relatively dormant, that he can devote real time to roaming the wilds on two wheels. “My winters are free,” said Kaastad “so, I have plenty of time to ride, and I’m always looking for an adventure.” That’s when he brings out his fat bike, a carbon fiber steed specifically designed to ride on snow with 5-inch-wide knobby tires and mountain bike gearing. Kaastad’s fat bike adventures take him far and wide. In Canada, he and his partner, Connie Hammond, have ridden across frozen Lake Louise and up the valley to the glacier that feeds the lake, and they’ve spent days riding endless miles of groomed single-track in the Kimberley/Cranbrook area of British Columbia. But some of his more adventurous outings have been in the Sandpoint area, chugging his way to the top of Schweitzer Mountain on the Highpoint Trail, topping out at Lunch Peak in the Cabinet Mountains, and ascending through winter storms to Roman Nose Lakes in the Selkirks—all feats that many mere mortals would not

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consider even on a clear summer day. While the origins of mountain biking can be traced to the 1970s with the first commercially available mountain bikes appearing in the 1980s, fat bikes—that is, mountain bikes with extra wide wheels and tires intended for riding on snow and sand—were a rare breed before the 2000s and were not generally available commercially until 2005. Fat biking is surging in popularity, and the Sandpoint area offers an array of fat biking opportunities—from Idaho State Snowmobile Association-groomed backcountry trails and groomed Nordic trails at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, to snowshoe-packed routes on popular single-track trails and the frozen waters of local lakes and streams. Fat biking appeals to anyone who enjoys getting outdoors in the winter months, and while riding a bike on snow can be

a challenge, depending on snow conditions, it’s a great form of recreation and exercise that can be enjoyed by anyone who can ride a bike. The uninitiated among us may wonder why anyone would want to ride a bike in the snow when there are plenty of other snow-centric activities to enjoy, like skiing, snow boarding, or snowshoeing. In fact, many, if not most, local fat bikers also ski through the winter months. But when the conditions aren’t great for skiing, they often are good for fat biking (and vica versa). Fat bikes have even entered into the eBike realm; that is, bicycles equipped with electric pedal-assist motors. Class I eBikes, those with a top speed of about 20 mph which will not function without pedaling input from the rider, are growing in popularity world wide. While eBikes, including fat eBikes, are becoming popular on local streets as a practical means of commuting, offroad use of Class I eBikes is generally limited to trails designated for motorized access. Schweitzer Mountain Resort leads summer tours on mountain trails on a fleet of electric-assist fat bikes for visitors eager to experience the beauty of the mountains. Pine Street Woods, Kaniksu Land Trust’s recently-acquired parcel of 180 acres of forest and meadow on the outskirts of town, together with an adjacent 140-acre private parcel managed under conservation easement by KLT, provides fertile ground for development of an extensive network of single-track fat biking close to town and accessible to riders of all abilities. The Sandpoint Nordic Club and Kaniksu Land Trust were recently awarded grants to build an outdoor recreation center at Pine Street Woods. Initially, the facility will house cross-country skis, snowshoes, and trail grooming equipment, with plans to add mountain bikes in the future. It will also be a warming hut and base-camp of sorts for Nordic skiers, hikers, and cyclists. “The grant also includes funds to purchase 50 sets of snowshoes for use by school groups and others at Pine Street Woods,” said Ross Longhini, president of the Sandpoint Nordic Club and member of the KLT trails committee for Pine Street Woods. The Nordic club plans to groom approximately 7 kilometers of wide trails at Pine Street Woods for Nordic classic and skate skiing and the goal is to develop a separate single-track, or narrow, trail network for use by hikers, snowshoers, and fat bikers. The Pend Oreille Pedalers, Sandpoint’s local bike club, recently purchased SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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features a grooming machine specifically designed to groom narrow trails for fat biking. “The groomer will be available for use at Pine Street Woods as well as other trails maintained by the club,” said club president, Mike Murray. “The groomer will be perfect for the narrow trails at Pine Street Woods,” added Longhini, “and will complement the snow-packing power of the 50 sets of snowshoes under the grant quite well.” Snowshoe packing, according to Frank Benish of Nine Mile Falls, Washington, is often essential, even when a groomer is available. “On days after a heavy snow fall, it is difficult to initiate grooming with the machine,” said Benish. “So we first walk the trails with snowshoes to create a path that the groomer can manage.” Benish, who has been spotted racing around the Sandpoint cyclocross course and plying the local mountain bike trails, spent last winter grooming fat bike trails at Riverside State Park in Spokane, Washington, and conducted a grooming demonstration at Mt. Spokane State Park. “Washington State Parks has provided the main impetus for developing a fat bike grooming program on State Park lands,” said Benish. “I see this interest as a positive force in growing the sport.” The grooming machine that Benish operates is a track-driven machine that pulls the operator on various sleds designed for differing snow conditions. The operator maneuvers the groomer much like a walk-behind snow blower while standing on the sled, which finishes the track packed by the groomer. Kaastad, who enjoys the challenge and beauty of riding his fat bike to the top of a mountain on a wide track groomed for snowmobilers, prefers winter riding on single-track trails. “Some of the most epic winter riding I’ve done is on the vast network of groomed single-track in the Cranbrook/Kimberley area of British

Columbia,” said Kaastad, “It would be great if we had access to a groomer locally because it would give us the means to further develop some great terrain in and around Sandpoint for singletrack fat biking.” Sandpoint, known for some of the best skiing in the state, may soon also become a winter fat-biking mecca, as interest continues to grow.

fat bike Events: OPT OUTSIDE, November 29, 2019—Greasy Fingers leads a group ride, typically on fat bikes. GLOBAL FAT BIKE DAY +1, December 8, 2019—Greasy Fingers leads group rides on Selkirk Recreational District trails, followed by refreshments by a campfire. Fat bike rentals available. SKI & SNOWSHOE FREE DAY, January 4, 2020—As part of the Idaho Free Ski and Snowshoe Day at Priest Lake, Greasy Fingers offers free Fat Bike Demo rides on the Indian Creek groomed trails. 6TH ANNUAL FATTY FLURRY FEST, January 25, 2020—At Round Lake State Park in Sagle. Fat bike demos are offered in the morning with lead group rides in the afternoon. Refreshments, evening ride after. TBD—WESTERN PLEASURE AND GREASY FINGERS co-host a fat bike Poker Ride in March.

Local Fat Bike Sales/Rentals/Service:

BONNERS FERRY PRIEST LAKE

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Bonner County Bicycles: (208)597-5339. BonnerCountyBicycles @ Facebook. Sales and service. Greasy Fingers Bikes N Repair: (208)255-4496. www.GreasyFingersBikes.com. Sales, service, rentals. Murphy’s: (208)597-2343. Rentals. Outdoor Experience: (208)263-6028. Sales and service. Sandpoint Sports: Sales and service. (208)265-2163. Schweitzer Mountain Ski and Ride Center:(208)255.3070. Rental Fat bikes available for use on Schweitzer Mountain Nordic trails. Syringa Cyclery: (208)610-9990. www.SyringaCyclery.com. Sales and service. Tanner Cycle Works—Custom bicycle frame builder: Will be offering custom fat bike frames. Email tannercycleworks@gmail.com.

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find

heli skiing

cat skiing

backcountry skiing

Located at Schweitzer Mountain Resort

avalanche education

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snowmobilE tours

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photo essay

WINTER COLD AND WIND SCULPTS THE SANDPOINT RAILROAD BRIDGE PILINGS INTO ART. PHOTO BY DON FISHER

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FACING PAGE: ICE WORKS ITS MAGIC ON ROCKS AND WOOD JUST OFF THE PEND D’OREILLE BAY TRAIL, PHOTO BY JESSE HART. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: BLOWING SNOW ON A WINTER MORNING ALONG THE KOOTENAI RIVER, PHOTO BY LINDA LANTZY; SUNSET PAINTS THE SKY, PHOTO BY DAN ESKELSON; SUNSET ON THE SHORE OF LAKE PEND OREILLE, PHOTO BY LINDA LANTZY

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real estate

Regional architectural firm with decades designing residential and commercial structures offers guidelines for what wears well in winter and beyond

by Carrie Scozzaro

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esigning for winter involves anticipating not only inclement weather—snow, ice, wind, extreme cold—but also shorter days with less sun. To counter that, architects like Sandpoint-based Boden Architecture proactively prepare for winter through careful consideration of such things as building site, windows, floor plan, amenities, roof elements, and the type and quality of finishes used—both exterior and interior. In their office, said principal and company founder Tim Boden, they work hard and play hard. “We love that active lifestyle.” They share that with clients, who have come to trust Boden and his team to provide valuable insight, whether for a chateau on the mountain or a more contemporary structure in town. Location, location, location. Site location and how the design integrates into the environment is one of the first things they consider when designing, said Boden, who started his firm

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designed for winter

in 1984 and has since brought on several architects and other staff, including Scott Wohlschlager and Tom Russel. Although they’re known for their work on the mountain— Schweitzer’s Sky House, for example—Boden Architecture applies the same principles for projects elsewhere, such as on the lake or in town. Town locations don’t get the extreme cold or wind, explained Wohlschlager, a Sandpoint native and University of Idaho grad formerly with CTA Architects/Engineers. Snow,

re al e stat e

however, is still an issue. “Our roof designs minimize the potential for leaks with any kind of ice damming that could happen with buildup of snow,” he said. They also approach snow and the ensuing ice that occurs during thawing and freezing in a holistic way, looking at where and how heat escapes from the structure, as well as where freezing might occur and ensuring there is an appropriate path for melting snow. “You don’t have to be on the mountain to get a steep slope,” SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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real estate said Boden. A challenging building site can add cost, he said, but also make exterior maintenance more difficult, prompting the use of materials that won’t require painting, for example. It can also complicate snow removal, from snowdrifts to everyday shoveling and plowing, to snow sliding off a metal roof. “If your snow goes onto your neighbor’s property in Idaho,” added Russel, “it’s considered trespassing.” Another factor in site location is maximizing solar exposure, said

You might have the greatest design in the world but if you don’t follow through on details, it’s gonna fail.”

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Wohlschlager. Views are important, yet so is ensuring solar gain, factoring in the seasonally changing angle of the sun, and how other parts of the design relate to such things as window placement. See through to winter. Windows provide several necessary functions in any structure, from air flow and ventilation, to emergency egress, to allowing light in during shorter winter days, but they’re not all created equally. Windows should be at least double-paned, even triple-glazed, said Russel, who prefers what’s known as metal-clad windows, which show wood on the inside yet provide the durability of metal on the outside. “Energy efficiency and just the quality of the windows and the quality of the finish on them are some of the primary considerations.”

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real estate It’s worth it, in other words, to spend a little more on windows. Another consideration, added Wohlschlager, is window placement, which needs to be much higher for structures where snow levels might otherwise cover them. “One of the things that I’ve always noticed in snow country designs is your designs can almost look out of proportion in the summer.” Overhangs, said Wohlschlager, help minimize excessive sun in warmer months and protect the windows from rain, snow, and the like. From the top down. A significant feature of allseason design involves the roof design and material choices. Simpler is better, said Boden, who describes how complexities in the roof—lots of ridges and valleys, problematic pitches—can lead to the potential for ice buildup. Because fireplaces are a common feature in northern climates, chimneys can become an issue, said Boden. They need to be built and located with largerthan-usual crickets (which divert water) and closer to the ridgeline of the roof versus near a roof valley. They also try to design the roof such that gutters aren’t needed and if they are, said Boden, they might even incorporate a heat source that extends to the downspout. The pitch or angle of the roof is an important con-

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designed for winter sideration, too. Flat roofs can be a viable option, said Wohlschlager, providing they’re designed to withstand the snow load and include a drainage component. The same goes for decks, said Russel, who designed his with removable rails so he can push the snow off. Another option, said Boden, is to cover them, especially using polycarbonate roofing that allows light in. As far as materials, said Russel, metal roofs are typically more durable, although some brands of asphalt shingles claim to last 30 to 40 years. “If you do a metal roof, you need to have a properly engineered retention system,” said Russel, whose background is in civil engineering. Sliding snow can be extremely dangerous. “An engineer can actually do a calculation that will tell you exactly what you need,” said Boden, who prefers a welldesigned roof rather than snow brakes, aluminum rails that impede the sliding of snow. Somewhere in between metal and asphalt is Decra, metal coated with aggregate or stone, which Boden Architecture used on both the Amtrak station remodel and at Schweitzer. A material world. Exterior finishes in snow country need to be durable. “Snow, when it gets kind of icy, can even almost act as an ice blast,” said Wohlschlager. That means either a stepped-up maintenance plan to repair, replace, or repaint, or choosing finish materials better suited to the climate. Finish choices depend on the style the client is looking for, said Boden. Some of their mountain contemporary designs feature metal siding, including Cortan—it’s used on the Belwood 301’s building exterior—which is designed to rust naturally. Another consideration, said Russel, is how the snow sits against the exterior of the structure. They’re partial to stone or a durable wainscot. When using wood, they’ve been exploring a chemical treatment called Eco Wood that is supposed to reduce or eliminate maintenance, he said. They’re also looking at an emerging trend called shou sugi ban, an ancient

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real estate

PHOTOS, P. 100 - WINTER BUILDING CONSIDERATIONS ARE THE SAME FOR BOTH RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL SITES, SUCH AS THE SKY HOUSE AT SCHWEITZER. P. 102: FROM VIEWS TO SOLAR GAIN, WINDOW PLACEMENT MUST BE CAREFULLY CONSIDERED. P. 104: LIGHTER, SHINIER INTERIORS REFLECT LIGHT AND BRIGHTEN UP LONG, DARK WINTER DAYS. THIS PAGE, TOP: ROOF DESIGN IS A CRITICAL ELEMENT FOR HOMES BUILT AT ALTITUDE. BOTTOM: IN SNOW COUNTRY, EXTERIOR FINISHES MUST BE DURABLE. SKY HOUSE PHOTO BY MARIE-DOMINIQUE VERDIER; ALL OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY BODEN ARCHITECTURE.

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Japanese treatment using fire to stain and seal the wood. (You might have seen it on Chip and Joanna Gaines’ hit HGTV series, “Fixer Upper.”) They love the look, said Russel, but it hasn’t stood the test of time in the Northwest yet. Interior finish choices are also important, said Boden, who attended school in Copenhagen for a year. “That influenced my understanding of how interior choices of colors and materials really makes a northern climate home way nicer to live in.” Taking a cue from Scandinavians, Boden Architecture tends toward lighter colored interiors and shinier surfaces—satin paint, metal, low-sheen wood—to reflect light. “We’re really playful,” said Boden, “whether the clients realize it or not.” Their use of bolder materials and colors is part of that playful approach, he said. “It really does make for a more exciting living space.” In the end, however, the “devil’s in the details,” said Boden. “You might have the greatest design in the world but if you don’t follow through on details, it’s gonna fail.”

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lodge at idaho club | designed for winter

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‘Part of the community’

New clubhouse, restaurant set to open at the Idaho Club by Beth Hawkins

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ore than a decade after the iconic log clubhouse at The Idaho Club golf course burned to the ground, it will feel a little bit like a homecoming when the golfing community—and the public as a whole—walk through the doors of its replacement in spring 2020. Perhaps that sense of familiarity comes from the fact that the new, 10,000-plus-square-foot clubhouse is built in the same location as its predecessor, with a majority of the building sitting on the original foundation. And the large, east-facing windows will show off that peaceful view of the golf green next to the meandering Lower Pack River. Even the driveway’s moose-motif brick inlay—one of the few surviving elements from the 2008 fire—has been spiffed up and reinstated into service, in an honorary nod to the past. And yet fresh beginnings are definitely in the air. The new clubhouse, built in a rustic, timber-frame style of architecture with modern elements, soaring ceilings, and a stately rock fireplace in the center, is set to open in May 2020, and its owners want to ensure the community feels right at home. “It will be open to the public, that’s the message we’ll get out,” said Bill Haberman, managing member of Valiant Idaho, the entity that owns The Idaho Club. “To be successful, it will require the support and the following of the locals. We want it to feel like a place that’s part of the community, we want it to be a place where businesses think to have their events, and where young couples can have their weddings and receptions.

We want that loud and clear.” That being said, club members will retain their perks at the 18-hole, Jack Nicklaus-designed course. “We are a semi-private golf course, which means that we do have members who have certain privileges—most significantly tee times, the priority of tee times, and of course unlimited golf,” Haberman said. “But we open to the public at 10:30, so from 10:30 on it is an extremely high-end public golf course.” And the welcoming attitude doesn’t end there. The Idaho Club is inviting more charitable events with open arms. “We’ll do as much as folks want us to,” he said. That includes tournaments such as the Angels Over Sandpoint’s Italian Open, the Bulldog Bench, and high school tournaments, among others. “We want to be part of the community,” he said. “That’s why we do the charity events. Oftentimes we’ll donate the course to the charity as our contribution.” Members of The Idaho Club enjoy having the tournaments at The Idaho Club. “Most often, members are volunteering at the charity events,” Haberman said. “It’s the members who are shuttling the high school kids from hole to hole, and they’re helping with other things. Most of the tournaments, they end up playing. They love it.” Inside the new clubhouse, which was designed by Sandpoint architect John Hendricks and built by Andy Hartley and Sandpoint Framing and Exteriors, there are some exciting things that everyone—golfers and foodies alike—can anticipate. The main dining area will seat approximately 100, with SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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PREVIOUS PAGE: GOLFERS RICK WILMONT (DRIVING) AND JOSE AGUIRE CONTINUE TO ENJOY THE COURSE THROUGH LATE FALL AS THE LODGE NEARS COMPLETION. ABOVE: THE IDAHO CLUB HUGS THE WINDING, LOWER PACK RIVER DELTA. ABOVE, RIGHT: THE DECK IS WHERE ARCHITECT JOHN HENDRICKS EXPECTS MOST VISITORS WILL FIND AS THE BEST PLACE TO HANG OUT. STAFF PHOTOS

You can sit out there, under cover or not, have a drink or meal, and enjoy the fresh air and the beautiful views of the Pack River.”

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dinner served five days a week featuring high-end Americana food. “It’ll be a nice, upscale-casual environment where you can get a burger and a craft beer, or a great steak and a bottle of Camus,” said Haberman. And on Sundays, a brunch rounds out the main dining options. “We hope that we’ll do a good enough job that folks will think of us in the same light as the other great restaurants in town, and we become part of that rotation.” Adjacent to the main dining, a bar and grill will be open seven days a week during the golfing season, featuring a more relaxed pub menu. There will also be seating out on the expansive deck overlooking the golf course. And that’s where Hendricks, the architect, will likely be found. “I think the deck is going to be the best place to hang out,” he said. “You can sit out there, under cover or not, have a drink or meal, and enjoy the fresh air and the beautiful views of the Pack River.” Haberman is confident that the clubhouse’s presence will be a huge boost to The Idaho Club, and the community as a whole. “The Idaho Club was recently rated by “Golf Digest” in the top 10 of Idaho, and that was before the new clubhouse. We expect to move up that list into the top five after it is completed,” he said. He’s hoping to expand in other offerings, as well, mulling pickleball courts and wintertime activities such as an ice skating rink; and of course spotlight ongoing real estate sales at the course. All in all, there’s a lot to look forward to. “As far as a golf experience in northern Idaho for a public golfer, there really isn’t much that’s comparable.”

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abbott district |

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a new lease on Life

BUSINESSES BURNED IN THE ABBOTT DISTRICT FIRE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO REBUILDING

Following tragic fire, First Avenue gets a facelift by Cameron Rasmusson

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he fire that gutted three historic First Avenue SandAround 1 a.m., a fire kindled in the building located at 202 First point buildings in February 2019 dealt irreparable Ave. Before long, the localized fire was a conflagration, ripping damage to the downtown core’s identity. through downtown Sandpoint and engulfing a block of historic Every tragedy, however, presents an opportunity. brick buildings. Five businesses were destroyed in the blaze: The properties of 202 and 204 North First Ave. are now a blank The Hound, China Kitchen, Sandpoint Chocolate Bear, Headslate. And Sandpoint City Administrator Jennifer Stapleton lines Salon and Sandpoint Tattoo. Grace Sandpoint Church was said several forces—redevelopment of the burned blocks, the damaged but survived the fire, closing temporarily. ongoing downtown revitalization project and several planned For months, there were more questions than answers. An business expansions—are working in tandem to give First investigation by the Idaho State Fire Marshal proceeded slowly. CUSTOM HOMES | REMODELS | ADDITIONS Avenue a new lease on life. Economic growth can be messy, On April 12, state authorities ruled the fire accidental, bringing but looking past the burned bricks and upturned asphalt, many the matter to a legal close. But there was still the question of officials and business owners see a bright future. what to do with the burned block as the annual summer tourist “I think a lot of people were discouraged when they saw loomed large. To prevent a public safety hazard, the burned businesses closing or the fire downtown, but what we’re seeing buildings were partially demolished and fenced off. Later in the happening now is a real cause for hope,” said I Saw Something year, vinyl coverings portraying the history of downtown SandShiny owner Lizbeth Turley Fausnight. point gave residents and visitors alike a more informative and There didn’t appear to be much cause for hope on the mornvisually pleasing sight as they strolled the downtown blocks. The fire investigation and beautification efforts solved the iming of February 11. Sandpoint residents and downtown busimediate crisis. But it left open a critical question: What does the ness owners awoke to a scene of devastation on First Avenue. SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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real estate future hold for the burned block of downtown Sandpoint—a vital piece of real estate and the gateway to the iconic City Beach? Investors believe there’s promise hidden amid the wreckage. R.J. Wilcox, who owns 202 North First Ave., announced in August his plans to rebuild an 8,000-square-foot structure, which will be used exclusively for a re-imagined version of The Hound. The restaurant’s previous iteration was destroyed in the February fire. “Our main goal is to keep the same atmosphere and vibe that we had but just increase what we offer and [the amount of] seating so we can serve more people,” Hound owner Ben Higgs told the Sandpoint “Reader.” But that’s only half the story when it comes to the scorched Sandpoint block. According to Stapleton, an investor purchased the 204 North First Ave. property in mid September. The city is now working with the new owner and Wilcox to coordinate re-development in the area. “He was going to meet with R.J to see if there might be something that is a larger concept they might do together,” Stapleton said. According to Stapleton, planning for the redevelopment of the First Avenue properties is happening quickly, and every week brings a new twist. But it’s just a portion of the upcoming changes that could transform the look and feel of downtown Sandpoint. The public sector is driving a portion of those developments. The city initiated Phase II of its downtown revitalization project in August 2019, a complete reconstruction of First Avenue

from Church to Cedar streets and extending west to Second Avenue. The construction introduces a new intersection at Main Street, as well as bulbouts at Second Avenue, Church Street, and at mid-block pedestrian crossings. New stormwater swales, trees, lighting, benches, and bike racks will also be added. More amorphous but potentially just as important is the development of a new Sandpoint Parks and Recreation Master Plan, Stapleton said. Set to guide the evolution of Sandpoint parks for years to come, the master plan will determine the future of City Beach and the downtown waterfront. According to Stapleton, coordination between parks development and the rebuilding of 202 and 204 North First Ave. will be vital. That’s just the beginning of changes to the look and function of First Avenue. Stapleton said a project in partnership with Avista Utilities will take all overhead utilities and fiber optic connectivity underground from the old Arlo’s building to Beet & Basil. The project begins in 2020. All that work is happening independently from something Stapleton sees as equally transformative: the evolution of downtown businesses. “We can look at downtown revitalization in the context of the construction happening now, but I think it’s bigger than that,” Stapleton said. The expansions planned for downtown businesses are almost too numerous to list. For a start, MickDuff’s Brewpub made big news when owners announced a move to the historic Federal Building on Second Avenue. Jewelry store Grace & Joy

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is in business next to a re-opened Blue Lizard Gallery. I Saw Something Shiny is moving to Great Stuff’s previous location, complete with a remodel and the construction of a new storefront. A&P’s Bar and Grill owner Travis Thompson intends to renovate the watering hole’s facade next summer. The new owner of the old Arlo’s building, which was condemned by the city as a public safety threat, is preparing to tear it down and rebuild. And Stapleton is working with the Panida Theater to secure a grant that will spruce up its marquee. I Saw Something Shiny is undergoing a particularly major expansion. Set to move from its existing 1,200-square-foot location to the 2,500-square-foot space previously occupied by Great Stuff, Fausnight aims to turn her retail location into a full shopping experience. In addition to the store’s clothing, accessories, and gifts, it will also offer a wine and chocolate bar. In turn, Cognito Brands, which shared I Saw Something Shiny’s original space, will expand into the full 1,200 square feet. “This is the next step for us,” said Fausnight. “It’s taking us to an entirely different level.” In isolation, each business expansion is a major occurrence, but taken as a whole, it’s momentous, Stapleton said. “I’m stopping in with a lot of the businesses downtown just to see how things are going and what’s happening, and we have a lot of movement happening with them right now,” she added. It’s easy to look at the scarred corner of First Avenue and take away an impression of destruction and loss. But Stapleton doesn’t see it that way. She believes the next few years will be critical. Once the rubble is cleared away, it just might uncover a new era for downtown Sandpoint business. “How I look at it is that we’ve invested around the downtown with this revitalization, but what you hope for is that it spurs that private investment,” said Stapleton. “People aren’t physically seeing it quite yet, but that private investment is starting to happen.” Learn more about downtown changes at www.SandpointStreets.com.

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MLS #20191988 $5,500,000 55 Ideal Drive, Sandpoint - 5 BD / 7.5 BA - 10,130 SQ. FT. - 1.5 AC Immaculate Estate located in desirable Oden Bay. Fully landscaped & gated. Chefs kitchen, Granite, Moen Fixtures & SS Sinks, Indoor Pool, hot tub, sauna, electric skylights and dehumidifier. walkout to the covered/heated lakeside patio. Guest house, large shop, + 26x54 toy barn.

MLS #20191841 $2,900,000 151 Greatwater Cir, Sandpoint - 4 BD 5.5 BA - 6,804 SQ. FT. - 4.68 AC Situated in “The Idaho Club”, with soaring ceilings, custom stone accents, & expansive views. Impressive tile, custom granite, and local artisan ironwork. Gourmet Kitchen,and a grand master suite are just a taste of this home’s many luxurious amenities.

MLS #20192250 $1,699,900 802 Sandpoint Ave #8203, Sandpoint - 4 BD / 4 BA - 2,950 SQ. FT. Luxury Waterfront Condos at Seasons at Sandpoint featuring Rooftop Heated Pool, Quartz Counters, 10ft. ceilings, floor to ceiling windows, heated underground parking garage. Model unit tours available.

MLS #20192028 $1,699,700 4160 Sunnyside Ln, Sandpoint - Sunnyside's premier South facing Estate complete w/views from Hope to Sandpoint & everything in between! Over 200+ feet of private, deep waterfront complete w/a concrete boat dock, lighting & ample guest parking. Don’t miss out on this stunning lake front home.

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MLS #20183055 $1,599,000 818 Bryce Ln, Sandpoint - 4 BD / 4 BA - 3,112 SQ. FT. - 0.32 AC Modern open concept, Tray Ceilings in Living Room and Master Bedroom, Custom Cherry Cabinets, XL view capturing windows and sliders on lakeside of house. Beam Central Vac. Large L shaped Trex dock with room for a boatlift. Lakeside metal roofed storage shed.

MLS #20191296 $1,397,000 1517 Otts Basin Rd, Sandpoint - 5 BD 5 BA - 7,200 SQ. FT. - 10.69 AC Stunning architecture, custom stone, and gorgeous high-end materials come together to create this magnificent estate w/ Creek frontage! Wine room, Exercise room, walk-in pantry, Steam Shower, and grand master suite, this home truly has everything.

MLS # 20191784 $1,197,000 433 Campbell Pnt Rd., Laclede - 5 BD / 5 BA 5,282 SqFt. .47AC. Bring the whole family to the River! Room for everyone with over 5000 sq ft. in this beautiful river front home. Custom wooden spiral staircase, well appointed kitchen. Wrap around deck on the main floor. Large dock with covered boat lift, sandy beach, storage shed and concrete sea wall. Close to community boat launch.

MLS #20181408 $1,125,000 1435 Eagen Mtn Rd, Hope - 4 BD / 3.5 BA - 3,600 SQ. FT. - 8.9 AC. Breathtaking views from the Selkirk’s to the Cabinet Mts. SW exposure backed by 3100 acres of wilderness. Hydronic floor heating system supplemented by a 80,000 BTU Swiss Ruegg fireplace, SS appliances, marble counters, and cherry wood floors. Detached 1200 Sq. Ft. garage/workshop.

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sandpoint designed shopping for district winter |

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THERE’S MORE THAN SHOPPING IN Downtown Sandpoint Businesses work together to promote downtown area by Isabella Mortensen

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he downtown district of Sandpoint is beloved by many, near and far. With cute, quirky shops and unique offerings, plus interesting events year-round, there’s something for everyone. Behind the scenes, there’s an organized group that’s responsible for much of what we celebrate downtown. The Sandpoint Shopping District is an informal organization made up of participating local retailers in the downtown area. It’s left up to each retailer to decide if they want to be involved. Some business owners are consistently involved in each promotion, while others pick and choose, depending on which events they want to participate in. It’s not a membership, it’s a group that gets together to discuss business and talk about future events. It’s a way for business owners to share ideas and help problem solve. The District was formed back in 2008, during the recession, when a few of the local business owners got together and determined to work together to mutually benefit the downtown businesses as a whole. The District promotes Sandpoint’s downtown businesses in many ways. Throughout the year they put on a multitude of events including Crazy Days, First Fridays (along with POAC), the Shop Small Event, Ladies Shopping Night, and many other holiday specific events and group sales. Crazy Days has been an ongoing, annual mass sale that the Sandpoint Shopping District took over after the local Business Improvement District disbanded. It’s an open-air sale event put on in the heart of summer, a perfect time for visiting folks

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real estate and locals to check out what the participating shops have to offer. It draws huge crowds to the downtown streets in search of the best deals and the most sought-after sales. First Thursday is a monthly event the District organizes on the first Thursday of every month. Participating businesses partner with local restaurants and provide small bites and drinks for customers to enjoy while checking out all the shops have to offer. The stores stay open late, hold special sales, and there’s an after-party at the Pend d’Oreille Winery. Patrons receive an entry ticket to the after-party with any purchase at any of the participating downtown retailers. The Shop Small Event is another great promotion for downtown businesses. The District organizes this event to encourage people to shop small by offering deals and giveaways at the local shops. The Sandpoint Shopping District also puts on a Ladies Shopping Night in December, where downtown shoppers catch up on Christmas purchases while enjoying music, drinks, treats, and prizes, as well as an after-party at the Pend d’Oreille Winery. In addition to the sales and annual events, the District has also worked together to advertise Sandpoint’s downtown shops as a group in various local magazines and on the radio. The District maintains social media pages where they post about how to continue shopping downtown throughout con-

struction, which can be a big issue for businesses if it hinders car and foot traffic from reaching them. Social media also spreads the word about general downtown businesses as well as individual business events such as giveaways. Participating retailers agree to host a giveaway, one retailer per week, and at the end there is a grand prize winner who receives a combined gift basket full of gift cards and certificates from each of the retailers. By teaming together, each of the retailers benefits greatly, while working together to promote Sandpoint’s small businesses. “If we can make a great shopping experience overall downtown, we’re all going to win,” said Deanna Harris, owner of Sharon’s Hallmark. “It’s not like if I do better then someone else does worse.” The Sandpoint Shopping District also put together an historic Sandpoint downtown walking guide of the local retailers. It’s available for shoppers at the Chamber of Commerce, in hotel rooms, and in all the shops. The District created this guide to help out-of-towners discover all that downtown Sandpoint offers by drawing a map of downtown and the location of each business. It also helps get business names out there by giving a quick description on the back of the guide. In promoting our local small businesses, the Sandpoint Shopping District benefits all of the greater Sandpoint area through encouraging local dollars to remain in our local area. Learn more at www.DowntownSandpoint.com

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DID YOU know?

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he original “downtown” Sandpoint was located on the far side of Sand Creek—a long stretch of buildings located on both sides of the railroad tracks. When the Sandpoint byway was slated to be built in that same location, three-quarters of a mile of local history was set to be destroyed by road construction. Before that could happen, the largest archaeology project in Idaho’s history—and one of the largest urban archaeology projects in the entire U.S.— was undertaken. Field work began in 2006, and officially ended in 2013 with the publication of a four-volume report. As a result of the excavations, almost 600,000 artifacts from Sandpoint’s early history were recovered, and a permanent exhibit was set up for the Bonner County History Museum. Between 1905 and 1907, as businesses moved to the east side of the creek and the railroad reclaimed its land, 12 to 16 feet of till was added to raise the railroad tracks in order to avoid flooding.

PHOTO BY LARRY TURNER/ SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT

LEGACY CONSTRUCTION SANDPOINTLEGACY.COM | (208) 610-5413

CUSTOM HOMES | SPECIALTY TIMBER WORK SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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J O H N C LO U D C ON S T RU C T I ON

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PHOTO COURTESY KAMI BREMMER WITH ABBA, INK.

northwest designedhandmade for winter |

re al e stat e

25 YEARS OFArt & Love

Northwest Handmade celebrates a quarter century by Carrie Scozzaro

T

wenty-five years. Laurie Huston shakes her head as she says it, with a look that says, “Where did the years go?” She is tucked into her “office” behind a shaved log bunk bed in the far northeast corner of Northwest Handmade. The store, located in the 300 block of First Avenue, is a fixture in Sandpoint with a storied history of selling local and regional handmade goods: wood furniture, rustic metal wall ornaments, painted saw blades, folksy frames with images of Northwest wildlife. And more. So much more, much of which surrounds Huston’s office—which is actually just a desk made by Dan Mimmack, the company’s co-founder and Huston’s stepfather. The roster of 130 or so artists and growing spans all ages, genders, media, and experience levels. “We have artists aged 13 to 93,” said Huston, who has been involved from the get-go, eventually taking over the store in 2015 when her stepfather was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s. “Life started here,” says Huston, who was living in Colorado when her mother, Pam, and Dan started the store in 1994, mostly based on Dan’s handmade furniture. Huston and her brother Greg contributed artwork, too, including framed mirrors and other creations using river stones they marketed as Sticks and Stones, for around six years. Their first location was at the corner of Cedar and First Avenue and was run as an artist’s cooperative. It relocated to 308 N. First Ave. in late ‘95, along the way adding all manner of artisans, and building up staff to around six employees. The current location is also much more colorful than when the Mimmacks ran it, as Huston couldn’t help but inject color, painting every single wall some manner of earth tone. “I think that’s just my personality,” she said. She has had a passion for art since she was very young, said Huston, who sells some of her photography in the store. She was considering a career in art therapy, yet didn’t pursue schooling.

Instead, she relocated to Sandpoint, helping out her mother and Dan in the store when she wasn’t also helping the couple work with students in wilderness programs. “In a way I am doing [art therapy] with the artists I support since I get to see the sparkle in their eyes when they bring in their creations and an even bigger smile and sparkle when they sell,” she said. Huston likes to tell a story about Galen McKay, their delivery person, whose woodworking and metalworking is featured in the store. “He came into our store with a flower planter made from old propane tanks to sell and has taken off from there,” said Huston. “It’s been fun to see him blossom.” Walking through the store—something Huston does often— she pauses to relay a tidbit about each artist; where they’re from or a new direction for them or something about the piece that strikes her. “This is a store of stories,” Huston explained. And that matters to customers, who often ask about the artists, wanting to ensure they’re local. They are, many from Sandpoint, but also Coeur d’Alene and other parts of the Panhandle, western Montana, even Washington. And although they used to travel to seek out artists, now the artists come to them, including electronically. Another thing that matters to customers, said Huston, is being able to see and touch the items in the store, something that has so far enabled Northwest Handmade to outmaneuver the fate that has befallen so many other retailers, as internet sales make inroads into the brick and mortar market. What else has contributed to their longevity? Customer service, said Huston. “We stand by our products and have always gone an extra mile to have our customers happy,” she said. “Some people have dubbed the store ‘the Love Station’ meaning they come in to just get loved up. That is such a great thing to hear!” Learn more at www.NorthwestHandmade.com SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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real estate

DESPERATELY SEEKING MORE

I

f you’re in the market to buy a house in Sandpoint, or have been paying attention to the local real estate market, you know what’s going on—there’s a shortage of homes to buy, unless you happen to have several million dollars sitting around, which opens up a few more options. The problem lies in the fact that there are too few builders in the Sandpoint area, and there are not enough new houses being built. Those issues are helping to drive the average sales price for a home in the Sandpoint area just past the $400,000 mark during the period of April 20, 2019 to September 30, 2019. “It’s hard to find a builder,” said Teague Mullen, MLS president for the Selkirk Association of Realtors, and partner and realtor with Realm Partners. He said a lack of inventory and increased building costs are putting a squeeze on the local real estate market. “Everybody has a buyer, but we can’t find them what they want to buy.” Residential sales at Schweitzer are also red hot, with the average residential sales price increasing 21 percent this past year. “It’s crazy right now,” Mullen said. “Normally in the Schweitzer market, we’ll see between 60 and 70 residential listings. Right now there are six” (as of Oct. 10, 2019). “There’s no inventory, and there’s a high demand for condos at Schweitzer. There’s an opportunity for builders at Schweitzer.” Mullen mentioned there will be some new Sandpoint housing

developments coming in 2020 that will start in the $300,000 to $500,000 range. Apparently, that will be the new cost of housing. “It’s going to be tough to find something under $300,000,” he said. As far as affordability, online research indicates the numbers don’t add up for local residents looking to buy a home in Sandpoint. To purchase the average-priced home at $400,000 with 20 percent down ($80,000 cash), the total payment with taxes and insurance averages around $1,860 per month. Now consider what residents are earning. According to DataUSA, Bonner County had a median household income of $45,607 in 2017. Pop onto an online mortgage affordability calculator, and enter a $45,000 income with a $20,000 down payment and $250 per month in total debt payments (car payments, credit cards, etc.), and it recommends a home price of $182,000. At press time, there were a handful of mobile homes on property for sale near that mark. Property in Priest River and Bonners Ferry is less expensive, yet the average sales price of a home is between $270,000 and $290,000. That’s a big decrease from Sandpoint’s average sales price, but could still be a financial stretch for many households. As with many other communities, the struggle for affordable housing is a new reality for Sandpoint and the people who call this place home.

-Beth Hawkins

Servicing the Community Since 1993

FULL SERVICE BUILDING SUPPLY CENTER Trusted Respected

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SandpointBuildingSupply.com 208-263-5119 / 800-881-7380

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marketwatch designed for winter |

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Selkirk Multiple Listing Service Real Estate Market Trends Vacant Land—Bonner County

residential sales—All Areas 2018

2019

2018

2019

Sold Listings

607

543

-11

Sold Listings

274

245

-11

Volume - Sold Listings

$207,321,978

$191,306,159

-8

Volume - Sold Listings

$35,603,599

$33,780,891

-5

Median Price

$285,000

$305,000

7

Median Price

$83,475

$87,500

5

Average Sales Price

$129,940

$137,922

6

Average Days on Market

186

202

9

% Inc/Decr

Average Sales Price

$341,551

$352,313

3

Average Days on Market

106

101

-5

% Inc/Decr

Residential Sales—Schweitzer

Sandpoint City 2018

2019

2018

2019

Sold Listings

112

93

-17

Sold Listings

22

28

27

Volume - Sold Listings

$31,148,527

$30,602,300

-2

Volume - Sold Listings

$7,173,700

$11,081,449

54

% Inc/Decr

% Inc/Decr

Median Price

$269,950

$300,000

11

Median Price

$273,500

$352,500

29

Average Sales Price

$304,897

$329,056

8

Average Sales Price

$326,077

$395,766

21

-6

Average Days on Market

145

143

-1

Average Days on Market

95

89

Residential Sales—All Lakefront

Sandpoint Area

2018

2019

Sold Listings

43

24

-44

Volume - Sold Listings

$28,440,604

$13,732,600

-52

13

Median Price

$595,000

$554,450

-7

Average Sales Price

$661,409

$572,191

-13

Average Days on Market

135

108

-20

2018

2019

% Inc/Decr

Sold Listings

378

311

-18

Volume - Sold Listings

$141,773,274

$125,015,644

-12

Median Price

$320,000

$362,500

Average Sales Price

$375,061

$401,979

7

Average Days on Market

108

103

-5

% Inc/Decr

Residential sales by area based on information from the Selkirk MLS for the period of April 20, 2019 to September 20, 2019 versus April 20, 2018 to September 20, 2018. Real estate stats for Bonner and Boundary counties. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. ©

The experience, knowledge and proven results To turn your dream into a reality. 208.255.7340 | barryfishercustomhomes.com | Sandpoint, Idaho SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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is a proud sponsor of Kinderhaven at Sandpoint.

Kinderhaven is a community organization

dedicated to supporting children in crisis and giving them back their right to thrive by providing a safe, secure home in which their emotional, physical, and mental well-being are protected and enriched.

Visit us online at www.kinderhavensandpoint.com and on Facebook!

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105 S. 3rd Ave., Sandpoint, ID 83864 • 7BTV.com

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introducing locals | n at i v es & n e wcome rs

NATIVES & NEWCOMERS by Marianne Love

R

egardless of age, geographic background, work experience or how long they’ve lived in Sandpoint, this issue’s Natives and Newcomers share some common threads. All love the outdoors, lead busy lives, and express great pride in their families. Our mix includes a retired nurse, a ski-mountain manager, a retired educator and a beverage sales specialist. Along with their unique stories comes a mutual appreciation for living in Sandpoint.

Native

S

Patti McDonnell

andpoint native Patti Hagadone McDonnell would like to return to the days of her youth and take her family with her. “Driving uncrowded streets, riding our bikes safely, knowing nearly everyone,” she recalls, “going shopping in town, parking the car nearly in front of the desired shop, leaving windows down and keys in the ignition.” McDonnell, a retired Bonner General RN, grew up at 323 St. Clair. The house is still there. Her sister Judie lives next door. Her brother Jon owns Idaho Pour Authority. “I learned to ride my bike on the gravel street when I was

6,” she said. “I put my roller skates on, tightened them with ‘the key,’ and skated on the sidewalks with the neighbor children on the other side of St. Clair. We had no sidewalks on our side and still don’t.” Except for a year as a critical-care nurse in Oregon, McDonnell has lived here her entire life. She and her late husband Jack’s three children, Kimberly, Johnna, and Tim, also live and work in the area. Nowadays, Patti, 78, helps her son and his partner with their construction company as full-time bookkeeper. In her spare time, she likes to golf, garden, pick huckleberries, SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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introducing locals | n at i v es & n e wcome rs

and “sit on my deck in the shade, read any good book I can find and boss my kids and grandkids around.” She also yearns for the good ol’ days in Sandpoint. “The ‘50s for me were surely the best of times and the best of Sandpoint,” she said. “I would love my family to have the experience of living it as I did.” Local inspiration(s): My grandparents Hagadone had a small dairy farm on what is now Great Northern Park. I spent a great deal of time there while growing up and am still impressed when recalling their work ethic, their self-sufficiency, sustainable lifestyle, and love of the land. Notable Sandpoint location/icon: The lake, of course. Growing up, it was always a part of my life. My family almost always maintained a summer cabin on the lake. The water was clear, the rocks, without algae ... it was actually fishable. I realize now how much we took it for granted. Most cherished aspect(s) of a lifetime in Sandpoint: Growing up in a true small town with a true, small-town atmosphere. Must-see of Sandpoint and surroundings: The lake and Schweitzer. Take a boat ride around the lake at least as far as Hope and a lift ride at Schweitzer.

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natives & newcomers

Native

Dean HOLT

D

ean Holt always looks forward to pumpkin time at Hickey Farms. “I love seeing the joy on families’/kids’ faces when they come to the pumpkin patch,” the

47-year-old Sandpoint native says. “We really want people to unwind and unplug for a few hours, whether they are young or young at heart.” Along with his day job in sales for Odom Corp., Dean and his wife Karrie have helped extended family put a new twist on the longtime Oden dairy, once run by his grandfather Jack Hickey. Each growing season, the farm attracts hundreds of visitors, hoping to fill berry or veggie containers, or to select the perfect pumpkin. It truly is a family project,” he said. “My brothers, uncle, and dad do most of the daily work, for which I am very grateful." Because of full-time jobs, Dean and Karrie work behind the scenes. Holt, a University of Idaho marketing grad, also enjoys SHS, U of I, and Pittsburgh Steelers sporting events along with supporting his sons’ (Cameron and Evan) lacrosse team. Having grown up near the present library, Holt lives just five blocks away from his boyhood home. “My parents (Jim and Jackie Holt) still reside in the house,” he said. “The street used to be the dividing line between city and county. The field across from us was hayed. Now, it’s housing.” Holt also remembers scrambling to the house during a tornado, ash from Mt. St. Helens falling, and construction of the byway, which had “been talked about since I was born.” These days, Holt loves watching his family members succeed.

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introducing locals | n at i v es & n e wcome rs

“I’m also proud of being able to work and live in a place I love,” he added. Local inspiration(s): My dad definitely influenced and has helped me through life. He will always be the greatest dad to me. I’ve also really leaned on Mike Kenna and Dan Lister. Mike took me under his wing when I started in the wholesale beer/wine industry. Dan has always been there to help with business questions. Notable Sandpoint location/icon: Memorial Field. Football on a Friday night. The moon coming up over Gold Hill during the Festival. Playing high school/American legion baseball while growing up. I could go on. Most cherished aspect(s) of a lifetime in Sandpoint: Being close to my family, the natural beauty, and the way the community rallies around and supports people. Must-see of Sandpoint and surroundings: The view from the top of Schweitzer. The Festival on a warm summer night. A cool fall Friday football game. The Green Monarchs up close, and of course, a beautiful day starting across the Long Bridge for home.

Newcomer

Rob BATCHELDER

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natives & newcomers views life in Sandpoint as pretty much a perfect fit. “We love the area. I have a great job, and I get to enjoy the outdoors,” said Batchelder, a 56-year-old New Hampshire native and University of Montana graduate. He figures he has the best responsibilities at Schweitzer, overseeing lift construction/ operation, ski runs, ski patrol, etc. “It’s so varied,” he said. “There’s necessary office time, but I get to be outside, all over the mountain, handling a broad spectrum of projects.” Batchelder’s career has included stints at National Outdoor Leadership School, Crazy Creek Products, the Firehole Ranch, and New Hampshire’s Waterville Valley Ski Resort, as well as involvement with a patent on a lightweight hammock. He’s traveled to Alaska, Mexico, and Argentina for NOLS, and has summited Argentina’s Aconcagua, the world’s highest peak outside of Asia. Besides scouting an area in Garhwal Himalayas for courses, Batchelder also created the U.S. Forest Service Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness map. Since moving here, he’s discovered local outdoor destinations. “Green Bay, Gold Hill, the [Pend d’Oreille] Bay Trail, Pine Street Woods, and Trestle Creek are all great places for humans and dogs,” Batchelder says.

of great people I work with at Schweitzer that grew up here or have been here for more than 20 years. They certainly have reinforced that this is a tremendous place to live, work, and recreate year round. How do you plan to use your talents/ experiences/passions to contribute to the Sandpoint community? Through my work at Schweitzer, I hope to help the resort continue to grow in a smart way. I hope to be a good low-impact neighbor and recycle responsibly.

Observations of Sandpoint’s general culture: I think for a small town there is a fair bit of diversity and something for everyone. The lake, downtown, the library, businesses and restaurants, Kootenai and Ponderay areas, the ski hill—all provide good options for living a good life here. How has living here changed you personally? I’ve noticed I spend a lot more time on Craigslist looking at used boats. First local resident you got to know here and their influence: Gosh, there are a bunch

I F

Newcomer

Michele RYMANLEWIS

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etired FFA instructor Michele Ryman-Lewis studied a real estate listing and spotted her dream home in the mountains, with a pond. The rest is history for this Nevada transplant and her husband Steve. “We saw the property,” Ryman-Lewis recalled. “It was love at first sight. Everything fell into place.” A few days after retiring as educators, the Lewises loaded up belongings and made the 900-mile trip from Carson City, Nevada, to Sandpoint. Nowadays, their “Little Flume Creek” features three often-occupied guest cabins. “Our sons [Calvert and Bryton] were skeptical and thought Mom and Dad had

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natives & newcomers totally lost it until their first visit,” she recalled. “They fell in love and have made many visits to the area.” The Lewises spend time on Lake Pend Oreille on their pontoon boat, the Lena Belena, or simply relax by the shady pond at their property. They also enjoy a San Francisco Giants game on TV, fishing, hiking, entertaining, or skiing. Retirement couldn’t be any better for Michele and Steve who love “having no schedule, no meetings and generally planning the day at our leisure ... primary agenda: recreation, relaxation, and a bit of exercise (no need to get too crazy)." Observations of Sandpoint’s general culture: The day we made the offer on our property, we sat on the porch at Pack River Store, sharing a burrito and a cold refreshment. While watching clientele come and go—rafters from the river, construction workers, mountain folk, and well-dressed folks stopping by for lunch—I remember saying to Steve, “These are my people. I love this place. Let’s buy this property!” We have also experienced wonderful customer service and helpful individuals everywhere we go: cashiers at the market, clerks at the DMV, and people on the road.

tor in a one-high-school town in northern Nevada. In Sandpoint, I can just be Michele, not the school administrator. As an educator, I never really read for pleasure. When we moved here, I was informed by the local ladies that I was expected to participate in the Flume Creek book club. I’m having a blast reading and participating with this wonderful group of ladies! First local resident you got to know here and their influence: My next door neighbor Colleen Derby is very helpful on everything from how to stack wood to how the living room should be arranged. Also, local artist Lori Moore inspires me to find my creative capacity. She’s extremely creative in all aspects of art—from sewing to painting with oils! When I feel lazy, I think of Lori and get right back out there. How do you plan to use your talents/experiences/passions to contribute to the Sandpoint community? Steve and I were involved in many community and state service activities in Nevada. We barely had time to come up for air. I have a passion for youth activities and career and technical education. Steve has assisted numerous nonprofit organizations in developing strategic plans. I’m sure once we catch our breath, we’ll find our niche in the community.

How has living here changed you personally? At 64, I feel that I’m finally finding myself here in Sandpoint! I was an administra-

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2019-2020

|

w i n t e r gu i de

winter guide 2019/20

get

OUT!

IT’S SAID THINGS SLOW DOWN IN WINTER... BUT ONLY IF YOU WANT THEM TO! THERE’S PLENTY TO DO IN SANDPOINT NO MATTER WHAT THE SEASON.

FIND A COMPLETE GUIDE AT www.SandpointOnline.com/rec.

Outdoors SKIING AND RIDING. The 2,900-acre Schweitzer Mountain Resort features 92 trails and open bowl skiing just 11 miles from downtown Sandpoint. The mountain boasts 2,400 vertical feet, plus 32 kilometers of Nordic trails. Ten lifts serve two open bowls, treed glades, and three terrain parks. www.Schweitzer. com (208-263-9555). CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING. Trails at Schweitzer, Round Lake State Park, Farragut State Park, and Western Pleasure Guest Ranch, plus new trails at the just-opened Pine Street Woods, and the Lakeshore Trails on Lakeshore Drive. Ski or snowshoe the 1.5 miles of flat lake shoreline alongside the Pend d'Oreille Bay Trail just north of City Beach. www.SandpointNordic.com BACKCOUNTRY. Nearly unlimited options exist on public lands surrounding Sandpoint up National Forest roads such as Roman Nose and Trestle Creek. Call the Sandpoint Ranger District (208263-5111) or the Bonners Ferry Ranger District (208-267-5561) for maps and current conditions, including avalanche advisories. Call the Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center toll-free at 866-489-8664. For a guided backcountry experience, take an excursion from Schweitzer via snowcat with Selkirk Powder or check out their heli-skiing offers. www.SelkirkPowder.com (208-263-6959). SLEIGH RIDES. Western Pleasure Guest Ranch, 16 miles northeast of Sandpoint on Upper Gold Creek Road, offers sleigh rides in a rural setting for groups and couples. www.WesternPleasureRanch.com (208-263-9066). SNOWMOBILING. Snowcat trails around Sandpoint and Priest Lake in the Selkirk Mountains are renowned; for more information, contact Sandpoint Winter Riders, www.IdahoSnow.org (208-2630677) or Priest Lake Trails & Snowmobile Club (509-466-3331) or www.priestlake.org. For guided rides at Schweitzer, contact Selkirk Powder. www.SelkirkPowder.com (208-263-6959). STATE PARKS. Three state parks are within close range to Sandpoint: Farragut (208-683-2425), Round Lake (208-2633489), and Priest Lake (208-443-2200) with activities including camping, cross-country skiing trails, and snowmobiling. www. parksandrecreation.idaho.gov. WALKING. For cleared paths, try the Pedestrian Long Bridge alongside Highway 95 over Lake Pend Oreille; the paths along the Sand Creek Byway; Travers Park on West Pine Street; City Beach downtown; Sandpoint-Dover Community Trail along

Highway 2 West; Lakeview Park, through and around the Kinnikinnick Native Plant Society Arboretum; and overlooking Sand Creek at the Healing Garden next to Bonner General Health. STAY ACTIVE. Sandpoint’s City Rec department offers a huge variety of activities, for all ages, throughout the year. A sampling of what’s up for winter includes basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, dance, swimming, art programs, skiing, dancing, and much, much more! You can find it all in the winter activities guide. Pick one up at City Hall (1123 Lake St.) or get it online at www.sandpointidaho. gov. WILDLIFE REFUGE. Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge, 30 miles north of Sandpoint near Bonners Ferry, has more than 2,700 acres and abundant wildlife and birds. Hiking trails to a waterfall and around a pond, auto tour routes. www.fws.gov/kootenai (208267-3888). WATERLIFE DISCOVERY CENTER. On Lakeshore Drive, the center offers interpretive trails and self-guided tours of fish habitat and an interpretive area on the Pend Oreille River. Although the building is closed for winter, and is not staffed, visitors are welcome. www.FishandGame.idaho.gov (208-769-1414). FISHING. There's great ice fishing on Lake Pend Oreille at the north end of the Long Bridge in front of Condo del Sol. Main prey is perch, though bass and trout are also caught. Ice fishing is also popular on smaller lakes: Cocolalla, Mirror, Gamlin, Shepherd, Round, Antelope, and Priest. Lake Pend Oreille's deep waters rarely freeze, and even in midwinter charter fishing boats pursue its trophy rainbow trout. SHOOTING SPORTS. The city of Sandpoint operates a 6-acre, outdoor shooting range at 113 Turtle Rock Rd. that opens for the season in mid April and closes mid November. The fee for use is $5 per day, or check out the season pass options. Call 208-2633628 in season. ICE SKATING AND SLEDDING. It takes several days of sustained, below-freezing temperatures without too much snow, but when conditions are right, ice skaters flock to Third Avenue Pier, Sandpoint City Beach, or Sand Creek below the Cedar Street Bridge. Round Lake State Park maintains both regular and speed-skating rinks (208-263-3489). For sledding, Schweitzer offers Hermits Hollow Tubing Center (208-255-3081). SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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Winter guide

Indoors

ART GALLERIES. Truly an arts town, Sandpoint has numerous galleries and artists' studios. You can take a walking tour downtown: on First Avenue check out ArtWorks, Cedar Glen Gallery/Ferrara Wildlife Photography, Hallans Gallery, and Hen'sTooth Studio. Art lovers may also visit Pend Oreille Arts Council, 302 N. First Ave., www.ArtinSandpoint.org (208-263-6139). At Schweitzer, the Artists' Studio in the White Pine Lodge features local artists. MUSEUMS. Enjoy many fine displays depicting old-time Bonner County at the Bonner County History Museum. Open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission on the first Saturday of the month year-round, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Located in Lakeview Park, 611 S. Ella. www.BonnerCountyHistory.org (208-263-2344). Open other Saturdays only in summer. MOVIES. The Bonner Mall Cinema is a six-plex theater inside the Bonner Mall on Highway 95, featuring new releases

weekly (208-263-7147). The historic Panida Theater downtown at 300 N. First shows foreign and independent films, plus film festivals (208-263-9191). ATHLETIC CLUBS. Greater Sandpoint has a plethora of opportunities, but the most comprehensive is the Litehouse YMCA, 1905 W. Pine St., with a 25-meter indoor pool, wellness center, indoor and outdoor basketball, raquetball courts, and hydro massage bed. Open daily. www. YMCAINW.org (208-263-6633). SHOOTING SPORTS. Wrenco Arms (478338 U.S. 95 in Ponderay) offers an indoor shooting range open Tuesday through Sunday. Enthusiasts can rent equipment for day use; various membership packages are also available. www. WrencoArms.com (208-265-6737) SPAS. Get pampered at Wildflower Day Spa, www.thewildflowerdayspa.com (208-263-1103); Solstice Wellness Spa at Schweitzer Mountain. www.SolsticeWellBeing.com (208-263-2862); or Highlands North Day Spa highlandsnorthdayspa. com (208-263-3211). BREWERIES AND PUBS. Downtown,

rental Your Vacation condos on beautiful lakeside lake pend oreille getaway ONE, TWO & THREE BEDROOM UNITS AVAILABLE SLEEPS 4 TO 8 GUESTS

Accommodations include: Fully equipped kitchen, washer/ dryer, fireplace, full service athletic club, espresso shop, convenience store & gift shop

(208) 264-5828 | posresort.com 47390 Hwy 200 | Hope, ID | 83836

Indoor Shooting & Archery Ranges Machine Gun/Gun Rentals Firearms Training Classes/CCW Open to the Public Locals and Visitors Welcome

208.265.6737 • www.wrencoarms.com Ponderay, ID • One mile north of Walmart on Hwy 95 • Tues.-Fri. 10am-7pm, Sat.-Sun. 11am-5pm

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see brewing in action at MickDuff's Beer Hall, the production and tasting room, open daily at 220 Cedar St., (208-2096700) or visit their family restaurant at 312 N. First. www.mickduffs.com (208-2554351). For pubs that serve a lot of craft beers, try Eichardt's Pub & Grill at 212 Cedar St. (208-263-4005) or Idaho Pour Authority at 203 Cedar St. (208-5977096). Taste handcrafted ales at Laughing Dog Brewing in Ponderay; taproom is open at 805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr. 7 days a week from noon to 8 p.m. www.LaughingDogBrewing.com. Utara Brewing Co. at 214 Pine St. (208-627-5070) is described as a British pub-meets-curry house. Open Monday through Thursday, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday-Saturday noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday noon to 6 p.m. With several beers on tap, it offers Indian food, and is a northern home for Rathdrum’s Westwood beers. www.UtaraIdaho.com. Matchwood Brewing Co., at 513 Oak St. (208-718-2739) is open from Tuesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Saturday from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m., has six of its own beers on tap and specializes in pasties. (208-263-9222) www. MatchwoodBrewing.com. WINERIES AND WINE BARS. The Pend d' Oreille Winery and Tasting Room, closed on Wednesdays, is open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and features award winning wine paired with live music (not all nights). 301 Cedar St. www.POWine.com (208265-8545). Small House Winery is open Saturdays from 2.p.m. to 6 p.m. and by appointment at 1636 Baldy Park Dr. www. SmallHouseWinery.com (208-290-2016). SHOPPING. Downtown retailers are

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Winter lodgingguide guide

Lodging in Sandpoint

Pool on site

Restaurant

Bar or Lounge

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Daugherty Management

21

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x

Dover Bay Bungalows

19

x

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FairBridge Inn & Suites

60

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Holiday Inn Express

83

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Hotel Ruby

68

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Lodge at Sandpoint

25

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Northern Quest Casino

250

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Pend Oreille Shores Resort

50

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x

R&L Property Management

125

Sand Creek Lofts

13

Sandpoint Quality Inn

68

x

x

x

Selkirk Lodge

70

x

x

x

Sleep's Cabins

4

Twin Cedars Camping and Vacation Rentals 208-920-1910

8

x

White Pine Lodge

26

x

x

Downtown Sandpoint on the lake. Indoor pool, sauna, fitness room, hot tub. All rooms with lake view. Dine at Trinity at City Beach. Also 22-site RV park. www.BestWesternEdgewater.com

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Sandpoint’s luxury vacation home rentals, with properties on the lake and the mountain. See ad, page 5. www.DM-Vacations.com

208-263-3194 or 800-635-2534

x

208-263-1212

x

x

x

Waterfront bungalows at Dover Bay in Marina Village. Fully furnished, lake and mountain views. Fitness center, marina, hiking/biking trails. See ad, page 130. www.DoverBayBungalows.com

208-263-5493

Free breakfast with waffles, 24-hour hot tub, free wireless internet. Family suites. Schweitzer ski packages. At the base of Schweitzer Mountain, two miles from Lake Pend Oreille.

208-263-2210

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The newest hotel in Greater Sandpoint. 100 percent smoke free. The Ponderay location is at the base of Schweitzer Mountain next to Sweet Lou’s. See ad, page 137. www.HIExpress.com

208-255-4500 / Fax 208-255-4502 x

x

x

New pool, hot tubs, pet-friendly with dog run, free breakfast, ski waxing room, BluRay players/ movies & WiFi, hot tub rooms, athletic center. www.HotelRubyPonderay.com

x

x

x

Accommodations for weddings, retreats and banquets. Lakeside with swimming and docks. Views of lake and mountains for an unforgettable Idaho vacation. www.LodgeAtSandpoint.com

x

x

x

x

Northern Quest Resort and Casino is the Inland Nortwest’s only AAA-Rated 4-Diamond Casino Resort. Complimentary Wifi, valet and overnight parking. See ad page 161. www.NorthernQuest.com

x

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Fully furnished condos and on-site athletic club on Lake Pend Oreille. Stay and play packages. See ad, page 134. www.POSResort.com

208-263-5383 208-263-2211 877.871.6772

208-264-5828

Full service residential and commercial property management, serving tenants and clients since 1979. See ad in Marketplace. www.RLPropertyManagement.com

208-263-4033

x

Offering the ultimate in waterfront condominium comforts and convenience for your vacation home or even year-round living. www.SandCreekLofts.com

208-265-1597

x

x

Indoor pool and hot tub. Close to downtown Sandpoint. 5th Avenue Restaurant and Mitzi's lounge on property. See ad page 36.

x

x

Mountain accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor heated pool and hot tubs. See ad on back cover. www.Schweitzer.com

x

x

Sleep's Cabins have been a beloved part of the community and a landmark on Lake Pend Oreille since the 1930s. Perfect for family vacations. See ad page 24. www.SleepsCabins.com

208-263-2111

x

208-265-0257 or 877-487-4643

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Owner-managed vacation rental homes and camping cabin; RV sites on Lake Pend Oreille and Selle Valley; tipi on beach (seasonal). Horse/dog friendly. www.TwinCedarsSandpoint.com

x

x

x

x

208-265-0257 or 877-487-4643

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Twin Cedars Camping and Vacation Rentals

Meeting Rooms

Spa or Sauna

54

No. of Units Best Western Edgewater Resort

Kitchen

Sleep's Cabins vacation rental cabin on the lake

Daugherty Management vacation rental home on the lake in Sandpoint

x

x

New accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain & lake views. Outdoor hot tubs, access to heated pool. See ad back cover. www.Schweitzer.com

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ON PAGE 134, FIREWORKS AT SCHWEITZER. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL. THIS PAGE: CEDAR STREET BRIDGE AT LEFT, AND DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, AT RIGHT, ARE BEAUTIFUL NO MATTER THE SEASON. PHOTOS COURTESY SANDPOINT SHOPPING DISTRICT.

Shopping going all out in the Sandpoint Shopping District, where shoppers will discover a fine array of eclectic shops and galleries with clothing, art, and gifts galore. www.DowntownSandpoint.com. Highlights include the Cedar Street Bridge Public Market with retailers such as Carousel Emporium and Huckleberry Depot, art, and food such as Cedar Street Bistro, all in a beautiful log structure spanning Sand Creek. www.CedarStreetBridge.com (208-255-8360). Just down the street are First Avenue retailers such as Finan McDonald

Clothing Company, Zero Point Crystals, I Saw Something Shiny, Wolf & Bell, and Northwest Handmade. Antiques abound at Foster’s Crossing, a mini mall with lots of collectibles, on Fifth between Cedar and Oak streets (208-2635911); and MarketPlace Antiques & Gifts, open daily, at Fifth and Church (208-263-4444). Just out of town, Bonner Mall in Ponderay has many stores large and small and often hosts events; it’s on U.S. Highway 95 two miles north of Sandpoint (208-263-4272).

[ Closest Hotel to Schweitzer Mountain Resort ] Newest Hotel in Sandpoint Indoor pool/hot tub

SM

Fitness Center Meeting Rooms Available

477326 Hwy 95 N \\ Ponderay, Idaho 83852 // Phone: (208) 255-4500 SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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Game f

GET YOUR

LOCAL HOT SPOTS FOR GAME DAY by Beth Hawkins

I

t’s game day at Seattle’s CenturyLink Field, and Sandpoint Seahawks fans are hitting local restaurants and taprooms in their lime green jerseys to catch the action with fellow sports buffs. With so many fans, the Sandpoint area, in fact, might be the 13th man in and of itself. Fans pour out to cheer on the Packers, Gonzaga, and even Boise State. There’s a sense of camaraderie when cheers erupt en masse—no matter which team or sport you’re cheering on— plus delicious food and beverages, to boot. Here’s a look at some of the hot spots around the area come game day. With a whopping 21 big-screen TVs, Sweet Lou’s Restaurant and Bar, 477272 Highway 95 in Ponderay, strives to have as many games airing as possible. “We love all sports and all sports fans, so we do our best to get all the action,” said co-owner Meggie Foust. Monday nights are particularly popular during the NFL football season, when Sweet Lou’s teams up with K102 Country radio for viewing parties. “We give away prizes, have food and drink specials, and we always have a great turnout,” she said. “It’s a lot of fun.” And because there are so many different games airing, each table at Sweet Lou’s has its own personal speaker so customers can listen to the game commentary of their choosing while enjoying their meal. Speaking of food, the restaurant launched a new NFL menu this fall which includes wing specials and a new spinach and artichoke dip. The biggest hit of the season, however, are the lobster egg rolls. “They rival only our tailgate egg rolls for favorite NFL appetizer,” Foust said. Nearby at Laughing Dog Brewing, 805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr. in Ponderay, the taproom’s five big-screen TVs are tuned in to as many games as possible, particularly on Sunday afternoons, Sunday evenings, and Monday and Thursday nights. “Seahawks games definitely bring a bigger crowd, and we also have a

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drinks pretty good Broncos following with some of our customers,” said Amanda Coburn with Laughing Dog. The biggest cheers at the local brewery go out for what’s being poured in the taproom, and Laughing Dog recently put a cider and seltzer on tap. They are unrolling their Small Batch Series Fall Release, with limited quantities of the DogFather Imperial Stout released every year in November. And keep those tastebuds peeled for a Winter Release coming in December.

CRAFT BEER, WINE, EATERY, EVENTS, LIVE MUSIC

The Fat Pig at 301 Cedar St. always has two big-screen TVs tuned into the Monday and Thursday night NFL games, as well as college football games. “We have the Pac-12 Network games, and show all of the Washington State and Washington games,” said owner Brett Mullinder. “WSU attracts a good crowd anytime they are on.” The downtown restaurant tunes into other big sporting events, as well. “We love baseball, so we tune in to all of the playoffs and World Series games,” said

SANDPOINT, COEUR D’ALENE, & NEW! SPOKANE WONDER BUILDING 524 CHURCH ST, SANDPOINT 504 E SHERMAN AVE, COEUR D’ALENE WONDER MARKET, 821 W MALLON AVE, SPOKANE

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Mullinder. “And we have some big golf fans who come in for lunch and watch.” And if there are some avid hockey buffs out there, The Fat Pig also tunes in to NHL games via the NHL Network, NBC Sports, and the Altitude Network, which all show regular NHL games. Enjoy a cold beer on tap, plus check out the restaurant’s new fall and winter menu. While there weren’t any sneak peeks available at press time, the ground chuck burger served with Fat Pig sauce and fries are always winners in our book. Watch pro football games at The Burger Dock, 116 N. First Ave., where customers can catch the action on two big-screen TVs while enjoying “NFL Happy Hour” featuring $1 PBRs and Montucky beer. And on Seahawks Sundays (or Mondays!), anyone who comes in during the Seattle game wearing a ‘hawks jersey receives a free small order of French fries. Obviously, a burger is a good match for watching football here. Co-owner Claire Anderson said the bacon cheeseburger is the common go-to. “But if you’re feeling a little more adventurous, try the popper burger made with grilled onions, fresh jalapeno, apricot jam, and jalapeno cream cheese.” Appease the littles with a kids’ menu featuring burgers, grilled cheese, and good ol’ PB&J, plus a variety of milkshakes. Another upcoming televised game event at the burger joint is the Apple Cup between Washington State University and the University of Washington, held on Black Friday—the day after Thanksgiving. “We’ll have different specials going on, and it will be a rivalry,” she said. “A Huskies shake and a Cougars shake.” May the best flavor win! You can spice up your game day experience at Jalapenos Mexican Restaurant, 314 N. Second Ave., where two big-screen TVs show all of the Sunday, Monday, and Thursday night NFL games, as well as the RedZone channel all day Sunday (the NFL RedZone shows various games to see the most exciting plays). Owner Dave Vermeer said Jalapenos just introduced a few new offerings that’ll bring the heat on football night.

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“We just launched our new mango habanero wings, along with a list of spicy cocktails like our habanero Cadillac margarita or a spicy blueberry vojito, which is a twist on a mojito using habanero vodka instead of rum.” Order up! And finally, if you’re up on the ski hill on game day—no problem. There are four big-screen TVs at Chimney Rock Bar and Grill, and at least four in the Taps Lounge (projectors go up on Super Bowl Sunday). “We definitely try to focus on local sports, Gonzaga, Seahawks,” said Kellie Marshall, Schweitzer’s food and beverage hospitality manager. “But we also have quite a Patriots follow-

ing with some of the employees up here. It’s actually really fun to watch when the rivals pop up!” Weekends, naturally, are always busy at the ski resort. And the sports crowds grow when local games come on. “Our employees and guests come from a variety of places, so it’s interesting to see which teams are popular.” To go along with the games, Marshall said there’s always a variety of food offerings. “We’re always trying to spice up our menus, and we’re working to add a lot more grab-and-go options. They’re much more approachable when looking to get back out on the hill.”

serving you 7 days a week at two locations!

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & Bar Hwy 95 N Ponderay | 208.263.1381

Come hungry, Stay late, Eat well! www.sweetlousidaho.com

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & TAP HOUSE 601 Front Ave. 208.667.1170 | DOWNTOWN Cda

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serving Sandpoint CHEF Q&A WITH MELISSA MIDSTOKKE & AMY BORUP MELISSA MIDSTOKKE

Meet two of the friendliest, hardestworking servers in the local restaurant industry: Melissa Midstokke, 38, who has been a server at Beet and Basil, 105 S. First Ave., since it opened as a restaurant three years ago, and Amy Borup, 51, who has worked for 19 years at Di Luna’s Cafe, 207 Cedar St. Both of these women grew up in Sandpoint, and sing high praises for their respective eating establishments. Here’s what they have to say about their experiences:

AMY BORUP

Melissa Midstokke How did you get started in your career as a server?

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They were opening a restaurant; it used to be a food truck. I had been teaching and hadn’t served for a lot

Amy borup I came in to help for one day, and I stayed for 19 years! I like the social part of it.

of years. Now I’m the last of the original servers.

What do you love most about being a server?

I love the interaction with people. As a former teacher, I love the adult conversations! People come into the restaurant for what they want, and they’re happy.

The people. In the summertime, we get a lot of out-oftowners. We also have lots of regulars, they all come in and visit each other from table to table.

What do the ‘regulars’ order most often?

The Kung Pao Cauliflower. It’s an appetizer that’s lightly battered and deep fried, but it’s not heavy. And you’re eating your vegetables!

The Reuben sandwiches. The meat is roasted all night in house. We also serve breakfast all day, so that’s popular, too.

What’s your favorite dish on the menu?

The Togarashi Salmon Noodle Bowl with thick noodles and a ponzu citrus-soy sauce. It’s like a stir-fry with salmon on top, and it’s on the lunch and dinner menu.

I’m a vegetarian so I Iove the veggie hash, made with sweet potatoes, onions, sweet peppers, roasted potatoes, and greens, and topped with hollandaise.

Any words of wisdom you’d share with potential customers?

It takes a village to make your meal, I’m not just a messenger. We all have input here.

I’d remind them it takes time to make good food, we’re not fast food. We buy local whenever possible, and I’m proud to work here because of that.

What’s kept you here?

It’s definitely that it’s a family here. The people I work with keep me here … and the food. I’ve never eaten healthier! It keeps me in shape!

It’s become my family, and I feel really included here. I’m involved in the dinner concerts, selecting the musicians, and also the gift shop. I’m part of the big picture.

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Meatless wonders

NO BEEF ABOUT IT, VEGGIE BURGERS & MELTS ARE DELICIOUS! by Beth Hawkins

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egetarians and non-vegetarians alike enjoy the savory goodness of a veggie burger—but they’re not all created equal. While the world of fast food is jumping on the bandwagon, local restaurants around Sandpoint have been serving up these mouthwatering sandwiches for years now. So we decided to run through a few of our favorites, patty, bun, and all: Meatless goes magnificently with beer at Matchwood Brewing Company, 513 Oak St., where the house-made veggie burger is a delicious match for hearty appetites. The patty is made with black beans, bell peppers, garlic, onion, and an in-house spice blend served with house-made jalapeno ranch, cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, and a pickle on a Le Petit Outre bakery brioche bun. “Our vegetarian options are very popular among meat

and non-meat eaters and are often an item folks are seeking when they arrive at our brewery,” said Andrea Marcoccio, co-owner of Matchwood. “We have expanded our purveyors to include more locally and regionally sourced produce, bread, and meat.” While not a veggie burger, per se, Matchwood’s Herbivore Melt is the newest vegetarian sandwich on the winter menu, and the handheld features specialty grilled Birdman Bread from Le Petit Outre, along with roasted squash and portabella mushrooms, melted mozzarella cheese, and housemade hummus topped with Moose Meadow Farm microgreens. “This sandwich is perfect for a cold day served with a side of warm vegetarian chili, sidewinder French fries, or the Caesar salad. The ‘Herbie’ was inspired by Matchwood’s local regulars who were seeking a winter vegetarian option

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drinks PREVIOUS PAGE: A NEW ADDITION TO THE WINTER MENU, MATCHWOOD’S HERBIVORE MELT IS A CLOSE COUSIN TO THE VEGGIE BURGER FAMILY. COURTESY PHOTO. RIGHT: BRING A HEARTY APPETITE WHEN ORDERING THE PRETENDER VEGGIE BURGER AT WINTER RIDGE ... IT’S ENORMOUS! STAFF PHOTO

that wasn’t a salad as we head into the colder months,” Marcoccio said, explaining that the warm vegetarian sandwich was a collaborative recipe developed by the kitchen team at Matchwood. She adds that Matchwood will also be releasing another vegetarian handheld this winter, a vegan Reuben. The veggie burger gets an upscale, creative twist at Trinity at City Beach, 58 Bridge St., where chefs created the popular root vegetable burger that’s a longtime favorite with the lunchtime crowd. It’s made with seven kinds of roots, walnuts, and spices, breaded and fried on a hearth-baked, flour-top bun, that’s topped with jalapeno aioli, pickled red onions, spinach, and Gouda cheese. It’s so delicious, it’ll keep even the meat-lovers in the world satisfied. Trinity serves the root burger with a choice of French fries, sweet potato fries, side salad, or pea salad. The deli at Winter Ridge Natural Foods, 703 Lake St. is another great place to enjoy a meatless burger—and meals ordered at the counter can be eaten either in the seating area or to go. “We make the garden burger, called The Pretender, all

from scratch, it’s from a Winter Ridge recipe,” said Tommy Smith, a cook in the Winter Ridge deli. This classic burger is made with black beans, quinoa, sweet potatoes, and seasonings, and is served on a house-made Winter Ridge bun fresh from the store’s bakery. It’s topped with tomatoes, lettuce, onions, cheese (if you wish), and a yummy vegan pesto may-

coffee with your pastry purchase!

Breads Scones Pastries Cookies Pies Cinnamon Rolls Coffee Teas Canned Goods Spices Beans Rice Pasta Flour Nuts Dried Fruit Christian Books Housewares

Hours:

M-F 8:30-5:30 Join us on

208-263-9446

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While the world of fast food is jumping on the bandwagon… [Sandpoint has] been serving up these mouthwatering vegetarian sandwiches for years.”

onnaise that makes it a gooey mess, but totally worth it! Smith explains that fans of the garden burgers are thrilled that the deli has returned to their longtime recipe. “We had deviated the past year and a half from the classic recipe, and recently returned to the classic garden burger recipe and people love it.” The store also sells Beyond Burger, a plant-based meat substitute, and tofu. Veggie burgers are also housemade at Eichardt’s Pub and Grill, 212 Cedar St. “They’re made with black beans primarily, and also a fresh corn masa and green chilies,” said Doug Clark, an employee at Eichardt’s. “They’re mild chilies, but it definitely has a southwest flavor.” The veggie burgers are served with choice of soup, salad, or fries, and customers can substitute the veggie patty for meat on all of the burgers on the menu; for instance, the Swiss mushroom burger topped with sauteed mushrooms and Swiss cheese, or even the pub-style burger that’s topped with herbed goat cheese, caramelized onions, and (gasp!) Wood’s bacon. “We had somebody order the pub-style burger last night with the veggie patty, and they wanted the bacon as well. They just really love our veggie burgers.”

E ATS + D R I N KS

Local Natural Delicious

Winter Ridge Natural Foods is your onestop-shop to support your healthy lifestyle. Organic Produce Salad Bar Deli Hot Food Bar Local Grass-Fed Meats and Dairy Extensive Wellness and Beauty Departments Exclusive Wines and Cheeses Beer and Kombucha on Tap Robust Bulk Items Healthy On-The-Go Foods And So Much More.

703 Lake Street at Boyer St Sandpoint, ID

SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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(208) 265-8135 www.WinterRidgeFoods.com

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PHOTO BY MARY FRANZEL

drinks

Go East, Young Man H

AND FIND SIMPLE, GOOD FOOD IN CLARK FORK

by Trish Gannon

~Community Dinner ~ Friday and Saturday Nights

Hours: Wed., Thur., 8-7 Fri., Sat.,& Sun. 8-9 Closed: Mon. & Tues.

(208) 266-3466

Clark Fork, Idaho

www.kellysclassiccarcafe.com

ead east out of Sandpoint on Idaho’s Scenic Highway 200 and, 20 miles or so down the road, you’ll find yourself in Clark Fork, home to some seriously good eating. In the heart of town, just across from the high school, you’ll find the Clark Fork Pantry, 204 E. 4th St., a natural foods grocery and deli known for their dough. Only non-GMO white flour is used in the bakery, and the whole grain flour is ground on site just before use. From bread to pizza to bakery items, this is all made from scratch, “just like Grandma used to make” goodness using recipes culled from the owner’s Amish backgrounds. Buy to go or sit in and eat a made-to-order sandwich from your choice of a selection of meats, cheeses and vegetables—on one of seven different choices of bread, including gluten free—and through the winter pair it up with one of the day’s homemade soups. For dessert, why not a huckleberry milkshake? Or any one of a dozen or more choices of pastries, strudels, cookies, or pies. Take-and-bake pizzas are offered daily and made to your order. “We go to a lot of effort to use as natural ingredients as possible,” said Barbara Shrock, who owns the place with her husband, Dave. “We try to source nonGMO products, and avoid soy, hydrogenated oils, and high fructose corn syrup.” In the grocery you’ll find a large selection of bulk foods, candies, specialty grains and flours, and quite possibly the area’s largest selection of spices. Serious cooks and bakers will appreciate the great variety of organic, all-natural, and hard-to-find ingredients.

Purveyors of Homemade Dining Cafe • Grocery • Beer & Wine FREE Wi-Fi • Serving Breakfast All Day

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE Hope

Come on out for great food, amazing views and a community vibe.

LOCAL EVENTS TRIVIA NIGHT TACO WEDNESDAYS HAPPY HOUR

Every 3rd Tuesday

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7am-2pm Every Day!

Hwy. 95, Cocolalla, ID

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208.264.0539

www.davisgrocery.com

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PHOTO BY MARY FRANZEL

PHOTO COURTESY CLARK FORK PANTRY

Celebrating ten years of operation in the spring of 2020, Barbara said, “I think the store speaks for itself.” The Pantry is open Monday through Saturday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Learn more at www.clarkforkpantry. com, or like them on Facebook. On the north side of the highway just as you’re leaving town toward Montana, it’s hard to miss Kelly’s Classic Car Cafe, 14 Elkhorn Dr. Just look for the building with a classic car mounted on the roof. Once inside, you can settle down for an affordable meal featuring large portions of hometown favorites. Although the restaurant opened just this summer, business is “doing really well,” said owner Kelly Kearns. No stranger to Clark Fork, Kearns is the former owner of the Clark Fork Lodge, and a local developer. He opened the

restaurant because, he said, “I’ve always wanted to be a positive part of a community, doing something well.” While the roasted chicken and simple cheeseburgers come in for a lot of praise, it’s the cafe’s fish and chips that people tend to rave about. “I’ve had people tell me they’re the best in Idaho,” said Kearns. “People even come from Spokane just to have our fish and chips.” Hand-dipped, hand-cut, deep fried cod filets are just what the doctor ordered. Don’t forget to pair it with Kearns’ homemade coleslaw. Why the classic cars? Restoring old cars is a passion for Kearns, who restored two with each of his now grown daughters—one of which is the 1948 Chrysler Windsor parked out front. Kelly’s Classic Car Cafe now offers a drive-thru option, or a cozy fireplace

inside for wintertime meals and is open Wednesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sundays from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Check out their website at www.kellysclassiccarcafe.com or find them on Facebook.

ALL NATURAL!

Amazing “From Scratch” Bakery Delicious Sandwiches and Soups

208.266.1300 SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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facebook.com/theclarkforkpantry www.clarkforkpantry.com

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Do Winter with by Beth Hawkins

C

old weather is the perfect excuse to expand

are necessary—just walk in. And if your group includes beer

your appreciation of wine, and there are several

fans, send them through the doors adjoining her husband Kris

must-try places to sip and enjoy right here in

Lonborg’s Crosstime Saloon featuring craft beers, ciders, and

northern Idaho. Step through the doors of Heart

more in a sci-fi, rock ‘n’ roll atmosphere. Clever couple!

Rock Wines—at times ranked the “Number One Thing to Do in

There’s lots to experience and learn about wine at Sand-

Bonners Ferry” on TripAdvisor.com—and find yourself in the so-

point’s Pend d’Oreille Winery, 301 Cedar St. Co-owner Kylie

phisticated and elegant surroundings of a place that’s reminis-

Presta said there are daily tastings available featuring five

cent of an old world wine cellar. It’s just the atmosphere that

wines for $7, and servers are well-versed and knowledgeable

owner Lillian Lonborg was striving to create when she opened

about each of the wines on the tasting menu. “They provide

her wine bar and retail shop in 2015. But more than that, she’s

an interactive experience with each guest,” Presta said. In

passionate about sharing her knowledge and appreciation of

addition, the winery offers wine flights, which include three

wine with others.

3-ounce pours of any wine on the menu for $12. “They’re a

“I want people to enjoy an education in fine wines,” said

popular choice,” she said. “I usually recommend chardonnay,

Lonborg, who learned to love wines, and Northwest wines in

syrah, and the reserve cabernet, but guests can choose any

particular, while living in the Seattle area where she spent

three of their personal favorites.”

“twelve years of taking my enjoyment of wine into a professional environment.”

In addition, the winery always features a wine of the month with specially priced glass pours. And of course, what’s great

The wine bar carries about 30 varietals, and also a large

wine without an accompanying bite to eat? “We frequently

number of blends because of their popularity. “And we carry a

offer wine and pizza specials, and we just introduced our new

lot of Northwest wines; we are huge fans,” she said.

fall menu,” Presta said. “We will likely offer a pairing special

A tasting at Heart Rock Wines includes five different

with our wine of the month, such as meatballs paired with

wines for $10, which is refundable with any bottle purchased

a glass of L’Oeuvre.” The fall appetizer menu includes lamb

in the wine bar. “I used to run wine rooms in Seattle, and

meatballs, Greek fries, and San Marzano tomato soup, in addi-

that’s the way they treat their members. If you buy wine, you

tion to artisanal pizzas and farmer’s boards. Splurge on a special affair with a wine dinner at Forty One

get a free tasting.” Located in downtown Bonners Ferry’s Bonnerport Building

148

Wine

South, 41 Lakeshore Dr. in Sagle. These reserved-seating events

at 6371 Kootenai St., Heart Rock Wines is open Wednesdays

often include a five-course dinner featuring wine pairings with

through Saturdays from 3 p.m. until 9 p.m. No reservations

each course, along with the featured winery– representative

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E ATS + D R I N KS on-site who shares their knowledge and

ning Rd., hosts five-course dinners

Serving dinner 7 nights a week

monthly and sometimes works with

Reservations Recommended

story, plus offers discounts on bottle sales following the dinner. Pack River Store, 1587 Rapid Light-

winery representatives to turn them into paired dinners. “If we don’t have a wine pairing with our dinners, guests can choose bottles of wine from our eclectic wine selection,” said Brittany Jacobson, co-owner of the store. “People love it because we sell our wine at retail prices.” The five-course monthly dinners are really something special. For example, October’s dinner included a first course of ham-brined pork tenderloin tonnato, confit albacore tuna, fried capers, lemon, and parsley. And that’s just the beginning! Reservations are required for the five-course dinners by calling

208.265.2000

208-263-2409. And finally, gain top-notch knowl-

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle www.41SouthSandpoint.com

edge about wines at Gourmandie in the Schweitzer village. Manager Gary Lirette regularly holds Friday night wine tastings, later after work, with topics such as Pinot Noir and the Opulence of Red Burgundies or Chardonnay: Why This Is the Best Wine You Hardly Ever Drink. Friday wine tastings can also include a ‘Meet the Winemaker’ component. We have friends of Gourmandie, winemakers who are up to Schweitzer, Lirette said. They come up on a regular

Seasonal Pub Fare with a Unique Twist

basis, and we’ll custom-make a wine

12 Rotating Draft Selections

tasting. The intimate gatherings will

Open Monday-Saturday 11:30am-9pm

often find the winemaker visiting each table to discuss the wines. And on Saturdays, guests can enjoy $25 flights of

301 Cedar St., Suite 102 208.265.PORK

www.sandpointfatpig.com

Friday’s featured wines. No reservations are necessary; just stop in after a day on the slopes and enjoy. The market also offers hearty food, as well, with a deli that features more than 40 European cheeses, and a rotating menu of unusual Northwest-inspired foods including wild game (buffalo, elk, rabbit), a tapas menu, sushi, ramen, pho, and more culinary delights. “We offer unusual things,” Lirette said. And there you have it, a journey through wine … what a delightful winter activity!

SANDPOINT’S PREMIER

CRAFT BEER STORE OVER 300 BEERS IN STOCK 12 ROTATING BEER TAPS MEATS & ARTISANAL CHEESE 208-597-7096 WWW.IDAHOPOURAUTHORITY.COM • 203 CEDAR STREET DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, ID SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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the local dish

I

f you’re searching for a special Northwest-made treat, Robinson Soft Brittle just launched this past summer with their soft peanut brittle candy. Owners Todd and Pamela Robinson are overwhelmed by the positive response to their product. “We’re as busy as we can be,” Todd said. The secret, he said, is not in the recipe itself. “It’s broadly known, there are people here in the Northwest who make it, and also it’s popular in the Deep South and Thailand, where peanuts are big.” Rather, it’s the technique of making the soft

brittle that sets the Robinsons’ product apart from the rest. “We make it light and flaky and amazing, that’s our secret.” Meet the Robinsons and taste a sample at large events, including the Bonner County Christmas Fair at the fairgrounds and Schweitzer’s Fall Fest, or stop by their facility in Hayden (call ahead for hours, 208-610-1880). Or order online at www.RobinsonsSoftBrittle.com. If you live in Hope, or just need a great excuse to take the short-yet-scenic drive from Sandpoint, Davis Grocery, 620 Wellington Pl., has become the go-to spot for not only grocer-

~ Family Owned for 35 years! ~ SINCE 1994

208.263.0211 102 S. First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID

Open Nightly@ 4:30pm

www.ivanosrestaurant.com

700 Kootenai Cutoff Road, Ponderay, ID

208.263.6174

202 N 2nd Avenue, Sandpoint, ID

208.265.4149

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E ATS + D R I N KS

A GRILLED PANINI FROM MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE. TACO WEDNESDAY IS A POPULAR EVENT AT DAVIS GROCERY AND MERCANTILE IN HOPE. HAND-BATTERED FISH AND CHIPS DRAWS FANS TO KELLY’S CLASSIC CAR CAFE IN CLARK FORK. HUCKLEBERRY FRENCH TOAST IS A BREAKFAST DELIGHT AT THE VIEW CAFE IN COCOLALLA. COURTESY PHOTOS.

ies but a wonderful place to eat with its fresh bakery and deli. And this winter will see the transition from a cafe to a breakfast and lunch restaurant called Cafe at the Merc (‘The Merc’ for short), according to Jamie Davis, who owns the business with her husband Ross. “The locals have told us they want a breakfast place,” she said. The Merc will serve pancakes, eggs and bacon ... “good ol’ fashioned comfort food.” And all fall, winter, and spring, you can head to Davis Grocery for warm soups and bakery treats. “We have a daily soup each day, from fire-roasted vegetable to split pea

with bacon to chili, and several in between,” Davis said. The bakery also makes daily treats—don’t miss the spanakopita, which is a Greek spinach pie made with goat cheese and puff pastry. Or satisfy a sweet tooth with one (or a dozen!) of the chocolate cupcakes with buttercream frosting. They also make custom orders, like birthday cakes and pies. For social butterflies, Davis Grocery now hosts a variety of gatherings including Trivia Night, held on the third Tuesday of every month, plus special holiday events, and their enormously successful Taco Wednesdays. “They’re

Restaurant & Catering serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 150+ bottles of wine • 100 different beers Gas • propane • showers • ice • convenience store 1587 Rapid Lightning Rd, Sandpoint, ID • (208) 263-2409 • VISIT US on SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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the most popular thing we do,” said Jamie. “It’s almost a club night for the locals.” It’s no surprise that the bustling towns of Cocolalla and Sagle are keeping the recently rebuilt restaurant The View Cafe hopping. “We’re busier than ever,” said owner Kerri Clary Newsome. The restaurant is located at 462109 Highway 95 in Cocolalla, just across from Lake Cocolalla (hence, “The View”) and Newsome credits a big part of The View’s popularity to the fact that they serve delicious, home-cooked breakfast all day, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. And now they are open for dinner on Friday nights, featuring a prime rib special along with the regular breakfast and lunch menu. The View is a great place to relax and unwind, enjoy the free Wifi, and maybe a beverage. “A lot of people don’t realize we have beer and wine, and we even do Bloody Marys, margaritas, and mimosas,” Newsome said. Hop in your automobile and motor on out to Kelly’s

Classic Car Cafe, 14 Elk Horn Dr. in Clark Fork. It’s worth the drive—especially if you’re in the mood for delicious fish and chips. “We batter, hand-cut, and dip-fry cod for our fish and chips,” said owner Kelly Kearns. “People drive from all over for it.” Another specialty at Kelly’s is the broasted chicken. “There aren’t a lot of places that still do broasted chicken,” Kearns said. The process takes a little more effort, but the end result is worth it. “We cook it in a pressure cooker with hot oil, which locks the flavor into the chicken.” Kearns operated a bar in the building before deciding to turn it into a restaurant. “I’m the former owner of a hotel, and was raised in restaurants.” The classic car-themed restaurant is modeled after Clark Fork’s growing passion for vintage rides. “The whole town’s starting to do that, have classic cars,” Kearn said. “We even put one on the roof!” And his love of the automobile even extends to his willingness to make

Natural beer, food & fun!

Come visit us today at one of our two locations: Family Friendly Brewpub

312 N First Ave.

Beer Hall & Brewery

220 Cedar St.

T WO G R E AT BU S I N E S S E S

WHERE

Skis, Bikes & Beer collide Located in Ponderay next to Taco Bell 476930 Hwy 95 • (208) 265-6163

MickDuffs.com

Rice crusts & soy cheese now available

& CrossTime Saloon

208.290.4397

6371 Kootenai St. Bonners Ferry, ID www.heartrockwines.com

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FAMILY FRIENDLY • OUTDOOR SEATING FULL BAR

(208) 263-2995

www.sandpointjalapenos.com 314 N. Second Ave.

•Delivery •Sandwiches •Calzones •Specialty Salads •Homemade Dough •Beer/Wine •Take & Bakes

The Carolyn

215 S. 2nd Ave.

263-9321

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E ATS + D R I N KS ARLO’S STEAMERS FEATURE PETITE CLAMS. THE MAINE LOBSTER ROLL AT BAXTERS ON CEDAR. HEALTHY LUNCH CHOICES AT MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE. A DELICIOUS TREAT FROM ROBINSON SOFT BRITTLE. COURTESY PHOTOS

deliveries in the Clark Fork and Hope area, as well as operating a drive-thru window. The restaurant is open Wednesdays through Sundays for breakfast, lunch, and dinner; check hours at www.KellysClassicCarCafe.com. If you’re on the go to work, or better yet headed up to the mountain for a ski day, a stop at Miller’s Country Store, 1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. is in order. The market’s deli serves up hearty breakfast burritos, and can also put together sandwiches to-go from their selection of finer meats, cheeses, and homemade bread. It’s hard to resist the sweets that are baked in the store every day, including homemade cinnamon rolls and scones. If you’re heading out to play in the great outdoors, those calories will be burned off pronto … go for it! For folks who have a little extra time to linger, consider coming in for a lunchtime visit. “We have a cozy seating area,” said owner Lane Riffey. “And our soups are some of the most

popular things to order, along with our daily panini specials. Anything hot seems to hit the spot on cold winter days.” Riffey also sells bulk food items—perfect for snacking on later. “My personal new favorite products are chocolate-covered banana chips, and peanut butter-filled pretzels.” In downtown Sandpoint at Ivano’s Ristorante, 102 S. First Ave., take a peek at the new winter cocktail menu—there’s a drink called the “Hot Jimmy” that’s too interesting not to try! It starts with the restaurant’s house wine, the Jimmy Gardetto Vino Rosso from Pend d’Oreille Winery, with housemade star anise and clove honey, an orange slice, and a float of brandy—served hot with a cinnamon stick. It sounds like the perfect warmup on a cold winter’s early evening. Perfect accompaniment to the season is the Pappardelle Fattoria, a large ribbon pasta that’s topped with roasted rabbit, duck, chicken, house-made Italian sausage and mushrooms. Delizioso!

What’s Cooking Around Town?

FIND OUT>> www.SandpointDining.com

Serving Breakfast and Lunch Daily.

#1 on tripadvisor

ONLINE DINING GUIDE!

Baxters on Cedar home of the Maine Lobster Roll

102 N 1st Ave, Sandpoint 208-265-4311 Spudsonline.com

SERVING LUNCH & DINNER phone208.229.8377 webBaxtersOnCedar.com 109 Cedar St. Sandpoint, ID 83864

Catering& TakeOut

208.255.4186 www.arlosristorante.com

124 S.2nd Ave. Sandpoint, ID

Corner of 2nd & LakeSt.

SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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NEw Location!

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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

SA

N

D

CR

EE

Fir

K

Healing Garden

Bonner General Health

Poplar Alder

Main

Cedar

Oak

Division St.

33 26 34

Main

27 1

To Dover & Priest River

29 10 24

Town Square

Pine St.

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Panida Theater

Bridge St.

12

17

25

City Beach

20

11

Marina

7 16

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Cedar St. Bridge

Lake St. 9

8

N

Cedar St.

15 14 31

Farmin Park

Pine

E

Visitor Center

Larch

Church

W

Sand Creek Byway

LAKE PEND OREILLE

17

Elks Golf Course

5 Baldy Mountain Rd.

Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail

16

Bonner Mall

First Ave.

14 15

32

35

Second Ave.

12 13

6

Kootenai Cut-off Rd.

S. Second Ave.

11

18

To Hope & Clark Fork

23

Schweitzer Cut-off Rd.

PARKING

10

21

Third Ave.

9

To Schweitzer Mtn. Resort

Fourth Ave.

7 8

2 13 19

S. Fourth Ave.

6

4

3

To Bonners Ferry & Canada

Fifth Ave.

4 5

Dining Map 30

Boyer Ave.

3

Evans Brothers Coffee Mojo Coyote at Schweitzer Clark Fork Pantry Davis Grocery & Mercantile Miller’s Country Store & Deli Pack River Store Robinson Soft Brittle Winter Ridge Natural Foods Arlo’s Ristorante Baxters on Cedar Beet & Basil The Burger Dock Chimney Rock at Schweitzer Di Luna’s Cafe The Fat Pig Forty-One South Ivano’s Ristorante Kelly's Classic Car Cafe Sky House at Schweitzer Spuds Waterfront Grill Sweet Lou’s The View Cafe Fiesta Bonita Jalapenos Restaurant Second Avenue Pizza Eichardt’s Pub & Grill Matchwood Brewing Co. MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Brewpub The Back Door Heart Rock Wines & The Crosstime Saloon Idaho Pour Authority Laughing Dog Brewing MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Beer Hall & Brewery Pend d’Oreille Winery Skal Taproom

Division St.

1 2

Sandpoint

Boyer Ave.

eats

22

To Sagle & Coeur d’Alene

Map not to scale!

10/31/19 10:35 AM


G G I DE IDNI N TIENRV I EUW Restaurant index by type of cuisine Locate by number on dining map

COFFEE & CAFES EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE

ROBINSON SOFT BRITTLE

01

www.evansbrotherscoffee.com

9991 N. Lyle Loop, Ste. B, Hayden. Gourmet soft peanut brittle, chocolate-hazelnut soft brittle, crushed brittle topping and bark. Gift boxes and gift baskets. Corporate accounts. Free samples during will-call hours, Monday-Thursday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 208-6101880 www.robinsonsoftbrittle.com

MOJO COYOTE AT SCHWEITZER 02

WINTER RIDGE NATURAL FOODS 08

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Enjoy a fresh Evans Brothers espresso and treat your sweet tooth to a warm scone. Fresh-baked pastries, breakfast burritos and lunch specials. Fine selection of beer and wine. 208-2553037 www.schweitzer.com

703 Lake St. A natural foods grocery store with in-house deli, bakery, meat department, organic produce department, a juice and espresso bar, and hot food bar with indoor seating. Open daily, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. 208-2658135 www.winterridgefoods.com

ECLECTIC/FINE DINING

DELICATESSENS & MARKETS CLARK FORK PANTRY

03

ARLO’S RISTORANTE

09

204 E. 4th St., Clark Fork. All-natural, made-from-scratch baked goods, homemade soups and sandwiches, on freshly baked bread, made to order from the deli. Wide selection of bulk foods, snacks, spices and gift items. Monday through Saturday, 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., closed Sunday. 208-2661300 www.clarkforkpantry.com

124 S. Second Ave. New York-style Italian cuisine. Great food, great service, casual and relaxed with live music on weekends. Nightly dinner specials. Catering also available. Open daily, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., with live music until 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 208-2554186 www.arlosristorante.com

DAVIS GROCERY & MERCANTILE 04

BAXTERS ON CEDAR

620 Wellington Pl., Hope. Cafe and coffee shop with fresh-made pastries, sandwiches, and gluten-free options. Full-service grocery store supplies local produce, meats, wine and beer, and handcrafted goods to the Hope community. 208-264-0539 www.davisgroceryinhope.com

109 Cedar St. Daily specials, fresh local products. From steaks and chops to half-pound burgers, great salads, and Baxters’ signature Key Lime pie. Open Monday through Saturday, serving lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., happy hour 3 p.m. until 5 p.m., dinner 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. 208-2298377 www.baxtersoncedar.com

MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE & DELI

BEET & BASIL

05

10

11

1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. Wholesome goodness with a selection of fine deli meats and cheeses, bulk food items, pie fillings, and delicious fresh-baked pies, breads and pastries, soup and sandwiches. Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 208-263-9446 www.millerscountrystoresandpoint.com

105 S. First Ave. Global street food with a local flair, featuring unique options for vegetarians, vegans, meat lovers and those with dietary restrictions. Overlooking the marina with a warm fireplace and fabulous antique bar. Open Tuesday through Saturday starting at 11 a.m. 208-9206144 www.beetandbasil.net

PACK RIVER STORE

THE BURGER DOCK

06

12

116 N. First Ave. Voted Best New Business in Bonner County 2019! Handcrafted, locally sourced gourmet burgers. Vegan-friendly options. Beer specials during pro-football season. Waterfront view of marina. Open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m, Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 208-5977027 www.theburgerdock.com

1587 Rapid Lightning Rd. A country store with gourmet fare, serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Grocery necessities, plus a chef’s menu featuring weekly specials and more. Open Mon. through Thurs., 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Fri., 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sat., 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sun., 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. 208-2632409 www.packriverstore.com SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

Dining Guide_pg154-157.indd 155

07

524 Church St. Located in downtown Sandpoint’s historic Granary Arts District. Enjoy exceptional coffees and espresso, including the popular Headwall Espresso Blend. Locally baked pastries, breakfast burritos and more. A second location in Coeur d’Alene. 208-265-5553

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Eats eats &Drinks | Local Dining Guide

drinks

CHIMNEY ROCK AT SCHWEITZER

SKY HOUSE AT SCHWEITZER

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19

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Fireplaces, comfortable seating in the bar, and diverse cuisine. Enjoy an extensive menu including high-quality steaks, hearty pasta, scrumptious salads and exquisite seafood. Open daily inside the Selkirk Lodge at Schweitzer. 208-255-3071 www.schweitzer.com

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Ride the chairlift to the Sky House for a lunchtime experience unlike any other. Featuring a chef-inspired menu from locally sourced, farm-fresh ingredients, with a fabulous view at the resort’s summit overlooking Lake Pend Oreille. 208-263-9555 www.schweitzer.com

DI LUNA’S CAFÉ

SPUDS WATERFRONT GRILL

14

20

207 Cedar St. American bistro café offering regional, sustainable foods including hand-cut steaks, homemade soups and vegetarian cuisine, plus eclectic gifts for sale. Check the website for dinner concerts. Open Wednesday through Sunday for breakfast and lunch, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 208-263-0846 www.dilunas.com

102 S. First Ave. On Sand Creek overlooking the marina. Spuds is a landmark restaurant in Sandpoint since 1995. Spuds creates everything from scratch, from soups and elaborate baked potatoes, to loaded salads, unique sandwiches and desserts. Serving breakfast and lunch daily. 208265-4311 www.spudsonline.com

THE FAT PIG

SWEET LOU’S

15

21

301 Cedar St. Suite 102. Enjoy an extensive draft beer selection in a warm pub environment with a rotating wine list. Refreshing twists on classic pub fare with a complete vegetarian menu offered for lunch and dinner. Open Monday through Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 208-265-PORK (7675) www.sandpointfatpig.com

477272 U.S. Highway 95 in Ponderay. Open every day, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Terrific traditional and regional fare. Serving hand-cut steaks, freshly ground burgers, wild salmon and smoked ribs. Family-friendly environment. Full bar. A second location is located in Coeur d’Alene. 208-263-1381 www.sweetlousidaho.com

FORTY-ONE SOUTH

THE VIEW CAFE

16

22

462109 Highway 95. Overlooking scenic Lake Cocolalla, The View Cafe is a purveyor of homemade dining. Serving breakfast all day, free wifi. Experience the goodness of Grandma’s house and The View! Open daily from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Friday dinner 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. 208-263-5915 www.theview.cafe

41 Lakeshore Dr., Sagle. South end of the Long Bridge. Waterfront dining in an elegant lodge setting; exquisite service paired with innovative cuisine make for one of North Idaho’s premier dining experiences. Open 7 nights a week for dinner. 208-265-2000 www.41southsandpoint.com

ETHNIC IVANO’S RISTORANTE

17

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KELLY’S CLASSIC CAR CAFE

JALAPEÑOS RESTAURANT

SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

Dining Guide_pg154-157.indd 156

23

Two family-run eateries serving generous portions of authentic Mexican dishes made with fresh ingredients, in family-friendly environments. Downtown Sandpoint, 202 N. Second Ave. open Wednesday through Monday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 208-265-4149. Ponderay location at 700 Kootenai Cutoff Rd. open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 208-263-6174

18

14 Elk Horn Dr., Clark Fork. Legendary fish and chips, salads, burgers, and broasted chicken, by the piece or bucket. Phone orders and drivethru window for your convenience. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday through Sunday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., closed Monday-Tuesday. 208266-3466 www.kellysclassiccarcafe.com

156

FIESTA BONITA

102 S. First Avenue. Family-owned trattoria serving refined Italian dishes in a rustic, romantic atmosphere. Fine wine selection, full bar, and glutenfree options. Convenient take-out, hot or take-and-bake. Catering available for large and small parties. Open 4:30 p.m. daily until close.208-263-0211 www.ivanosrestaurant.com

24

314 N. Second Ave. A Sandpoint favorite for over 20 years offering both traditional and Americanized Mexican dishes in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. Full bar, patio seating, banquet facilities, gluten-free menu and quick to-go menu offer something for everyone. 208-263-2995 www.sandpointjalapenos.com

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G G I DE IDNI N TIENRV I EUW

SECOND AVENUE PIZZA

25

IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY

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215 S. Second Ave. Savor the piled-high specialty pizzas, loaded with fresh ingredients on homemade dough, or calzones, specialty salads and sandwiches. Gluten-free choices. Beer and wine, take-and-bake pizzas available. Free delivery; open daily. 208-263-9321

203 Cedar Street. Sandpoint’s premium craft beer store with 12 taps and 300 bottled beers in stock. Also serving hard ciders, wine by the glass, gourmet cheeses and meats. Glassware, T-shirts, and other gift ideas available. Monday through Saturday, 12 p.m to 8 p.m., closed Sunday. 208-596-7096 www.idahopourauthority.com

EICHARDT’S PUB & GRILL

LAUGHING DOG BREWING

www.secondavenuepizza.com

PUB-STYLE 26

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212 Cedar St. Relaxing pub and grill mixes casual dining with seriously good food. Completely family friendly. More than a dozen beers on tap, good wines and live music. Upstairs game room with fireplace. Locally supported and nationally recognized since 1994. Open daily at 11:30 a.m. 208-263-4005 www.eichardtspub.com

805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr., Ponderay. The dog-friendly taproom is open and offers a variety of beers. Stop by and taste the delicious huckleberry cream ale, and a wide selection of beers on tap. Open seven days a week from noon to 8 p.m. 208-263-9222 www.LaughingDogBrewing.com

MATCHWOOD BREWING CO.

MICKDUFF’S BREWING CO. BEER HALL & BREWERY

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513 Oak St. in the Granary District. Experience Sandpoint’s newest brewery featuring six beers on tap, freshmade pasties, appetizers, burgers, and more. Indoor and outdoor seating; community room upstairs is great for large gatherings. Open daily, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 208-718-2739 www.matchwoodbrewing.com

MICKDUFF’S BREWING CO. BREWPUB

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220 Cedar St. Family-friendly brewery tasting room boasts 16 taps and weekly entertainment. Beer Hall is BYOF (Bring Your Own Food)-friendly and has a beer for every taste. 21 years or older for live music on Friday and Saturday nights. 208-209-6700 www.mickduffs.com

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY

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301 Cedar St. Locally made wines, tasting room, house-made appetizers, live music, local art installations, and refillable wine growlers, located in the renovated and historic Belwood 301 Building. Open daily 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 208-2658545 www.powine.com

312 N. First Ave. Handcrafted ales in a family-friendly downtown atmosphere, brewing natural ales and root beer. Menu includes traditional and updated pub fare gourmet hamburgers, sandwiches and handcrafted soups. Open daily at 11 a.m. 208-255-4351 www.mickduffs.com

TAVERNS, BREWERIES AND WINERIES THE BACK DOOR

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HEART ROCK WINES & THE CROSSTIME SALOON

476930 Highway 95, Ponderay. Six beers on tap, wine, cider, and hard kombucha and water spirits. Occasional live music. Open Sundays and Tuesdays noon to 6 p.m., Wednesdays through Saturdays from noon to 8 p.m., closed Mondays. 208265-6163 www.SandpointSportsSkalTaproom.com

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6371 Kootenai St., Bonners Ferry. Named one of Idaho’s Top Ten Wine Bars. Wine tastings and pairings. The Crosstime Saloon next door has over 400 craft beers for your exploration. Open Wednesday through Saturday, 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. 208-290-4397 www. heartrockwines.com and www. thecrosstimesaloon.com

for a complete guide to local dining in sandpoint, visit our website at www.sandpointonline.com

SANDPOINTMAGAZINE.COM

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SKÅL TAPROOM

Located downstairs at 111 Cedar St. It feels like you’re going into a speakeasy from the prohibition years; a warm and intimate space featuring wines and craft beers along with a great tapas menu. Open 3 p.m. to midnight; closed Sunday. 208-610-7359 www.BaxtersBackDoor.com

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Advertiser index

advertiser INDEX 7B T.V. – Hesstronics 124 A Glass Act 126 All About Paws 74 All Seasons Garden & Floral 44 Alpine Shop 23, 27, 56 Ameriprise Financial 74 Arlos 153 ArtWorks Gallery 44 BNSF 79 Barry Fisher Custom Homes 123 Baxter’s 153 Beet & Basil 147 Boden Architecture 130 Bonner County Fair 67 Bonner General Health 60 Bridge Asst’d Living, The 43 Burger Dock, The 145 Capers Travel 52 Cedar Street Bridge 72 Century 21/Riverstone 111 -Carol Curtis 22 Clark Fork Pantry 147 Co-Op Country Store 20 Community Assistance League/Bizarre Bazaar 35 DSS Home Preservation 104 Dana Construction 112 Dan Fogarty Construction 53, 126 Daugherty Management 5 Davis Grocery 146 DiLuna’s 153 Dover Bay 103 Eichardt’s 150 Elks Lodge & Golf Course 66 ELTC 64

Evans Brothers Coffee 140 Eve’s Leaves 19 Evergreen Realty 6 - Charesse Moore 58, 59 Farmers Insurance 110 Fat Pig, The 149 Festival at Sandpoint 37 Fiesta Bonita 150 Finan McDonald 19, 46. 57 Fogarty Construction 126 Forty-One South 149 Foster’s Crossing 16 Greasy Fingers Bikes 35 Guaranteed Rate 107 Hallans Gallery 44 Heart Rock Wines & Crosstime Saloon 152 Heartwood Center 23 Hendricks Architecture 115 Holiday Inn Express 137 Hotel Ruby 43 Huckleberry Lanes 51 Idaho Pour Authority 149 I Saw Something Shiny 34 Idagon 4 Innovia Foundation 131 International Selkirk Loop 43 Ivano’s 150 JEP Designs 44 Jalapenos 152 John Cloud Construction 120 KPND Radio 132 KRFY Radio 76 Kaniksu Health Services 74 Kelly’s Classic Car Café 146 Keokee Books 158 Keokee Media & Marketing 115

Lakeside Medicine 62 Lakeshore Realty North 15 Laughing Dog Brewing 57 Legacy Construction 119. 126 Lewis and Hawn 25 - Sleep Solutions 65 Litehouse Foods 14 Local Pages, The 127 Matchwood Brewing 140 Mickduff’s Brewing Co. 152 Miller’s Country Store 144 Monarch Marble & Granite 118 Mountain West Bank 105 North 40 Outfitters 3 Northern Lights 54 Northern Quest Resort Casino IBC Northland Cable 23 Northwest Autobody 66 Northwest Handmade 28 Northwest Self Storage 127 Pack River Store 151 Panhandle Special Needs 52 Pend d’Oreille Winery 150 Pend Oreille Shores Resort 134 Reader, The 130 Realm Realty 9, 116 - Jeremy Brown 51 Refined Aesthetics 51 Remax in Action 11 ReStore Habitat For Humanity 105 Robinson Soft Brittle 147 Rock Creek Alliance 31 Sandpoint Building Supply 122 Sandpoint Marine & Motorsports 77

Sandpoint Momentum 48 Sandpoint Movers 128 Sandpoint Online 153 Sandpoint Optometry 38 Sandpoint Quality Inn 36 Sandpoint Super Drug 50 Sandpoint Waldorf School 46 Sayers Jewelers-AquaGem 76 Schweitzer Mountain Resort BC Second Avenue Pizza 152 Selkirk Powder Company 95 Selle Valley Construction 2 Skal Taproom 152 Skywalker Tree Care 22 Sleep’s Cabins 24 Spears Insurance 36 Spuds 153 Super 1 Foods 17 Sweet Lou’s 141 Syringa Cyclery 74 Taylor Insurance 129 Timberframes by Collin Beggs 114, 126 Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s -Agents Page 70,71 -CoOp Page 68,69 -Cindy Bond IFC -Chris Chambers 1 -Rich Curtis/Luz Ossa 108 View Cafe, The 146 Wildflower Day Spa 26 Winter Ridge Natural Foods 145 Wrenco Arms 134 YMCA 16

Go Exploring with Keokee Guide Books www.KeokeeBooks.com NEW EDITION

$26

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loc al bu sin ess

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market PLACE Alpine Motors Your Buick, GMC truck dealer. New and used sales and leasing. Full service, parts and body shop. Highway 95 N., Ponderay, 208-263-2118, 1-800-430-5050. www.AlpineMotors.net

Kokanee Coffee House blends roasted

in small batches. Serving breakfast all day plus homemade soups, sandwiches & salads. Kokanee Ironworks art for admiration and sale inside. 509 N. Fifth Ave., 208-597-7831, kokaneecoffee.com.

CB Tans & Lashes is your premier source for sunless tanning, eyelash extensions and now nails and pedis! NEW Salon location at 302 S First Ste C (below Urgent Care) 208.610.7612 or book online at www.tansandlashes.com

Dr. Paul E. Koch graduated with honors from Ohio State University - College Of Optometry. Dr. Koch affiliates with no hospital, cooperates with many other doctors and specialists, without joining any medical groups. Located inside the Ponderay Wal-Mart. Same day fitting for most contact lens prescriptions. Treatment of minor eye infections. Please call for an appointment, (208) 255-5513, or just walk in.

Elite Tire & Suspension in Ponderay is

your locally owned and trusted shop for tires, suspension work and alignment. 800 Kootenai Cutoff Rd. Ponderay, ID 83852 Call Bill at 208-265-3603, visit our website at www.elitetireandsuspension.com or follow us on Facebook.

R&L Property Management Rental management experience since 1979. Tenant screening, rent collection, accounting, maintenance, and marketing. Residential and commercial. 1205 US-2 Suite 202A, 208-2634033, rlpropertymanagement.com �

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Sandpoint Super Drug The Center for Functional Nutrition offers a full line of clinical nutrition products including Klaire, Thorne, Pure, Ortho Molecular, and Apex. 604 N. 5th Avenue. Go to www.SandpointClassifieds.com.

Shop Sandpoint Go to www.shopsandpoint. com, for local web links to trusted services, merchants, artists, craftspeople, farmers and green building. Write your own reviews in the new SandpointBlog. Fun reading, recycling, and more!

Sandpoint FREE classified ads. Got something to sell? Looking for good deals, a place to rent, a job, a ride share… or even looking for love? Post for free, or browse hundreds of ads in Sandpoint’s own version of Craigslist. Go to www. SandpointClassifieds.com Vanderford’s

Embed

as diverse as healthcare, housing, utilities, and clothing, while also connecting those who want to help with groups in need of volunteers. There is even an option to register your organization’s need for volunteer support. Learn more about it at www.sandpointcommunityresource.com 208-920-1840.

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Offering the latest books and novels, office supplies, machine supplies and free delivery in Sandpoint. Order online. 201 Cedar St.,

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Keokee A marketing communications firm

providing web design, hosting, search engine optimization and marketing, graphic design, editorial, media consultation and more. 405 Church St., 208.263.3573. www.keokee.com

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Board Minutes May 23

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logo.pdf

logo word.docx

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Database Documents Mar 1, 2016

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cfp_logo_black_outline… Debra MayTownsend 9, 2016 Jun 15

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Sandpoint Community Resource Center provides an extensive website offering information about how to receive help in areas

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Branding Email.docx Helpful Resource Documents

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208-263-2417. www.Vanderfords.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Get current rate sheet on our website www.SandpointMagazine.com or call 208-263-3573 and talk to Sales Director

Clint Nicholson (ext. 123; email clint@keokee.com) or sales assistant Miriam Robinson (ext. 115, email miriam@keokee.com).

SA N D P OI N T M AGA Z I N E .C OM

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sandpoint of view

Reaching for the

O

ne evening late in the 1940s a pajama-clad young boy sat on the floor while the radio played Captain Video and His Video Rangers. Thus began my interest in space travel. At that time it was pure fantasy that no one believed possible, but the images my mind’s eye could create were spectacular. With the launching of Sputnik the idea of going into space gathered credence. Starting in high school I followed the progress of Gemini and Apollo all the way to the culmination of the lunar landing at the end of the decade, wishing I somehow could have been involved. With the moon landing I realized that my time had passed; born too late to be a cowboy and too early to be an astronaut. What I became was just as exciting: a teacher. In the 1980s there came a glimmer of hope when the Teacher in Space program was announced. I knew I was probably past my prime but I could not let the opportunity go by without at least trying. Fate was holding a carrot in front of me. I thought how great it would be to go into a class and share my experience. How many young students could be motivated to follow their dreams? I would say, “Hey, look what this old man did! Now think what you could do.” I as well as many other teachers at Sandpoint High would frequently remind the students to not put limits on themselves, that

Stars

they could achieve far more than they believed. And through the years, they have shown us we were right. We have had numerous students go on to have very successful—and sometimes very prominent—careers. My becoming the first teacher in space wasn’t meant to be. My colleague Marianne Love had also been a candidate, and we consoled each other at not being chosen. I followed the progress of the program and was excited when the day for the launch arrived. Several classrooms at Sandpoint High had televisions to follow the takeoff. The school was stunned when the terrible, tragic news came across the PA system, that the Challenger had broken apart just 73 seconds into its flight, resulting in the death of, among others, Christa McAuliffe, who would have been the first teacher in space. At that time I renewed a promise I had made to myself after several close calls in Vietnam: that I would treasure each day and be grateful for what I had. This was the message I took to our students after that fateful day. I wasn’t a cowboy or an astronaut, but as NASA reminded us with its commitment to put a teacher in space, what I was is just as exciting and fulfilling and worthwhile... and it still is. It’s nice to know that Bonner County students had and continue to have teachers who motivate their students to reach for the stars.

RAY MILLER SPENT 30 YEARS TEACHING GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMICS AT SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL. HE ALSO SERVED 20 YEARS ON SANDPOINT’S CITY COUNCIL, AND 6 YEARS AS SANDPOINT’S MAYOR.

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YOU’RE GOING TO NEED A BIGGER BUCKET LIST. With so many entertainment options at Northern Quest, the nonstop action of 24/7 gaming in our casino is just the beginning. See all the ways you can start checking off your list at northernquest.com. NORTHERNQUEST.COM | 877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

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Profile for Keokee :: media + marketing

Sandpoint Magazine Winter 2020  

When the snow blankets our magnificent mountains, it brings a whole new kind of outdoor recreation to our neck of the woods. And in this fea...

Sandpoint Magazine Winter 2020  

When the snow blankets our magnificent mountains, it brings a whole new kind of outdoor recreation to our neck of the woods. And in this fea...

Profile for keokee