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The

Kent Stater

@KentWired

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018

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‘NO EXCUSES’

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KSU Tuscarawas wrestler Zion Clark breaks boundaries on and off the mat

Downtown Kent set to host Mardi Crawl Friday

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Cold weather sends utilities prices soaring for students

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KentWired sits down with Flashes coach Sean Lewis


2 The Kent Stater

Thursday, February 8, 2018

NEWS

Mardi Crawl to descend on downtown Kent Lily Nickel Business and Downtown Reporter The spirit of New Orleans is set to arrive in downtown Kent with the inaugural Kent Mardi Crawl Friday. Participants will make their way to different bars downtown throughout the night, collecting beads and masks at each location, according to the event’s website. The night will begin at Venice Cafe at 5 p.m., where attendees can participate in a costume contest as well as pick up their bar crawl lanyards and passes. Guests who visit at least five out of the 10 participating locations, including spots such as The Loft and

Water Street Tavern, can enter to win a prize provided by Main Street Kent. “We really enjoy creating fun opportunities for people to explore our downtown, and we think the Mardi Gras theme will be a real draw,” said Heather Malarcik, the executive director of Main Street Kent. Part of the proceeds from the event will go to Main Street Kent, with a portion designated to Freedom House, a transitional housing facility for homeless veterans in northeast Ohio. The event is open to guests 21 and over, and tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite. Contact Lily Nickel at lnickel2@kent.edu

A pint of beer sits on the bar at Zephyr Pub Sat. Jan. 27, 2018. Alexander Wadley / The Kent Stater

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Thursday, February 8, 2018

KentWired.com 3

Kent State recognizes college, professor with diversity awards Gershon Harrell Diversity Reporter Kent State’s Diversity of Equity and Inclusion (DEI) awarded the College of Communication and Information (CCI) and economics professor Kathryn Wilson with the 2018 Unity Award for Diversity and the Diversity Trailblazer Award. Wilson received the Diversity Trailblazer Award for her work with the university climate study in spring 2016. “It was a survey that went to all faculty staff and students, across all of the campuses and it asked them questions about what it was like to study here, to work here, to learn here and questions about interactions with other people,” Wilson said. The Diversity Trailblazer Award is given to those “who have displayed exemplary contributions in the area of diversity to the university community,” according to DEI’s website. In her analysis, Wilson asked students if they felt respected by professors in the classroom. “Our black and African-American students ... answered that question very differently than our white students did across the board. Our students with disabilities, for a lot of questions ... answered very differently.”

Wilson also found LGBTQ students feel less valued by their peers but have a faculty member they consider to be a role model. But even with those results, Wilson said people should keep in mind that the climate study was just a snapshot of a point in time. “I don’t know if we took it again today… it would look exactly the same,” Wilson said. “I think we’re doing a lot of things moving in the right direction.” As for CCI, Dean Amy Reynolds accepted the 2018 Unity Award for Diversity on behalf of the team. The Unity Award for Diversity reflects the contributions the college has made to enhance diversity, equity and inclusion for students and staff. CCI has done numerous things when it comes to promoting diversity on Kent’s campus. The department works with underrepresented students, low-income and first-generation college students. CCI also shows how important diversity is to the college by hosting diversity week. “It’s exciting,” Reynolds said. “This is a really important award because we really care a lot about diversity, inclusion (and) equity in everything that we do.” CCI reached out to DEI to work with them on its diversity tool kit for first-year students. The kit consists of a resource

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packet of information that academic units can use to build diversity curriculum. “We were the first college to reach out to build a diversity curriculum utilizing that tool kit,” said Amanda Leu, the academic diversity outreach coordinator. The lesson is incorporated into the First Year Experience course for freshman. “The main message is to encourage students to think about how diverse their universe is,” Leu said. Leu encourages students to go out to different, diverse events. “If it’s a LGBTQ student and they go to pride every week that’s great,” Leu said. “But go to something else! Go to a (Black United Students) meeting, go to a (Spanish and Latino Student Assocation) meeting, go to an international student event, go to something for disability awareness month.” The reason why CCI received the 2018 Unity Award for Diversity is because the staff, the students and their leadership team are all working towards a common goal, Reynolds said. “It’s really our entire college committed to this,” Reynolds said. “For me, as a dean, that’s what I find really rewarding.” Contact Gershon Harrell at gharrel1@kent.edu.

‘‘

The main message is to encourage students to think about how diverse their universe is.” – Amanda Leu Academic diversity outreach coordinator


4 The Kent Stater

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Students dealing with increase in utility costs during winter months Natalie Eusebio Commuters and Apartments Reporter Plenty of Kent State students choose to reside in apartments nearby campus, since the university only requires students to remain on campus for their freshman and sophomore years. But students have realized there is a cost for staying warm.

How rent and electricity are billed Eric Gros, a junior political science major, is a resident of the downtown Kent complex 345 Flats. Gros moved into the apartment complex at the beginning of this academic year. At 345 Flats, electricity is contracted out, and residents must pay an electric bill that is separate from their monthly rent. “When I moved in, they said that on average we would spend about $30 for all months,” Gros said. “They warned that winter could be a little bit higher, but when we got these last couple bills it was just insane.” Rent and electricity are two separate bills at The Province, said Kayla Blackberry, a senior middle childhood education major who lived there during her junior year. Both The Province and University Edge follow a similar format in billing rent and electricity by dividing the costs between the roommates of an apartment. But at University Edge, electric is included with utilities, and residents receive a $30 credit toward their bill. If residents exceed this allowance, then they are charged an additional fee.

“We explain how electricity and utilities work on tours and when the lease is signed,” said Lea Zaitzew, a University Edge employee. Joona Lee is a sophomore nursing major at Kent State, and she moved into University Edge in August of this past year. “We didn’t think it would be a problem,” Lee said of the extensive electricity fees. Gros said he and his roommates started to notice an increase in their electricity bill in November. Considering that November is when Ohio flips the switch to winter weather, a slightly higher bill is to be expected. What Gros and his roommates got, however, was much higher than anticipated. “Going into November it jumped up to almost $42, and we were confused as to what happened. Going into December, it was $62 per person. Even when none of us were there for Thanksgiving or all of Christmas break, it was still almost our highest one,” Gros said. Blackerby saw a spike in the bill as soon as her and her roommates started using heat. “The electric bill was usually only $15 for each of us. But then come winter the heat ran off of electric, so the more heat, the higher the bill. We would each pay $40 to $50 during the winter months," she said.

increasing electric bills, Mullen stressed that all students are made aware of the way electricity in the apartment works during tours and when the lease is signed. Mullen said the average price of electricity is different from apartment to apartment and that the bill depends largely on individual usage. “Fluctuating the thermostat can really cause an increase in the bill,” Mullen said. Mullen also said when occupants turn the heat off, they think they are saving energy. But it actually takes more energy to warm up the whole apartment. “At one point, 345 Flats sent out an email,” Gros said. “They recommended turning our heat down ten degrees to save 5 percent on our electricity bill. Our apartment would be at 56 degrees then, it just seemed ridiculous.”

Students in The Province face higher electricy and rent bills during cold days, like Tuesday.Natalie Eusebio / The Kent Stater

Some residents look for alternative methods to stay warm. “We put extra blankets out around the apartment,” Blackerby said. “I liked to just turn the heat up and be comfortable, but my roommates were more concerned with saving money.”

How apartment complexes handle frustrated students

Blackerby liked to keep her apartment between 71 or 72 degrees. McNerney said an average electricity cost is “impossible to gauge” because of the different styles of apartments available. Blackerby said The Province office was helpful in setting up ways for their residents to pay bills. “They were helpful by making the process to pay easy, or you could set it (paying) up automatically. But if you wanted to negotiate price, it

was a no.” Lee said she and her roommates try to keep the apartment heated to about 71 degrees. She said that this month’s rent marks the fourth time that her and her roommates have exceeded the $30 allowance. While apartments tend to do what they can to keep their residents happy, it looks as though staying warm is something that college students need to budget for. “It’s frustrating,” Lee said, “but we get it.” Contact Natalie Eusebio at neusebio@kent.edu.

How to keep the electricity bill down

Brittany Mullen is the property manager for 345 Flats. While residents tend to be blindsided by the

Students, like those in 345 Flats, are fighting high utility costs due to weather like Kent experienced Tuesday. Natalie Eusebio / The Kent Stater


Thursday, February 8, 2018

KentWired.com 5

Flashes ace first test of season at MAC Match Play Challenge Amanda Levine Sports Reporter Kent State women’s golf finished 12-3 for the tournament, earning the Mid-American Match Play championship with a 3-2 victory over Florida Gulf Coast Tuesday. Michaela Finn, Chloe Salort and Pimnipa Panthong went undefeated in the tournament. “Having three players go undefeated in our matches this week was good to see,” coach Greg Robertson said. “That’s going to be a great field, and it will give us a good feel for where we are at this point of the season.” Finn, a senior from Ängelholm, Sweden, won 3-and-2 over the Eagles’ Ashley Kimbrough in her final round of the tournament. Finn said she was happy with how she played, and her goal for the season is to “play better than (she) did the season before.” Kent State got off to a good start with a 4-1 win against North Carolina-Asheville, advancing to play Western Michigan in the semifinals.

The Flashes defeated the Broncos with a dominating 5-0 win to move on to the championship round. “Overall, it was a good first week for us, coming away with a win and going 12-3 overall,” Robertson said. “With this being our first tournament, we definitely have some things to work on, but I saw a lot of things that we can move forward with and feel good about.” Salort, a freshman from Ermont, France, was among the three players to go undefeated in the tournament. The World Amateur Golf Rankings recently ranked Salort 83rd in the world after the match. In an interview last week, assistant coach Maddi Swaney said Salort will add more depth to their lineup. “Having (Salort) added on to the team brings more competitiveness to the lineup,” Swaney said. “The more

Members of the Kent State women's golf team pose after starting their spring season with a victory at the Mid-American Conference Match Play Tuesday at Lakewood Ranch Golf and Country Club in Lakewood Ranch, Florida. Photo courtesy of Kent State Athletics

competitive our lineup, the better our team is going to get.” The team has won 19 conference titles since its inaugural season in 1998 and is looking to continue that success this year after being ranked 15th in the country, according to NCAA’s women’s golf rankings. “We never really talk about winning,” Swaney said, “We want to continue to take this team to new heights.” Swaney said she is excited to see where the team ends up this spring. “I know that they want to continue,” Swaney said. “They have the same goals that we have: (to) continue to keep us on the national map.” Contact Amanda Levine at alevine3@kent.edu.


6 The Kent Stater

Thursday, February 8, 2018

SPORTS

Q&A with new Flashes football coach Cameron Hoover Sports Editor Kent State head football coach Sean Lewis sat down with KentWired Tuesday to discuss recruiting, his staff and excitement over the upcoming season.

WITH SEAN LEWIS

It’s your first season as a head coach at a program that’s been pretty rough over the past few years (14-45 in previous coach Paul Haynes’ five years with the Flashes). How important was it for you to get off to a good start in recruiting and show the Mid-American Conference that you mean business?

A:

Recruiting is the lifeblood of your program. As I’ve alluded to in my opening press conference, this is a players’ game, and to win football games, you need good players. All the schemes in the world don’t matter if you don’t have the Jimmies and the Joes to execute them. It wasn’t so much important to put the league on notice or anything like that, but just that for our family, players, team and our community at Kent State to know that we’re going to go out, and we’re going to recruit. We’re going to compete in recruiting, and we’re going to get really good players because of that.

I saw on 247sports.com that Kent State went from the 12th-ranked recruiting class in the MAC to the fifth in a few weeks. What do you think you’re selling that’s making these players want to come here?

A:

I’m selling the university. I’m selling our staff, who has done a tremendous job. When I say the staff, not only the football staff — our director of football operations, Adam Young, our director of player personnel, Steve Schrum, but also the maintenance people who paint these offices and put these graphics up. We’re selling the people of Kent State University and the vision that we have and where we’re going to go in the future. We’ve been fortunate that families who share the same beliefs we have and have the same ambitions we have, have decided to join our Kent State family.

Q

Kent State football coach Sean Lewis addresses the media during his National Signing Day press conference Wednesday. The Flashes announced 23 signings and went from the 12th-ranked recruiting class in the Mid-American Conference to the fifth in three weeks, according to 247sports.com. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

What sort of player are you looking for, both on and off the field?

A:

Off the field, it’s a young man who wants to grow as a person, who has a thirst for knowledge, knows the value that a Kent State degree will bring him and the doors that that will open. We look for a kid who’s mature, that is willing to grow. As a football player, we’re looking for guys who are hungry to be developed, guys that are asking more questions than believing they have the answers already. We look for kids who have a passion for the game of football, who loves going to practice just as much as he does a game day. Then there’s some specific measurables that are unique to what we do on both offense and defense in terms of height, weight, speed, length, those sorts of things.

For a few weeks, it seemed like multiple recruits a day were tweeting their intentions to come to Kent. How are you adjusting to how fast it’s all going?

A:

I knew it was going to be fast because of the time frame of everything when I was hired. I enjoy tempo. I enjoy going fast, obviously, so that’s not a big deal. That has been not as big of a transition sitting in the head coach’s chair versus sitting in a coordinator’s chair. A lot of the conversations are the same. You’re selling people, because people are what wins championships. The support of our athletic director (Joel Nielsen) and president (Beverly Warren), who are very active on recruiting weekends, has made a huge difference.

Like you’ve said, you want to play fast. A lot of those games are going to be won and lost in the trenches. How have you been recruiting the offensive and defensive lines?

A:

That is where the games are won. Everyone knows about the headliners who get the numbers and the guys who get the flash, so to speak. But the guys who play those positions and understand the trench life, if you will, are generally unselfish individuals, and they don’t look for a whole lot of fanfare. They’re good salt-of-the-earth people, and you can sit down and have a good, frank conversation with them to explain the opportunity here for them in all phases of their life. We’ve got some really good players in this class that will help us win the battle at the line of scrimmage.

You’re a more offensive-minded guy, so a lot of concerns I’ve heard are that the defense might not be as good. How have you recruited on that side of the ball?

A:

I’m a football guy, first and foremost, that happened to coach and happened to play on the offensive side of the ball. That being said, I’m looking for football players, and we’re not going to compromise one unit, whether it be offense, defense or special teams. We’ll be great in all three phases, and we’ll have the same standards and expectations of all of them. So our fanbase does not need to worry about that.


Thursday, February 8, 2018

You’ve been traveling all over the country getting recruits from California, Florida and other places. How important is it for you to hit all those regions instead of just staying local?

A:

It’s been a unique circumstance this year. Because of when I was hired, the majority of prospective 2018 recruits were already signed, so this class will be unique compared to other classes going forward because we had to go where the players that were available were. We went to find the players that matched our profile, and we went a little further than we’ll probably go in the future. Recruiting starts at home, first and foremost, but because of the high caliber of coaches and players that are in this area, a lot of those young men signed Dec. 20 and weren’t available to us. We needed to put a recruiting class together, so we had to go where those players are. In the future, we’ll start at home, and there will be a ripple effect from Kent, Ohio, outward, and the majority of our class will be within a sixhour driving radius.

Shifting from recruiting to staff, what kind of football minds were you looking to bring to Kent with you?

A:

The best in the country, and we were able to do that.

One of the guys who has really created a lot of buzz is (quarterback) Woody Barrett. What can you tell me about him?

A:

It’s a big get, because he’s one of the people who believed enough on one of our first official visit weekends to jump in. I know it’s created quite a buzz because of his high school rankings and where he went to high school (rated four stars coming out of West Orange High School in Winter Garden, Florida). A lot of that stuff refers to a phrase we talk about with our guys: “It doesn’t matter. Get better.” All that stuff and all those accolades really doesn’t matter, and Woody needs to get better along with the rest of our team. We’re excited about Woody, but we’re excited about the full roster and what everyone can add.

A question for the fans: With the staff and the recruits you’ve brought in, how fast do you think we’re going to start seeing results?

A:

I think it’s as fast as we’re able to tie consecutive days together of having championship habits. That’s as fast as we will win.

KentWired.com 7

Tom Kaufman, the defensive coordinator, is going to have a tough job. Playing fast, his defense is going to be on the field a lot. What can you tell me about him that made you want to bring him in?

A:

He’s a guy that I trust. He’s a guy who has incredibly high standards. The misconception that just because you play fast means your defense is going to compromise is something that he doesn’t believe in and something I don’t believe in. It’s a challenge he wanted to take on. With the trust of being with him for five out of the last six years (at Bowling Green in 2014-15 and Eastern Illinois in 2012-13) and working together, I know the type of man he is, and I know the type of role model he’s going to be for our players. It was a no-brainer for me.

How much have you worked with offensive coordinator Andrew Sowder to mold the offense into that FlashFAST mentality you’ve been talking about?

A:

Again, his history is overlapped with mine. We’ve worked together for four out of the last six years, so he’s comfortable playing fast, playing at tempo. I have a great level of respect and trust with him because of the number of games we’ve coached and the number of championships we’ve won together. Three out of those four years together, we won conference championships. He’s a good one to have.

Last question: How excited are you to get the season going?

A:

I’m excited to get to National Signing Day (Feb. 7). I’m excited to get to a team run Thursday, (Feb. 8). Much beyond that, I don’t want to rush the season because there’s a lot of work that needs to be done between now and then that I’m excited about the work. Work works, and I enjoy working.

Sean Lewis, 31, speaks at the podium after being introduced as Kent State's 22nd head football coach in program history Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017. Lewis signed a five-year, $2.3 million contract with the university. Ben Orner / The Kent Stater

Contact Cameron Hoover at choove14@kent.edu.


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Thursday, February 8, 2018

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KentWired.com 9

COVER

Despite medical obstacles, wrestling motivates Zion Clark to ‘keep going’

Zion Clark tapes up before practice. Photo courtesy of Kelly Corey

On the cover: Zion Clark wrestles during practice Tuesday. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

Brynn Pennell Regional Campuses Reporter

O

ne medical condition won't define the life of Kent State Tuscarawas freshman Zion Clark.

The wrestler was born with a condition called caudal regression syndrome, a congenital disorder in which there is abnormal fetal development of the lower spine. “My diagnosis hasn’t really affected my life good or bad, it’s just a day-to-day thing ...” Clark said. “I just kind of figured out how to do a lot of things, like when it comes to riding a bike, I can do it.” Around age eight, a teacher introduced Clark to a sport that would eventually impact his life forever: wrestling. “My high school coach’s twin brother, who was my art teacher at the time, introduced me to it. I still remember the conversation pretty clearly,” Clark said. “He came up to me and asked ‘Have you ever heard of wrestling?’” After that, the rest was history. Clark was born in Columbus but raised in Massillon. Given up for adoption as a baby, Clark grew up moving around through the foster care system. “When I was moving from home to home, there was a lot of bad things that happened,” Clark said. “At first, it affected me in a bad way. The more bad things that happened to me, the worse I started to act.” It wasn’t until Clark’s senior year of high school he found his adoptive mother, Kimberly Hawkins. “I was about to be kicked out of another home and was forced to move to Cincinnati or New York and I didn’t want to do that ...” Clark said. “The agency reached out to my mom about adopting

me and told her about a band concert I was playing in that night. I was the first chair trumpet player.” He met his mother the night of his band concert. As soon as she laid eyes on him, she said yes to adopting him, Clark said. Throughout Clark’s high school years, he finished with a career record of 33-15. Freshman and sophomore years, Clark won no matches. It wasn’t until his junior and senior years things started to improve. “My junior year at the Smithville (Ohio) tournament, I hit a sloppy version of a move I’ve never done or tried before called a tilt,” Clark said. “The move worked, but I still ended up losing the match. I finally had something to base off of what I needed to start doing to get better. I just went from there, and after that a lot of things just started expanding.” Beyond Kimberly, he relied on another person for guidance: his high school wrestling coach, Gil Donahue. “I have known coach and his family for so long, back when I was really little,” Clark said. “I went to him for some consolation sometimes because there are some things you don’t want to talk to your mom about.” Not only has Donahue made a major impact in Clark’s life, but Clark has forever changed the way Donahue looks at his perspective of life. “You go through your ups and downs of being a human, and then you come to wrestling practice and look at a kid with no legs and his attitude,” Donahue said. “It is hard to not try and mock what he is doing and look at his aspect at life about having no excuses. How can I even act that way when I have two legs?” Clark adopted the motto “no excuses” early in life. The phrase began when Clark read a book written by a congenital amputee, Kyle Maynard, titled “No Excuses.” “I read the book when I was really little, and then I kind of used that for a

Kent State Tuscarawas freshman Zion Clark pins a teammate during practice Tuesday. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

Kent State Tuscarawas freshman Zion Clark during the team's practice Tuesday. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

little motivation,” Clark said. “Then coach kept reminding me of it throughout senior year of high school to really push myself to be better.” Wrestling on the collegiate level was never a plan, Clark said. Kent State Tuscarawas reached out to Clark as a senior in high school. Uninterested, he declined the offer. “I had no idea I was going to end up here, I had no idea I was going to end up anywhere,” Clark said. “Kent Tuscarawas got a hold of me and I kind of blew them off, but then I got a hold of Coach Schlarb and I reconsidered.” Dave Schlarb is the head coach for the Kent State Tuscarawas wrestling team. Schlarb previously coached for New Philadelphia High School for 23 years, crossing paths with Clark on multiple occasions in high school. “I don’t look at the things he has to do differently as a handicap, it is just things that have to be perfect,” Schlarb said. “He has to have things down and repeat it over and over again. He has limited moves, so they need to be perfect.” Not only is Clark ranked nationally for wrestling, he is ranked as the 10th fastest 100-meter sprinter in the world for wheelchair racing. “The year before, my sister, Indy, won a state title,” Clark said. “I was just out there watching her and these people approached me saying I would be really good at it.” In 2017, Clark qualified to be a member of the Paralympic Nationals in California, taking home two state titles. “I just tried the sport and I happened to

be really good at it,” Clark said. Clark is currently a member of Team USA’s B-Team with hopes of getting the gold for the A-Team in the 2020 Summer Paralympics in Tokyo. “I like both sports, but wrestling is definitely my favorite ...” Clark said. “I like to beat up on people. There is no other way to put it, it hasn’t changed since I was little. Who doesn’t think it is fun to beat up on someone?” Along with wrestling and wheelchair racing, Clark taught himself how to play six different instruments: drums, guitar, piano, trumpet, ukulele and the bass guitar. “I learned how to read music really young, so once I figured it out, if I could read this, I could play that,” Clark said. There are three important matches of the season left for the Flashes, the most important being the National Collegiate Wrestling Association’s National Championship meet, which will be March 8-10 in Allen, Texas. Clark’s main focus for the upcoming meets is healing. “There is something wrong with my ribs, but I am still wrestling with it,” Clark said. “I stubbed my wrists the other day, but it is healing up.” To people who face obstacles, such as young athletes with a physical disability, just keep trying, Clark said. “Some of the best people failed more than ever,” Clark said. “I mean, I lost all the time, a lot of important people have lost before they even picked up a skill. After that, once you get some traction, you have to keep going.” Contact Brynn Pennell at bpennel1@kent.edu.


8 The Kent Stater

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Thursday, February 8, 2018

KentWired.com 9

COVER

Despite medical obstacles, wrestling motivates Zion Clark to ‘keep going’

Zion Clark tapes up before practice. Photo courtesy of Kelly Corey

On the cover: Zion Clark wrestles during practice Tuesday. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

Brynn Pennell Regional Campuses Reporter

O

ne medical condition won't define the life of Kent State Tuscarawas freshman Zion Clark.

The wrestler was born with a condition called caudal regression syndrome, a congenital disorder in which there is abnormal fetal development of the lower spine. “My diagnosis hasn’t really affected my life good or bad, it’s just a day-to-day thing ...” Clark said. “I just kind of figured out how to do a lot of things, like when it comes to riding a bike, I can do it.” Around age eight, a teacher introduced Clark to a sport that would eventually impact his life forever: wrestling. “My high school coach’s twin brother, who was my art teacher at the time, introduced me to it. I still remember the conversation pretty clearly,” Clark said. “He came up to me and asked ‘Have you ever heard of wrestling?’” After that, the rest was history. Clark was born in Columbus but raised in Massillon. Given up for adoption as a baby, Clark grew up moving around through the foster care system. “When I was moving from home to home, there was a lot of bad things that happened,” Clark said. “At first, it affected me in a bad way. The more bad things that happened to me, the worse I started to act.” It wasn’t until Clark’s senior year of high school he found his adoptive mother, Kimberly Hawkins. “I was about to be kicked out of another home and was forced to move to Cincinnati or New York and I didn’t want to do that ...” Clark said. “The agency reached out to my mom about adopting

me and told her about a band concert I was playing in that night. I was the first chair trumpet player.” He met his mother the night of his band concert. As soon as she laid eyes on him, she said yes to adopting him, Clark said. Throughout Clark’s high school years, he finished with a career record of 33-15. Freshman and sophomore years, Clark won no matches. It wasn’t until his junior and senior years things started to improve. “My junior year at the Smithville (Ohio) tournament, I hit a sloppy version of a move I’ve never done or tried before called a tilt,” Clark said. “The move worked, but I still ended up losing the match. I finally had something to base off of what I needed to start doing to get better. I just went from there, and after that a lot of things just started expanding.” Beyond Kimberly, he relied on another person for guidance: his high school wrestling coach, Gil Donahue. “I have known coach and his family for so long, back when I was really little,” Clark said. “I went to him for some consolation sometimes because there are some things you don’t want to talk to your mom about.” Not only has Donahue made a major impact in Clark’s life, but Clark has forever changed the way Donahue looks at his perspective of life. “You go through your ups and downs of being a human, and then you come to wrestling practice and look at a kid with no legs and his attitude,” Donahue said. “It is hard to not try and mock what he is doing and look at his aspect at life about having no excuses. How can I even act that way when I have two legs?” Clark adopted the motto “no excuses” early in life. The phrase began when Clark read a book written by a congenital amputee, Kyle Maynard, titled “No Excuses.” “I read the book when I was really little, and then I kind of used that for a

Kent State Tuscarawas freshman Zion Clark pins a teammate during practice Tuesday. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

Kent State Tuscarawas freshman Zion Clark during the team's practice Tuesday. Megan Humphrey / The Kent Stater

little motivation,” Clark said. “Then coach kept reminding me of it throughout senior year of high school to really push myself to be better.” Wrestling on the collegiate level was never a plan, Clark said. Kent State Tuscarawas reached out to Clark as a senior in high school. Uninterested, he declined the offer. “I had no idea I was going to end up here, I had no idea I was going to end up anywhere,” Clark said. “Kent Tuscarawas got a hold of me and I kind of blew them off, but then I got a hold of Coach Schlarb and I reconsidered.” Dave Schlarb is the head coach for the Kent State Tuscarawas wrestling team. Schlarb previously coached for New Philadelphia High School for 23 years, crossing paths with Clark on multiple occasions in high school. “I don’t look at the things he has to do differently as a handicap, it is just things that have to be perfect,” Schlarb said. “He has to have things down and repeat it over and over again. He has limited moves, so they need to be perfect.” Not only is Clark ranked nationally for wrestling, he is ranked as the 10th fastest 100-meter sprinter in the world for wheelchair racing. “The year before, my sister, Indy, won a state title,” Clark said. “I was just out there watching her and these people approached me saying I would be really good at it.” In 2017, Clark qualified to be a member of the Paralympic Nationals in California, taking home two state titles. “I just tried the sport and I happened to

be really good at it,” Clark said. Clark is currently a member of Team USA’s B-Team with hopes of getting the gold for the A-Team in the 2020 Summer Paralympics in Tokyo. “I like both sports, but wrestling is definitely my favorite ...” Clark said. “I like to beat up on people. There is no other way to put it, it hasn’t changed since I was little. Who doesn’t think it is fun to beat up on someone?” Along with wrestling and wheelchair racing, Clark taught himself how to play six different instruments: drums, guitar, piano, trumpet, ukulele and the bass guitar. “I learned how to read music really young, so once I figured it out, if I could read this, I could play that,” Clark said. There are three important matches of the season left for the Flashes, the most important being the National Collegiate Wrestling Association’s National Championship meet, which will be March 8-10 in Allen, Texas. Clark’s main focus for the upcoming meets is healing. “There is something wrong with my ribs, but I am still wrestling with it,” Clark said. “I stubbed my wrists the other day, but it is healing up.” To people who face obstacles, such as young athletes with a physical disability, just keep trying, Clark said. “Some of the best people failed more than ever,” Clark said. “I mean, I lost all the time, a lot of important people have lost before they even picked up a skill. After that, once you get some traction, you have to keep going.” Contact Brynn Pennell at bpennel1@kent.edu.


10 The Kent Stater

Thursday, February 8, 2018

OPINION

The extremes of self-care

SHANNON KOVACH’S VIEW

Kellie Nock Your room smells like a day spa and your bank account is empty from overspending on essential oils and face masks. You have three overdue assignments, and it’s Sunday night; you have a paper due tomorrow, which you have not started yet. There is no shortage of stress when you’re a college student. Everyone copes with this stress differently, from drinking to relaxing to whatever works for you. Maybe you binge watch baking shows on Netflix like I do. Self-care has been around forever. The idea of it existed well before Twitter got a hold of it. As time has gone on, however, the definition of self-care has changed. Now, there are a few problems with this new definition. For the most part, it’s good that there’s been an emphasis on self-care. Millennials are known as the most anxious generation in history, according to the American Psychological Association. So it makes sense, then, that we have tried to find new ways of coping with stress. Most methods of self-care work in a small way. Aromatherapy can ease stress, and yes, retail therapy is a thing. However, I certainly wouldn’t recommend blowing your entire paycheck in one fell swoop simply to feel a little more relieved. Taking care of your body can help you feel better and more organized, too. This isn’t an argument against these methods. I utilize them, too. Truthfully, the best self-care is personal responsibility. While little things help, at the end of the day, the best thing you can do for yourself is to be on top of things. Time management and organization may seem daunting at first, but when you take tasks step by step, you’ll find that they get easier later on. So often, it seems that self-care is all about shirking responsibility and sitting inside, doing nothing all day. While a day like this can truly help, that only happens when you’ve got everything else situated already. Otherwise, your stress will eat you

up and cause more problems in the long run. This is the problem with “Twitter self-care,” as I call it. “Twitter self-care” tells you to ignore that exam until the last minute, buy all those snacks and turn your face away from everything that may cause you stress. While ignoring stress is one way of dealing with it, that only prolongs the problem later on. “Twitter self-care” tells you that diffusing essential oils and taking bubble baths is all you need to relieve anxiety and stress. My advice? Put down your phone, set some time to relax and not think, and work on your stuff. The sooner you get hard work out of the way, the less you’ll be stressed later on, and the more time you’ll have to take care of yourself. Kellie Nock is a columnist. Contact her at knock1@kent.edu.

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Truthfully, the best self-care is personal responsibility.” – Kellie Nock

SUBMISSIONS: The Stater hopes to encourage lively debate about the issues of the day on the Opinion Page. Opinions on this page are the authors’ and not necessarily en­dorsed by the Stater or its editors. Readers are encouraged to participate through letters to the editor (email them to lmisera@kent.edu) and guest columns. Submissions become pro­­perty of the Stater and are subject to editing without notice.


Thursday, February 8, 2018

KentWired.com 11

Disconnect and reintegrate with reality NUMBERS TO KNOW:

Joseph Langan

When the president is a former reality TV host who campaigned on being a good businessman, despite filing for bankruptcy six times, it’s easy to lose sight of what is real and what is not. We live in a nation where certain media outlets bombard us with biased “reporting” in order to generate profitdriven outrage, widening the divide between liberals and conservatives. The reality of any situation often lies somewhere in the middle of these polarized perspectives. That is why it’s so important to disconnect for a while and reflect on what surrounds you outside the phone in your pocket. Besides, getting ensnared in our digital web is often bad for our health. Our average attention span has decreased from 12 to eight seconds since 2000. This would put our average attention span just below the infamously distracted goldfish. If the studies are true, how much of a role could our social media ecosystem play?

The first thing we do as soon as we’re bored is reach for a phone. Jumping from texting, to scrolling through Instagram, checking SnapChat to reopening that Safari tab you’d forgotten about can’t be having a healthy effect on our lives. The prominence of brevity and rapidly switching between tasks is doing a lot to ensure we hold onto our thoughts for less time. This communicative infrastructure combined with the fast-paced consumption of bite-sized portions of infotainment is turning culture and ideas into fast food for our brain. How often do you see somebody reading a novel — not a textbook — on the bus? When was the last time you were able to sit through a whole movie without once checking your phone? We need more time to breathe and more space to think. We need to reintegrate ourselves with what is real. Your physical sensations, your thoughts and the self-awareness of being in human relationships are all real phenomena drowned out by the digital cascade.

A constantly flowing Facebook feed is a dam blocking your creative potential. It’s not a problem that these online media exist. The problem is that the options for entertainment are endless. Boredom can be a powerful tool to incite curiosity and to propel you toward pursuing solutions and ideas you wouldn’t have otherwise. If every moment of tedium is burned away by your phone or laptop screen, you’re not generating new thoughts, you’re just digesting the thoughts of others. We seldom take the time to notice the beauty around us. Visit one of our wonderful national parks and go hiking for an afternoon. Bring a partner to a park or take a solitary stroll through the woods. Learn to be more aware of your thoughts with mindfulness and meditation. Turn off your phone for a weekend, leave your laptop on the shelf and rediscover yourself and your aspirations. After all, that’s what life is all about.

Joseph Langan is a columnist. Contact him at jlangan3@kent.edu.

Letter to the Editor: Kent State University: ‘Quarterback U’ Jake Adams Kent State football has been rough. Over the last five years, the team has won just 14 games, which calculates to 2.8 wins per season. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what has gone wrong. Is Kent State not a hot destination for recruits? Or maybe it’s because the Mid-American Conference is viewed as borderline Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level of play? These are not my words, but the thoughts of concerned fans (whom I believe to be incorrect). However, the university did respond to these critics by firing Paul Haynes, who had to take an assistant job at Michigan State, because head coaching jobs are far and slim. I don’t like to dwell on the past. Instead, I want to recite the glory days of the program. It may be hard to remember for some,

but at one point, Kent State was known as “Quarterback U.” This is because of the team’s former quarterbacks becoming stars at the next level. There are a lot to name, so I will only highlight some: First up, Joshua Cribbs. Cribbs played quarterback at Kent State for four seasons. During that time, he lead the team in passing and rushing yards. He would go undrafted and signed by the Cleveland Browns, which as we know, is not a place for quarterbacks. So, he made the tactical decision to be a wide reciever and return specialist. He was amazing at what he did, but the Browns couldn’t help but put Cribbs at his natural position in the Wildcat formation. One must wonder if he could have been the Browns’ quarterback solution, if he didn’t strive to be a Hall of Fame return specialist. Then, there’s Julian Edelman. He would have to fill the huge shoes left by Cribbs, and that he did.

He broke Cribb’s rushing record at Kent State and found himself drafted by the New England Patriots in the 7th round. We all know who owns the quarterback position in Foxborough, but Edelman shines at the positions when needed. Here’s more of a hypothetical: Antonio Gates. It’s hard to believe that arguably one of the best football players in program history didn’t actually play football for Kent State. As a basketball player, he led the Golden Flashes to the Elite Eight, a record for the program. As an NFL player he excels at tight end, but I know if we had him on the football team, he’d flourish as a dual-threat quarterback. He will no doubt be a Hall of Fame pro and one of the biggest “what if”s for Kent State football. Jake Adams is a guest columnist. Contact him at jadams86@kent.edu.

8

Pelosi sets record for speech-length House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi set a record after speaking for 8 hours on DACA. Her main point? Opposing the government’s plan, which doesn’t address immigration issues.

6.4 Earthquake in Taiwan causes damage

At least eight people died and more than 200 were injured after an earthquake with a magnitude of 6.4 late Tuesday.

Cheers&Jeers

Cheers to ... the munchies. A Girl Scout was awarded the best salesperson of her group after she managed to sell 300 boxes of cookies outside a California marijuana dispensary.

Jeers to ... lost mail. An Iowa couple figured out what was happening to their missing mail: A cow from a nearby lot was making its way to their property and eating the couple’s letters.


12 The Kent Stater

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Kent State offers renovated meditation room to all students

Ritu Phogat (left), Soumya Yalamanchili (middle) and Divya Lingwal (right) meditate Tuesday. Helen Yablonski / The Kent Stater

Helen Yablonski Religion Reporter On the second floor of the Student Center, students of all backgrounds have an improved space to practice prayer and meditation on campus. The new meditation room replaces an existing prayer room previously located in the "lost leaders" lounge of the Student Center. What used to be a windowless, four-byfour room has been replaced by a 550-square foot meditation space. Reopened in January 2017, the space is fully equipped with a foot washing station and meditation wall. In addition to other changes, the new area offers storage for student’s personal belongings as well as a larger, more comfortable place to practice worship and self-reflection. Zeynep Ozgur, a junior integrated

life sciences major, said she stops by the meditation room once or twice a day when she is on campus. She uses the space to perform her daily prayers. “I am Muslim, and in Islam we are required perform prayer to God five times a day,” Ozgur said. As a student commuter, she finds it difficult to perform her prayers in a place with little or no distractions. “Sometimes when Muslims pray in public, people may cut in front of them or try to interact with them because they are unaware,” Ozgur said. During Muslim worship, a person should not cut or stand toward a person during their prayers. Outside interruptions are also put aside to focus on worship only. “By having this meditation room, I don't worry about other distractions or where I

will be praying next,” Ozgur said. Soumya Yalamanchili, a public health graduate student, said she visits the space to perform meditation with her friends. Yalamanchili practices a form of yoga called Sudarshan Kriya and uses the room daily for 30 minutes. “This technique cleanses all parts of the body, mind, breath and ego … it purifies all the layers to get the positive energy, and just let go of all the negative things,” Yalamanchili said. Yalamanchili said she remembers a time on campus when the meditation room was not available for students. She found it difficult to find quiet spaces on campus, or in her own home to practice her meditation. “I used to go to my friend’s place, and we both would go to the laundry room, and we practiced,” Yalamanchili said.

Yalamanchili said she is grateful she and her friends now have a space to utilize and practice their craft, and she is currently involved in a volunteer training program to help others practice yoga. With this training, she will be able to organize courses and educate people about the benefits of meditation. Creating this space is part of the Strategic Roadmap to a Distinctive Kent State. The initiative includes a push for the university to become more inclusive for all students. The meditation room cannot be reserved, but it is available to anyone during Student Center building hours. “I feel like it shows respect to my religious practices as well as to people of other faiths,” Ozgur said. “It makes religious practice more accessible.” Contact Helen Yablonski a hyablon@kent.edu.


Thursday, February 8, 2018

KentWired.com 13

Student Recreation and Wellness Center attendance drops despite healthy initiatives Shelbie Goulding Recreation Reporter Kent State offers free nutrition advice and fitness facilities to give students a healthier college lifestyle, but statistics show students have not taken advantage of these opportunities. “Students are more interested in how to become healthy these past couple of years,” said Tanya Falcone, a nutrition expert and the coordinator for the Center of Nutrition Outreach. Falcone gives students free service

to improve eating habits and nutrition health. “Students have been saying they want to be healthy rather than only lose weight.” Falcone helps about 100 students on average each semester. She believes if it wasn’t only her working alone, she would have more students come to the Center of Nutrition Outreach. “I give students advice on eating habits,” Falcone said. “From meal plan dining and eating to-go, I help students alter their food routines to better their health.” Falcone states that every diet is different for each person.

The food choices that are made are based on the individual’s personal health. Although Falcone’s specialty is nutrition, she expresses the importance of exercise. “I usually advise students to go to the Rec,” Falcone said. She provides pre-imposed workouts that must be used on a weekly routine. The diet she applies to a person is based on a person’s daily routine, including their workout habits. Based on recent statistics, students have been attending the fitness facilities on campus less each semester. Nick Barber, the

member and guest services coordinator of the Student Recreation and Wellness Center, analyzes the total amount of students that enter the fitness facility each semester. In spring 2017, the amount of students to utilize the fitness facilities — including the Rec and Tri-Rec — totaled 211,942. In fall 2017, the amount of swipes into the facilities was estimated at 169,146. Some theories to the drop in attendance is that students go to fitness centers off campus, but others choose not to go due to lack of time and effort. “The ‘Freshman 15’ is a myth," Falcone said. “The number 15 comes from the average weight gained in a student’s first year of college. Some students don’t gain weight while others will gain 20-30 pounds.” Falcone can be reached for advice at tfalcon1@kent.edu. Contact Shelbie Goulding at sgouldi1@kent.edu.

The Kent State Student Recreation and Wellness Center offers many activities to promote a healthy lifestyle and physical fitness, like a climbing competition held Feb. 23, 2013. Photo courtesy of Rachael Le Goubin


14 The Kent Stater

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Review

Justin Timberlake goes back to his roots in 'Man of the Woods' Alex Novak Entertainment Reviewer Justin Timberlake is back and officially put everyone on notice that he’s changing things up. What a week it has been for the now 37-year-old pop icon, celebrating his birthday in style with his brand new album release “Man of the Woods” and headlining the Super Bowl LII halftime show in Minnesota. “Filthy” fiercely opens up the album, echoing his past work on the 2006 smash hit “SexyBack.” He bombasts this one with back and forth bass drive womps and a pair of rock guitar breaks to start his return to the mainstream. “I guess I got my swagger back,” sings Timberlake. The success of "Trolls" and its massive hit song “Can’t Stop the Feeling” can still be felt on this record, specifically in the popfunk groove song “Sauce” and the reggae engaged “Wave.” His album is full of exploration and some occasional experimentation. It may not be his best, but it is still a pure creation. JT lets himself be truly open from start to finish, full of that wide-smile fun-at-times charm and then at his most sincere during others. It will make you want to get up out of your seat to dance and sing throughout. We can still see his old pop star tricks at work again in nearly every track. He ultimately takes us back to his roots, to the music he says made him, after the brief dip in the music that made him the biggest pop star of the last decade. Listeners get up close to his life as a husband with tracks like “The Hard Stuff” that illustrates his appreciation for a relationship built together through the struggle, and “Flannel,” where he offers his warmth for her to lean on when she’s broken. Furthermore, it explores the culture of the South that he grew up with in Memphis with “Midnight Summer Jam,” a funky

groove that pays homage to their lifestyle of wholesome hospitality; “Montana,” exploring the wonders of love’s rhythm and reach; and “Livin’ Off the Land,” which examines the hardships of blue-collar, working-class people. Bringing in the guests for the middle tracks, “Morning Light” featuring Alicia Keys is a ballad that mirrors 70’s R&B and classic bubblegum pop. “Say Something” delivers a perfect vocal mesh of melody and harmony between Timberlake and Chris Stapleton that develops into a bluegrass rock anthem with an important message for our current political climate. The duo recognizes here that weighing in on issues of public concern can easily turn into a greater focus on the person and their image than how they’re serving the actual cause at hand, as we’ve often seen to be an issue this past year. Heartfully, he addresses a sweet letter to his wife, actress Jessica Biel, and another to his 2-year-old son son, Silas, who is also the inspiration behind the album title. The song, “Young Man,” is a cute and upbeat title track and heartfelt closer. “Hers (Interlude)” may be one of the most emotional one-minute tunes ever, and it perfectly turns the album toward its rustic, folk and homeward conclusion. “Sometimes the greatest way to say something is to say nothing at all,” sings Timberlake and Stapleton together. “But you gon’ have to stand for something,” he later writes to his song. While it’s not exactly the full country sound that many people expected, this album creates a personal atmosphere that we haven’t seen fully from Timberlake before, and it blends the R&B and pop that we all know JT for unbelievably well with the funk and folk that originates from his southern home. Contact Alex Novak at anovak12@kent.edu.

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Courtesy of RCA Records

He ultimately takes us back to his roots, to the music he says made him.” – Alex Novak


Thursday, February 8, 2018

CLASSIFIEDS Legendary BBQ Pork Every Thursday! Franklin Square Deli See Us @ Facebook Delivery 2:00-4:30 Only Franklin Square Deli Hands Down, The Finest, The Freshest, The Best Soups & Sandwiches! For Over 35 YEARS! Delivery After 2:00

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Kent State Student Media is now seeking motivated students to join our office staff for up to 10hours per week. Duties include: answering phones; taking classified orders, supply replenishment; distribution of materials throughout Franklin Hall; greeting customers, students and faculty/staff; data entry; and other duties as assigned. This position also includes a writing component. Staff member will research and write copy as assigned for special sections, sponsored content and other projects as assigned. Interested candidates should email tbongior@kent.edu for an application.

The Communications Office of the Diocese of Erie seeks a multi-media journalist for its digital presence. The MMJ will work on platforms ranging from Facebook and Twitter to Instagram. Ability to cover news and write features for online and print. Significant involvement with diocesan website, www. ErieRCD.org, relaunching this spring. Responsible for writing/producing/editing weekly video stories for social media. On-camera presence, if appropriate. Must demonstrate strong communications skills and ability to interact with many departments. Some evening and weekend assignments, and travel within northwest Pennsylvania required. The office collaborates closely with the Office of the Bishop, ensuring that priorities and teachings of the Catholic Church are shared with the public in a clear, thoughtful and uplifting manner. Go to http://www. ErieRCD.org/employment. htm for a full profile and details on how to apply. Deadline for application: Feb. 26, 2018.

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” State and local laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. If you feel you have been wrongfully denied housing or discriminated against, call the FHAA at 330-253-2450 for more information.

AVAILABLE NOW. Short term leases and leases in August available. Close to campus. 2 and 3 bedrooms, details for special move-in. Landlord pays heat, water and trash. Good parking, central air. 330-6769440.

Leasing for fall 2018 REMODELED 2,3,4,&5 bedrooms with 2-3 full baths. High quality and close to KSU. Starting $385/mo. 330-5527032

Available Fall! 2 bedroom luxury condo, near Kent State campus, full kitchen, large living room and dining room, washer/dryer in building, offstreet parking, no pets, $450 per bedroom, includes water and trash. Tennent pays for gas and electric. Will not respond to texts or emails. Call Justin 330-328-1084

7 bedroom houses, great location - 1 block from campus, large bedrooms, free parking, big front porch, washer, dryer, lawn, trash and handyman service incl. $345/mo., owner pays partial util. Must have a group of 7. Call or text 330-6072569

Houses for spring semester and 2018-2019 school year. 2 & 3 bedrooms. 330-547-1212

4 bedroom 2 bath, Neat and Clean $270 per month per person plus utilities. Parking available one half block from Mcgilvrey Call Nancy at (330)-472-0501

6 Bedroom 3 Bath North Lincoln 1 Block from Campus Neat and Clean $365 per month per person plus utilities. Please call Nancy at (330) 472-0501.

Leasing for fall 2018 Spacious 2,3,4,&5 bedrooms with 2-3 full baths. Great condition, A/C, washer/dryer, dishwasher, deck, garage. Starting at $350 a room. 330-808-4045

Leasing for Fall. Beautiful, newly redecorated 2 bedroom and 3 bedroom duplexes with attached garage. One block from KSU. $400 per student. 330-687-6122.

Kent 2 and 3 bedroom apartments. Air, appliances, carpet, heat and water paid. No pets or Section 8. $660 and $810. Short term available. 330-677-5577

Apply Now For ‘18-’19 Large 1, 2, 3, & 4 BR Close to campus Call to schedule tour 330-678-3047 www.buckeyeparksmgmt.com

2 BR House for Rent 2018-2019 School Year Close to campus Call to set up tour 330-678-3047

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Houses for spring semester and 2018-2019 school year. 2 & 3 bedrooms. 330-547-1212 5 Bdr House for students available July/August 2018. Call for details 330-592-1848.

7 bedroom houses, great location - 1 block from campus, large bedrooms, free parking, big front porch, washer, dryer, lawn, trash and handyman service incl. $345/mo., owner pays partial util. Must have a group of 7. Call or text 330-607-2569

Fall 7 bedroom rooming house, E College one block off campus 330-815-3523

Large 4 BR for Rent 2018-19 School Year Call to set up tour 330-678-3047

ROOMATE (S) NEEDED East Townhomes Group of females looking for a roommate. 1 Bedroom available for January & for August/ Fall 2018 Rent is $450/m with 1 month FREE! special = $385/m! Rent includes ALL utilities, tv, & internet Call/text Keith 330-689-8888 KSUtownhomes.com

3 BR House for Rent 2018-19 School Year Call to set up tour 330-678-3047

HOW TO ADVERTISE For information about placing a Display ad please call our offices at 330-672-2586 or visit us at 205 Franklin Hall, Kent State University. Our office hours are from 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Classified ads can be placed by fax at (330) 672-4880, over the phone at (330) 672-2586 or by e-mail at ads@ksustudentmedia.com. If you fax or e-mail an ad, please be sure to include run dates, payment info and a way for us to contact you.

DOT GAME

KentWired.com 15


MIND YOUR STEP. KEEP YOUR HEAD OUT

OF THE CLOUDS,

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AND YOUR FEET

ON THE GROUND!

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WWW.KENT.EDU/COMPLIANCE/INCIDENTACCIDENTINJURY KENT STATE UNIVERSITY, KENT STATE AND KSU ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS AND MAY NOT BE USED WITHOUT PERMISSION. KENT STATE UNIVERSITY IS COMMITTED TO ATTAINING EXCELLENCE THROUGH THE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF A DIVERSE STUDENT BODY AND WORKFORCE. 17-BF-00327-009

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The Kent Stater - February 8, 2018  
The Kent Stater - February 8, 2018  
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