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portfolio KENNETH YOUNG MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES


CONTENTS

DESIGN WORK MASTERPLAN | CIRCULAR QUAY TRANSPORT HUB

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CONTEMPORARY CHINESE GALLERY + MUSEUM DARLING HARBOUR

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PROJECT HOME | KELLYVILLE

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ART GALLERY | NEWTOWN

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WORK EXPERIENCE CQ SUPER HIGH RISE | CHONGQING

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ORDOS MUSIC HALL | ORDOS

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CANNONDESIGN NEW OFFICE | SHANGHAI

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RESUME

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MASTERPLAN | CIRCULAR QUAY Masters Design Studio 2011 Collaborator: Boris To Tutor: Richard Johnson & Ken Maher

The reconfigured Circular Quay will be a vibrant and equitable chain of transit, social, and commercial activity hubs intertwined with ‘ecologies’ (networks / systems) of green open-space; water sensitive parks and sites of contested memories. To achieve ‘ecological’ sustainability in all three aspects: economics, social and environmental; and put the urban foreshore gateway on the atlas through a solution that challenges convention.

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Intertidal Wetland From George Street Entry

Diagram For Diversity

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Aerial View Of Circular Quay Redevelopment

MASTERPLAN | CIRCULAR QUAY Environmental Sustainability To reintroduce native floral and faunal species to bring biodiveristy back to an equilibrium; maximise the use of renewal forms of energy and to use resources in a more effi cient manner Social Sustainability To accomodate a diversity of activities through different times of the day, which are readily accessible to everyone; and to nurture the reinvention of collective memories through constant exchange and debate of individual memories. Economical Sustainability Insert commercial activity as an attractor of people which will become mutually benfi cial for one another; and to enhance identity of Circular Quay as an urban Sydney foreshore.

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Water Sensitive Urban Design Express the Tank Stream and reinvent it as a large bioswale to treat stormwater and integrate it with water squares so that people can also interact with and learn from it Green Infrastructure Pocket parks, urban produce gardens and oyster rock-beds will be inserted at appropriate locations, connected by strings of bioswales and linear gardens to enhance biodiversity, lifestyle choices and equitable access to green open space Transit Oriented Development Maintain the role as a gateway transport hub, but intensify it through the addition of the lightrail & the undergrounding of the heavy-rail station; improve it by relocating bus stops & reducing vehicular congestion & access


DAWES POINT SMALL CRUISE

CAMPBELLS COVE ROCK POOL BEACH

SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE

OVERSEAS PASSENGERS TERMINAL WHAVES ABORIGINALS CULTURE CENTRE

WETLAND

TRANSPORT HUB

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MASTERPLAN DIAGRAMS

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Alfred Street Shops From Pitt Street

Places for People

Alfred Street Shops Section

Circular Quay will be renewed with a central focus on people: minimise vehicular usage and unnecessary street ‘clutter’; maximise safe & pleasant pedestrian environments, social activties; cycling routes & variety of outdoor seating

Dawes Point Earth Bermed Shops Section

Dawes Point Earth Bermed Shops

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Foot Bridge From From MCA

Contending Memories Memorial parks shall become physically and mentally interactive; questioning identity and history of Sydney Cove by juxtaposing Colonial, migrant & Indigenous mnemonics

OPT Section

Aboriginal Centre Section View Of OPT & Aboriginal Cultural Centre

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TRANSPORT HUB | CIRCULAR QUAY Academic Design Studio 2011 Tutor: Richard Johnson & Ken Maher

Located in front of the AMP Building and next to the Historical significant Customs House and Square, the design of the building is to be a public space and place. The ground floor is a void in which people can flow into the type of transport needed, train(B2), ferry(B1), bus(L2), taxi(G), bike(G). The large atrium provides visual clarity for passengers and creates a modern grand terminal.

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Bus Terminal

TRANSPORT HUB Aiming to intergrate the variety of transport systems in Circular Quay, the need for fluid circulation, transparency of travel systems therefore creating visual clarity and connection, was essential. The building is therefore to become an important public space and place. The building is completely open to the elements on the ground, while shelter is provided above to create a boundary for the shops.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Existing Condition

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BUS ROUTE

FERRY ROUTE

BUS TOP

FERRY WHARF

RAILWAY

OVERSEAS PASSENGERS TERMINAL

RAIL STATION

TAXI BAY

Proposed Design


Interior Perspective

Short Section (ferry access)

North Entrance

Short Section (train access)

Transit Space Shops/Restaurants

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CONTEMPORARY CHINESE GALLERY + MUSEUM | DARLING HARBOUR Masters Design Studio 2012 Tutor: Dijana Alic

The project explores the contemporary issue of Chinese identities, the identity as an immigrant, the inner conf ict of tradition and modernity, and developing a site specif c response in Darling Harbour. The site selected is to the south of the Chinese Garden of Friendship, and west of Sydney Chinatown; there is the opportunity to create a connection between these two culture elements. Through the investigation of Chinese culture centres, the history of the Chinese settlement in Sydney, research on Chinatowns and Chinese Gardens, the project proposes three main elements to the building, the Contemporary Chinese Gallery and Museum (enables visitors to ref ect on the contested memories of the Chinese in Sydney and contemporary expressions through art), the contemporary Chinese roof garden (place for self-contemplation and relaxation), and Chinese designer shops and restaurants, brought together through courtyards and landscapes, a public haven that allows one to escape the city. 16


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CONTEMPORARY CHINESE GALLERY + MUSEUM BACKGROUND RESEARCH

SITE TRANSFORMATION 1855 RURAL

1880 WAREHOUSES

1958 MARKETS

2012 LEISURE BUSINESS

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DARLING HARBOUR MASTERPLAN The master plan for south darling harbour and dixon street site reinterprets the historical patterns with existing axis and circulation routes. The revival of the space involves incorporating commercial, cultural, educational activities in the public space, bringing people together site transformation 01 realignment of light rail - opportunity to redevelopment powerhouse east facade 02 redevelopment of entertainment centre 03 underground entertainment centre carpark 04 remove pier street 05 removal of monorail and novotel hotel 06 construct gallery contemporary chinese art 07 construct mixuse developments *masterplan anticipates significant positive changes to transport infrastructure and future city traffic plan, ie lightrail routes

CHINESE CULTURE HOUSE EXPERIMENTAL ART GALLERY

HOTEL, SERVICE APARTMENTS , OFFICE, RESTAURATNS, SHOPS NEW ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE

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CONTEMPORARY CHINESE GALLERY + MUSEUM BACKGROUND RESEARCH Research in the contested memories of the Chinese in Sydney has the opportunity to support the investigation in the Chinese identities, as through providing a museum and gallery to share the past experiences that may be relevent to present and future generations. Furthermore it is a place to explore the contemporary expressions of modern China through artworks and the people encountered

CHINATOWN SYDNEY - MIGRATION, COMMUNITY, COMMERCE Chinatowns are celebrated as part of the authentic ethnic fabric of cities worldwide. Often major attractions, Chinatowns are as familiar to tourists as McDonalds. Bustling activity, exotic goods and cuisines of Chinatowns convey a genuine cultural experience. As ethnic enclaves, Chinatowns have always faced the possibility of displacement, destruction, or discrimination from municipal authorizes and local residents. Such conditions have often resulted in the birth of numerous New Chinatowns. The Rocks area was the first of three sites identified as “Chinatowns” in the inner city area. The first visible concentrations of Chinese residences and shops were in lower George Street, site of the colony’s first official markets. Yet with the decline of the goldmines, many Chinese moved to Sydney where they established market gardens on the city fringe. A second “Chinatown” center began to develop in the southern end of the city around the Belmore fruit and vegetable markets established in 1869. This Haymarket area expanded with boarding houses operating in Goulburn Street catering for poorer Chinese laborers and the market gardeners who often stayed overnight when they brought their produce into the city to sell. Households were also established in the adjacent Surry Hills area around Wexford Street which by 1900 was almost exclusively occupied by Chinese, including Chinese and Chinese-European families. The wealthier Chinese preferred to live in The Rocks or had followed non-Chinese families in moving out to the rapidly expanding suburban areas. In 1909, the City Council began a period of progress, slum clearance and better traffic. Wexford Street disappeared to give way for the construction of a new Wentworth Avenue. Furthermore, an estimated 724 people had their houses demolished in Surry Hills by this resumption, dealing with the ‘Chinese problem’. Reflecting the importance of economic factors in the location of Chinatown the focus of Chinese settlement moved a third time to the nearby Dixon Street area when Sydney’s new produce markets relocated there in 1909. Today this remains the center of Sydney’s Chinatown. Chinese worked at all levels of the produce industry from market gardeners, to retailers and wholesalers. Also located here were the firms which conducted the import and export trade with Hong Kong and China. Chinatown was the center of Chinese economic activities stretching around Australia to the South Pacific and back to Hong Kong and China.

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1 1850s - LOWER GEORGE STREET, THE ROCKS (SITE OF FIRST MARKETS)

1870s - CAMPBELL, GOULBURN STREET, WEXFORD STREET (DEMOLISHED)

1920s - DIXON, HAY STREET 1980 - DIXON STREET, OFFICAL CHINATOWN 1914 - PADDY’S MARKET OPEN

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1869 - BELMORE MARKETS OPEN 21


Chinatown

Developments 1850s The discovery of gold

concentrations of Chinese residences and shops were in lower George Street, in The

1840s Early settlers came in very small numbers as cooks, cabinetmakers and market gardeners, late 1840s, Chinese men were imported as indentured on pastoral properties created partly by the end of convict transportation.

The Rocks 1854 1858 First Chinese business entries in city directories began to appear

1869 Fruit and vegetable markets move from near the Town Hall to the Belmore Markets (site of the present Capitol Theatre)

1895 Trades Hall and Trade Union Centre built, four storeys occupying a prominent site and terminating the Dixon St Mall with the octagonal tower. Adjacent Trades Hall Hotel 1896 Christian Missions follow the Chinese into Chinatown, Wexford Street, Surry Hills; the foundation stone of St Luke’s Chinese Church is laid.

1900s Haymarket became increasingly industrial with markets, warehouses, shipyards, along with the construction of the city circle railway lines and stations nearby. 1910 storey Federation free style featuring unusual curved facades and rendered brink on prominent corner site 1912 The old Belmore Markets site bought by Wirth Bros with the view to construct a circus and hippodrome complex

1870s Chinatown migrates south to Campbell and Goulburn Streets, the location of the centre of Chinese trade, the Belmore Markets; Residential areas spreading into Surry Hills. As the shipping and new arrivals declined, so did The Rocks, and the number of Chinese in produce and market dealings increased, the emergence of the Haymarket area was Sydney’s second Chinatown.

1873 Yiu Ming Hung Fook Tong Temple built by the Yiu Ming society that looked after the interests of gardeners, funded by local community donacant for its blending of traditional design, local materials and Federation detailing.

1860s A second Chinatown situated in the poorer, southern end of the city near cattle markets, Wexford Street (since removed) near Surry Hills, was formed; Chinese were establishing themselves as market gardeners.

Wexford Street (now Wentworth Avenue)

1898 Sze Yup Temple in Glebe Point built a cultural centre for the Chinese community, social contact and companionship. Celebrations and festivals took place at the temple.

Belmore Markets

1906 City Council began a period of progress, slum clearance and Wexford Street disappeared to give way for the construction of a new Wentworth Avenue. Furthermore, an estimated 724 people had their houses demolished in Surry Hills by this resumption, dealing with the ‘Chinese problem’.

1914 destination where Paddy’s Markets still operates today

1930 NSW Bank (Westpac) built, three storey building of unusual architecture style not common in central Sydney

1920s Chinatown migrates to Dixon and Hay Street because the move of the markets to Paddy’s Market, the focal point of present day Chinatown

1930 Covent Garden Hotel constructed, three storey hotel located on the Dixon Street Mall and complimenting to the scale of the market building adjacent. The building acts as a southern anchor to Dixon Street

1970s

1936 Baptist Church built, an inter war Gothic that served the local community

Paddy’s Market 1930s

1960s Less than 15 percent of Chinese residents lived in Chinatown, compared to over 50 percent at the turn of the century; most moving into the suburbs 1973 Belmore Market-turnedHippodrome, Capitol Picture Theatre closes

1974 The City Council restored some of the best small scale nineteenth century buildings and installed the Haymarket Library into an old bank building. The library specializes in Chineselanguage books and newspapers. Undergoes a major refurbishment (1990-92)

1975 Plans to move the markets to Flemington also generated a Chinatown plan in the form of Gus Homeming’s Chinatown Redevelopment Company.

1983 Sydney Entertainment Centre completed 1987 UTS Market Campus developed on former Paddy’s Market site, COX Architecture

1995 The disused Capitol Theatre is redeveloped, revived and reopened. 2011 The revitalization of the public domain precinct in Darling Harbour. Competition of the Darling Quarter near Tumbalong Park by Aspect Studios with FJMT Architects

1980 Dixon Street became Sydney’s 1988 Chinese Gardens, a gift for the Bicentennial celebrations by sister city of Canton (Guangzhou), designed by Henry Tsang 1985

1997 Market City is completed, integration of Paddy’s Market 2012 Sydney Entertainment Centre, Convention Centre and Exhibition Centre expected to be closed to be expanded or replaced under a $1 billion upgrade Plans for the monorail to be demolished or redeveloped

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1960s Links with Communist China had been broken by events of 1949, the tongs were frequented only by elderly people, and at times when Chinatown would once have been alive with crash of cymbals and lion dances, it was now ‘quite dead’

Sydney City Council, Dixon Street property and business owners raised funds for the ceremonial archways, lions, pavilions and other features. Henry Tsang was the Honorary Architect.

2010 Draft Chinatown Public Domain Plan presented to Council, Public exhibition of Plan, Council adopts the Plan. The Plan was prepared by Spackman Mossop Michaels, Tony Caro ArchitecConsulting (community consultation)

1979 After a trial closure of Dixon Street, Council decided to create a permanent mall

1990s Chinatown has expanded into the surrounding streets, it is not connecting and reviving the older precinct in Campbell Street

2012 Chinatown laneways transformed and upgraded into more pedestrian friendly spaces with wider footpaths, more trees, new street furniture, bike parking, stencil designs on the road and new lighting. The laneway upgrades were designed by Aspect Studios

1979 Sussex Hay Centre

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1979 Dixon House

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Events/Policy

Communities

TIMELINE - CHINATOWN SYDNEY 1883 Mei Quong Tart, perhaps the best known Chinese at the time, was a commissioner and delivered a petition to the Council,

1888 Chinese Restriction and Regulation Act, tax increased from 10 to 100 pounds per Chinese arriving by ship, intended to halt the entry or re-entry of Chinese to the colony

crusade calling for a ban on opium imports

1901 Australian White Policy legislation passed, restricting immigrants from working in Australia and “Asiatic and coloureds” from migrating into Australia

1900 NSW Chinese Empire Association formed, conservative, pro-monarchist interests

1917 The newly built premises at 50-54 Dixon Street was acquired by the Goon Yee Tong and the

1912 The opening of the Chinese Masonic Society, the national headquarters for all Yee Hings, who are anti-Manchu and support Sun Yat Sen

joined organizations (1899), they were formed to support and assist people from their districts, services included temporary accommodation, sending remittances to family in China 1930s The Great Depression, unemployment increased 1939 World War II, Australian Chinese served in the Australian forces

1939 Chinese Youth League established in Dixon Street, originally by left-wing elements but nevertheless carried photographs of Chiang Kai-shek in its early publications

1947 Immigration Restriction Act relaxed, entry of assistants and

1949 Centuries old patterns of migration in which Chinese moved readily and frequently between 'home' and 'overseas' ended and family ties and cultural links were severed or

1949 The end of the civil war, the Chinese Communist Party defeated the Kuomintang, assumed full control of mainland China and the Kuomintang retreated to Taiwan

1960s Changing attitudes towards Asia resulted in increasing criticism of the White Australia policy and a growing sensitivity to Australia's racist image.

1974 Establishment of the Australian Chinese Community Association, non-political, non-religious, Chinese Australian community. Originally set up in Dixon Street, later moved to Mary Street, Surry Hills

1991 Cabramatta oriental mall and Pai Lau (archway) was opened, becoming a centre for the Indo-Chinese community.

1971 Dixon Street Chinese Committee set up to promote a dying precinct, chaired by Henry Ming Lai

merchants allowed longer stays, entry permitted for families of ‘executive’ assistants

1950 Colombo Plan (British Commonwealth Countries) temporary entry permitted for students from South-East Asia

1964 White Australia Policy abolished and large investors from South East Asia were allowed into Australia

1966 Citizenship became available

1973

Chinese immigration to Sydney during the mid-1850s was propelled by a series of political upheavals and natural catastrophes affecting China at the time, as well as the search for gold. On arrival Chinese immigrants settled around the edges of commercial districts. The importance of Chinatown as a place of refuge and community is also part of the early history of Sydney’s Chinese settlements. Shared the experience of racism and state sponsored discrimination. ‘Community living offered support against policies that denied the entry of Chinese mens’ wives and families and restricted access to certain occupations’. In 1980 the ceremonial Chinese gate to Dixon Street was built and opened, a casket was buried within the precinct of the gate. In the casket were old Chinese coins, some earth from China and a representation of a tortoise. The contents were not only traditional symbolic meanings, but symbolize the changes recently taking place in Sydney, the pattern of investment in Sydney by Chinese business people. The old coins – change from old pattern of repatriation to China of the money earned by Chinese people in Australia to the new pattern of investment. The earth – not only the presence of a small part of China in Sydney but also the permanent settlement in Australia of many people of Chinese origin. The tortoise – symbol of good lick and long life, a new sense of optimism and permanency felt about Chinese presence and participation in Australian society.

uniform residency requirements for everyone

1980 In opening ceremony of the Dixon Street mall, the action of the burial of some Chinese earth symbolized that the Chinese community was no longer focused on China but was staying put 1992 Chinese community donated the sculpture To Sail To Stop as part of the celebrations of the Sesquicentenary of Incorporation of the City of Sydney, it stands in Sydney Square

1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre led to thousands of Chinese students seeking asylum, four year permits granted

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HIDDEN ARCHITECTURAL TYPOLOGIES IN CHINATOWN There is a general misconception that the “authentic” quality of Chinatowns developed through an “organic” process of development over an extended period of time. Chinatowns have a long history of being built from top down with city blocks constructed all at once.Chinatown projects an image on the exteriors that diverts attention from the internal activates of the spaces, making these developments more acceptable to Westerners. The result is a “stealth” architecture where “real” Chinese characteristics are cloaked by apparel appealing to the West. There is the opportunity to expose these qualities through the play of spaces. The technique of architectural projection is essential in the design of New Chinatowns. Amidst political and cultural opposition to Asian developments in primarily upper middle class white areas, Chinatowns were required to project an idealized image of the East as a strategy for survival. Such imagery is primarily oriented towards the non-Chinese public and detached form the functional, spatial and sometimes even the cultural needs of the Chinese. The projected image on the exteriors diverts attention from the internal activates of the spaces, making these developments more acceptable to Westerners. The result is a “stealth” architecture where “real” Chinese characteristics are cloaked by apparel appealing to the West.

THE ECONOMY OF SPACE In contrast to typical commercial strategies, perhaps ordinary in Asia, are typically uncommon in Australia and are spatially interesting

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deep commercial

upstairs commercial

packed commercial

temporary commercial


INVESTIGATION OF THE COMPLEXITIES AND CONTRADICTIONS OF CHINESE IDENTITIES Globalisation has brought countries closer together and in contemporary Sydney, the importance of hybridity as a means of bridging and blurring the multiple boundaries which constitutes both ‘Chinese’ and ‘western’ identities have emerged and continues to grow. In contemporary cultural studies, it claims that all cultures in modernity are always-already hybrid, always the impure products of intersecting influences and flows. Although Chineseness may have been an imposed identity by western culture, it is now clear that Chineseness is a category whose meanings are not fixed and pregiven, but constantly renegotiated and rearticulated, both inside and outside China. The past is full of images of lonely men cut off from their families in China as well as ‘astronaut’ families, where Chinese women and school aged children live isolated lives essentially apart from family support, as a result, many Chinese children are now born in Sydney, yet they have no understanding of their ancestry and may not even have the ability to communicate in Chinese. Therefore the project aims to help them to learn of their past and hopefully gain a better understanding of their identities.

UNDERSTANDING THROUGH CONTEXT As the project site selected is in close proximity to both the Chinese Garden and Chinatown, the dichotomy of the urban and natural Chinese culture, it is logical to question and investigate Chinese identities through architecture. Through research on both western and traditional urban patterns one understands the scale and relationship between people and buildings.

Chinese gardens on the other hand, relates to framing and sequencing of spaces, and since the meaning of landscape in Chinese is ‘shan shui’, literally meaning mountain and water, mountains and water are considered the basic ingredients of nature; the guiding principle of Chinese garden art is thought to be the representation of mountain and water as an approach to the spirit of nature. Therefore, a garden without water is a blind garden as water is the generator of life, the mirage of reality, and the eye of the garden. To the Chinese water is not just physically beautiful in a garden, but is absolutely necessary to balance the mountains and so to represent the totality of Nature in perfect harmony. Furthermore, waterscapes are used both to create and delineate a natural scene and to give a perception of a larger space in a small area.

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CONTEMPORARY CHINESE GALLERY + MUSEUM DESIGN STRATEGY BUILDING COMPONENTS

DESIGN CONNECTION

CONTEMPORARY ROOF GARDEN

CHINESE GARDEN

REINTERPRET TRADITIONAL GARDEN ELEMENTS, INVESTIGATE RELATIONSHIP OF PEOPLE WITH SELF

TRADITION, NATURE

CHINESE LUXURY SHOPS + RESTAURANTS

CHINATOWN

REINTERPRET TRADITIONAL URBAN PATTERNS, INVESTIGATE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PEOPLE

COMMERCE, WESTERN IMAGE OF CHINA

CONTEMPORARY CHINESE GALLERY MUSEUM

CHINESE IDENTITIES

EDUCATE SHARE EXPERIENCES OF THE PAST AND CONTEMPORARY EXPRESSIONS THROUGH ART, SYDNEY CHINESE CONTESTED MEMORIES

CONSTANTLY RENEGOTIATED AND REARTICULATED

Through mapping the potential circulation patterns, the site is separated into two where the north will respond to the Chinese Gardens, while the other to respond to Chinatown on the east. The proposed program of Gallery+Museum will link the programs together. Through shifting the programs around, the Garden element is lifted above, and as the Gallery+Museum and Commercial activities are sliced to allow flexible circulation. The blocks are rotated around the grid of the Pumphouse, and the circular roof garden.

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GROUND PLAN PERSPECTIVE

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CONTEMPORARY CHINESE GALLERY + MUSEUM The Contemporary Chinese Gallery + Museum is a place to experience Chinese ethnic identity, the history of the Sydney Chinese, their acceptance into society, as well as the new-age Chinese through contemporary artworks, the tension between tradition and now. The gallery has three main galleries, and other inbetween gallery spaces. Being underground, visitors are able to look into the sloped gravel rocks, aligning the viewer towards the Chinese Garden wall behind and the sky beyond. The Contemporary Chinese Gallery and Museum enables visitors to reflect on the contested memories of the Chinese in Sydney as well as contemporary expressions through art. The contemporary Chinese roof garden, on the other hand, delivers a different experience of a space of both self-contemplation and relaxation. As the threshold between the Chinese Garden and Chinatown, the project searched for a contemporary Chinese architectural language. Instead of mimicking traditional Chinese architecture, the project reinterprets elements of Chinese gardens and houses; the framing and sequencing of spaces, somewhat similar to a Chinese scroll that are never spread out and viewed in their entirety, by analogy, the unrolling of a scroll is experiencing the sequence of scenes of a spatial narration.

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LEVEL 1 PLAN

GROUND PLAN

BASEMENT PLAN 29


gravel waterproof membrane insulation reinforced concrete

skylight

plasterboard diffused lighting directional lighting

corten steel waterproof membrane insulation concrete plasterboard

aluminum panel reflect light hang paintings

wood parquet cement screed insulation reinforced concrete slab

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ABSTRACT MEMORIES EXHIBITION history is a given interpretation is making it ours Abstract memories consists of contemporary artworks reflecting on sydney’s chinese history The idea of this exhibition relates to the idea of cultural Identities belonging to the future as much as the past, histories undergoing constant transformation, subject to the continuous play of history, culture and power. This exhibition is the linkage and transition space between the museum exhibitions, and the contemporary art gallery exhibitions.

MUSEUM

GALLERY

SECTION A

SECTION B

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PROJECT HOME | KELLYVILLE Masters Design Studio 2011 Tutor: Dijana Alic

To offer a house that fits all moments of life and to all kinds of standards of living. To offer space for personal input, for all kinds of people, independently from their origin, social status or age. This results in the production of dynamic public while also creating private outside space. Through its flexible and adaptable planning, the house develops opportunitues to experience sequences and events. It is a house that transforms through time.

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TRANSFORMABLE HOUSE CONCEPT The idea of the box in a box creates inbetween space. The organisation of the boxes inside (independent private spaces) create different sorts of inbetween spaces (interdependent spaces). Thus adding a layer between inside and outside creating ambigious boundaries within the spaces. When inside it feels like you are outside, and vice versa. And the windows add to this feeling, framing its surroundings, or framing another frame.

Section A

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Section B


Spatial perspectives

NEW URBAN LANDSCAPE As the materials can be chosen to taste and budget, spatial organisation to taste and needs, the integration of nature into the house, creates a flexibile and adaptable house. As houses are not just for living, there is the ability to have a studio or workshop, not having to reuse the garage. This house is an affordable and customisable choice within the project home market.

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box in box

space inbetween

combination formation

VARIETY OF SPATIAL ORGANISATIONS As the structures are independent, there is flexibility in the organisation of the plan. On the right presents 5 different schemes of organisation through the clients needs. For example for the elderly and guest house there are two living rooms and the interior courtyard is enlarged. Also as second floors are not closed up into private rooms it allows the formation of terraces or balconies. On the left shows a diagrammtic explanation of the box in a box idea and how the green, inbetween and box spaces form the overall scheme. PLAN TRANSFORMS THROUGH TIME As children become teenagers, their needs change, so as shown in the left where next the children’s bedroom is the children’s room, this space can be converted to a study room and the bedroom becomes a single room, while the space above walls are added to form another room for the other teen. STRUCTURE GRID The use of a steel frame 4x4m grid connected to a concrete foundation gives flexibility to the panel facades, and the choice of materials. The box is self supporting, therefore gives interior flexible organisation. The small boxes use sandwick panels that support the structure, connecting to walls if nessessary.

exploded axonometric

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Spatial organisation perspectives

VARIETY OF COURTYARDS Through the variety of courtyards, there is an ambigious boundary between inside and outside. Somewhat like a house in a house, when inside there is an element of the outside, and vice versa. It is the space inbetween boxes where courtyards are formed. Therefore inbetween spaces are seen as internal courtyards, where function can change as the resident requires. The different distance between elements forms independent and interdependent elements.

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ART GALLERY | NEWTOWN Bachelor Design Studio 2009 Tutor: Xing Ruan

Located in Newtown, well-known for its street music and art culture and consisting of many contemporary art and fashion stores, the project is to design an art gallery located on Kings Street. As the site is very slender, the approach to the project was to first experiment with rotated cubes on the site and then developing a diagonal grid in which creates a strong axis, different from the surrounding buildings. The roof and floor of the main gallery are sloped to create a varied levels for seating and a more interactive space. 38


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Model Images

Perspective Long Section

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Perspective Short Section

Main Gallery Perspective

ART GALLERY Unlike the usual organisation of art galleries, a white box which give artists a blank canvas, this gallery plays with the geometry and creates opportunities of interaction between the inside and outside, as well as the variety of levels within the gallery, although limiting to medium sized artworks, creates a lively interaction of people in the gallery.

Main Gallery Small Gallery Office Courtyard Display Storage Studio Workshop

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DESIGN STUDIO 2008 BATH HOUSE WOOLOOMOOLOO

DESIGN STUDIO 2010 BONDI APARTMENTS BONDI BEACH

GLENN MURCUTT DESIGN STUDIO 2010 ARTIST RESIDENCE TRIAL BAY GAOL

OTHER PROJECTS

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BIM 2010 RHINO/GRASSHOPPER EXPERIMENTAL ARCHITECTURE


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WORK EXPERIENCE

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CQ SUPER TOWER | KPF Chongqing Tian Di, Chongqing Internship 2009

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The Chongqing Super Tower is located in a pivotal location in the larger Chongqing TianDi masterplan, fronting the river and acting as the fulcrum between the SoHo development to the west and the commercial development and public transit hub to th south. Incorporating off ce and hotel uses, the super tower will be one of the tallest buildings in Chongqing. Fortunately, I was able to follow this project not only as an architect, learning the processes involved in design of large buildings, their services and the possibilities in curtain wall design, but also as the developer, the coordination and meetings with the different consultants, schedules and budgets, and was able to recognize the changes overtime in the design due to the clients’ needs. 47


CHONGQING SUPER TOWER Hotel

T.O.P

OfÀce Sky Garden Retail T.O.S.

Mech. / Parking

Hotel Luxury Suite Floors @ 3.4 mts

Hotel Public Spaces

Hotel Standard Room Floors @ 3.4 mts

Refuge / Mech. / Sky Garden

OfÀce Floors @ 4.3 mts

Refuge / Mech. / Sky Garden

OfÀce Floors @ 4.3 mts

Refuge / Mech. / Sky Garden

OfÀce Floors @ 4.3 mts

Refuge / Mech. / Sky Garden

OfÀce Floors @ 4.3 mts Retail Floors @ 6 mts

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Typical OfÀce Floor Plan

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Hotel

OfÀce

Service Apartment

OfÀce Tower

Convention Retail Parking + Mech. Retail Base District Cooling Towers

Typical Standard Room Floor Plan

Lobby

Typical Luxury Suite Floor Plan

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ORDOS MUSIC HALL | CANNONDESIGN Ordos, Inner Mongolia Internship 2007

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Located in the southwestern part of Inner Mongolia, in Ordos City is an emerging art and cultural district known as Kaokaoshina. The design, with its curves, mimics the footwork pattern of a traditional chinese dance named the ‘long sleeve dance’. the looping of the long sleeves is reflected in circular drums that house the 1200 seat main concert hall, 335 seat performance theater and 100 seat black box experimental theater. I was involved in exploration of theatre organisations, while learning the possibilities of working with Revit, and the innovative experimentation with Excel for the building skin. 53


ORDOS MUSIC HALL | CANNONDESIGN

Auditorium Space

BUILDING SKIN CONCEPT The density and size of the perforation on the exterior panels are determined by both the direction1 and publicness2. VIP Space

1.The perforation on the panels and the sunlight exposure will be highly correlated. Southern facing panels will have smaller perforated holes so that they can protect the building from direct sunlight. 2.In addition, the perforation is also adjusted by the publicness of the interior. A more public space will be enclosed by a more perforated skin.

Performance Space

Admin Space

Public Space

Service Space

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There are 3 groups of panels and 5 panels in each group with different levels of perforation. The pattern of these panels is distributed by a faรงade making programme developed on Excel


1

2

3

4

1

5

A

A

B

B

C

C

ᵓੇ DIRECTION

ࣕ㜳 FUNCTION

঍ђ㾵् S

E/W

N

⿷ᇼ‫ާޢ‬ PRIVATE

PUBLIC

ᵓੇ DIRECTION

ࣕ㜳 FUNCTION

2

3

4

5

঍ђ㾵् S

E/W

N

⿷ᇼ‫ާޢ‬ PRIVATE

PUBLIC

Legend

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NEW OFFICE | CANNONDESIGN Bridge 8, Shanghai Internship 2008

56


The Cannondesign New Office is located at Bridge 8, a recently redeveloped area to become a new Creative Hub. Originally a restaurant space, there was the opportunity to completely redesign the interior space. I was very fortunate to be able to be involved in this project. Although there was only one level, but embodying enough height to add a mezzanine level, and through adding large steps, creates an open office area in which encourages more casual work as well as other activities. Furthermore the design to layer and seperate the public space from the work area, not only creates a barrier for clients to enter without entering the work areas, but also creates an informal meeting room. Although I was only able to work on it in the preliminary stages, the planning, site visits and surveying, and was not able to see it through, there seemed to be only slight changes to this design to what was actually built.

57


Bridge 8

NEW OFFICE | CANNONDESIGN

Interior Perspective

Office Work Area Private Office Informal Meeting Area Office Public Space

58


Work Area

Office Public Space

59


RESUME NAME ADDRESS TELEPHONE EMAIL

KENNETH YOUNG Flat 21/B, 25 Braemar Hill Rd, North Point, Hong Kong +86 18616823347 yken43@hotmail.com

WORK EXPERIENCE

INTERNSHIP | SHUI ON, SHANGHAI Janurary 2012 - February 2012 Learn Developer Obligations, Chongqing Super Tower, Contracts, Redesign Fee, Retail Research INTERNSHIP | KPF, SHANGHAI December 2009 - February 2010 Chongqing Super Tower Booklet Design, Drafting, Translating INTERNSHIP | CANNONDESIGN, SHANGHAI December 2008 - February 2009 Cannondesign New Office Design Assistant (Prelim), Model Making INTERNSHIP | CANNONDESIGN, SHANGHAI December 2007 - January 2008 Ordos Music Hall Drafting, Learning Programs INTERNSHIP | CATHERINE SULLIVAN ARCHITECTS, SYDNEY November 2004 - December 2004 Oxford Square Basement Club Design Option

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

ARCHITECTURE | FACULTY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE March 2011 - November 2012 BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES March 2008 - November 2010 UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING/COMMERCE (INCOMPLETE) March 2007 - November 2007 HIGH SCHOOL | BARKER COLLEGE, SYDNEY February 2004 - November 2006 MIDDLE SCHOOL | SHANGHAI AMERICAN SCHOOL September 1997 - December 2003

60


PERSONAL SKILLS LANGUAGES ENGLISH MANDARIN CANTONESE

Strong Communication ability through involvement in social clubs Impressive team-building skills through clubs and sports Strong problem-solving skills and enjoyment in design Enthusiatic drive and motivation to succeed

COMPUTER SKILLS

Advanced Knowledge of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Indesign, Google Sketchup, Autodesk AutoCAD, Autodesk Revit, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Powerpoint

ARTISTIC SKILLS

Basic Drafting, Sketching Oil Painting

OTHER SKILLS

Student Volunteer | Japan Emergency Shelter Exhibition September 2011 Graphic Designer | Taiwanese Student Association March 2009 - June 2011 Sydney Harbour Cruise Poster Designs Promotion Marketing | Taiwanese Student Association March 2008 - November 2008 Public Relations | Envision Social Events March 2007 - November 2007 Varsity Volleyball Team | Barker College February 2005 - November 2006 Representative Swimming CAS Team | Barker College February 2004 - November 2006

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Award of Distinction Academic Achievement, Warrane College, UNSW March 2008 Applicable Training of OHS for Construction Work in NSW June 2007 Merit Prize for excellence in Academic Studies December 2005

REFERENCES

Michel Hsiung, Shui On Land, Senior Manager, Shanghai Email: michel.hsiung@shuion.com.cn Methanee Massirarat, PMCM, Design Director, Bangkok (Ex-KPF Senior Associate Principal) Email: mmassirarat@hotmail.com Michael Tunkey, Cannon Design, Principal, Shanghai Email: mtunkey@cannondesign.com

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Architecture Portfolio  

Kenneth Young Architecture Portfolio UNSW 2008-2012

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