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The

Kent Stater

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THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER | MONDAY, MARCH 12, 2018

Gone in a Flash Page 8

Kent State season ends in MAC Tournament loss to Buffalo 3

Operation Hope brings awareness to sex trafficking

12

City of Kent proposes new six-story building downtown

14

REVIEW: ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ delivers enchanting story


2 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

NEWS

Entrepreneurs converge for Spirit of Women in Business Conference Lily Nickel Business and Downtown Reporter Entrepreneurs and business professionals of diverse backgrounds came together to discuss what it means to be a woman in the modern workplace for the eighth annual Spirit of Women in Business Conference Thursday. Kent State’s College of Business Administration hosts the event annually as a way to bring women together to discuss how to further their advancement in the business world and how to build each other up as women. Undergraduate students were able to benefit from the conference as well — senior entrepreneurship major Brianna Steigerwald left the event feeling inspired and motivated. “As an entrepreneurship major and a female business owner, it was very empowering,” Steigerwald said. “Women need to build up women, whether it’s business or personal, not tear each other down.” Steigerwald owns her own photography business and works as a photographer for the College of Business Administration. Participants of the conference heard from women like Liza Mundy, an award-winning reporter and author, and Sandra Volpe, the senior vice president of strategic planning, communications and contractor relations for FedEx Ground. Volpe is this year’s recipient of the Spirit of Women in Business Award, an honor given to someone who exemplifies leadership. Attendees were also able to participate in sessions that addressed topics like strategies for career advancement and building your own brand through social media. Yoga instructors taught a session on the importance of mindfulness in the office, and women like Jan Focke, the senior vice president of Huntington National Bank, spoke at a panel discussing what it means to be a leading woman among men.

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Sandra Volpe addresses the crowd Thursday during the Spirit of Women in Business Conference. Brianna Steigerwald / Kent State University

“We really try to offer a diverse variety of topics that leave women feeling empowered,” said Erin Nunn, the event coordinator and director of Kent State Career Services at the College of Business Administration. “It’s really important to us to have a conference program that allows for something for everyone, whether you’re entry level or a CEO.”

Nunn believes the diverse array of topics is what makes the conference successful. “Women can leave with strategies they can take back to their organization, and either implement them through a professional development standpoint as an individual or with a team or as a manager,” Nunn said. “Being in a room with 270

women and men who are interested in learning, developing and amplifying other women’s voices is just really refreshing and re-energizing. It makes me excited to go back to work tomorrow and talk about how we can make this even better for next year.” Contact Lily Nickel at lnickel2@kent.edu.

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Flashes advocate for sex trafficking victims through Operation Hope Helen Yablonski Religion Reporter Most fashion shows present audiences with high couture, but fashion design majors Evelyn Rossol and Anna Honerlaw sent chains down the runway Friday night. International Justice Mission (IJM) presented "Operation Hope: Freedom is Possible" to a ballroom filled with friends, family and supporters of the organization. The show depicted the two realities victims of sex trafficking face: One is a world where they must face their situation alone, and the other is a world in which groups like IJM are present. The theatrical fashion show opened with a scene depicting life for victims of human trafficking. “Our girl is out there, along with millions just like her,” Honerlaw said. The event continued by portraying the ideas and hardships of sex trafficking through fashion. The Red Light District in Amsterdam was the inspiration for the designs in the show. Black and navy blue fabrics were torn to show off red

material underneath the models’ dresses. Chains were adorning their ankles and wrists, some even restricting their movement. The items are representations of the struggles victims must deal with in their day-to-day lives. The show concluded with two juxtaposed scenarios. In the first instance, the victim decided to take her own life. In the second, the victim rescued by IJM conquered her freedom. Her dark matted dress transformed into a yellow ball gown as she walked the runway freed. Rossol and Honerlaw thanked the audience, receiving applause from the ballroom and leading in a final prayer to end the show. “We ask your hand to be over all those enslaved and that you will be using IJM and other organizations like them to rescue people from this horrible reality,” Rossol said. “We ask for justice to prevail on this Earth, and that one day we will know a world with no more slavery.” Contact Helen Yablonski at hyablons@kent.edu.

A model showcases the fashion designed by Evelyn Rossol and Anna Honerlaw. International Justice Mission (IJM) presented "Operation Hope: Freedom is Possible," a fashion show advocating for those trapped in sex trafficking and other varieties of slavery Friday. Adrian Leuthauser / The Kent Stater


4 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

Fresh faces: Two Kent State students take on the tech world Faith Riggs Women and Gender Issues Reporter It all started in entrepreneurship class. Asia Frazier, a junior communications studies major and Tiffany Coleman, a junior digital science major were assigned a final project. The mission: to pitch a product idea. The two women never thought “The Fresh App” would turn into a real business. “We’ve been told that it’s an idea, but not a business,” Frazier said. “We’ve really been told everything. People really just try to discredit us and try to dethrone us … and that’s what I’m saying … If we would listen to that we literally wouldn’t have got this far.” Designed to make college student’s life a little easier, the app’s platform allows students to advertise their services and sell their belongings. Students may also promote their services such as tech repair, tutoring, art, design, fashion and hair.

“You don't have to work at the fastfood restaurant or campus jobs anymore,” Coleman said. “You can literally make money doing something that you love. Who wouldn't jump on that?” Frazier just wants the app to make a big difference. “We're just focusing on putting it out there and really supporting and building the community … it's just the fact that we can be apart of something so great and purposeful. That's what really drives us,” Frazier said. Both women are determined to change the stereotype of STEM professionals, with wanting to make an impact on the lives of youth and young black girls being a driving force for them. “We’re not regular tech people, when you think about tech people, you’re thinking about, like, boring ‘locked in a chamber’ and coding for hours types of stuff,” Coleman said. “We have personalities

Asia Frazier poses for a photo. Courtesy of Tiffany Coleman.

where we speak out and bring awareness to a lot of different situations, and we’re fun.” Frazier feels the two may face challenges in the business being African-American women. In 2016, 26 percent of the computing force were women, and less than 10 percent were women of color, according to the National Center for Women Information Technology. “It definitely is going to be challenging because only two percent of tech is black women, and we’re part of the two percent,” Frazier said. “It’s really just raising awareness and these tech giants like Google try to bring in initiatives because they see the issues in the industry.” Erika Jefferson, the CEO of Black Women in Science and Engineering said there should be more black STEM businesses. “I think having more engineering firms owned by black females, more tech fields owned by black females, because I think that obviously is going to financially benefit communities of color,” Jefferson said. Money is not what drives Colman and Frazier. Their main motivation is improving underrepresented communities. “All of our offices will be in inner cities and poverty areas, so we can give those kids internships and the latest technology and bring awareness to communities and what’s going on,” Coleman said. The first office will be located in Flint, Michigan, which the Census Bureau records 41.9 percent of Flint citizens in poverty. “I feel like we should worry about our own thing and really have this be in an area that is not breeding grounds for growth, creativity and development,” Coleman said. Frazier and Coleman’s goal is to become a major tech business and bring light to

Tiffany Coleman poses for a photo. Courtesy of Asia Frazier.

underserved children and communities. Coleman, originally from Flint, wants to show the state of the children in poverty. “If people want to have meetings with us, they’re gonna have to come to us and see this as a reality,” Coleman said. “We believe that all the tech jobs are usually all in one place … They really kind of forget about kids in the inner city, if we put our business there it’s able to infiltrate through us in the community.” Inspired to change the narrative of aspirational careers within the black community, the two want to show that careers in science are cool. “Young black women need to see that it’s OK you don’t have to ... be in entertainment, be an instagram baddie, there’s more than that,” Frazier said. “It’s OK, you know black women and black girl magic covers a whole plethora of subjects especially STEM because we’re needed.” Frazier and Coleman said the app is going to take over the tech scene. “There's not going to be anything people are talking about besides us,” Coleman said. “I believe it. I'm not trying to talk cocky … but I really do believe that this is going to be something that's big.” The Fresh App is available for download in the App Store and Google Play starting March 16. Contact Faith Riggs a friggs@kent.edu.


Monday, March 12, 2018

KentWired.com 5

NE Ohio man starts GoFundMe to bring back Geauga Lake Amusement Park Paige Bennett Feature Writer A Northeast Ohio man has launched a fundraising campaign in an effort to bring back Geauga Lake Amusement Park. Brian Roote created a GoFundMe page on Feb. 24 asking for donations for a project called “Bring Back Geauga Lake.” The project is divided into five phases. The first phase is to purchase the land. If the land is purchased, the other four phases would focus on refurbishing the area, building attractions and a hotel and maintaining the grounds. “We will rehabilitate the park close to its nostalgic state, while upgrading amenities and updating safety precautions,” Roote wrote on the page. The idea, Roote said, developed over years of frustration of seeing the land go unused. “We’ve heard every excuse about what’s going to go there, and nothing ever happens,” Roote said. Roote set up the GoFundMe page by himself; however, he has since implemented a board of directors to assist with the project. The board is made up of business owners from around Northeast Ohio. Roote said the entire project could cost approximately $350 million. About $250 million would go toward cleaning up the land and constructing new rides and facilities. “The first step is transforming the current waste land into a thriving natural oasis, similar to that of a nature preserve for all of the community to enjoy,” Roote wrote. As of Sunday, the GoFundMe page had raised $1,009 of its $20 million goal. Roote wrote although the project “seems impossible,” he believes it can happen. Located in Aurora and Bainbridge Township, Geauga Lake Amusement Park was about 15 miles from Kent. The park was home to roller coasters such as Raging Wolf Bobs, Big Dipper and Double Loop. Taking up over 500 acres of land, it was once considered the largest amusement park in the world. Geauga Lake permanently closed in 2007, three years after it had been acquired by Cedar Fair Entertainment Company. The closure was a result of declining attendance, as well as a lack of hotels in the surrounding area, according to Cleveland.com. Geauga Lake’s water park portion, Wildwater Kingdom, was shut down at the end of its 2016 season.

Geauga Lake Amusement Park. Photo courtesy of Brian Roote’s GoFundMe page.

Since the closure of Geauga Lake, Cedar Fair Entertainment Company has tried to sell the property. Disagreements between Aurora and Bainbridge Township over how to divide tax revenue from future developments on the land have made it difficult. The city of Aurora gave the Geauga Lake

revitalization project a soft confirmation Tuesday, meaning if the money is raised, the city would be interested in reopening the park. Bainbridge Township, on the other hand, is not. The project currently has no funding deadline. However, if it is unable to happen,

Roote said the money will be returned to donors or donated to Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital. A meeting will be held to discuss the project April 6.

Contact Paige Bennett at pbennet8@kent.edu.


6 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

SPORTS

Kent State senior forward Jordan Korinek and coach Todd Starkey share an embrace after Korinek was subbed out of the Flashes' 72-50 loss against Buffalo in the MAC Tournament Wednesday. Henry Palattella / The Kent Stater

Flashes bow out of MAC tournament after 26 turnovers Ian Kreider Sports Reporter Turnovers have been an issue all season for the Kent State women’s basketball team, never more apparent than in its seasonending 72-50 loss to Buffalo on Wednesday. Buffalo (26-4, 17-2 Mid-American Conference) has proven it knows how to expose that weakness with a keen ability to cause giveaways (11.8 steals per game). The Bulls had 14 steals in their two previous meetings with Kent State (13-19, 5-14 MAC). Wednesday, the Bulls forced 26 Flashes turnovers and stole the ball 20 times, which led to 41 points. The Flashes were unable to respond in the second half. A major contributing factor to the poor second-half play for Kent State was an apparent

head injury suffered by sophomore guard Megan Carter with 4:42 left in the third quarter. She was taken off the floor in a stretcher. “It looks like she’s going to be OK,” Kent State coach Todd Starkey said after the game. “It looks more concussion-like than anything.” The injury stopped play for five minutes as fans and players all watched as Carter was evaluated by the medical staff. After the injury, Kent State turned the ball over six straight times, which resulted in a 11-0 run by Buffalo. “It’s hard to be focused on the game plan, as well as you have to against a phenomenal Buffalo team, and do that with tears in your eyes,” Starkey said. “Right then, Buffalo ran away with it.” Kent State was not the same team after the injury, scoring just 17 points over a 15-minute span. The Flashes were unable to

slow the game down like they did for much of the first half. “We came down and had a couple turnovers there and missed a shot,” Starkey said. “Defensively, they're like sharks on blood. They kind of sense that they have you, and then they just swarm you.” The Bulls came into Wednesday’s game second or better in three defensive categories in the MAC. The Flashes played a similar game against Buffalo two weeks prior. They came out in the first half and played well. Despite having several turnovers, they were only down, 36-28. The Bulls came out of halftime on a mission, though, and pushed the lead to 26 by the end of the third quarter. Wednesday's game marks the end of four careers: forward Jordan Korinek, forward McKenna Stephens, guard Naddiyah Cross

and forward Zenobia Bess. Three of the four started, and each shared an emotional hug with their coach as they were subbed out in the final minutes. After today’s game, there will be a major shift in Kent State women’s basketball. The team will be one of the youngest teams in the MAC next season, and it will not have players who had to suffer through 11 combined wins in their first two seasons. “Couldn't be more proud of these two that are sitting with me, the other two seniors,” Starkey said. “Phenomenal careers. When I got here a couple years ago, I just asked them to trust me. We would try to get things turned around. We would develop an expectation of winning here, and 32 wins later, we were able to do that.” Contact Ian Kreider at ikreider@kent.edu.


Monday, March 12, 2018

KentWired.com 7

Kent State gymnastics posts season high in win over Bowling Green Libby Schrack Sports Reporter The Kent State gymnastics team posted a season-high score against Mid-American Conference rival Bowling Green on Friday, resulting in a 196.625195.400 win. The Flashes (6-7, 3-3 MAC) had one fall during the entire competition, and coach Brice Biggin couldn’t have been happier about it. “We performed the way that we know we are capable of,” Biggin said. “Today they were all on. I told them I could not be more proud of them.” Biggin was pleased with the way the team bounced back after its last home meet, a disappointing loss against Eastern Michigan. “The last time we were here, it was a disaster,” Biggin said. “We haven’t lost to Eastern Michigan in 20 years.” Biggin felt, coming off that last home meet, it was important to tell the gymnasts to believe in themselves and to be confident in every routine. Senior Rachel Stypinski took home another all-around title with the third-highest score in school history, a 39.575. Stypinski was more excited, though, about how her team came together and performed on its home floor. “I am so happy,” Stypinski said. “It was definitely a good setup for next week, which will be my last meet here in the (M.A.C. Center).” Stypinski noticed her teammates were focused in on themselves this time. She said they didn’t let any distractions take over, and they concentrated on what they had to do. Junior Kennedy Plude was the leadoff performer for the Flashes on the balance beam,

which was a change in their lineup. Plude set the tone for the rest of her teammates by scoring a 9.850. “This week, he switched my spot to the first,” Plude said. “I just tried to remain calm and practice exactly what I do in the gym.” During the last home meet, the beam was the Flashes’ weakest event. Plude said this week the beam team stepped up, but she still hopes to see improvements on dismounts and confidence. Biggin was thrilled with the confidence the team expressed overall. “It started on vault,” Biggin said. “We just looked more relaxed when we competed. You could just tell on their faces that they were more confident.” Not only was Biggin impressed with the improvement on beam, but he was ecstatic with the amount of landings the Flashes stuck on the uneven bars. “The last couple of weeks, we really have spent a lot of time on stuck landings,” Biggin said. Along with Biggin, Stypinski, a senior and captain on the team, could not have been happier with the bounceback performance. “We reminded the team it is our senior year,” Stypinski said. “We want to enjoy this as a team. That’s what they did, and that’s what they gave us.” The Flashes will be hosting George Washington and Temple next weekend in the Kent State Tri-Meet. “We hope to improve on pointed toes, straight knees, and let’s go get some more stuck landings,” Stypinski said. Contact Libby Schrack at eschrack@kent.edu.

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Sarah Lippowitsch goes through her beam routine as her team looks on during the Flashes' 195.625-195.400 win over Bowling Green Friday at the M.A.C. Center. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

We just looked more relaxed when we competed. You could just tell on their faces that they were more confident.”– Brice Biggin

Kent State gymnastics coach


8 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

Monday, March 12, 2018

u bo n c t ed e g

COVER

Flashes run into Buffalo buzzsaw, Cameron Hoover Sports Editor A season full of twists, turns, wild finishes and exciting moments for the Kent State men’s basketball team ended with an unceremonious thud Friday night, as poor shooting and defensive breakdowns culminated in a 78-61 loss to Buffalo in the Mid-American Conference Tournament semifinals. The Flashes (17-17) were in trouble from the start. Much of their game plan revolved around getting the ball to junior center Adonis De La Rosa in the post. From there, he would be able to pass to an open teammate if he was double-teamed or score if he wasn’t. He never got the opportunity. Buffalo (25-8) made a concerted effort to limit De La Rosa’s touches early, and Kent State’s big man finished the first half with two points and two rebounds (1-for-2 from the field and 0-for-2 from the foul line). “We really wanted to get the ball inside, but we didn’t do a very good job of it,” Kent State coach Rob Senderoff said. “(Buffalo) did

a good job taking things away. We didn’t get enough ball reversals. ... They really made an emphasis on not letting (De La Rosa) catch the ball. We didn’t do a good enough job making sure he caught the ball.” While Buffalo’s forwards shut down Kent State’s bigs, the Bulls’ guards took over the scoring. In particular, junior guard Jeremy Harris made both of his first-half three-point attempts en route to a 13-point performance. Buffalo ended the first half with a 39-29 lead, shooting 51.6 percent from the floor and 50 percent from behind the arc. “(Harris) is a good player,” Senderoff said. “They have four all-conference players. You try to take something away, and when they need a big basket, he’s been … an X-factor.” Kent State showed glimmers of hope in the second half, as back-to-back three-pointers from junior point guard Jalen Avery cut the deficit to 10 points with 11:30 left. After a media timeout, Buffalo freshman guard Jayvon Graves shot a three-pointer from the left corner with the shot clock

winding down. The ball hit the back of the rim, kissed off the backboard and fell in. The shot seemed to take the wind out of the Flashes’ sails. “We had cut (the lead) a couple times, and it seemed like every time we cut it, they either got a steal for a leakout or they got an offensive rebound,” Senderoff said. As expected, the game played out physically. During the game's closing minutes, De La Rosa injured his lower body attempting to block Buffalo’s CJ Massinburg — a play De La Rosa earned a flagrant foul call for. On the next Buffalo possession, Kent State senior guard Kevin Zabo got called for an intentional foul. Senderoff praised his team’s toughness, but the chippiness of the game didn’t seem to sit well with Buffalo coach Nate Oats, who said Kent State “would rather go out with a fistfight than they would go home with a loss.” “Just at the end of the game, we need to make sure we've got all of our players

‘‘

in MAC semifinals

On the cover: Flashes walk off the court after losing to Buffalo 78-61 Friday. Alexander Wadley / The Kent Stater

available for Saturday,” Oats said. “Keep your head. It kind of came to that. I thought the referees did a great job keeping it under control late in the game.” Avery led the Flashes with 16 points, followed by Zabo’s 14 and junior guard Jaylin Walker’s 12. Sophomore forward Danny Pippen added 10 points and 16 rebounds, including eight offensive, for his sixth double-double of the season. Harris finished with a game-high 22 points (5-for-6 on three-pointers). Massinburg chipped in with 14, Nick Perkins added 12 and Dontay Caruthers had 11. Despite the effort, Senderoff didn’t need many words to sum up his team’s final performance. “We played really hard tonight,” Senderoff said. “But we didn’t play well.” Buffalo beat Toledo to win the MAC Tournament Saturday to earn a No. 13 seed in the NCAA Tournament and will play No. 4 Arizona in the first round. Contact Cameron Hoover at choove14@kent.edu.

We played really hard tonight. But we didn’t play well.”

Kent State junior center Adonis De La Rosa dunks during the Flashes' season-ending 78-61 loss to Buffalo in the MidAmerican Conference Tournament semifinals Friday. Kayla McMillen / The Kent Stater

KentWired.com 9

– Rob Senderoff Men’s basketball coach

BJ Duling goes for a block against Buffalo's Jeremy Harris during Kent State's 78-61 MAC Tournament semifinal loss Friday. Kayla McMillen / The Kent Stater


8 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

Monday, March 12, 2018

u bo n c t ed e g

COVER

Flashes run into Buffalo buzzsaw, Cameron Hoover Sports Editor A season full of twists, turns, wild finishes and exciting moments for the Kent State men’s basketball team ended with an unceremonious thud Friday night, as poor shooting and defensive breakdowns culminated in a 78-61 loss to Buffalo in the Mid-American Conference Tournament semifinals. The Flashes (17-17) were in trouble from the start. Much of their game plan revolved around getting the ball to junior center Adonis De La Rosa in the post. From there, he would be able to pass to an open teammate if he was double-teamed or score if he wasn’t. He never got the opportunity. Buffalo (25-8) made a concerted effort to limit De La Rosa’s touches early, and Kent State’s big man finished the first half with two points and two rebounds (1-for-2 from the field and 0-for-2 from the foul line). “We really wanted to get the ball inside, but we didn’t do a very good job of it,” Kent State coach Rob Senderoff said. “(Buffalo) did

a good job taking things away. We didn’t get enough ball reversals. ... They really made an emphasis on not letting (De La Rosa) catch the ball. We didn’t do a good enough job making sure he caught the ball.” While Buffalo’s forwards shut down Kent State’s bigs, the Bulls’ guards took over the scoring. In particular, junior guard Jeremy Harris made both of his first-half three-point attempts en route to a 13-point performance. Buffalo ended the first half with a 39-29 lead, shooting 51.6 percent from the floor and 50 percent from behind the arc. “(Harris) is a good player,” Senderoff said. “They have four all-conference players. You try to take something away, and when they need a big basket, he’s been … an X-factor.” Kent State showed glimmers of hope in the second half, as back-to-back three-pointers from junior point guard Jalen Avery cut the deficit to 10 points with 11:30 left. After a media timeout, Buffalo freshman guard Jayvon Graves shot a three-pointer from the left corner with the shot clock

winding down. The ball hit the back of the rim, kissed off the backboard and fell in. The shot seemed to take the wind out of the Flashes’ sails. “We had cut (the lead) a couple times, and it seemed like every time we cut it, they either got a steal for a leakout or they got an offensive rebound,” Senderoff said. As expected, the game played out physically. During the game's closing minutes, De La Rosa injured his lower body attempting to block Buffalo’s CJ Massinburg — a play De La Rosa earned a flagrant foul call for. On the next Buffalo possession, Kent State senior guard Kevin Zabo got called for an intentional foul. Senderoff praised his team’s toughness, but the chippiness of the game didn’t seem to sit well with Buffalo coach Nate Oats, who said Kent State “would rather go out with a fistfight than they would go home with a loss.” “Just at the end of the game, we need to make sure we've got all of our players

‘‘

in MAC semifinals

On the cover: Flashes walk off the court after losing to Buffalo 78-61 Friday. Alexander Wadley / The Kent Stater

available for Saturday,” Oats said. “Keep your head. It kind of came to that. I thought the referees did a great job keeping it under control late in the game.” Avery led the Flashes with 16 points, followed by Zabo’s 14 and junior guard Jaylin Walker’s 12. Sophomore forward Danny Pippen added 10 points and 16 rebounds, including eight offensive, for his sixth double-double of the season. Harris finished with a game-high 22 points (5-for-6 on three-pointers). Massinburg chipped in with 14, Nick Perkins added 12 and Dontay Caruthers had 11. Despite the effort, Senderoff didn’t need many words to sum up his team’s final performance. “We played really hard tonight,” Senderoff said. “But we didn’t play well.” Buffalo beat Toledo to win the MAC Tournament Saturday to earn a No. 13 seed in the NCAA Tournament and will play No. 4 Arizona in the first round. Contact Cameron Hoover at choove14@kent.edu.

We played really hard tonight. But we didn’t play well.”

Kent State junior center Adonis De La Rosa dunks during the Flashes' season-ending 78-61 loss to Buffalo in the MidAmerican Conference Tournament semifinals Friday. Kayla McMillen / The Kent Stater

KentWired.com 9

– Rob Senderoff Men’s basketball coach

BJ Duling goes for a block against Buffalo's Jeremy Harris during Kent State's 78-61 MAC Tournament semifinal loss Friday. Kayla McMillen / The Kent Stater


10 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

OPINION

Moving forward, don’t forget Olivia Eastly In February 2018, 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. It’s been almost a month since the shooting, and I can feel the news cycle moving on. The media has gone back to starting every morning with the latest scandal in the White House. Fourteen children died, but America is forgetting. Our nation isn’t moving forward, but we are moving on. If we were making progress, we would be listening to the nation’s youth. Lobbies would be powerless compared to the masses. People would be able to have civil conversations about politics. Instead, we accuse high schoolers of being “snowflakes” or “crisis actors.” Politicians take millions of dollars from the NRA. Conversations about policy turn into shouting matches. America is trapped in a horrendous cycle of violence and anger, and there is no easy way to escape.

The only solution is knowledge. It’s the media’s job to cover the stories that matter, not just the stories that receive the most clicks or views. Fluff pieces may make us feel good, but in today’s society, they are just distractions. Tawdry gossip about celebrities might be fun to read, but it doesn’t matter. The media can’t stop talking about shootings. If you think Parkland isn’t relevant anymore, then you’re part of the problem. It pains me to read news stories about a new mass or school shooting each day, but I still read about them. I know that it is my responsibility as a civilian to arm myself not with a gun, but with knowledge and compassion. I’m not anti-gun. I support common sense gun reform, like what occurred in Australia after the Port Arthur massacre. Lawmakers there banned semi-automatic weapons. There is now a 28-day waiting period to get a weapon, and people need a good

reason to have a gun. The media should push stories like the death of 17-year-old Courtlin Arrington at the hands of a gunman. Arrington was a senior at Huffman High School and was one of two students shot on March 7. Her dreams of becoming a nurse were crushed. Another student was injured. I make a point of reading the news every day, and I have barely seen anything about them. Citizens have a responsibility to pay attention and demand coverage of the important stories. Don’t click on that headline about Stormy Daniels today. Instead, search for Courtlin Arrington. Show the media that we not only want, but need, to hear the stories of victims. When America starts hearing and paying attention to all the facts about gun violence, I promise we will get gun control. Olivia Eastly is a social media promoter. Contact her at oeastly@kent.edu.

The growing student debt bubble Bruno Beidacki $1,400,000,000,000. Americans owe over $1.4 trillion in student loan debt, according the Federal Reserve. That’s more than the gross domestic product of 183 countries. Let’s take that in: Americans owe more in student debt than the total value of everything produced by most countries in the world. The reason behind such an enormous number is the extremely high cost of higher education in the United States. The Education Department reports 44.2 million Americans owe money tied to their student loans from college. No one deserves such a financial burden for pursuing more education. Today, college students around the country are graduating and having to take on jobs that don’t require a higher education degree — strictly to repay their loans. That is not only negative for their industries, which are missing out on qualified, educated potential employees, but also for those who do not have a college education. A single mom working at a fast food chain wants a promotion. Instead of becoming manager because of how long she’s been there, she now has to compete with a recent college graduate who studied business. The

college graduate wants to start his own company, but before doing so, he needs a job to pay back his college loans. The single mom doesn’t get the promotion, and the business graduate has to postpone his dreams. It’s a lose-lose. Someone is winning, however. Private loans are on the rise, which means higher interest rates and a lesser chance of forgiveness. Worse, the standards for being approved for these loans are getting lowered, trapping people who may not be able to pay them back later. Sound familiar? This practice is what led to the 2008 financial crisis, the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s. That time, it was the mortgage debt bubble that ended up bursting. College debt seems to be heading in the same direction. The almost $1.5 trillion owed represents more than 6 percent of the total debt in the United States, an alarmingly high number for an individual industry. College graduates are finding themselves owing dozens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars after finishing their studies. Many of them can’t find a job, and those who do are not making enough money to pay for their basic needs and repay their loans

at the same time. People shouldn’t have to choose between paying their debts or eating lunch. Solutions are being offered by politicians, think tanks and academics, but most of them only serve to postpone the burden. For-profit companies have taken the opportunity to offer loan refinancing services, which end up extending the deadline in which these loans need to be paid, but not lessening the debt itself. It’s time for a smartly developed loan forgiveness program. If people cannot find a decent-paying job even after studying for years and putting hard work into their learning experiences, they shouldn’t be forced to pay for an education that has failed them. If lowering the cost of higher education tuition is unrealistic, let’s at least be empathetic with those who are trying to make a better future for themselves and their families. After all, the more we push people to get student loans, the closer we get to another financial crisis. And let’s be honest: In a period of severe political and ideological crisis, the last thing we need is for the economy to crash. Bruno Beidacki is the opinion editor. Contact him at bbeidack@kent.edu.

NUMBERS TO KNOW:

4

Kent State men’s basketball seasons with under 20 wins since 2000 A 78-61 loss to Buffalo in the MAC Tournament ended the Flashes’ season at a record of 17-17. It’s the worst season for the Flashes by record since 2013-14.

131 Age in years of a message in a bottle found in Australia

A woman in Australia stumbled upon the oldest message in a bottle ever found. The 131-year-old note was tossed from a German ship to track the ocean’s currents.

Cheers&Jeers

Cheers to ... dedication. A group of Missouri bowlers ditched their car — ­ which malfunctioned in the middle of a highway — to make sure they were on time for a tournament.

Jeers to ... forgetting a password. A Chinese woman’s iPhone was locked for 47 years after her toddler continuously entered the wrong code.


Monday, March 12, 2018

KentWired.com 11

Continuous update of mass, school shootings in US

School shootings

Mass shooting

School and mass shootings

*The darker the red circles, the more severe the incident

Editor’s Note:

Each dot on this map represents either a mass shooting or school shooting that has occurred since Jan. 1, 2018. All information is compiled from the Gun Violence Archive. Its definition of a school shooting is

Mass shootings: March 3, 2018: Miami, Florida, 4 injured and 0 killed.

any weapon that has been fired on a school campus, whether March 4, 2018: Rockford, Illinois, 4 injured and 1 killed. or not it results in an injury or death. Regardless of the physical damage, a gun being fired on or March 7, 2018: Hurtsboro, Alabama, 3 injured and 1 killed. near a school contributes to the fear students face in society today. March 7, 2018: Clinton, Missouri, 2 injured and 2 killed.

March 9, 2018: Yountville, California, 0 injured and 4 killed. March 9, 2018: Wadesboro, North Carolina, 1 injured and 3 killed. March 11, 2018: South Bend, Indiana, 6 injured and 0 killed.

SUBMISSIONS: The Stater hopes to encourage lively debate about the issues of the day on the Opinion Page. Opinions on this page are the authors’ and not necessarily en­dorsed by the Stater or its editors. Readers are encouraged to participate through letters to the editor (email them to lmisera@kent.edu) and guest columns. Submissions become pro­­perty of the Stater and are subject to editing without notice.


12 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

Ramella Pizzeria, Mugs see last light as city prepares for new six-story building Dylan Reynolds Feature Writer There is a vacant brick building on the corner of West Erie Street and Franklin Avenue in downtown Kent. On the side facing Erie, a green awning hangs from the facade advertising “Ramella’s Pizzeria: World Famous Italian Pizza and Zarolli.” The interior is mostly empty, except for a few cleaning supplies and decorations from when the restaurant was operational. The side facing Franklin Avenue is equally bare. Behind tall windows sits an unstocked, unattended bar littered with pizza boxes. That space, most recently called Ramella’s Lounge, was once Mugs Brew Pub. Out front, a yard sign is knocked over in the grass. “Official notice: City of Kent, Ohio,” it says. “Planning commission is considering a proposal involving this property.” That proposal is a six-story, multi-use building, which the Planning Commission approved at its Feb. 20 meeting. To build the new structure, the old brick building would be demolished. Although it may not look like much today, the corner of West Erie Street and Franklin Avenue has seen numerous businesses come and go through many decades of Kent history. Records from the Portage County Auditor’s website show the property is now owned by Tulips LLC, incorporated by Badreeyeh Alhasawi, who purchased the property after a series of transactions from Portage Community Bank. Portage Community Bank foreclosed on the the building after Pub Properties, LLC, incorporated by Vincent Fazio Jr., defaulted on the mortgage, according to court documents. Fazio has not responded to a request for an interview. The Record-Courier reported Tulips LLC’s proposal is a 26,000-square-foot structure expected to contain a restaurant, bakery and wine bar at the bottom, and 16 upscale

Ramella’s Pizzeria is set for destruction as the City of Kent proposed a new six-story, multi-use building. The proposition was approved Feb. 20. Michael Indriolo / The Kent Stater

apartments above. Those high-class establishments are a longshot from Mugs, the bar that faced Franklin Avenue in the early 2000s. This was the stomping grounds for musician and Kent alumnus Patrick Sweany, a blues rocker who has released multiple studio albums. “It was a cool hangout,” Sweany said. “It was a really cool scene.” At that time, Sweany was in a band with Dan Auerbach, who became the guitarist and vocalist for the Black Keys. "(Auerbach) came out to a gig, and I heard he could play,” Sweany said. “And I invited him up, and he eventually joined the band.” During the time Auerbach was in the Patrick Sweany Band, the group routinely performed at Mugs. Sweany had Mondays and Tuesdays off at his day job, allowing the band to play weeknights, when they were often the only show in town. “That was a weekly thing,” Sweany said. “We played every Monday night. We played late. There was just nothing else to do.” But in the middle of the 20th century, long before Mugs existed, the building was home

to Kent Office Supply, a store owned by Richard and Luella Blair. “This was a mom and pop store,” said Bill Blair, son of the owners. “If you needed it in the office for business, — pencils, pens, ink, paper, adding machines, typewriters ­— … we had it.” Blair remembers hanging around the business and helping his parents run the shop. “Even as a kid, as a teenager, my brother and I, if we were down there, we’d wait on customers,” Blair said. “We’d answer the phones. It was all very much hands-on.” Above the shop was an apartment, which Blair’s parents decided to upgrade when they bought the building. At the time, the apartment only had a “water closet” — a toilet without a bath or shower. The Blairs installed a shower, but they placed it in an unconventional room. “There are two separate kitchens, and one of the kitchens had a shower in it,” said Elizabeth Lax, a senior studio arts major, who rented the unit in 2016 from Fazio. Lax said the building had some issues while she lived there. She said nobody had occupied the place for some time and that

the apartment’s pipes burst multiple times during her seven-month stay. “They could have been working with that building and not let it kind of crumble,” Lax said. “But they did let it crumble, and there’s really no saving it.” Sweany said he visited Mugs regularly even after his band stopped playing there. But Blair, who now lives in California, hasn’t been inside the building since the late 1990s. “Every once in a while when I was downtown, I wanted to stop in and just say hi to whoever was there and tell them a little about the building, but I just never really had time,” Blair said. Although he said he doesn’t deserve an opinion on Kent-based issues because he moved away, Blair becomes sentimental thinking about the building’s likely fate. “I’m sad to see another building of history, a piece of Kent history, going by the wayside,” Blair said. “However, in modern days, buildings weren’t meant to last forever.”

Contact Dylan Reynolds at dreyno18@kent.edu.


Monday, March 12, 2018

KentWired.com 13

KSU student to take part in MIT, Harvard neuroscience program Emelia Sherin Science Reporter A Kent State student and sprouting female scientist was accepted into a summer internship program at The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard for Summer 2018. Ya'el Courtney, a senior biology major, is making waves in the world of neuroscience research after years of struggling to find her place. “About 800 people apply, and they only take 12,” Courtney said. Courtney will be committing to a nine-

week research internship designed for undergraduates to focus on biomedical research and genomics. Genomics focuses on the functions and evolution of genomes, which is a complete set of DNA. DNA holds all the information needed for the human body to grow, according to the National Human Genome Research Institute. Joshua Pollock, an assistant professor of sociology and the current director of the Electrophysiological Neuroscience Laboratory of Kent, said Courtney is a great person with an excellent work ethic. “Ya’el is a wonderful student and

Ya’el Courtney poses for a photo. Courtesy of Ya’el Courtney.

‘‘

Inclusivity, diversity and expanding our base of people in science is important, and I intend to do that in the future.”

person,” Pollock said. “She has an amazing drive and work ethic and is always willing to go that extra mile. She comes up with innovative ways to deal with problems and is quite successful at doing such.” Kent State does not offer a neuroscience undergraduate program, but it does as a master ’s program. She has always wanted to study the science of the nervous system and has a great passion for research. “Her passion for science, research and learning is contagious,” said Logan Verheyen, Courtney’s boyfriend. The two met at a summer research program in St. Louis following their first year of college. “As she describes her work in a lab, an experience at a neuroscience conference or specific content from an interesting class, one can't help but share her excitement on the topic.” She thought applying for several internships on what she was more interested in was the perfect opportunity for her to branch out and follow her dreams. After years of feeling lost, she has happily found herself at Kent State, declining other internship offers from Harvard and MIT, as well as offers from the University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of California, Berkeley. “She acts on what she believes,” said Linda Powlison, Courtney’s grandmother. “Cause and effect that she has learned through science has carried over to social

– Ya’el Courtney Senior biology major and other areas of her life.” Escaping an abusive household at 15, Courtney lived in six different states within her adolescent years. She was faced with a dilemma at 17: Her legal guardian at the time told her she had two paths to choose from: enlisting in the Army or ending up on the street. “Proving people wrong is a driving motivation,” Courtney said “Making a difference is very important to me.” Instead, Courtney took a gap year to work and save money. “I was shift manager and worked 70-80 hours a week at Wendy’s,” Courtney said. “I read 300 books that year.” She achieved her General Education Development certificate at 18, then applied for colleges. From there, she found her home at Kent State and is in love with the collegiate atmosphere. “Ya’el’s energy is refreshing because it’s genuine,” Powlison said. “It’s an energy that ... reaches out to bring (people) with her.” She is active in research studies on campus and serves as the vice president of the academic fraternity, Phi Sigma Pi. Her passions in science, people, music and even coffee drive her to make change in the future. “Inclusivity, diversity and expanding our base of people in science is important, and I intend to do that in the future,” Courtney said. Contact Emelia Sherin at esherin@kent.edu.


14 The Kent Stater

Monday, March 12, 2018

Review

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ puts together a decent story despite its faults Alex Novak Entertainment Reviewer Continuing this year’s trend of diverse cinematic spectacles, "A Wrinkle In Time" adapts this incredible journey of unexpected discovery from the novel written by Madeleine L’Engle. While the story is sure to enchant readers, the film is too wildly ambitious for its own good. Through the physics of atoms and frequencies, the story begins when Dr. Alex Murry (Chris Pine) and his wife, Dr. Kate Murry (Gugu Mbatha-Raw), discover the possibility of traveling great distances to anywhere in the universe through a process called tessering. However, following the ridicule and scorn of the scientific community when they present their findings, Alex takes matters into his own hands to actually test the calculations and ends up tessering across the universe in a split second of time. Despite the innocent intention to simply see what’s out there, he is captured within an evil force called Camazotz, referred to simply as “The It,” on his tessering trip and is unable to find a way out despite resisting its vile grasp. The exposition of this film sets the mystery up well but

‘‘

is still a bit choppy. It seems as if the director forced in some scenes that don’t necessarily contribute to the story, hindering their artistry from being completely natural. For example, the playground and resulting principal’s office scenes at the beginning seem unrealistic and unauthentic. The subject matter of them is almost elementary. Moreover, the premise of this film was largely centered around its visual effects and its top-notch cast. And while some of the effects are exquisitely dazzling, original and creative, others are just a little too unbelievable to pull you fully into the worlds the film visits. Most of the performances greatly contribute to making this film better than the story originally adapted by director Ava DuVernay. It feels like the movie is in such a rush at some times that it’s hard to pinpoint where the journey begins and when it really takes off. Before you know it, you are arriving to the conclusion and you can feel the build toward the end abruptly. Dr. Murry’s daughter, Meg Murry (Storm Reid), must now travel throughout the universe with the help of the three Misses: the headstrong Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon),

the deeply educated Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling) and the exceptionally wise Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey) to search for the desparate cries of her longlost father. Joined also by her classmate Calvin (Levi Miller) and her intelligent younger brother Charles Wallace (Deric McCabe), Meg must learn to love the gift of her faults if she is to find her father and help many others in the universe from escaping the force of the evil It by seeing the light through the darkness. The film furthers the modern trends of both diversity and the female empowerment in popular entertainment while shedding a shining light on relevant topics like bullying and depression, especially for younger people in the context of school and family. Ultimately, Meg is able to overcome the temptation of dark forces and save her family and friends, and even the universe, from the spreading evil. The performances of the cast are all mostly solid, particularly those of Reid, McCabe, Pine and Winfrey. They, more than anything else, transform this film into a experience that can tell an entertaining story despite some of its shortcomings. Contact Alex Novak at anovak12@kent.edu.

Most of the performance greatly contribute to making this film better than the story originally adapted by director Ava DuVernay.” – Alex Novak Entertainment Reviewer

March 13 - 14th 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

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Monday, March 12, 2018

CLASSIFIEDS LEADERSHIP CLASSES – 2 SESSIONS, FREE. Be prepared for the real world. Call or Text (330) 715-9259 to reserve your seat. Limited class size. REMEMBER! Start Your Celebration For St. Patty’s At Franklin Square Deli Delicious Corned Beef Traditional Irish Soups SPECIAL EXTENDED HOURS OPEN UNTIL 8:00pm

A&W Restaurants Opening soon! Now taking applications for: -Car Hops -Fountain Help -Assistant Fry Cooks Apply in person only, 1-5 p.m. Mon-Fri. 1124 West Main St. Kent, Ohio 769 E. Main St. Ravenna, Ohio Lawn maintenance company seeks FT/PT employee starting at $11.50/hr. Must have valid drivers license 4 points or less and reliable transportation, please call 330-688-3389 or email lawnpride1978@gmail. com. Barrington Golf Club now hiring part-time servers, valets, men’s locker room attendants, line cooks, kitchen pantry, and dish washers. Meals and uniforms provided, competitive starting wages. Apply in person 350 N. Aurora Rd. Aurora. EOE Club Energy Dance Music Bar & Scoreboard Sports Bar need bartenders: 21 and over. Part-time. Day or nights. No experience necessary. Apply 289 Darrow Rd. Akron, Route 91. Or call 330-733-6863 after 3 PM. Or 330-338-6934. Minutes from KSU. Attention to Health and Human Services and Nursing upper class students... We need you! Certified Home Care Agency is hiring direct caregiver to provide homemaking and personal care assistance to developmentally disabled individual adults(19-55) years old in their homes (in the Kent State area). Great experience for students to obtain hand on experience with providing care to the disabled. Starting pay is 10.00 per hour. Please send letter of interest and or resume to Providers300@gmail.com or call agency at 330-4853699. Reliable transportation is needed.

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” State and local laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. If you feel you have been wrongfully denied housing or discriminated against, call the FHAA at 330-253-2450 for more information. Houses for 2018-2019 school year. 2 & 3 bedrooms. 330-547-1212 Leasing for fall 2018 Spacious 2,3,4,&5 bedrooms with 2-3 full baths. Great condition, A/C, washer/dryer, dishwasher, deck, garage. Starting at $350 a room. 330-808-4045 6 Bedroom 3 Bath North Lincoln 1 Block from Campus Neat and Clean $350 per month per person plus utilities. Please call Nancy at (330) 472-0501. AVAILABLE NOW. Short term leases and leases in August available. Close to campus. 2 and 3 bedrooms, details for special move-in. Landlord pays heat, water and trash. Good parking, central air. 330-6769440. Kent 2 and 3 bedroom apartments. Air, appliances, carpet, heat and water paid. No pets or Section 8. $660 and $810. Short term available. 330-6775577

For rent, 4-5 bedroom town homes for Fall 2018. Newly Remodeled, 2.5 baths, washer, dryer and dishwasher included. Sign early get a free months rent. Please call 330-685-9622 or text 330-770-2197 for more details.

FALL 2018 Luxury 4/5 bedroom 2 bath house LESS THAN 1 MILE FROM CAMPUS and on the bus route!! Beautifully remodeled inside with very spacious rooms and big closets, large deck, your own laundry room, newer appliances, and more. Last one we have. 385/ mo per bedroom includes all utilities except electric and cable/internet. 330-552-7032 5 bedroom 2.5 bath. All appliances and washer/dryer. $425 a month/per person. All utilities and cable/internet included. 2 bedroom 1 bath $750+ See JLCASTO.COM 330-6887040 Kent Studio, 1, 2, & 3 BR Full Apartments Newly Remodeled Avail Pet Friendly Across From Kent State Swimming Pool Fitness Center Call Today Cable & Wifi Included 330-673-8778 4-bedroom apartment in Kent. $475/month per person. All utilities included. Call 330-6787901. Leasing for Fall. Beautiful, newly redecorated 2 bedroom and 3 bedroom duplexes with attached garage. One block from KSU. $400 per student. 330-687-6122. KSU 4 bedroom leasing for fall, on site parking, washer-dryer, please call 330-221-0460 for inquires.

Kent Apartments The places to stay on your way to success Studios, efficiencies, 1 bedrooms, 2 bedrooms and 3 bedrooms Check us out at our website www.kentapartments.com Call us @ 1-888-999-1596

HOW TO ADVERTISE For information about placing a Display ad please call our offices at 330-672-2586 or visit us at 205 Franklin Hall, Kent State University. Our office hours are from 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Classified ads can be placed by fax at (330) 672-4880, over the phone at (330) 672-2586 or by e-mail at ads@ksustudentmedia.com. If you fax or e-mail an ad, please be sure to include run dates, payment info and a way for us to contact you.

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