Page 1

Read an expert’s tips on dodging the H3N2 flu strain

The

Kent Stater

Page 14 @KentWired

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER | MONDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2018

$605,000

KSU budgets for mounting costs in Lauren Kesterson Title IX lawsuit Page 8

4

KSU athletes use cryotherapy for quick recovery

7

Road woes continue for Flashes at Bowling Green

12

Hiram student impresses at international film festival


2 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

NEWS

A day in the life of nursing majors Emelia Sherin Science Reporter

‘‘

Students in the College of Nursing are beginning to feel the effects of real-world experience. “I couldn't be happier to have ended up with nursing," sophomore nursing major Jennifer Lachendro said. The nursing program has over 400 Bachelor of Science in Nursing graduates every year, along with a 99.6 percent job placement rate within six months of graduation. The program is very competitive and only accepts students with high combined average GPAs. “The anxiety about the amount of material that is required to know is immense and sometimes seems unbearable, but that’s what I signed up for,” Lachendro said. Emma Valare, a senior public health major, is applying for the accelerated two-year nursing program after graduating this summer with a Bachelor of Public Health. The accelerated two-year program lets the student work toward a nursing degree if they have already Cleveland

There’s nothing they do that isn’t hard.”

TheKent

Stater 240 FRANKLIN HALL KENT STATE UNIVERSITY KENT, OHIO 44242 NEWSROOM 330-672-2584

– Kim Lecturer

completed general core classes. Valare originally applied for the nursing program twice, but did not get in due to her GPA. The nursing program’s requirements are 30 hours of college-level coursework, including classes in progress, and a combination of their science and cumulative GPA. “The nursing program has to meet a quota of students with the top GPA per semester,” Valare said. “There is no interview process, so those who have good resumes but poor GPA don’t stand a chance.” When accepted to the program, students are required to complete eight to 12 hours of clinical rotations per week every semester until they graduate. Clinical rotations are a hands-on practicum experience where students work in hospitals to obtain real patient interaction and apply what they learn. Lachendro mentioned professors taking 14 credit hours during their first semester of clinical rotations in case they become overwhelmed with the additional coursework. “I regularly question myself as to why I stuck with nursing … while driving to clinical in the snow at 5:45 a.m.," senior nursing major David Hartsook said. Hartsook has encountered many difficult

situations during his clinical, especially when patients express their overwhelming emotions to the students, such as fear and sorrow. “We learn therapeutic communication techniques, but nothing really prepares you for that situation aside from experiencing it and learning the best way to address these issues,” Hartsook said. Although the real world of medicine may seem scary, the students are well prepared by their professors and mentors. The coursework may be redundant, but “every nursing professor I’ve had is extremely passionate about the profession, and that makes all the difference in the world,” Lachendro said. “There’s nothing they do that isn’t hard,” said Dr. Kim Cleveland, a lecturer in the College of Nursing. Cleveland teaches an array of classes, such as health policy, healthcare law, nursing leadership and many more. She believes that students view life through a different lens with every lesson and patient interaction. “I knew I wanted to be challenged each and every day, and I wanted my learning to be lifelong,” Lachendro said. “ … All of those reasons … have brought me to nursing.” Contact Emelia Sherin at esherin@kent.edu

STUDENT MEDIA BUSINESS OFFICE • 330-672-2586

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lydia Taylor ltaylo49@kent.edu

DESIGN DIRECTOR Addie Gall agall7@kent.edu

OPINION EDITOR Bruno Beidacki bbeidack@kent.edu

ASSIGNING EDITORS Cameron Gorman cgorman2@kent.edu

STUDENT MEDIA DIRECTOR Kevin Dilley

330-672-0887

kdilley@kent.edu

DIGITAL DIRECTOR Ray Padilla rpadill2@kent.edu

SPORTS EDITOR Cameron Hoover choove14@kent.edu

COPY DESK CHIEF Lauren Sasala lsasala1@kent.edu

Taylor Robinson trobin30@kent.edu

ADVERTISING MANAGER

Tami Bongiorni

330-672-6306

tbongior@kent.edu

MANAGING EDITOR Lucas Misera lmisera@kent.edu

FEATURES EDITOR Rachel Duthie rduthie@kent.edu

ILLUSTRATOR Michaela Courtney mcourtn4@kent.edu

Henry Palattella hpalatte@kent.edu

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jacyna Ortiz

330-672-0886

jortiz4@kent.edu

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Maddie Scalzi Hayden Seddon

OFFICE MANAGER

Lorie Bednar

330-672-2572

lbednar@kent.edu

SPONSORED CONTENT WRITER Madi Baughman

DIVERSITY EDITOR Tierra Thomas tthoma54@kent.edu

CARTOONIST Joseph McGrellis jmcgrell@kent.edu

BUSINESS OFFICER

Norma Young

330-672-0884

njyoung@kent.edu

STATER ADVISER

Sue Zake

330-672-2584

szake@kent.edu

ADVERTISING • 330-672-2586 SALES MANAGER Christian Caudill

ads@ksustudentmedia.com


Monday, February 5, 2018

KentWired.com 3

‘An art of war’: The Women’s March Caroline Henneman Humanities Reporter

W

omen and allies across the nation armed themselves with posters, witty slogans and "pussy hats" Jan. 20 for the second annual Women’s March.

Though there is no way of obtaining the exact number of people who marched in 2018, major cities like Chicago, New York and Cleveland are estimating 300,000, 200,000 and 7,000 marchers, respectively. All together, an article by Fortune estimated at least a million people took to the streets this year to protest a broad amount of equality issues they believe plague the United States. “I’m here to promote peace,” said Vietnam War veteran Lou Pumphrey. “I’m trying to show not all veterans, not all Americans, are blood-thirsty killers. (War) is like trying to put out fire with gasoline. It just makes matters worse.” Citizens like Pumphrey joined together in Cleveland to raise awareness for topics like sexism, racism, bigotry, discrimination and hate that affects several subgroups of American culture. Though there were more marchers in 2017 — around 3 million — 2018 packed a punch. This year’s march spoke on new movements that have arrived throughout the past year, such as the trend, #MeToo, for women telling stories of sexual harassment and assault and the activist group and movement “Time’s Up,” which promotes awareness for women inequality. The crowd marches through the streets of Cleveland as they lift flags and signs during the Women's March on Jan. 20, 2018. Adrian Leuthauser / The Kent Stater Marchers took to the streets Jan. 20, but these same streets, filled with a grievance that has held them to a longing She explained the most important part of “Marches are for the marchers,” Holt said. activism and passion a day before, were flooded for more, a conviction that we can do better marching is the sense of unity it entails and “They are ultimately the people who will make once again with traffic and normal day-to-day — and we can change this. Marching is like utilizing this feeling as encouragement to a difference, who will try and make an impact. activities Jan. 21. church and coming together to pray. You continue working toward equality. Historically, this difference is in the laws our It has been two weeks; the picket signs “You shouldn’t tell yourself that marching come together to provoke something on the government makes and holding accountable have been recycled or lay in the trunks outside that you feel on the inside.” is enough,” said Sunny Matthews, the the people who perpetuate this unfair culture. of cars and protesters marched back into Both Matthews and Holt agreed a march Marches are only secondarily for those at home co-chair of the 2018 Women’s March in their everyday lives. The feeling of justice is only a beginning. The best way to continue Cleveland. “A march is to make us visible and the administrations above us. It is up to the that once filled millions of Americans now and to spread a message to the nation. ... Our promoting equality is through voting, running dissipates back into feelings of frustrations as marcher to make the difference.” goal is to make sure women and our allies Holt continued to remark on the art of for local office, being socially and politically seemingly nothing changes. know we have power too.” marching and the science behind change. It engaged and continuing to support others in Did marching work? Did walking around Matthews called a march a “starting line” all begins with patience. their fights against inequality as well. in circles change anything? And where do and “an art of war” for change. As women’s rights activist Susan we, as a nation, go from here? Contact Caroline Henneman “Marching is an art, but it’s almost like a Dr. Suzanne Holt, the director of women’s Brownmiller said, “(Change) is a long-haul.” at chennem3@kent.edu. practice of faith,” Holt said. “Those who seek Holt said the nation should not expect studies at Kent State, said marches do matter. change have something like faith. They have to see change tomorrow or in a week.


4 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

'Like something out of a spaceship': Kent State athletes use cryotherapy for recovery Cameron Hoover Sports Editor Jordan Korinek and the Kent State women’s basketball team needed a quick and simple way to recover after a grueling road trip at the Play4Kay Showcase in Las Vegas, which saw the Flashes play three games in three days some 2,100 miles from home. When the Flashes returned home bruised and sore from their travels, teammates took turns recuperating in a five-foot barrel of liquid nitrogen chilled to -230 degrees Fahrenheit, a scene that looked like it was ripped straight from a science-fiction space opera. When the players exited the machine, they felt the same effects they normally would after more traditional methods like ice baths. The difference? This method only took three minutes. The athletes underwent “whole body cryotherapy,” which the Kent State athletic department is using to aid in muscle recovery and pain management. Physical exertion for studentathletes, whether it be after practice or competition, allows lactic acid to build up in the bloodstream, said Michelle Rura, the assistant athletic director for sports medicine. This lactic acid causes muscle soreness and bumps and bruises for players.

Rura said the sub-zero temperatures of the cryotherapy chamber cause the blood vessels to contract and constrict. This flushes out the blood that has been tainted with lactic acid and allows new, healthier blood to flow through the vessels. In turn, this relieves muscle soreness and “repairs them from whatever damage happened during their participation.” The main selling point for whole-body cryotherapy is the duration of the treatment. The three-minute process is equivalent to a 15- to 20-minute ice bath, said Trent Stratton, the associate athletic director for sports medicine, sports performance and studentathlete well-being. “The benefits are a lot quicker,” Korinek said. “It’s only three minutes in there. Overall, it’s just helped our team so much. We used it after the Vegas trip. It helped us recover a lot quicker.” With those colder temperatures and faster recovery speeds comes a sensation unlike what most people have felt before. “It feels like you walked out in the freezing cold to get your newspaper in the morning, except you’re in your underwear,” Stratton said. Stratton emphasized the athletic department uses the machine only for recovery. There has been anecdotal evidence

of cryotherapy being used to treat illnesses from depression to fibromyalgia, but there has been little peer-reviewed research to support those claims. Cryotherapy is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for the previously mentioned ailments, but the device is approved as safe for use. Stratton argued the cryotherapy chamber is no different than an ice bath, which also hasn’t been certified as a healing technique by the FDA. The cryotherapy chamber at Kent State is the first of its kind to be offered by a MidAmerican Conference school, but many other universities and high-profile athletes have jumped on the train, including LeBron James, the University of Alabama and the Philadelphia Eagles. Stratton played an integral part in the design and acquisition of the athletic department’s new facility, which includes the cryotherapy chamber. He is one of three employees who is certified to operate the machine. He said at the end of each year, the athletic department determines items they need and ones they want.

‘‘

“We identified that as something that we wanted,” Stratton said. “Then we had to go through all the university channels and get a whole bunch of safety measures and precautions in place and figure out the best way to utilize the space it was going to be in.” The chamber itself cost $50,000, and each tank of liquid nitrogen costs $100. While not all teams on campus have chosen to use the cryotherapy chamber as a means of post-activity recovery, Stratton said most of the athletes who have used it have reported positive experiences.

It feels like you walked out in the freezing cold to get your newspaper in the morning, except you’re in your underwear.” – Trent Stratton Associate athletic director for sports and medicine

Teams across professional and collegiate sports use cryotherapy treatment, including the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, Cleveland Cavaliers and Philadelphia Eagles. Photos courtesy of U.S. Cryotherapy.


Monday, February 5, 2018

‘‘

KentWired.com 5

If you’re going to overdo anything, why wouldn’t you overdo health care?” – Todd Starkey Women’s basketball coach

The Kent State athletic department's state-of-the-art cryotherapy chamber. The $50,000 device is being used to help student-athletes recover from minor bumps, bruises and soreness after competitions and practices. Bob Christy / Kent State Athletics

First impressions with the device can be disconcerting, possibly because of the futuristic design of the machine. But as Mitch Peterson, a sophomore guard on the men’s basketball team, said, “You get used to it.” “It looks like something out of a spaceship,” said Peterson, a frequent user of the chamber. “I was kind of intimidated by it, but it’s cool now that I’ve got used to it.” Korinek and her teammates on the women’s basketball team are some of the heaviest users of the device. At one point, coach Todd Starkey made the cryotherapy chamber mandatory recovery for players who played over 20 minutes in a game. “I think we’re still discovering the best ways to use it, but

what we’ve been trying to do is be very specific with how we’re trying to use it,” Starkey said. “We’ve had a lot of backto-back games, so it’s nice to be able to have our players, especially high-minute players, be able to get in it for three minutes and have the benefits of recovery.” As the department and individual teams and players feel out the most effective and efficient ways to use the cryotherapy chamber, Starkey is looking to the future, seeing the method as a potential tool to entice recruits. “Recruiting is all about selling the advantage you believe you have over other people, and this is certainly one,” Starkey said. “I think we have some of the best athletic training and health care in the league. Parents want to know

their kids are being taken care of. It already has been a benefit to us in recruiting.” Skeptics exist, but Starkey, Peterson and Korinek agree the chamber is a worthwhile investment for the athletic department. “If you’re going to overdo anything, why wouldn’t you overdo health care?” Starkey said. “I could see people being skeptical about the costs we spend on maybe other things — although I don’t think we do anything in an exorbitant way here — but if you’re going to splurge in any area for studentathletes, why not in health care?" Contact Cameron Hoover at choove14@kent.edu.


6 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

#Trumpgret expands, but not for all

President Donald Trump pauses mid-speech at the Covelli Centre in Youngstown, Ohio, on Tuesday, July 25, 2017. Lydia Taylor / The Kent Stater

Addie Gall Student Politics Reporter #Trumpgret, a hashtag Donald Trump voters have used to express their unhappiness and disappointment via social media, ballooned in popularity since Trump came into office. Over a year after the start of Trump’s presidency, some of his voters are expressing regret for their decision. One post on reddit claims to have found a tweet that reads, “I voted for you but you have been such a disappointment. As much as I disliked Hillary I wonder if the USA would have been better off with her as president. As much as you believe her to be ‘crooked,' she is a saint compared to you or any of your White House staff.”

Though the hashtag has created an outlet for those frustrated with their decision, not all supporters have participated in the social media movement. Kaitlin Bennett, a senior biology major and president of Kent State’s chapter of Turning Point USA, said she doesn't feel #Trumpgret. She likes Trump because he’s not afraid to call out both sides. “I think Trump is very America-first, and I think the Republicans who have been against him have shown their true colors — that they aren’t,” Bennett said. Bennett said ending lottery basis immigration has been one of Trump’s successes. She said she has been a Trump supporter from the start of his candidacy and is happy with his achievements thus far — and perhaps even his controversy.

“What interested me was that nobody liked him and that everyone was freaking out about everything he said,” Bennett said. Not all Trump voters, however, were supporters from the beginning. In the primaries, some favored other candidates. Jonathan Lund, a sophomore paralegal studies major, originally supported Ted Cruz. “I voted for Trump because there was no one else,” Lund said. Lund said he doesn’t feel #Trumpgret a year later and added he hopes the economy will keep growing under the Trump administration. Stevan Krainovich, a junior political science major, voted for Trump, but said his rhetoric is a problem. “If you just look at policy-wise, I would say he’s done really good things,” Krainovich said. "But when he tweets, it

discredits everything he’s done.” Krainovich didn’t support Trump until the general election. First, he backed Jeb Bush, and then Marco Rubio — until they dropped out of the race. “I was still skeptical about it until the end,” Krainovich said. While Trump was not Krainovich’s ideal candidate, he does not regret his decision to vote for him. He said overall the first year has been good, even with the bad that accompanied it. “You don’t have to like the person in office, but you want him to do good,” Krainovich said. “There’s people that I don’t like, but I don’t want to see them fail because then that fails us as a country.” Contact Addie Gall at agall7@kent.edu.


Monday, February 5, 2018

KentWired.com 7

SPORTS

Second-half struggles down Flashes in loss at Bowling Green Cameron Hoover Sports Editor Even after Kent State put the MidAmerican Conference on notice with a statement win over then-undefeated Buffalo Tuesday at the M.A.C. Center, the Flashes still couldn’t carry that momentum on the road, a story coach Rob Senderoff has been familiar with this season. Kent State (12-11, 6-4 MAC) looked like it was cruising its way to an easy win, as the Flashes jumped out to a 20-5 lead over Bowling Green (14-9, 5-5 MAC) after a Falcons timeout with 10:33 left in the first half. At that point, Bowling Green had missed 14 of its first 16 shots. The Falcons slowly chipped away at the lead, and a stepback jumper with a foot on the three-point line from Justin Turner cut the Flashes’ lead to seven points at halftime.

The Flashes came out of the break sluggish, and it only took seven minutes and 35 seconds for the game to be tied on a dunk from Antwon Lillard. The game went back and forth until Bowling Green’s Matt Fox converted an andone with 3:56 left to put the Falcons up, 61-56. The foul went against Kent State’s Danny Pippen, his fifth. He finished with one point before his disqualification. The Flashes never led again, and poor execution and Bowling Green’s free-throw shooting down the stretch ended the game with a Falcons victory, 70-62. Bowling Green outscored the Flashes, 46-31, in the second half. The loss gives Kent State a 2-7 record in true away games this season, including 1-4 in the MAC. “It’s a 40-minute game, and the same way we played really well Tuesday (against Buffalo) for 40 minutes, it was like a complete reversal today,” Senderoff said. “We got out

Coach Rob Senderoff gives instructions during a timeout during Kent State's 70-62 loss at Bowling Green Saturday. Courtesy of Nathan Shively

to a great start, but didn’t sustain the effort or consistency that you need.” Senderoff had no explanation for the shift in the game. “I’m going to have to look at it and watch the film on that,” Senderoff said. “You’ve got to be all about winning at all times. When you’re not and you’re worrying about other things, it’s tough to win.” Kent State played its offense mostly through juniors Jaylin Walker and Adonis De La Rosa, as the pair each scored 20 points and pulled down six rebounds. De La Rosa shot 7-for-11 from the field and 6-8 from the free-throw line, while Walker finished 7-for-17, including 5-for-13 from three-point range. Junior point guard Jalen Avery added 11 points and four assists. Freshman guard Justin Turner led the

Junior point guard Jalen Avery reacts to a foul call during Kent State's 70-62 loss at Bowling Green Saturday. Avery scored 11 points and added four assists in the defeat. Courtesy of Nathan Shively

Falcons with 20 points on 8-for-18 shooting, including three rebounds, three assists and three steals. Turner has now scored at least 20 points in seven games this season. Junior forward Demajeo Wiggins added 13 points and nine rebounds for the Falcons, one off his 10th double-double of the season. Sophomore guard Rodrick Caldwell made two three-pointers en route to a 12-point performance, and Lillard finished with 11. Kent State returns to the court to host Eastern Michigan (13-10, 4-6 MAC) at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the M.A.C. Center. “We’ve just got to keep working,” Senderoff said. “That’s it — just have to keep working and try to get better.”

Contact Cameron Hoover at choove14@kent.edu.

Senior guard Kevin Zabo watches from the floor as three Bowling Green players chase a loose ball on Saturday. Zabo scored four points, his lowest total during a Mid-American Conference game, in the Flashes' 70-62 loss. Courtesy of Nathan Shively


8 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

Monday, February 5, 2018

KentWired.com 9

COVER

Kent State budgets more than $600,000 for Kesterson Title IX lawsuit Ben Orner Enterprise Producer for TV2

Follow the money: Important figures in the Kesterson lawsuit $605,000: How much KSU has budgeted for legal representation in the Lauren Kesterson lawsuit.

$325,000: How much KSU $170,488.83: How much KSU $175: The hourly rate has budgeted for the suit this has paid its law firm, Amer that KSU is paying Amer fiscal year (since July 2017). Cunningham, to defend it in Cunningham. the suit.

Kent State plans to spend more than half a million dollars to fight a lawsuit brought forth by former Flashes softball player Lauren Kesterson, who claims the university and her coach covered up her rape by the coach’s son. Kent State budgeted $605,000 over the past three fiscal years for outside legal counsel in the Title IX suit, said Mike Tierney, a spokesperson for the Ohio attorney general’s office. Filed in February 2016, the suit claims head coach Karen Linder’s son, Tucker, raped Kesterson in her dorm room in 2012. When Kesterson met with Linder in May 2014 to file a Title IX complaint with the university, she said Linder failed to report it as required by university policy. Kesterson also claims she reported Linder’s actions to the athletic department that August, but athletic director Joel Nielsen intervened to stop the filing of a formal complaint and no-contact orders. The lawsuit claims Linder blamed Kesterson for her resignation later in August, causing retaliation from teammates, coaches and alumni. Akron law firm Amer Cunningham Co., L.P.A. is representing Kent State in the suit. So far the firm has billed the university $170,488.83 for its services, Tierney said. Kent State is not a new client for Amer Cunningham; the law firm represented the university in a workplace discrimination suit decided in 2000. A sample of invoices obtained by KentWired via a public records request show Kent State is paying the firm $175 per hour. The invoices outline some of Amer Cunningham’s services, which include fact-finding, strategizing, performing case assessments and preparing documents. In fiscal year 2018, which began last July, Kent State budgeted $325,000 for the suit and has paid Amer Cunningham $45,833.58 so far this fiscal year, Tierney said. Portage County-based lawyer Tim Smith said even though large state universities like Kent State have legal teams (like Kent State’s Office of General Counsel), it is normal for outside lawyers to represent state universities in major suits like this one.

Karen Linder, former Kent State softball coach. Photo courtesy of Kent State Athletics

“The university is a state agency, and as such, the attorney general is its law firm,” Smith said. He added that the attorney general’s office acts as a middleman in the process. “The attorney general’s office would hire somebody to handle litigation on behalf of the university,” Smith said. The attorney general’s office’s involvement in the case stops there, though. Tierney said Kent State, not the attorney general’s office, sets the budget and pays the bills. When asked how the university makes

budgeting decisions for outside lawsuits and how much more it plans to spend on the Kesterson lawsuit, Eric Mansfield, Kent State’s executive director of university media relations, said the university does not comment on pending litigation. “The university cannot comment on the specifics of litigation or other details protected by privacy laws,” he said in a statement. “Kent State University supports and promotes policies prohibiting sexual harassment, sexual misconduct and retaliation. We enforce

our policies and protocols with prompt and impartial investigations. We also offer comprehensive support to victims of sexual violence. These policies and practices reflect our core commitment to fostering a safe, respectful environment across our eight-campus system.” The case is currently in discovery, which is the pre-trial phase in a lawsuit in which both sides gather evidence and prepare for trial. A jury trial could begin as early as Dec. 3.

Contact Ben Orner at borner@kent.edu.


8 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

Monday, February 5, 2018

KentWired.com 9

COVER

Kent State budgets more than $600,000 for Kesterson Title IX lawsuit Ben Orner Enterprise Producer for TV2

Follow the money: Important figures in the Kesterson lawsuit $605,000: How much KSU has budgeted for legal representation in the Lauren Kesterson lawsuit.

$325,000: How much KSU $170,488.83: How much KSU $175: The hourly rate has budgeted for the suit this has paid its law firm, Amer that KSU is paying Amer fiscal year (since July 2017). Cunningham, to defend it in Cunningham. the suit.

Kent State plans to spend more than half a million dollars to fight a lawsuit brought forth by former Flashes softball player Lauren Kesterson, who claims the university and her coach covered up her rape by the coach’s son. Kent State budgeted $605,000 over the past three fiscal years for outside legal counsel in the Title IX suit, said Mike Tierney, a spokesperson for the Ohio attorney general’s office. Filed in February 2016, the suit claims head coach Karen Linder’s son, Tucker, raped Kesterson in her dorm room in 2012. When Kesterson met with Linder in May 2014 to file a Title IX complaint with the university, she said Linder failed to report it as required by university policy. Kesterson also claims she reported Linder’s actions to the athletic department that August, but athletic director Joel Nielsen intervened to stop the filing of a formal complaint and no-contact orders. The lawsuit claims Linder blamed Kesterson for her resignation later in August, causing retaliation from teammates, coaches and alumni. Akron law firm Amer Cunningham Co., L.P.A. is representing Kent State in the suit. So far the firm has billed the university $170,488.83 for its services, Tierney said. Kent State is not a new client for Amer Cunningham; the law firm represented the university in a workplace discrimination suit decided in 2000. A sample of invoices obtained by KentWired via a public records request show Kent State is paying the firm $175 per hour. The invoices outline some of Amer Cunningham’s services, which include fact-finding, strategizing, performing case assessments and preparing documents. In fiscal year 2018, which began last July, Kent State budgeted $325,000 for the suit and has paid Amer Cunningham $45,833.58 so far this fiscal year, Tierney said. Portage County-based lawyer Tim Smith said even though large state universities like Kent State have legal teams (like Kent State’s Office of General Counsel), it is normal for outside lawyers to represent state universities in major suits like this one.

Karen Linder, former Kent State softball coach. Photo courtesy of Kent State Athletics

“The university is a state agency, and as such, the attorney general is its law firm,” Smith said. He added that the attorney general’s office acts as a middleman in the process. “The attorney general’s office would hire somebody to handle litigation on behalf of the university,” Smith said. The attorney general’s office’s involvement in the case stops there, though. Tierney said Kent State, not the attorney general’s office, sets the budget and pays the bills. When asked how the university makes

budgeting decisions for outside lawsuits and how much more it plans to spend on the Kesterson lawsuit, Eric Mansfield, Kent State’s executive director of university media relations, said the university does not comment on pending litigation. “The university cannot comment on the specifics of litigation or other details protected by privacy laws,” he said in a statement. “Kent State University supports and promotes policies prohibiting sexual harassment, sexual misconduct and retaliation. We enforce

our policies and protocols with prompt and impartial investigations. We also offer comprehensive support to victims of sexual violence. These policies and practices reflect our core commitment to fostering a safe, respectful environment across our eight-campus system.” The case is currently in discovery, which is the pre-trial phase in a lawsuit in which both sides gather evidence and prepare for trial. A jury trial could begin as early as Dec. 3.

Contact Ben Orner at borner@kent.edu.


10 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

OPINION

The Cavs need to trade Isaiah Thomas. Now.

JOSEPH McGRELLIS’ VIEW

Drew Taylor It has been a rough season for Cleveland Cavaliers fans. While the team is currently 30-21 and sitting at third place in the Eastern Conference, the magic from the last few seasons doesn’t seem to be there anymore. Many are considering the idea that they might not make the Finals this season, resulting in another LeBron James departure from the Land in this summer’s free agency. Because of this panic, fans and sportswriters expect the Cavs to make a big move before the trade deadline. They may trade a bench player or two, or even the first-round draft pick they acquired from the Brooklyn Nets. But I believe a move that would work out is trading away the star they received in the Kyrie Irving deal: Isaiah Thomas. Despite the wonderful season Thomas had last year, this season has been nothing short of a nightmare for him. After missing the first few months because of an injury, his return to basketball has not worked out for the Cavs. Although he is well known to be a terrible defensive player due to his short height, it has been especially worse for his new team. Analytics have shown it to be possibly one of the worst defensive seasons a player has ever had in the NBA. Even Thomas’ offense, which is what made him a star in previous years, is underwhelming. His shooting percentage over the course of his career is 44 percent, yet this year he is only making 36 percent of his shots. The numbers get even worse from the three-point line, where he is shooting well below his career average 36 percent at only 25 percent. His win shares rating — a statistic that measures how many more games a team wins with a player on the court — is so bad that it is currently in the negative. In other words, he is costing the team games instead of helping the Cavs win. It also does not help that rumors of a dispute with teammate Kevin Love have recently made headlines.

This is why he should be on the trade block when teams look to do deals with the Cavs this week. This is not meant to be a slight against Isaiah Thomas as a person. In his short time in Cleveland, he has not represented the team or the city in a negative light. But while here, he has not been a good fit with the team as a starting point guard. If the team could include him in a package in exchange for a solid player, they would be just fine starting Jose Calderon instead. The Golden State Warriors, the well-known rivals of the Cavaliers, are looking stronger than ever. The Houston Rockets and Boston Celtics have also looked intimidating this season. If the Cavaliers want one more chance to win a title before LeBron leaves the team or gets too old to carry it, they need to make a move quickly. Drew Taylor is a columnist. Contact him at dtaylo78@kent.edu.

‘‘

But I believe a move that would work out is trading away the star they received in the Kyrie Irving deal: Isaiah Thomas.” – Drew Taylor

SUBMISSIONS: The Stater hopes to encourage lively debate about the issues of the day on the Opinion Page. Opinions on this page are the authors’ and not necessarily en­dorsed by the Stater or its editors. Readers are encouraged to participate through letters to the editor (email them to lmisera@kent.edu) and guest columns. Submissions become pro­­perty of the Stater and are subject to editing without notice.


Monday, February 5, 2018

‘Family secrets, Andrew.’ Andrew Atkins One of my uncles recently told me of a time when I was in elementary school, and I ran out of the house on my way to the day’s adventure. My mom called after me: “Family secrets, Andrew!” I can think of a few reasons why she might have said that to me. One, my sister never knew when to stop talking, and I inherited that. Two, I habitually overshared. Three, some things that are (in retrospect) harmless could have landed my family in hot water. Case in point: My dad had a convertible. The backseat had a gigantic hole burned in the upholstery from a cigarette or something, and the entire interior perpetually smelled like smoke and gasoline. My dad, in all his nonsense, decided to lend this convertible to a 12-year-old neighborhood boy so the kid could practice backing up and down the driveway. Yes, I know a 12-year-old doesn’t need

to practice driving, but that’s a moot point because my dad was drunk and my mom wasn’t around to pump the brakes because of the joint custody situation. Anywho. We all piled into the backseat, careful to avoid the foul-smelling hole and enjoyed the excitement of going backward ten feet and forward ten feet — very slowly. Of course, this was incredible to me. I went into my kindergarten class and told anybody who would (and wouldn’t) listen about this fantastic adventure I had in my driveway. My teacher heard, and a very nice woman called me into the principal’s office and asked me to share this adventure with her, too. How could I stay quiet? So that’s the story of how my mom got a very unhappy phone call from the office of the very nice woman. Reflecting back, I realize I haven’t lost this habit of sharing, but this applies to so much more in my life than just the — relatively — exciting things. I’ve never been particularly adept at keeping “family secrets” — at least not the kind that exclusively apply to me. Sharing the things that hurt me most has always been one of my greatest sources of healing, and I’ve often found it particularly helpful to let

out the feelings I’ve been bottling up. And let’s face it, bottling things up is a coping mechanism that works for few people. Leon Seltzer for “Psychology Today” notes that while venting doesn’t always work, it’s typically a useful way to calm yourself. “Generally, it’s better to let things out than hold them in,” he writes. “And doing so feels almost akin to problem-solving — in the moment, at least. Venting your frustrations alleviates tension and stress. You almost always feel better — and ‘lighter’ — after sharing some perceived threat, indignity, misfortune or injustice.” He goes on to note that too much venting can actually negate positive effects, but we have to start somewhere. I’m of the opinion that we should work to destigmatize sharing things that make us vulnerable. You don’t have to share it with the world, but I encourage those difficult conversations with the people we trust most. Our vulnerabilities are what make us human. We shouldn’t try to be anything but. Andrew Atkins is a columnist. Contact him at aatkins5@kent.edu.

Analyzing the true ‘State of the Union’ Joseph Langan President Trump said, “This is our new American moment. There has never been a better time to live the American Dream.” What he didn’t say was the truth: It’s time to open our eyes to the reality we’ve been too scared to face. The union is in shambles beneath a facade of symbolic progress. Trump talked about economic growth without mentioning the most anti-consumer decision in decades: the repeal of net neutrality. This repeal tyrannizes the freedom of information. Our internet has been sold to a handful of powerful internet service providers, while services like Google and Facebook continue to manipulate you, the product, collecting and selling your data to the highest bidders. Climate change was never mentioned, but Trump triumphantly proclaimed: “We have ended the war on energy and the war on clean coal!” Pulling the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement is nothing less than a threat to our planet. It positions America as a rogue state starkly opposed to the broad global consensus. Our dogmatic devotion to fossil fuels hampers the

courageous efforts of our allies. The controversial decision to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem amassed international outcry. Not only does it violate our feigned impartiality in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, but the move legitimizes Israel’s demolitions and military occupation of Palestinian territory. The human rights abuses committed against the Palestinian people have been condemned by the U.N., but Trump whitewashes this conflict, swiping aside decades of oppression and attempts at a peaceful resolution. The State of the Union was filled with symbolic gestures and superficial platitudes, just like his campaign promises. One of the most dangerous is Trump’s symbolic solution to the opioid crisis. Make no mistake: America is currently in the middle of the deadliest drug crisis, and Ohio is at the center of this epidemic. Drug overdose is the number one cause of death for Americans under the age of 50. The opioid crisis is heavily associated with heroin and morphine, but far more people start using these drugs because they get addicted to overprescribed prescription painkillers.

Trump’s solution to this healthcare crisis is to “get tougher on drug dealers and drug pushers.” We’ve had half a century of increased police militarization and for-profit prisons filled to the brim — almost half of which are those incarcerated for nonviolent drug offenses. It doesn’t work, and we’re worse off than we ever have been. To thunderous applause, Trump declared indefinite continuation of the internationally illegal Guantanamo Bay. The detention center, which has been the subject of much controversy over its 16 year legacy of injustice, is still going strong, despite a majority of its prisoners having never been charged with a crime. I’ve never seen the president look more elated than when he announced they will continue building our mountainous nuclear missile arsenal. A small fraction of our stockpile could wipe out human civilization several times over, but the president believes we’ll be safer with even more weapons of mass destruction. Is this our “new American moment?” If so, I’d be embarrassed to brag about it. Joseph Langan is a columnist. Contact him at jlangan3@kent.edu.

KentWired.com 11

NUMBERS TO KNOW:

22 116 Still no traces of missing oil tanker

A group of 22 Indian nationals are still missing after the oil tanker they worked in disappeared near the West coast of Africa.

Two dead, many injured in Amtrak crash

An Amtrak accident in South Carolina ended up killing two employees and left 116 people injured after the train derailed.

Cheers&Jeers

Cheers to ... cheating? Hasbro seems to have found a new target audience. The company is releasing a version of Monopoly that rewards those who can cheat without getting caught. Sounds like fun!

Jeers to ... art haters. Florida homeowners were fined $100 a day after refusing to cover up or redo their house’s paint job, which is a mural of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.”


12 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

Local filmmaker wins big at international film festival Jarett Theberge Visual Arts Reporter A first-time filmmaker won the top prize at an international short films festival in Kent on Saturday. Hiram College sophomore Charlie Wirfel won the jury’s choice award at the 15th annual Standing Rock International Shorts Festival in their first entry to any film festival. Wirfel’s film, “Say That Again?,” was made as a side project and beat out the competition from Belgium, Canada, Germany and others. The short centered around two characters falling in love, except one of them can’t quite catch the other’s name, and this becomes a problem as their relationship continues. Wirfel said before the show the film was a “ridiculous nonsensical comedy” and seemed to move the jury panel enough to be awarded the prize. “I’m really impressed that I can be amongst so many wonderful artists and see all their work,” Wirfel said. “I’ve been making films for my personal use since I was 9 years old. I really like making film as a side project." The shorts festival rarely sees local artists taking home prizes, but as Jeff Ingram, the producer of the festival, said, there was more narrative and meaning from The audience watches various short films at the Kent Stage Saturday evening. Jarett Theberge / The Kent Stater the films this year. Ingram said he making films and short videos these days,” thinks people wanted to see that. Simpson said. “Just being creative and not “A lot of the time you get that in short doing it for money ­­— it elevates the whole film festivals,” Ingram said. “It’s abstract, it’s art, it’s whatever it means to you. These scene here.” As the event continues to be a yearly films took control of the storyline, and you gathering of visual artists and members of knew what they were about.” the community that continues to grow, the Dan Nelsen, a filmmaker in Akron, also attendees remain the biggest supporters. won a people’s choice award at the fest for Nadine Gomez attended the festival on his film “To Your Liking.” Saturday to make it her fourth consecutive In addition to the strong showing by area year at the festival because of the fun artists, the community also celebrated the atmosphere it holds and the attention to art 15th anniversary of international short films in the neighborhood that it gives. in Kent. “Every movie is short, so if you don’t like Tom Simpson, a representative from the one, there’s a new one coming up, and in Kent Stage and a partner with Standing the end you get a say,” Gomez said. “Let’s Rock for the event, has been involved with support (the local artists); if we don't support the festival since its early years and has seen them, who will? We have to be the first ones it grow in international participation and to do it.” community relevance. “There are more and more people Contact Jarett Theberge at jtheberg@kent.edu. Attendees watch several short films Saturday at the Kent Stage. Standing Rock Cultural Arts presented the 15th annual film festival, showcasing short films from Italy, France, South Korea and the UK. Sara Donato / The Kent Stater


Monday, February 5, 2018

KentWired.com 13

Better budgeting: College students make use of financial apps KE KSJJ47288 KSJJ47288KE

KSJJ47288KE

KS JJ 47 28

8K

E

KSJJ 4728 8K

E

KSJJ 4728 8K

E

KSJJ47288KE

KE KSJJ47288 KSJJ47288KE

KS JJ 47 28

8K

KSJJ 4728 8K

2. Venmo — Rating No. 4 in Finance

Francesca Barrett Finance Reporter With the iPhone App Store flooded with thousands of finance apps to help budget incomes and expenses, it can be hard to know which apps are worth time and money. Kent State University students share some ways to stay on track and keep budgeting goals attainable for 2018. This money-transfer app allows the user to transfer money to other PayPal account holders. However, the payments can only be made internationally with an email or mobile number. When the transferred money arrives in the user’s PayPal account, the money in the account can be used online for other purchases or the balance can be withdrawn from the connected bank account. “PayPal is really more useful than Venmo, because you get the receipts, and you’re able to show that you’re giving people money and you can visibly see which helps,” Stephen Francis, a sophomore visual communication design major, said. “Its super helpful to keep track of what you’re giving people.” When there is any activity on the account, the application will send the user a notification about the purchases made.

A money-transfer app, Venmo is a digital wallet that allows the user to make payments to other Venmo users. The app is easy to use, especially for forgetful college students when last minute dinner plans arise and a debit or credit card is left behind. The user can link a bank account to the app to ensure that funds are always available. “[Venmo] is really convenient when you have to pay someone for something, for example, when you share an apartment with someone, you can have the one roommate pay the whole bill and then you can pay your half without worrying about the paperwork,” Alexandria Villeneuve, a sophomore hospitality major, said. “I think that this app is really convenient for college students because we’re all about the quick and easy way to do something so this is a great resource for us to have.” The user can pay others and be paid through the free app, using their own bank accounts.

A free budgeting app, Intuit Mint connects directly to a bank account and updates any spending activity automatically. The app allows the user to create personalized budgets that are specific to the user’s spending such as coffee, online streaming services or grocery shopping. The Credit vs. Cash feature is useful for credit card payments and keeping the user informed if there are any outstanding balances. Mint also allows the user to add all accounts in one place and to see the individual summaries on one interface. The app can also send bill pay reminders, helping to set monthly budgets and track expenses.

KSJJ47288KE

1. Paypal — Rating No. 3 in Finance

KSJJ47288KE KSJJ47288KE

KS JJ47 288K

E

KS JJ 47 28

E

3. Intuit Mint — Rating No. 22 in Finance

E

KSJJ472 88K

8K

E

E

4. PNC Virtual Wallet — Rating No. 94 in Finance

This banking app holds all of the features of the PNC website in your pocket. The app allows the user to set savings goals, track deposits and withdrawals and schedule money in and out for any possible bills. “I like transferring my spend and reserve money, so I can budget myself, and [the app] makes it really easy because I can just slide it over and then more money is in either one,” Emily Schultz, a sophomore mathematics major, said. “It’s easier, your money is there, and you can always check how much money you have.” The only requirement for the app is to be a PNC member, an easy opportunity for Kent State students since the university signed a 12-year contract in 2015. “I feel that during college, you’re not necessarily making a very big income,” Francis said. “You need to save as much money and budget, this is kind of like a preparation for real life.”

Contact Francesca Barrett at fbarret1@kent.edu.

KSJJ47288 KE

KS JJ4 72

88

KE

KSJJ47288KE KSJJ47288KE

KS JJ47 288K

7288KE 7288KE

E

KS JJ 47 28

8K

KS JJ47 288K

E

KS JJ 47 28

E

KSJJ472 88K

8K

E

E

KSJJ47288KE

KSJJ47288 KE

KS JJ4 72

88

KE

KSJJ47288KE KSJJ47288KE

KS JJ47 288K

E

KSJJ472 KSJ 88KE J47288K E

KS JJ 47 28

8K

E

KS JJ4 72 8

8K

K8827 EEK 882744JJSK JJSK

E

K 74JJS EK882

KS JJ 47 28

8K

E

KSJJ47288KE

KSJJ4 7288K

E


14 The Kent Stater

Monday, February 5, 2018

H3N2 STRAIN TAKES OVER FLU SEASON Anu Sharma Health Reporter This year’s flu season may be bad, but it’s not the worst season ever, said Dr. Neha Vyas from the Cleveland Clinic. However, the dominant strain, H3N2, has made this year's flu season miserable. The flu should not be confused with the common cold. According to the Centers for

Photo courtesy of Center for Disease Control

Disease Control and Prevention, symptoms of the flu include fever, body aches, sore throat, fatigue, headaches and runny or stuffy nose. The common cold symptoms do not include fever or body aches. Vyas stated the flu shots were not ineffective, but provide only a 30 percent protection rate. For prevention against the flu, she said to stay away from those infected, wash hands and use an alcohol-

based sanitizer before touching the eyes, nose and mouth. Practice good personal hygiene by wiping down personal items with disinfectant wipes. For those already infected, Dr. Vyas suggested to “stay away, stay home (and) don’t try to fight it.” With 11 weeks left in flu season, Dr. Vyas stated it’s never too late to get the flu shot, as it takes two weeks to build immunity. Some flu shots have three strains, while others have four. However, both are effective this flu season. When in doubt, ask your primary doctor if you’re concerned you have the flu. Kaitlin Stanaitis, a junior visual communication design major, is staying vigilant this flu season. “I’m wiping down all of our

kitchen counters everyday and kind of staying away from my roommates because some of them are sick.” Senior chemistry major Caitlin Hawkins said she is “more concerned than I have been in the past” regarding the severity of this flu season. Vyas stated the flu can become severe enough to turn into pneumonia. Shortness of breath is an indicator that those fallen ill to the flu should seek medical attention. It’s important to stay vigilant this flu season, especially with the severity of this year’s strain. According to cleveland.com, there have been 11 flu-related deaths in Cuyahoga County this season. Flu shots are available at local pharmacies such as CVS or Walgreens. Contact Anu Sharma at asharm16@kent.edu.


Monday, February 5, 2018

CLASSIFIEDS FRANKLIN SQUARE DELI The Tastiest Sub’s In Kent One Bite & You’ll Know! Since 1983, Downtown Open Just Till 5:00, 7 days

Franklin Square Deli This Area’s #1 CUBAN Sandwich Just $6 Ð All Day Wed. Kent’s longest running DELI STYLE Restaurant. Now that your settled in, it’s time to find your way to FRANKLIN SQUARE DELI Downtown, on the main square, Daily until 5:00PM, 7 Days Short Term delivery 2-4:30

SOUP, SOUP, SOUP, CHILI, SOUP, SOUP, CHILI 35TH Year! Franklin Square Deli

EARN $$$$ for Spring Break! Campus Bus Service is “Now Hiring” Drivers Paid training, earn your CDL and meet new people! Apply online at www. partaonline.org Kent State Student Media is now seeking motivated students to join our office staff for up to 10 hours per week. Duties include: answering phones; taking classified orders, supply replenishment; distribution of materials throughout Franklin Hall; greeting customers, students and faculty/staff; data entry; and other duties as assigned. This position also includes a writing component. Staff member will research and write copy as assigned for special sections, sponsored content and other projects as assigned. Interested candidates should email tbongior@kent.edu for an application.

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap,

familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” State and local laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. If you feel you have been wrongfully denied housing or discriminated against, call the FHAA at 330-253-2450 for more information.

Leasing for fall 2018 REMODELED 2,3,4,&5 bedrooms with 2-3 full baths. High quality and close to KSU. Starting $385/mo. 330-5527032

7 bedroom houses, great location - 1 block from campus, large bedrooms, free parking, big front porch, washer, dryer, lawn, trash and handyman service incl. $345/mo., owner pays partial util. Must have a group of 7. Call or text 330-6072569

Leasing for fall 2018 Spacious 2,3,4,&5 bedrooms with 2-3 full baths. Great condition, A/C, washer/dryer, dishwasher, deck, garage. Starting at $350 a room. 330808-4045

4 bedroom 2 bath, Neat and Clean $270 per month per person plus utilities. Parking available one half block from Mcgilvrey Call Nancy at (330)-472-0501

For fall. Group of females looking for roommates to share apartment on 224 South Willow St. one block from campus. 12 month lease starting August 22nd, no pets, nonsmoking house. $500 per month, includes all utilities and wireless internet. Call 330-678-6984 or email kitmyers23@yahoo.com

Kent:Large 2 bedroom. Freshly painted walls and new carpeting. $700/ month. Heat, water and trash included.330-472-9671.

Leasing for Fall. Beautiful, newly redecorated 2 bedroom and 3 bedroom duplexes with attached garage. One block from KSU. $400 per student. 330-687-6122.

Houses for spring semester and 2018-2019 school year. 2 & 3 bedrooms. 330-547-1212

Available Fall! 2 bedroom luxury condo, near Kent State campus, full kitchen, large living room and dining room, washer/dryer in building, offstreet parking, no pets, $450 per bedroom, includes water and trash. Tennent pays for gas and electric. Will not respond to texts or emails. Call Justin 330328-1084

Fall - Rooming houses 7 & 9 bdrm one block off campus on E College 330-815-3523

5 Bdr House for students available July/August 2018. Call for details 330-592-1848.

Kent 2 and 3 bedroom apartments. Air, appliances, carpet, heat and water paid. No pets or Section 8. $660 and $810. Short term available. 330-677-5577

East Townhomes Group of females looking for a roommate. 1 Bedroom available for January & for August/Fall 2018 Rent is $450/m with 1 month FREE! special = $385/m! Rent includes ALL utilities, tv, & internet Call/text Keith 330-689-8888 KSUtownhomes.com

Apply Now For ‘18-’19 Large 1, 2, 3, & 4 BR Close to campus Call to schedule tour 330-678-3047 www.buckeyeparksmgmt.com

NICK

FALL

2 BR House for Rent 2018-2019 School Year Close to campus Call to set up tour 330-678-3047

HOLLEY

SIDELINE

D

|

SPECIAL

REPO

RT: HUR

RICANE

AVAILABLE NOW. Short term leases and leases in August available. Close to campus. 2 and 3 bedrooms, details for special move-in. Landlord pays heat, water and trash. Good parking, central air. 330-6769440.

Large 1 BR for Rent 2018-19 School Year Call to set up tour 330-678-30474

IRMA

|

VEGA

E MAG

Classified ads can be placed by fax at (330) 672-4880, over the phone at (330) 672-2586 or by e-mail at ads@ksustudentmedia.com. If you fax or e-mail an ad, please be sure to include run dates, payment info and a way for us to contact you.

2016

NIC

FAL

K HO

LLEY

SIDELIN

ED

| SPE

SUDOKU

ON STANDS NOW! RR.CO

CIA

Be sure to pick up the Fall issues of A Magazine and The Burr Magazine!

M | 1

L REP

ORT: HU

RRICA

NE

IRM

A

| VEG

AN

FOR

A MO

NTH

L 201 7

NICK HOLLEY SIDELINED

It’s jus more t so much onsta than sta nding lookin ge and g pre –ALIC tty.”

|

SPECIAL REPORT: HURRICANE IRMA

E MA Miss GOTO Ohio

|

VEGAN FOR A MONTH

It’s just so much more than standing onstage and looking pretty.”

2016

–ALICE MAGOTO

FALL 2017

Miss Ohio 2016

TOP PICK UP LOCATIONS – Student Center – Library – Rec Center – MACC – Eastway – Tri Towers

Student pageant contestants defy industry stereotypes to accentuate inner beauty THE

HOW TO ADVERTISE

TH

OTO

Miss Ohio

3 BR House for Rent 2018-19 School Year Call to set up tour 330-678-3047

For information about placing a Display ad please call our offices at 330-672-2586 or visit us at 205 Franklin Hall, Kent State University. Our office hours are from 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

A MON

Student contesta pageant defy indunts stereotyp stry accentua es to inner beaute ty

Studen contes t pagea nt def y tants stereoindustry accent types to inner uate bea uty

Large 4 BR for Rent 2018-19 School Year Call to set up tour 330-678-3047

N FOR

It’s just so more than much onstage standing and looking pretty.” –ALIC

2017

THEBU

6 Bedroom 3 Bath North Lincoln 1 Block from Campus Neat and Clean $365 per month per person plus utilities. Please call Nancy at (330) 4720501.

CLUMSY ACORNS

Pinewood Apts. Now Leasing Studio and 1B Single story Private entrance Quiet, Convenient Location Ask about our Special. 330-673-2403

BUR

R.CO

M | 1

THEBURR.COM | 1

KentWired.com 15


$500

Tour by February 15th & enter to participate on court for a

Kent vs Akron FEB 17TH | 7PM | MACC CENTER STUDENT HOUSING SPONSOR OF KENT STATE ATHLETICS

black squirrel radio’s

GET YOUR HEART ON

Spring Break Giveaway!

UNIVERSITYEDGEKENT.COM

VALENTINE’S SHOW

Dates & prize subject to change. See office for details.

LINEUP: Shaggs 8 - 8:30 pm G - Trill 8:40 - 9:05 pm

@KentWired

Clvtch 9:20 - 9:50 pm

I JUST DEPOSITED MY CHECK WITH MY PHONE! I THIS APP!

on SATURDAY

FEB 17 at

EURO GYRO

We know you’ll give it a

!

Kent State’s student-run radio, streaming the best urban, rock and local 24/7. We put the RAD in radio.

@ bsrkent

*Limit of 3 check deposits with a combined total of $5,000.00 allowed per day. Ravenna • 330-296-8090 Kent • 330-678-8080 • www.pcbbank.com

Bypass Circuit 10:55 - 11:40 pm Kuyahn 11:55 - 12:35 am Dutty 12:50 - 1:40 am

Mobile Deposit Capture from Portage Community Bank will put a on your face! Through our convenient mobile app, depositing a check is as easy as taking a picture with your smartphone. Plus, you can use the app for secure access to your accounts anytime, anywhere.

Download Portage Community Bank’s free mobile app at your device’s app store today

Luvabstract 10 - 10:40 pm

www.blacksquirrelradio.com In association with the School of Journalism & Mass Communication and Kent State Student Media

The Kent Stater - February 5, 2018  
The Kent Stater - February 5, 2018  
Advertisement